Radosek Pavril

Virellius's page

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber. Organized Play Member. 309 posts (310 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 2 Organized Play characters.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
keftiu wrote:
Andrew the Warwitch wrote:
Well, you also have the issue of some ancestries, such as Dwarves, while potientally friendly with other races would never willingly mate with a non-Dwarf.

What? Dwarves have free will and are individuals, they can do whatever they want. They're plenty capable of falling in love with a non-Dwarf.

The existence of Versastile Heritages implies it can even happen in a good variety of ways.

Seconding this. There is no 'dwarves the monolith'. In fact, my dwarf PCs would absolutely 'mate' with non-Dwarves. One in particular has (who knows about kids though, we're in the middle of an adventure!).

Stating '___ would never do ____' is reductive at best and weirdly essentialist at worst.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I always felt the 'only humans can interprocreate' is a little... limiting and doesn't make much sense considering the rest of Golarion's setting. I wonder if it's something Paizo would consider retconning in the future? The fact a Human and Dwarf for example cannot have a child is a little silly.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Xenocrat wrote:
BylethEisner wrote:

According to Pathfinder Lost Omens Impossible lands page 251,

"Quantium is a city made to eclipse all others. Imagine a city of circular plot, 15 miles in diameter and encircled by a wide "c"-shaped road."

This makes Quantium bigger than Absalom?

That gives it 60% of the land area of NYC.

With less than 1% the population.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Sibelius Eos Owm wrote:
TheWarriorPoet519 wrote:

There's some mishmashes about Tar-Baphon's original imprisonment. Early in 1st edition it was indicated that his body was destroyed by the Shield of Aroden embedding itself in his hand, that it was still there when he reformed, and that the crusaders sealed him away because they knew he'd reform inside of Gallowspire's dungeon, which implies his Soul-Cage was known to be down there.

Later supplements have indicated that his Soul-Cage was hidden away by Urgathoa and could be anywhere in the cosmos, which--if that were the case--would kinda throw a wrench in the idea that he reformed in the dungeon.

I don't expect an answer as to what his soul-cage is, of course. Or where it is. I've chalked most of these differentials up to the kinda unreliable-narrator nature of mythic history, but the inconsistencies make my brain itch a lil bit.

Personally, I feel like the most likely answer is that it was a soft retcon. As you said, if TB got blasted and reformed inside Gallowspire, it implies that his soul cage is down there. I don't know about everyone, but my understanding of liches is that they're expected to hide their soul cage somewhere fiendishly difficult to access, as a back-up master plan contingency. For this reason, it's considered pretty poor form if your headquarters gets surrounded and your soul cage is already right there.

In short, it seems like the discrepancy is intended to correct the logical conflict between, "Why wouldn't he have hidden his soul cage?" (now he has) and "How did he end up trapped in Gallowspire?" (he retreated there, badly weakened).

Oh yeah, plus there's one more explanation that's technically aided by this question: If he were destroyed, why is there still a shard of the shattered shield embedded in his hand? (For myself, the idea that it became such a part of him that it followed him through rejuvenation works for me, though that would have to be squared away with the climax of Tyrant's Grasp).

It also could be simply in-world confusion. Everyone ASSUMED he'd been destroyed but it was just a mistake.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

So, there's been some confusion on the OoA forum about the exact geography of the Mana Wastes and Alkenstar, specifically the Bridge of the Gods. Between the old books, Guns and Gears, Impossible Lands, and OoA, there is some seriously conflicting and confusing info on the bridge, where the bridge is, and how it is incorporated into Alkenstar.
Is there any final, official word on this? On that note, is Trietta Ricia from GnG is the canon look for her, or is it her as depicted in OoA book 3?


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

So, Hellside is actually still in the wall. It's depicted in the inner cover of volume 1 of this AP and you go there as part of the climax.

