Arclord of Nex

Paradozen's page

Organized Play Member. 1,382 posts (1,396 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 1 Organized Play character. 2 aliases.


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I kinda want to combine Grasping Reach with Everstand Style/Strike. Not super strong, but the bonuses and penalties cancel out leaving you with a d6 reach weapon effectively with parry++, and you can raise it as part of an attack. Fungal Leshy who beats people up with a mushroom cap might be my next character.


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Here are universities on the pathfinder wiki
Universities
Arcane Colleges


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One of my favorite parts of +level to everything is you can watch yourself grow stronger compared to enemies as you level. You can encounter a lone Cyclops at level 1 and barely survive. At level 3 the fight is rough, but doesn't feel nearly so impossible. Once you hit level 7 you can handle cyclopes 4 at a time. It really makes the party feel like they are quickly learning and growing.


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Cat Fall is an important safeguard for people with cloud jump, otherwise you can jump high enough to really injure yourself.

More on-topic, my bard will be taking occultism all the way, to power up bardic lore more than anything. Also diplomacy and maybe deception. I really want to play characters that trick out medicine and arcana because there are some pretty nifty tricks in there, but they don't fit that character. Specifically I rather like Godless Healing and Eye of the Arclords, feats that were conceptually cool in 1e but not useful, but now seen more useful to me. Lastly, I really like the options for maxing out athletics regarding jumping and titan wrestler. A gnome who can jump up to a giant's nose then spin-kick them to the ground is just the right kind of silly for me.


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Another contributing factor was the death of Aroden. It simultaneously removed the biggest threat to Deskari's plots and weakened the already-thin space between planes, making it an ideal time to Kool-Aid man through planes.


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When a fight starts due to a conversation going poorly I've been allowing PCs to use Intimidate, Deception, or Diplomacy depending on their role in the conversation.


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Yqatuba wrote:
Well don't monsters have a standard alignment like in 1e?

Yes, but also no. The bestiary alignment doesn't represent all members or cultures of a creature. In 1e humans were N, but there were humans and human societies of all nine alignments. Orcs were CE, but the Mwangi Orcs were generally chill and non-evil. Humanoid monsters with player options tend to have nuanced alignments that facilitate groups who play with alignment incorporating them as allies and PCs. Not all kobolds were LE in 1e, but kobold societies which PCs opposed often were. This holds true in 2e as well.


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The basic setup of ranged spell that forces a save makes it more desirable than TK Projectile or Chill Touch for my Bard. And looking at the divine list, I would consider it for a cloistered cleric if my deity wasn't opp-alignment from the expected enemy alignment and the game didn't revolve around undeath. Doing nonlethal is also a plus for me, even if only mildly.I

I do wish it got an extra die to play with at some point early on though, doing 4 damage at level 4 feels like a waste of a turn.


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JDawg75 wrote:
I'd think it would be ripe for an AP! Oh well.

I agree, my home game is set there. But the whole setting is ripe for adventure. Galt has a revolution to end, Razmiran has a god about to age to death, the Eye of Abendego needs to close some day, the Lands of the Linnorm Kings just changed hands to a new leader, as did Taldor and Irrisen (well, not 'just' but within the decade), the Sarkoris Scar still has demons to push back, the Gravelands exist, etc. I still hope the next one after the Absalom AP is set in Nex, but there are a lot of cool stories to tell elsewhere too.


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Champion, Hellknight, and Hellknight Signifer dedications get you to expert with a feat.


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The Kracken description text, on AoN, says they are like a squid. Squids have 2 arms and 8 tentacles, so one could extrapolate that the squidlike monster has 2 arms and 8 tentacles.

The veiled master picture is on AoN, you can see two claws and four tentacles. It also lacks the actions to get more than 3 creatures grabbed, because it has no ability to grab more.


