Is there a good way to determine if a Player (including oneself) is "qualified" to play a Paladin?


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Most hilariously bad paladin I've ever seen was a minotaur paladin. A friend did it. We knew it was going to end badly. So I rolled up a goliath oriental adventures samurai.

When he started a bar fight. I got him arrested. XD

Shadow Lodge

Sagawork Studios wrote:

Lawful Good means different things to different people. Me: I always try and take the honorable and just outcome to a given situation. In roleplaying a Paladin, I try to channel the Batman. Here's a guy who wants to clean up Gotham and make it safe, but he battles his own darker side in doing so. He comes close to killing the bad guys but ends up giving them over to the authorities. I know that most games don't work like that, so I try to channel Darth Vader from Empire Strikes Back when I defeat the bad guys "You are beaten! It is useless to resist. Don't let yourself be destroyed as (Obi-Wan) your comrades did!"

Of course, the latter action might go against the sensibilities of the greater RPG community, but it works enough for me.

I love the Darth Vader comparision. He is the reason I argue that Lawful Evil is the proper alignment for an Anti-paladin, competing for the same positions within an organization. Darth Vader, Mordred, etc.

My example; Superman.

All the Best,

Kerney


Typelouder wrote:
I on the other hand feel that its possible to put Good over Law. I think of it like playing Steve Rogers: Captain America... he is what I base my Paladin off of. If Law and Good come into conflict.. he takes Good side. He will fight against a legitimate authority if its evil (Norman Osborn).

A better Paladin example, I cannot think of.

Curse you Marvel for so ignominiously slaying the one true Paladin of Comicdom.

Sorry. Sore spot. Yes I am a huge nerd, but then we are all on an RPG board aren't we.


Lord Fyre wrote:

With all the discussions about Paladins on these boards, it is very clear to me that it is not easy to play one correctly.

So, what then would be some good ways of determining if a player "has what it takes" to actually play a Paladin "properly"? (i.e., avoid an unintended fall from grace.)

The best way to find out takes two steps. Step one, ask yourself "Is my game master a jerk" if the answer is "No" go on to step two. Step Two, say "Hey GM, I want to play a Paladin".

Paladins are no harder to play than any other kind of character, assuming your GM isn’t a jerk that is out to screw with the players.


I'm one of the folks who has strong disagreements with the LG alignment requirement on the Paladin (In fact, I would love to see a CG Paladin, with the idea of upholding personal liberty over law, but still heavily skewed towards Good over Evil). That said, the discussion between GM and player is the only way to make sure that both will enjoy having the paladin in a group.

Character building for a paladin is 1/4 what's on your character sheet and 1/2 what personality you imbue on the character. More so than any other class, a back story and personality write-up are key to a good paladin. Were I GMing a campaign, this would be my first requirement of a player for a paladin. A write-up is essential in that it provides a tangible reminder of how the Code applies to the character and, if necessary, a form of evidence if a potential violation occurs.

The remaining 1/4 is not being a total ponce.

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

Imnotbob wrote:
Lord Fyre wrote:

With all the discussions about Paladins on these boards, it is very clear to me that it is not easy to play one correctly.

So, what then would be some good ways of determining if a player "has what it takes" to actually play a Paladin "properly"? (i.e., avoid an unintended fall from grace.)

The best way to find out takes two steps. Step one, ask yourself "Is my game master a jerk" if the answer is "No" go on to step two. Step Two, say "Hey GM, I want to play a Paladin".

Paladins are no harder to play than any other kind of character, assuming your GM isn’t a jerk that is out to screw with the players.

From what I have been reading, you might be missing a step. :(

  • Step 1: "Is my Game Master a jerk?" If no, go to step 2.
  • Step 2: "Am I a jerk?" Is still no, go to step 3.
  • Step 3: "Hey GM, I want to play a Paladin."

    Note: If the answer to Step 2 is yes, then you want to play a Wizard.


  • This post proves to me that communication is perhaps the best way around most obstacles between player and GM.

    Then again, I suppose you could say that about any given social situation. Besides, talking with your GM gives you a chance to practice diplomacy; its a class skill, you know.


    Serisan wrote:
    I'm one of the folks who has strong disagreements with the LG alignment requirement on the Paladin (In fact, I would love to see a CG Paladin, with the idea of upholding personal liberty over law, but still heavily skewed towards Good over Evil).