2e is NOT a reset of 1e lore. Alkenstar and the Mana Wastes are just a huge, out of character for the company, gaping hole in consistency for some weird reason.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
DiceKnights wrote:
Virellius wrote:

The Bridge of the Gods is described as a Massive Causeway that leads from Cloudreaver to Dongun Hold and Alkenstar, and yet... Where? How? It appears on no map. It's described this way in both this book and Impossible Lands, and yet no map shows exactly how this path works.

Apologies to necro this thread. I only just started the AP myself and ran into much of the same issues (I just posted about Alkenstar itself earlier today).

I thought I had read somewhere that the Bridge of the Gods connects to Alkenstar directly, like into the city, but can't find where I read that. (Perhaps I imagined it). Checking the map in the earlier adventure featuring Alkenstar Wardens of the Reborn Forge, it shows the road leading west out of Smokeside leads to the Bridge of the Gods, so I figured its not actually connected to the city and you have to travel outside the city to reach it.

How it actually connects to the other two places I have no idea though. It's also disappointing to hear that my issues with the geography extends beyond Alkenstar itself :/ I ended up changing quite a few things on the map of Alkenstar to make it work for me.

Guns and Gears and Impossible Lands both describe it as a bridge that was supposed to link Geb and Nex. It's even stated that a portion of SOME bridge in Alkenstar itself is the remnants of the Bridge of the Gods and this connects to the Gunworks.

Literally none of this is on the map. It's so confusing lol.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
mtvjr wrote:
Virellius wrote:
My biggest complaint about this AP is that it's more Wild West than Steampunk.
I guess you and I have different desires, lol. The Wild West aspect is what drew me in!

Alkenstar has always been painted as Steampunk City so the low-to-zero focus on those tropes set a different expectation for the AP than what my party and I had. Don't get me wrong, I LOVE this AP. It just took some changing of expectations.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I ran Tyrant's Grasp and I actually wondered this too. I sort of assumed Pharasma is metaphysically aware of every judgement and makes sure they follow her will; I also assumed the Rosslar's issue to be specific and unique due to HOW they arrived there, and the situation being kind of a Soul Shock Quarantine zone.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
keftiu wrote:
Virellius wrote:
Ashava's connection to wisps coupled with Nhimbaloth's connection to wisps, but also the Lantern King having a connection to them, and Pharasma being directly opposed to Nhimbaloth... That intersection of the four is something I would LOVE to see explored.
It could also be a very, very strange Pantheon.

Call it The Wisp'ered Ones. >_>


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Ashava's connection to wisps coupled with Nhimbaloth's connection to wisps, but also the Lantern King having a connection to them, and Pharasma being directly opposed to Nhimbaloth... That intersection of the four is something I would LOVE to see explored.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
CosmicKirby wrote:

...

Ng the Hooded (N) Eldest. Having a homebrew where he and Norgorber are spatting over a true 'God of Secrets'. Having Ng be rather upset with 'the pretender' as he does NOT know his identity, but has an undeniable feeling that he did as some point.
...

...How did I never notice the N(or)g(orber) connection before? There's some real conspiracy theory investigator character concept there. madman who fully worships 'Ororber, the Missing Piece', a god they've made up in their own mind completely as the connection between Norgorber and Ng.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Leon Aquilla wrote:
Minor point of order but 'chantries' are the sanctums of mages in Mage: The Ascension, of which Tremere used to be a house of the Order of Hermes before their head diablerized Saulot, which is why they continue to use the word chantry.

As someone with a lot of Dragon Age knowledge, hearing that the Chantry IS the Mages has caused me to suffer mental damage. I need to read up on more VtM lore lol.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

My friend, I have been struggling with the maps and locations for this AP SO badly lol. I especially like how Dongun Hold is apparently on flat land but is also depicted and described as not only being very high up but also in mountains, despite being MILES from the mountain range. I'd love some clarification on this.

Try making sense of the trip to Cloudreaver, and then into the Spellscar. Not exactly On the Way.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Dragonchess Player wrote:

You could probably handle augmentations with the Sterling Dynamo archetype and/or Deviant Abilities with a little tweaking of the descriptions.

Giving the automaton PC free archetype feats in multiclass Inventor Dedication feats and taking Integrated Armament can add other options, as well.