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If I may add, it is also more fun to write adventures for IMO. Simplified XP makes tracking milestones easier, encounter building is more intuitive, treasure budgets are less fiddly, narrative-warping magic is easier to account for, monster generations is faster and easier, and overall the cognitive load is more shifted away from making sure the math is working right and more toward making the story work right. The math is done ahead of time in a lot of cases, or reduced where it isn't.


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Seems right to me


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Douglas Muir 406 wrote:
1) Monsters. Better, worse, much the same? Keeping in mind that PF2 has only one Bestiary so far. PF2 monsters are no longer built like characters, which is ummm.... good and bad I guess? Is it still possible to take a squirrel, Awaken him to consciousness, and train him as an assassin? More generally, how flexible is monster construction? We seem to have done away with templates. I liked templates. How is this working out in actual play?

So much better from a time perspective. Before when I had a cool idea for a monster it took like 90 minutes to work out all the math and rework until it looked good. Now all the math is done ahead of time, cutting creation to like 10-20 minutes depending on what cool abilities I want to give it. As for the specific squirrel example, in 1e you would have to look at the squirrel, give it adjustments for awaken, then add rogue and assassin levels and math tweaks until it looked okay. Now you can just decide you want the squirrel to be a level -1 creature before awakening and level whatever assassin after training, give it sneak attack and other assassin skills, follow the charts and be done. Much easier IMO.


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Pathfinder dedication is a level 2 feat and already stronger than the level 3 untrained improviser feat, should it really be as good as the level 5 clever improviser feat? It means humans can probably skip a 5th level ancestry feat and pick a different one and nonhumans don't have to be adopted by humans to pick up the better feat, can do it earlier, and can do it with a class feat rather than a general feat.


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Temperans wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

Your assumption that all attacks hit and electric arc targets only one creature is incredibly misleading. The reason electric arc is the strongest attack cantrip is largely because it hits two people and does 1/2 damage on a save. Completely ignoring that makes this assessment less useful.


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Psiphyre wrote:

^ Well... Geb didn't technically win the war against Nex (IIRC).

Geb almost won (or was winning, depending on pov), but then Nex went a "ran away" from the fight, leaving Geb so despondent over being "robbed of his final victory over Nex" (by Nex), that he felt that it just wasn't worth carrying on without Nex & so "offed himself" (possibly in the hope of being "reunited" with Nex in the Great Beyond...).
& Once the two leaders disappeared, a ceasefire was called, so..

From Geb's perspective sure. And from the international politics perspective too. But the way TB would see it, IMO, is that Geb won. The only reason the war ended without Geb conquering the eastern seaboard was that Geb gave up, hence wasted potential. The nuance of the situation would be somewhat lost on him. It heavily depends on Geb's emotional state, and if Geb had just become undead before the final battle that emotional state would not be as influential. And to the Whispering Tyrant being alive when you could be undead is folly, so it doesn't matter to him. Neither would truly respect each other's situation and both would see the other as foolish because they are too wrapped up in their own viewpoints to look at it from the other's angle.

Quote:
You know, after reading the above paraphrase/summary of Geb's & Nex's conflict (Has this perhaps been changed in the LOWG?), I am very sure there are some parts of the Internet where there'd be those who'd absolutely ship the two of them. ^^'

LOWG hasn't changed the tone of the Nex-Geb relationship, still as romantic undertones despite ferocious rivalry and hatred and them being toxic influences on each other IMO. Though I think the wording in LOWG makes it more clear how the two were toxic influences on each other and goaded each other to new heights of terrible power.

It also reminds me of the Miracle of Sound's Joker's Song.

Quote:

We are two of a kind

Violent, unsound of mind
You're the yin to my yang, can't you see?
And if I were to leave
You would grumble and grieve
Face it, Bats, you'd be lost without me!


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Doubt TB thinks highly of Geb. Geb spent centuries mastering necromancy, but rather than becoming a much he committed suicide specifically trying to not exist forever. Goes against the Whispering Way the tyrant has models himself around. And that was after Geb won the war on Nex. If Tar-Baphon had banished Aroden in their battle he would have gone on to conquer Avistan, that Geb didn't do the same with Avistan must seem worthy of contempt. I imagine the Whispering Tyrant sees Geb as a burn out and tragic example of wasted potential.