    I'd argue that's the (never so stated) role of the Ranger.

    ...aw, man, now I want to do a game with only a Paladin and a Ranger, stylized as a Buddy Cop film...


    Or multiclass the paladin and ranger.......


    J.S. wrote:
    Serisan wrote:
    I'm one of the folks who has strong disagreements with the LG alignment requirement on the Paladin (In fact, I would love to see a CG Paladin, with the idea of upholding personal liberty over law, but still heavily skewed towards Good over Evil).

    I'd argue that's the (never so stated) role of the Ranger.

    ...aw, man, now I want to do a game with only a Paladin and a Ranger, stylized as a Buddy Cop film...

    Right now in the game I am playing, There is a CG barbarian and my LG Paladin and we operate like a buddy cop film. except we almost never have issues. rarely the whole LAW thing prevents us from finding stuff to work together on.

    Gilfalas wrote:
    Typelouder wrote:
    I on the other hand feel that its possible to put Good over Law. I think of it like playing Steve Rogers: Captain America... he is what I base my Paladin off of. If Law and Good come into conflict.. he takes Good side. He will fight against a legitimate authority if its evil (Norman Osborn).

    A better Paladin example, I cannot think of.

    Curse you Marvel for so ignominiously slaying the one true Paladin of Comicdom.

    Sorry. Sore spot. Yes I am a huge nerd, but then we are all on an RPG board aren't we.

    Its ok. Captain America is alive and well. I actually really liked his death cause of the way every other character in the marvel universe took it. the memorials and the wya that everyone just felt like something was missing... it was nice. Honestly, I will even say he came back a bit quick.

    Side Note: the biggest thing about playing a good paladin. is not being the person who takes the whole "Im a paladin so I have to be a total a#+@#$% and annoy everyone else." a paladin is a leader. take up that role, lead by example and make others feel like they want to follow in your footsteps even if they are harder to walk in. the campaign i was playing in started as all Nuetral characters who were after $$$ and had no moral compass. If you are able to show people that you can do thinks better without always shoving it in there face and being a dick then you are more likely to be welcomed. I thik thats one of those things that people who play paladins screw up. like evil characters, just cause ur evil doesnt mean you need to rub it in everyones faces.

    Sovereign Court

    Typelouder wrote:
    Right now in the game I am playing, There is a CG barbarian and my LG Paladin and we operate like a buddy cop film. except we almost never have issues. rarely the whole LAW thing prevents us from finding stuff to work together on.

    Heh. In pathfinder society I play a barbarian/rogue and am always teamed up with the paladin. There can be some very interesting discussions between us.

    Like the time my character convinced his paladin to attack the city guards because they had been taking bribes from the crimnal guilds and thus were criminals themselves, enabling other criminals and not doing their duty to protect people.

    On the other hand he's convinced my character to stay calm rather than breaking out the sword of mighty chopping, release slaves that were given to him as a gift, etc.

    Playing a paladin is not an easy thing. A lot of people have given good advice here so hopefully it helps. Talk between DM, Party and Paladin is important

    Silver Crusade

    Lord Fyre wrote:


    From what I have been reading, you might be missing a step. :(

  • Step 1: "Is my Game Master a jerk?" If no, go to step 2.
  • Step 2: "Am I a jerk?" Is still no, go to step 3.
  • Step 3: "Hey GM, I want to play a Paladin."

    Note: If the answer to Step 2 is yes, then you want to play a Wizard.

  • Needs two more steps:

    Addendum 1: Are any of the other players jerks?
    Addendum 2: If so, are they too heavy to suplex through the table?

    Grand Lodge

    Jason Ellis 350 wrote:
    I suggest getting a hold of the old 2nd edition book Complete Paladin. That had plenty of descriptions for how to follow a paladin code, even when it wasn't the easiest thing to do.

    I second this by about a thousand. That book is a goldmine of "how to play a paladin" philosophy. Especially since there are so much "you could look at it this way, or this way, or that way" in it.

    If you can get your hands on a copy, it's worth a read. Actually, all those old "Complete" guides were pretty good if I remember correctly. I remember the "Complete Priest" one being really awesome for its time.

    Either way, the big thing is communication between player & DM, and being on the same page about you both view the alignment system and code.

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