Fey Spellcasters Differences


Advice


Hello everyone. So I am very new to pathfinder, ill be starting my first PF campaign here soon, and while I’ve settled on a general theme/idea for my character, I’m having a helluva time figuring out exactly what route to take mechanically. Part of it I’ll admit is simply unfamiliarity with the way PF seems to function when compared to DnD 5e, where my rpg experience has come from.

Class wise I’m looking at Sorcerer or Druid. Only other possible one I came across was a mesmerist but that class is out of the question for this campaign. Specifically, I’m between a Fey bloodline sorcerer, a sylvan bloodline sorcerer, or a feyspeaker druid. The veiled adept archtype looked really neat but I would really prefer having CHA as my primary stat.

I’ve spent the last few days comparing the options and I really just cant figure out what would work best to fit with the theme. I’m planning on leaning heavily into the fey theme for my character. Roleplay is my biggest focus here, and I’d like to fit around that, I’m not trying to min max or anything here, just make something that works well emough.

Part of my dilemma is that I definitely want to olay a full caster, and so it seems taking a domain over animal companion for druid only makes sense.

I know this is a whole lot of rambling, and I apologize for that. I suppose my main question is really what would be the main playstyle differences between a “controller” style sorcerer, either fey or sylvan, and a feyspeaker druid?


The most significant difference is the druid is a prepared caster, vs the sorcerer being a spontaneous caster. The druid has access to his entire spell list, but need to pick which spells he will be able to cast each day. The sorcerer has a very limited number of spells, but can cast any they know as long as they have the appropriate spell slot available.

The second difference is in the spell list. The druid spell list is one of the more versatile spell lists, but often lacks the sheer power of a more focused spell list. They have more damaging spells than a cleric, but their damaging spells are usually less powerful than a sorcerer. Unlike a sorcerer they get healing and condition removal spells, but their healing spells are less effective than a cleric. The only area where they are supreme is dealing with nature.

The sorcerer generally has more powerful combat spells. They also have access to a lot of utility spells, but as a spontaneous caster you will need to be very careful of what spells you learn. A poor choice of spells can cripple your character.

Another option you may want to consider is playing a bard. While they are not a full caster they often get early access to some spells. Their spell list includes pretty much most of the enchantment and illusion spells that you will want. Bards seems to be more fey like than just about any class in the game.


Mysterious Stranger wrote:

Another option you may want to consider is playing a bard. While they are not a full caster they often get early access to some spells. Their spell list includes pretty much most of the enchantment and illusion spells that you will want. Bards seems to be more fey like than just about any class in the game.

Thanks so much for the feedback! So this was actually the first class I went toadmkttedly probably when i had the least understanding of PF, but I couldn’t find an at least fey associated archetype. Ive played a glamour bard in 5e and loved it, and that was sort of the feel i was trying to hit with this character as well. I’ll do some more digging there then, thank you!


Lenulled wrote:
Mysterious Stranger wrote:

Another option you may want to consider is playing a bard. While they are not a full caster they often get early access to some spells. Their spell list includes pretty much most of the enchantment and illusion spells that you will want. Bards seems to be more fey like than just about any class in the game.

Thanks so much for the feedback! So this was actually the first class I went toadmkttedly probably when i had the least understanding of PF, but I couldn’t find an at least fey associated archetype. Ive played a glamour bard in 5e and loved it, and that was sort of the feel i was trying to hit with this character as well. I’ll do some more digging there then, thank you!

Would the First World Minstrel suit you? In Golarion, the First World is the land of the fey.


Druid is still quite flexible even with an animal companion, but a Sylvan Sorcerer gets the best of both worlds as I'm sure you've seen.

A Feyspeaker Druid also gets CHA as their main stat, extra skill points, but a lower BAB. It's honestly a downgrade on a normal Druid but druids are still very strong so it's worth doing if you like the flavor.

First World Minstrel is good, but I'd make cards to hand out to your allies to make sure they understand the buff(s) you are bestowing on them.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Druid is one of the most complex classes in the game (certainly in the CRB) and not necessarily a good choice for a newcomer to PF, unless you're really into preparing a *lot* before your first session. Druids are complex because they can fight, cast spells, use some good skills, polymorph into several forms (with various bonuses to figure into combat and so on) and also have an animal companion with its own stats and combat modes, and can even summon critters to further crowd the battlefield. That's what I mean by complex - so many options, a player can have option paralysis, and all that stuff requires you to calculate a lot more stuff in advance than nearly any other sort of character.

Sorcerer is often considered one of the best spellcaster classes for a novice to play, since once you pick your spells known, you just cast whatever you want (within the limits of spell levels and available slots, of course).

We had a PF newbe in a recent Jade Regent campaign who decided to play a druid. But he didn't do his homework. He never knew what his attack bonus was, what his animal companion could do, what his feats affected... it was painful to watch, and ate up swaths of game time, since the kindly DM tried to help him out, only to have to start over on the next session since the hapless druid had forgotten everything he'd learnt.

Don't be that guy.


The First World Minstrel seems like it would fit, but honestly the core bard would work equally well. Just because the class does not say Fey does not mean your character is not Fey. The Bards abilities pretty much match the legends of the Fey. Just describe your character as have a couple of unusual physical features that have no game effect. Maybe you have an unusual color of eyes, and or hair.

There are also a couple of feats and traits you could take to give you a bit more fey like abilities. Fey Foundling or Fey Performance would work well. There are also a couple of traits that deal with fey. Either Fey Protection or Friends of the Fey would work well for traits.

If Variant Multiclassing is available you could play a bard and gain some of Fey bloodline powers. You could also achieve similar results with the eldritch heritage feats.

Put some points into knowledge nature and role play the character as being fey touched. Don’t worry about your class having the word fey in it.


*Sigh* This is when I realized that I've got too many Fey-themed characters to play... You've got several distinct options for playing with Fey-themes.

Firstly, it sounds like you are playing a Fey-touched Caster. Other options that you might consider are Oracles (Nature with Pranked cursed is very "Fey" themed), Fey Trickster Mesmerist (Trust me, you will LOVE it), Seducer Witch (Really great option for non-PFS play and can multiclass into Mystic Theurge for the ultimate fey themed).

Pick your poison, you can never go wrong with Fey magics. Just make sure you learn proper fey eticate.

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