Mechanically is one thing; I was mostly interested in things like lore and setting canon but I DO like the idea of Sterling Dynamo. Mechanical Prosthesis for a machine seems very meta.

When it comes to the mask and such, a lot of it has to do with the fact that the structure of the head piece would need to be... adjusted. The entire body structure of automatons, while humanoid, are not exactly 1 for 1 in proportion, so serious adjustments would need to be made. I do wonder if that's even possible, given that the makers of their tech have been gone for... a LONG time. Do automatons know how to make more of their kind?


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

So, I was working on a PC (A Ghost automaton summoner for Blood Lords who is essentially a ghost in their own shell, if you're curious) and it got me thinking: we have a pretty good idea of the general look of a Jistkan automaton; the sleek, ancient high tech look, and I love it. It did get me thinking, though...

How do you imagine automatons look in the current day? I don't mean the recently awakened ones, but those who have been around a bit. Is it POSSIBLE for them to adjust or even completely restructure their bodies? Could one, in theory, craft something akin to Brigh's form, or perhaps use Gebbite undead grafts to give them a semblance of external humanity?

Is there any canon examples of automatons who have done anything of this sort? I feel like, with many of the newer ancestries (at least in terms of visuals) we have such a limited pallet to draw inspiration from. I'd love to hear how other people have been playing or imagining their ancient friends.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

The airship in book 2 goes to Cloudreaver Keep on its way to the Spellscar. Cloudreaver Keep is almost directly due north. The Spellscar is... Not.

The Bridge of the Gods is described as a Massive Causeway that leads from Cloudreaver to Dongun Hold and Alkenstar, and yet... Where? How? It appears on no map. It's described this way in both this book and Impossible Lands, and yet no map shows exactly how this path works.

I was trying to explain to my party how the airships path worked and everyone was confused, especially considering the book describes it as following the causeway.

Anyone have any sort of explanation for this? Paizo maps are usually in my experience very good but the Mana Wastes seem... Well, like the Mana Wastes but irl.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I disagree. I essentially made Geralt as a Thaumaturge with some Ranger multiclassing; just treat the weaknesses as blade oils, or alchemy.

You have the freedom to make this. You don't have to be Benny in the Mummy, whipping out every religious symbol ever; you CAN be, or you can be one of the Winchesters. You can be a Witcher. You can play it in so many ways, the silliness is only from your own perception and presentation.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
mikeawmids wrote:
I doubt it, since he seemingly ceases to exist after the events of book 1.

My biggest complaint about this AP is that it's more Wild West than Steampunk. The second is that Gattlebee just gets one line at the start of book 2, I think, and then is gone.

He's essential to the backstory of one of my players so I've been having to realllly squeeze him in as much as I can. Seems like a wasted opportunity.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
PossibleCabbage wrote:
Perpetual Stews are a real thing...

This was what I was thinking. Perpetual Stews that stop every winter seem... not perpetual lol. I would have said magic preservation but Dongun Hold is a no-magic zone, too, so it has to be done in a mundane fashion.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

In the Impossible Lands books, it refers to the large stew pots that the dwarves of Dongun Hold cook. It mentions some have been stewing and cooking since before the time of Nex and Geb according to their cooks. Just a few paragraphs later, it mentions that during the winter months, all fires are extinguished, and even cookfires go dark as dwarves eat only preserved or otherwise dry goods.

As written, it seems to imply these forever-cooking stews are allowed to just... sit for a season, which is understandably vile. Can we assume that these stews DO continue cooking and simply are not eaten, or is the assumption that the stews are somehow preserved or frozen in the mountain heights to be re-thawed when the fires roar back to life?


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I actually didn't know all that about the Deadshot Lands. Is that in the Guns n' Gears book? I must have somehow skipped that because that sounds amazing. Well, that minor worry assuaged quite handily...