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AsmodeusDM wrote:
Namely, that is certainly breaking all manner of verisimilitude through its existence. An ogre is unlikely to fall victim to my deadly poison because it's a big hulking creature 9' tall with a high constitution and the endurance of a giant; but then the same deadly poison doesn't work against the frail elven king who is aged and infirm.....because he's higher level than the poison?

The game actually has a good way to represent this. Creatures can be different levels depending on the roles you challenge them in. The frail, infirm elven king could easily be under level 4 in a fight and yet a level 15 social threat because his lifelong skills were about navigating political landscapes and managing his kingdom instead of fighting.

If he happens to be a level 15 threat in a knife fight my guess is either magic is at play or he isn't frail and infirm. Or the DM isn't taking advantage of the systems in place for them.


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Douglas Muir 406 wrote:
perception check wrote:


I could go on, but I need to prepare for today's PF2 session, wherein our martials will hit things, I the wizard will cast my boring, static-DC spells (and will likely resort to hitting things), and the baddies will hit us back. In terms of combat, grappling into submission as an alternate win condition is suboptimal at best. Control spells as an alternate win condition are nonexistent. It's all about damage now. We hit things, the enemies hit us back, and when the dice allow for it, one side wins. Long live my d20.

Harsh. Anyone have a response to this?

Doug M.

Just that my own experiences in both editions seem to be different.

In 2e my character, a Bard, always had a handful of different things they are trying to do at once. Know more about the baddy, inspire allies, throw up a shield, summon a fey, move to safety, use an attack cantrip, heal, or interact with the unique features of the scene. I find this fun and dynamic, and that it leads to each turn feeling a bit different. The fight as a whole also feels more dynamic, moving actually matters because fewer people are locked into standing still and full attacking and more can do things like rush past the monster.

In 1e a lot of fights felt more like a slugfest. You don't move more than 5' at a time or you get smacked and lose most of your attack routine, your spells either completely end the fight or do nothing worthwhile, or contribute to the slugfest similar to the 2e array. Healing is not generally a feasible idea and is best left to wands. Bards rarely if ever have a reason to not perform past level 4 or so.

Again though, this may just be a difference of experiences.


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Goblin with Boaster's Challenge and Scalding Spit from LOCG makes for the best battle rapper. Light yourself on fire, brag about how you are the best, and literally spit fire.


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Paradozen wrote:
As an afterthought, Geb is probably displeased with the whispering tyrant knowing he is associated with Arazni's escape. Not enough to wage war, Geb has enjoyed peace for a long time, but still enough to sour any interaction. He'd been enjoying an 800 year vacation from being an active dictator, and now because some creep from the north couldn't handle adventurers coming in he lost his surrogate ruler and has to do his job.

Another afterthought, Geb probably views the Whispering Tyrant with nontrivial disdain even without Arazni being freed. Tar-Baphon glorifies undeath, puts it up as a goal all should aspire to achieve. Geb, however, is imprisoned by undeath. He committed suicide trying to escape his paranoia and hatred and fear of Nex, and became a ghost utterly consumed by it and forced to simmer for millennia. The idea that this ghostly form of Geb's is a reward or goal to reach for is probably insulting. Mix in the failures on Tar-Baphon's record and Geb plausibly views the Whispering Tyrant as an arrogant upstart and foolish idealist who should not be trusted with the power he wields.


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Does it have to be one or the other? You could play through your 1e adventures and slowly grab an adventure or two that look neat and try the new system bit by bit. If you like it, incorporate more into your gaming routine. If you don't, you've only lost one module's worth of money, not the full investment of CRB+Bestiary+other.

