Chain Mauler

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What is the different between using Recall Knowledge and Identify Magic when you try to idetify spells? The first one requires an action and it's untrained, and the second one it's trained and for Exploration Mode. What else?

I am asking because I don't see the point in the last sentence: "...because you don't have the advantage of watching the spell being cast"

Here you have how Identiying Spells works according to CRB page 305
"Sometimes you need to identify a spell, especially if its effects are not obvious right away. If you notice a spell being cast, and you have prepared that spell or have it in your repertoire, you automatically know what the spell is, including the level to which it is heightened.

If you want to identify a spell but don’t have it prepared or in your repertoire, you must spend an action on your turn to attempt to identify it using Recall Knowledge. You typically notice a spell being cast by seeing its visual manifestations or hearing its verbal casting components. Identifying long-lasting
spells that are already in place requires using Identify Magic instead of Recall Knowledge because you don’t have the advantage of watching the spell being cast."


What do you mean by "unknown"?

As per the CRB, Learn a Spell Requirements: You have a spellcasting class feature, and the spell you want to learn is on your magical tradition’s spell list.

If not, what I assume, it is unknown for you or "encrypted" for you.


You can find the price of a blank spellbook on page 288 of the CRB. 1GP.


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I think it does apply. According to the CRB, page 234:

When someone or something tests your skill, they
attempt a check against your skill DC, which is equal to 10
plus your skill modifier.

And:

Skill modifier = modifier of the skill’s key ability
score + proficiency bonus + other bonuses + penalties


You can take a look to the corebook pages 304 and 455:

"Some spells restrict you to willing targets. A player can declare their character a willing or unwilling target at any time, regardless of turn order or their character’s condition (such as when a character is paralyzed, unconscious, or even dead)."

"Some effects require a target to be willing. Only you can decide whether your PC is willing, and the GM decides whether an NPC is willing."


As you can read on page 238, and I quote: "In many cases, you can use a skill to attempt to Identify Magic of a tradition other than your own at a higher DC. The GM determines whether you can do this and what the DC is."

You can also read more about it on page 503/504, Adjusting Difficulty. There is also an example about it.


Thank you guys!


Crafting: do you need to be able to cast the spell to make potions, oils, and ammunition? Or just the Magical Crafting feat.


thenobledrake wrote:
Pepor wrote:


Could you please point out the page where it is said that they can be crit?
Page 273 has a paragraph on Object Immunities. Critical hits are not listed.

Blinded, Confused, Clumsy, Dazzled.... neither. So?

Many objects are immune to other conditions, at the GM’s discretion.


Ravingdork wrote:
Pepor wrote:
I haven't found anything either. As I see it, they are stationary so it is assumed that you hit automaticlly so you just would roll damage to overcome the hardness.
Then why say they can be crit? How does one determine the crit without a target DC?

Could you please point out the page where it is said that they can be crit?


I haven't found anything either. As I see it, they are stationary so it is assumed that you hit automaticlly so you just would roll damage to overcome the hardness.


You can push someone using the Shove action (page 243), which belongs to Athletics.


Is there a way to move a grabbed creature with you? I mean dragging or carrying the grabbed creature with you.


A 1 is not an automatic critical failure. It might be possible in some situations to meet the DC even on a 1. If your roll would equal or exceed the DC even on a 1, you don’t critically fail, but you still fail instead of succeeding. You can’t succeed when you roll a 1 no matter what your modifier is.


A 1 is not an automatic critical failure. It might be possible in some situations to meet the DC even on a 1. If your roll would equal or exceed the DC even on a 1, you don’t critically fail, but you still fail instead of succeeding. You can’t succeed when you roll a 1 no matter what your modifier is.


You don't crit if you roll a 20. However, if you succeed and rolled a 20 on the die (often called a “natural 20”), or if your result is equal to or greater than the DC plus 10, you critically succeed.


Hi guys!

I have a doubt regarding Success and Critical Success described in the Pathfinder Playtest book. On page 292, in the last paragraph inside the Success and Critical Success section, you can read: "If your enemy is far more powerful than you or a task beyond your abilities, you might roll a natural 20 and still get a result lower than the DC. In this case, you succeed instead of critically succeed or fail. If you lack the proficiency for a task in the first place, or it’s impossible, you might still fail on a natural 20."

My question is: How can you succeed instead of critically succeed if your result is lower than the DC?

Thanks in advance.