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Hardness and Hit Points of Diamond


Rules Questions


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

What is the hardness and HP of diamonds? One of my players just cast Major Creation to form a "hollow spherical diamond shield" around them to ward off enemy attacks and I need to know how long it's going to take them to break through it.


One stone throw ^^
Diamond may be very hard, but it is also very brittle.

I would put it in roughly the same area of adamantine which is a super hard material.

So hardness 20, with HP of I dunno 20 HP per inch? But due to the brittle effect, blunt attacks ignore the hardness and sonic attacks deal double damage.


I agree with Karuth that using Adamantine stats works best. I would agree with him that sonic attacks should be more effective. (It might not follow real-world physics very well, but it follows Pathfinder physics.)

The only place I disagree is that I wouldn't make blunt weapons ignore the hardness. On the other hand, I'd give attackers with Craft: Jeweler or gem-cutting some kind of bonus or special chance to shatter the thing.

Grand Lodge

Send in the Creepers... Followed by a pool of lava! But on topic maybe the same as worked stone per inch and some additional hardness. I'm assuming he chose diamond because he thinks its really durable I'd be sad to exploit something like this becuase of a player misconception.


I would wait them out. They will start to suffocate soon!


Karuth wrote:

One stone throw ^^

Diamond may be very hard, but it is also very brittle.

I would put it in roughly the same area of adamantine which is a super hard material.

So hardness 20, with HP of I dunno 20 HP per inch? But due to the brittle effect, blunt attacks ignore the hardness and sonic attacks deal double damage.

This is interesting as well because the word 'diamond' is derived from the word 'adamant'.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting Subscriber

You could look at the Brinell scale. It has a hardness for both hardened tool steel (1500-1900 HB) and rhenium diboride (4600 HB). Rhenium diboride is comparable to diamond in strength. If you say that metal in Pathfinder (with a harndess score of 10) is comparable to the low end of hardened tool steel, than each point of HB is equal to about 0.007 points of in-game hardness. That would give diamond an in-game hardness of 30-31.

Of course that doesn't answer the hit point question, and is also a problem because glass is HB 1,550 (meaning it would have an in-game hardness of 11), but meh. Long story short, it's really tough to convert real-world harndess measurements into simple game statistics.


Blueluck wrote:

I agree with Karuth that using Adamantine stats works best. I would agree with him that sonic attacks should be more effective. (It might not follow real-world physics very well, but it follows Pathfinder physics.)

The only place I disagree is that I wouldn't make blunt weapons ignore the hardness. On the other hand, I'd give attackers with Craft: Jeweler or gem-cutting some kind of bonus or special chance to shatter the thing.

But if blunt weapons do not ignore Hardness no ordinary gem cutter could chip off a piece from a diamond. You use fine tools (1d3 at max) and even with power attack and 20 Strength you can only reach 10 points of damage (as level 1 expert).

I know crafting and battle are different things, but still. A diamond may be as hard as adamantine, but it lacks the elasticity needed to absorb blows without a scratch.


Karuth wrote:
Blueluck wrote:

I agree with Karuth that using Adamantine stats works best. I would agree with him that sonic attacks should be more effective. (It might not follow real-world physics very well, but it follows Pathfinder physics.)

The only place I disagree is that I wouldn't make blunt weapons ignore the hardness. On the other hand, I'd give attackers with Craft: Jeweler or gem-cutting some kind of bonus or special chance to shatter the thing.

But if blunt weapons do not ignore Hardness no ordinary gem cutter could chip off a piece from a diamond. You use fine tools (1d3 at max) and even with power attack and 20 Strength you can only reach 10 points of damage (as level 1 expert).

I know crafting and battle are different things, but still. A diamond may be as hard as adamantine, but it lacks the elasticity needed to absorb blows without a scratch.

For crafting you could allow diamond to bypass the hardness of diamond. I'm pretty sure gem cutters use diamonds to cut other diamonds.

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