For me the biggest reason to switch is homebrewing my own adventures. Making monsters is easier, level isn't as tricky as CR, and encounter design and XP tracking feel more intuitive, freeing up cognitive space for developing the story more. Paizo's adventures will soon become a bigger reason to switch to 2e, they do a fantastic job writing and will be continuing to support 2e, rather than 1e. The current AP isn't my jam, but the next one looks promising and there is a lot in the world left to explore.


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I don't think Tar Baphon and Geb have ever met, but if they did they would be rivals more than anything IMO. Both have operate in similar niches, armies of undeath, empires of power, to toe to toe with demideities and win, rule as dictators and tyrants, etc. If they met they would probably be enemies. We know Geb doesn't handle rivalries well, and is prone to committing atrocities when someone injures his ego. I'm not as familiar with the Whispering Tyrant lore, but he doesn't strike me as someone happy to having rivals either.

As an afterthought, Geb is probably displeased with the whispering tyrant knowing he is associated with Arazni's escape. Not enough to wage war, Geb has enjoyed peace for a long time, but still enough to sour any interaction. He'd been enjoying an 800 year vacation from being an active dictator, and now because some creep from the north couldn't handle adventurers coming in he lost his surrogate ruler and has to do his job.


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Relevant


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Psiphyre wrote:
The Gold Sovereign wrote:

...

I'm still hoping for a Setting Book covering Nex and Geb, finally fully illustrating Nex and Geb themselves.

While not a fullbody illustration, Geb does have an illustration in The Inner Sea World Guide (p.75) -- & in Inner Sea Magic !

(The former of which, last I heard, is still applicable -- not withstanding the changes brought about due to the new 2E ruleset & the advancement of the time line/ incorporation of the APs...)

Not sure if Nex has another illustration other than the one in Inner Sea Magic though...

However, a book (or AP?) on Geb & Nex (& perhaps Arazni, too!?) could be interesting!

Carry on,

--C.

Both have illustrations in the Lost Omens World Guide. Still only the head though.


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Tender Tendrils wrote:

What if Barbatos is just a guy in a tentacle mask who is really, really good at bluffing?

One hasty lie built upon another until they found themselves ruling a layer of hell and being stuck keeping up the lie. They just keep pretending and it keeps working somehow.

Like Razmir, but bolder. I like it. I now kinda want to play an evil game where the party has to help Barbatos keep his secret.


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I've been thinking about this a lot recently.

He made her a lich to prove a point to the knights of Ozem, specifically sending the message that he can and will destroy whoever he pleases if they interfere with his brooding affairs. From a continent away he managed to break into one of their most secure holy sites, steal the corpse of their heroine demigoddess, bind the soul of said demigoddess to the corpse, and subjugate her into becoming their enemy and his ally. Without once needing to leave his empire of undeath. Basically saying, unequivocally, that the Knights of Ozem cannot handle Geb so they should just get lost. They cannot keep him out, they cannot stop his will or whim, and he doesn't even need to show up himself to discipline them.

As for feelings, I assume basically all of the feelings Geb has left in him are anger, sadness, and a thirst for revenge. He's probably sad to see her gone, both in the sense that he lost a useful ruler and has to do his own governing now and in the sense that he lost (someone he perceived as) a toy. Angry and thirsting for revenge too, because someone defied him and his fragile ego cannot handle that. I don't intend to run Geb as having romantic feelings for Arazni. He could, but I think it is just as plausible that he doesn't.


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Ramanujan wrote:
graystone wrote:
Mellored wrote:
A group of hobgoblin paladins, with formation training and polearms...
Formation of leshy monks flurrying seedpods... [if we ever get errata on the range]

In a youtube/twitch Mark suggested 10 feet, but was clear this wasn’t final, just what he guessed it was going to end up being.

Looking at the other thrown weapons it’s fairly clearly either going to be ten or twenty feet.

Other feat-locked ranged unarmed attacks have 30' ranges, rather than 10' or 20'. Both Wild Winds Gust and Scalding Spit attacks are ranged unarmed attacks with 30' range. So maybe leshy seedpods will resemble those and the bestiary entry and have 30' range instead of mimicking manufactured thrown weapons.


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This book has a lot of different things I kinda want to build characters around. Like the Fungus Leshy or Vournoi elves whom I want to play for the art and lore. Or Scalding Spit or Serrating or Everstand Stance or Mask Familiar or the Scrollmaster archetype which have near mechanics I want to base a character around.


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no good scallywag wrote:
Paradozen wrote:

Not a perfect time comparison, but each action takes about 1.5-2 seconds. You spend 1.5-2 seconds thinking about the thing you are recalling knowledge about because it could be a lot of things and you could easily get things mixed up about the creature. Especially in an inherently hectic and confusing environment, such as a combat where you need to constantly be prepared to avoid attacks and look for openings to move and attack yourself.

For instance, let's say you are fighting a blue-grey creature 3' tall with tentacles and a football-shaped head. Could be a Grindylow or a Mutant Goblin, one of these can shoot ink and swim super fast and the other is drawn to fire and pickles, it might take a second to determine what the creature is and which features it possesses. Now, if you are a lifetime expert on goblinoid physiology you can probably do this more reliably (using Goblin Lore) and faster (using Automatic Knowledge) but if you are just a travelling wizard who knows a lot of things about a lot of things, it probably takes a moment.

Yet the listed free actions take just as long...including casting some spells and speaking; drawing a weapon which could certainly take longer than the synapses in your brain firing; speaking. Besides, it makes sense that adventurers are "trained" (not in the technical use of the word) to think quickly in combat- hence no facing, too. Just like horses can be combat "trained" to maintain some semblance of control. I don't really buy the cost of recalling knowledge when the PC is basically just thinking. It's not like they're doing a math problem or counting from 1-100.

I think concentrating on a spell is even a free action!

The only listed free actions that are not specifically gated behind feats that I see are Release and Delay. Drawing a weapon and sustaining a spell are both 1-action abilities with some class feats modifying them. Casting a spell for the overwhelming majority of spells is 2 actions, with some as 1 or 3 and very few as reactions. I'm not sure which spells are free actions, do you have any examples? The only listed free actions that are not specifically gated behind feats that I see are Release and Delay.

You can train your character to remember information faster in combat, that is the Automatic Knowledge skill feat. Representing you literally remembering relevant information faster than most.


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Not a perfect time comparison, but each action takes about 1.5-2 seconds. You spend 1.5-2 seconds thinking about the thing you are recalling knowledge about because it could be a lot of things and you could easily get things mixed up about the creature. Especially in an inherently hectic and confusing environment, such as a combat where you need to constantly be prepared to avoid attacks and look for openings to move and attack yourself.

For instance, let's say you are fighting a blue-grey creature 3' tall with tentacles and a football-shaped head. Could be a Grindylow or a Mutant Goblin, one of these can shoot ink and swim super fast and the other is drawn to fire and pickles, it might take a second to determine what the creature is and which features it possesses. Now, if you are a lifetime expert on goblinoid physiology you can probably do this more reliably (using Goblin Lore) and faster (using Automatic Knowledge) but if you are just a travelling wizard who knows a lot of things about a lot of things, it probably takes a moment.


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Sin_Dark wrote:
As for the Mask Familiar thematically it's amazing. Who doesn't want a cool talking Tiki or Animal mask. Thinking Crash Bandicoot here. How ever that's all it really is, is a thematic familiar. When you take it off it still takes the form of an animal. So people who take it litterly wasted a feat so their familiar can look like a mask. That's not worth a class feat, and as a DM if someone really wanted a mask familiar I'd give it to them, but that's me.

Everyone but gnomes needs to spend a class feat to get a familiar. Well, gnomes and wizards, but the wizard investment is bigger if they don't use a feat. Mask Familiar is great if you A) want a familiar, B) aren't a class that gets familiars, and C) aren't a gnome. Just as fast as multicasting for a familiar, but an RP prerequisite instead of an ability score prerequisite. It is no more of a wasted feat than Basic Arcana (Familiar).


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Invert their positive/negative energy interaction, make them susceptible to good damage of they were not evil, and give weakness equal to 1/2 level against positive damage. They came back alive, but have one foot left in the grave.

Maybe talk to the player about them turning on the party at a crucial moment, either some complex plot they had running since the resurrection or them snapping when placed under a specific pressure. Maybe make this a permanent turning point, the critical failure is supposed to be worse than death so having them come back fine afterwards might not cut it.

A significant rebuild to the character maybe. The barbarian loses touch with the fury of dragons, but gains a connection with the spirit world they returned from. The cleric came back but only in the condition they abandon their deity and work for the Lady of Graves. Or the Prince of Lies. The champion was bent on liberating slaves, but after death to devils they now only desire vengeance. (Swapping to spirit totem, New deity, and a hypothetical revenge cause for champions).

Lots to work with really.


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Paradozen wrote:

I made a self-winding clockwork doggo.

Clockwork Hound Creature 5
N Small Construct Clockwork
Ability Mods
Str +4; Dex +5; Con +2; Int -4; Wis +2; Cha -2;
Senses Perception +9; Darkvision;
Skill Athletics +12; Acrobatics +13;
Items Winding Aeon Stone
Defense
HP
76 Weakness Precision or Critical Hits 5; Resistance 4 physical except adamantine;
Winding The clockwork hound must be wound tightly to function normally, if the key is wound over the course of 10 minutes the clockwork hound can function autonomously for 10 days before needing winding again.
AC 22; Fort +12; Ref +15; Will +9;
Offense
Speed
35 feet;
Bite [1A]
+15 2d8+7 Piercing
Swift Bite The clockwork hound makes two bite strikes each at a -2 penalty. Multiple Attack Penalty increases for each strike, but does not increase until after the second attack.
Chest Container The clockwork hound has a container in their chest which can hold an item of L bulk or less and can open or close the container with 1 interact action. This container automatically opens when the creature unwinds or is destroyed, and any Aeon Stone automatically begins to orbit the creature until the hound withdraws the stone back into the container (1 interact action) or the stone is taken. With winding stones this allows clockwork hounds to rewind themselves when away from their creators.
--------
Winding Aeon Stone Price 10gp
This dull grey ioun stone has been magically empowered to spin faster and with more force around a target's head. When attached to a clockwork creature's key it rewinds the creature automatically over 10 minutes.

I forgot to specify that swift bite takes 2-actions.


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Fighters and Barbarians are the classes I'd use it for mechanically. Gives you a bit of spellcasting without any pesky ability score prerequisites, just ignore spells with saving throws or counteract mechanics. 2 feats for Shield, Jump, False Life, and Haste is a decent trade to me. The later ones I'm a bit iffy on, but Warding Magic (evocation) will probably come up a lot if you need to get another dedication later.


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I made a self-winding clockwork doggo.
Clockwork Hound Creature 5
N Small Construct Clockwork
Ability Mods
Str +4; Dex +5; Con +2; Int -4; Wis +2; Cha -2;
Senses Perception +9; Darkvision;
Skill Athletics +12; Acrobatics +13;
Items Winding Aeon Stone
Defense
HP
76 Weakness Precision or Critical Hits 5; Resistance 4 physical except adamantine;
Winding The clockwork hound must be wound tightly to function normally, if the key is wound over the course of 10 minutes the clockwork hound can function autonomously for 10 days before needing winding again.
AC 22; Fort +12; Ref +15; Will +9;
Offense
Speed
35 feet;
Bite [1A]
+15 2d8+7 Piercing
Swift Bite The clockwork hound makes two bite strikes each at a -2 penalty. Multiple Attack Penalty increases for each strike, but does not increase until after the second attack.
Chest Container The clockwork hound has a container in their chest which can hold an item of L bulk or less and can open or close the container with 1 interact action. This container automatically opens when the creature unwinds or is destroyed, and any Aeon Stone automatically begins to orbit the creature until the hound withdraws the stone back into the container (1 interact action) or the stone is taken. With winding stones this allows clockwork hounds to rewind themselves when away from their creators.
--------
Winding Aeon Stone Price 10gp
This dull grey ioun stone has been magically empowered to spin faster and with more force around a target's head. When attached to a clockwork creature's key it rewinds the creature automatically over 10 minutes.


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Sin_Dark wrote:


Pardon my lack of knowledge about the forums this is one of my first posts around here and I don't know how to apply the Quotes, but in regards to Gleeful Grognard and Paradozen why add lackluster feats at all then? Why tread old ground and just aim for par? This is Paizo's own edition and their chance to set their own precedents instead of having to tread the ground laid out by 3rd edition. People around here have become so accustomed to lackluster options and only parts of the book being useful that they just shrug and accept it. I see the brilliant design Paizo is capable of and honestly I expect them to bring it to every piece of mechanic and design they make.

Eh, if they just keep trying to publish the high-end level of feats it can quickly become a game of trying to one-up yourself, which makes power creep much more problematic. Also, I'm not sure I can speak to the lacklusterness of feats in LOCG, but I will say some of the lackluster options from LOWG actually seem decent in the context they are designed for, it just isn't a common one. Specifically thinking of the Magic Warrior anti-divination feat, it may apply to others as well. I'm a game full of intrigue and spies bonuses against divination are great, those just see not your typical PF adventure so the bonuses are mediocre.

as for quotes and formatting:
If you look below the text box to post with, there is a line that says "How to format your text" and a show button. That has the syntax to format text with, and you can use the preview button to make sure you have quotes and whatnot correct. If you want to reply to a specific post you can also click reply in the upper right corner of the post and the site will automatically prepare a text box quoting the post. Hope this helps.


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LOWG seemed pretty in line with the player companion and campaign setting lines IMO. Amazing art, amazing lore, a mixed bag of player options. Pretty thoroughly in line with the player companion line, with the exception of being more expensive and more durable. When I get the LOCG and time to process it I'll see if it seems different, but from what I've seen from pictures and spoilers it looks about the same. Amazing art, amazing lore, a mixed bag of player options.


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Thrune murdered 100 people to create an artifact, which implies that they did not murder 100 people just because. If Abrogail Thrune is as intelligent as the lore suggests, the laws of Cheliax are arranged in such a way that the creation of this artifact can be prioritized above the lives of 100 citizens of the state, and those lives can be confiscated via execution to create the artifact competely lawfully.

The difference, in my mind, between CE and LE rulers is that CE rulers will kill people and then pass the justification that says they are fine doing so, while LE people have already arranged the law code so make every instance of murder they need to commit perfectly lawful ahead of time.


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Here's a mock up of the Big Bad Wolf

The Big Bad Wolf Creature 5
Huge Beast NE
Ability Scores
Str +5; Dex +1; Con +4; Int -1; Wis +1; Cha +4
Senses Perception +12; Low-Light Vision;
Skills Deception +13; Stealth +9 (+11 in forests); Intimidation +13;
Languages Common, Sylvan;
Defense:
HP
115 Weakness 4 Slashing
AC 19; Fort +15; Ref +9; Will +12;
Offense:
Melee [1A]
Bite +15 2d8+7 Piercing and Grab;
Melee [1A] Claw +15 (agile) 2d4+6 Slashing;
Swallow Whole [1A] (medium, 2d4+4 acid) Rupture 5;
Change Shape [2A] The Big Bad Wolf can take the form of a small or medium humanoid at-will. In humanoid form the Big Bad Wolf cannot use Grab or Swallow Whole and the damage type done by their strikes may change, but their statistics are otherwise the same.


TriOmegaZero wrote:
We at least know that his death was at the hands of someone else now. How that connects to the Eye remains unclear.
We don't know that he was canonically murdered yet, according to James Jacobs.
James Jacobs wrote:
AKA a product's sales text or early desctription for a solicitation isn't automatically canonical.

Link


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Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:

But for some reason not to lanterns.

Oil companies have ... discouraged the lantern manufacturers from such actions.


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I like the thought of families of the Quick in Geb having heirloom guns as one of the ways to secure a lineage, using them as deterrents for when ghoulish cravings supersede the Dead Laws protecting them. Also seems like a fun way to set up a shotgun zombie-killing horror action scene, the PCs are trapped in a house besieged by zombies and grab the wall-mounted musket for this very purpose.

I also like the idea that alchemical scholars in major colleges around the Inner Sea (like Oenopion and Lepidstadt) getting guns. Gunpowder+magic chemistry= shenanigans.


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Andrew Mullen wrote:

Magaambyans are assisting the Knights of Lastwall in Vellumis, helping clear demons out of the Sarkoris Scar, and keeping tabs on the New Thassilonians' acclimation to the modern world.

Plus whatever else you want to come up with! They've got plenty of reason to help out all over :)

One of my first ideas of why the Magaambya messed about in New Thassilon is to understand the key differences between the Thassilonian and Magaambyan magical traditions and theories. Thassilonian magic was some of the most advanced magic on Golarion pre-earthfall and Magaambyan magic was the some of the first advanced magic to arise after, so comparing and contrasting could lead to great breakthroughs.


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zimmerwald1915 wrote:
David knott 242 wrote:

I rather like the idea of starting the party out as students at the Magaambya and then sending them on a mission elsewhere.

Why in the world would you want to leave?
Paizo Blog He's a Magic Man, She's a Magic Man! wrote:
In addition to their heavy presence in the Mwangi Expanse, the Magaambya has begun setting up satellite colleges to the north—after the explosion (many times literal) of arcane events and anomalies that have occurred in Avistan, from the closure of the Worldwound to the appearance of New Thassilon to the destruction caused by the Whispering Tyrant, the scholars of the south have decided it’s about time they go see what on earth is happening up there!

Link.


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I could have a totally false understanding of how leather armor works, but I thought the Eagle Knight art in LOWG was wearing leather (or other leather-based) armor. In PF1 I would have matched up that image with Parade Armor or an Armored Coat. Also, in the ISWG there is an eagle knight halfling wearing full plate. Also, Google seems to think eagle knights wear armor. Pretty sure that Andoran knows how armor works and can implement it.


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Nonlethal is a plus for me. I don't plan to use illusions on constructs in the first place, and I always prefer making the choice of whether or not the enemy lives after the fight rather than in the fight. They may have information, or need to be freed to send a message, or not need to die. If they do need to die you can stab them to death after you knock them out, but if they need to not die you can't stab them to life after you kill them.


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Ravingdork wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
You can't homebrew items in the system as written. That's intentional.

There's no such thing as a system that you can't homebrew. That's kind of the point of homebrew: to make new things in a system that doesn't have those thing on its own yet.

Captain Morgan wrote:
Custom items created serious balance problems in PF1 that they didn't want to happen again.

Do you have a source, such as a developer quote, for this?

Captain Morgan wrote:
Obviously you can house rule it, and Inventor seems like a good feat for it thematically, but at that point you're playing Calvinball.
Calvinball?

You can homebrew it, but the game doesn't have explicit guidelines for homebrewing items unlike 1e. So if you are homebrewing it you and the GM are making up all the rules for what you can create, including whether or not Inventor is a prerequisite for making them. Hence calvinball, you and the GM are making up rules as you need. Perhaps the game mastery guide will change this.


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Best thing about this spell is that bards get it. So many fun monster songs on my phone to bust out whenever I want to summon anything in the game. Not to mention the option of making an illusory duplicate of yourself to sing a quick duet while stabbing your foes to death. Its pretty solid, though it is easy to remove from play so it plausibly won't last long enough to do more than Acid Arrow.

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