I'd love to see also how Arazni is viewed now by her countrymen. Is she worshipped in some pockets? Is she viewed as a victim of circumstance, or of Aroden? How is Aroden seen as well? As an intentional villain or more misguided fool? As a god of humanity, how do the humans of Arcadia view him after what he did? I imagine there is a LOT going on regards to his legacy, and her part in it.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

First and foremost, I hope that when the Deadshot Lands are detailed, there is some in-universe explanation for their apparent similarity to Alkenstar, if there are indeed similarities. You hear Deadshot and see a southwestern US-looking region, you instantly think cowboys and the like, but Alkenstar already has veered heavily into Steampunk Victorian but Also Weird West, especially with the way Outlaws of Alkenstar is framed. To be sure, the AP feels way more Weird West than Victorian Europe Steampunk as I initially imagined (there's a fight on a riverboat for Brighs sake), but I do believe that's more the story itself and less the setting.

There's potential for a lot of setting overlap. I'm excited to see how the Deadshot Lands stand on their own when Desert Fantasy Gunslinger Region already exists in the setting.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I actually really dig Owlcat's WOTR game for specifically this, as the origin for her name is given to her by a very innocent character, and Noct loathes it at first but seems to sort of tongue-in-cheek take it later, almost ironically. It's a fun version of it, at least.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Kanabo Hobgoblins. Specifically as a way to help all that good 1e hob art stay relevant in some way: just say a kanabo hob looks like that because something something Oni influence.

Also, I'd love to see them do a sort of perspective swap; how do the people of Tian Xia see the Inner Sea? How do they feel about Aroden's mess, etc. I'd love to see the 'main' setting through the lens of another people, and how they relate to it; most of Golarion's major threats and changes originate from the Inner Sea so seeing that from the other side of the world would be interesting.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I think books like this are really important to help differentiate Golarion dwarves from Warcraft, Warhammer, and Tolkien-isms. Those are all great dwarf styles but I'm so excited for even more distinctly Golarion flavor like what we got with the Garundi Dwarves.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I'm super excited to see a lot of writers who I don't recognize and a few I do. Cant wait to see this book! Also, the nagaji looking distinctly snakey really helps seperate them from Iruxi and gives them such a strong identity. So excited to see more.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
keftiu wrote:

The only mention of Kerdak's fate I can find in 2e is that Legends describes Tessa taking the title of Hurricane Queen "when he fell," which is nonspecific, but does imply his death to me.

LOWG mentions the Master of Gales in the Shackles portion of the High Seas chapter, where he's listed as one of two example Free Captains who are 'less welcoming to outsiders' than some of the others.

There's not much High Seas content in 2e yet; other than the two sources mentioned above, there's some stuff in the Travel Guide (mostly about trade routes, IIRC), and I want to say the Ancestry Guide mentions a few local cultures of various Ancestries, but that might be it. This edition has mostly looked at Kortos and Garund so far.

Thank you, that's about what I could find too. I found references to him being voted out, but it was on the wiki I believe unsourced.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

So, I'm planning a campaign that will take place initially in the Shackles, and I'm having some trouble getting current info on the region, specifically on if Kerdak is dead or not. As far as I knew, he was killed at the end of S&S but everything I've read simply states he was voted out and that Tessa is queen now.

Has this been clarified? I feel like it must have been. Is the Master of Gales still kicking? What was the end result of the Chelaxians attempted invasion in terms of politics and such?

On top of that, what would be good sources for further information on the region?


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

My personal question from a world-building standpoint is: what are the -differences- between them? It seems extreme body modification, pain, chains, and black leather are shared traits inherited from Clive Barker (and wonderfully so), but what separates them?

Do they coincidentally share a visual theming, as Zon-Kuthon and many velstracs do, or do the demagogues emulate him due to his immense power? Is the way they treat beauty in pain, suffering as joy, etc; something inherent in being a velstrac and separate from what made Dou-Bral into ZK, or did they both perhaps experience or witness the same unknown that caused his unholy transformation? Is it something he shared with them after they left Hell?

In my personal world, I sort of lean to the latter; the velstracs coming to the Shadow Plane and being shown this new way, and then like disciples spreading off the share the pain in their own fashion.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Ah, sorry, didn't mean to be confusing! I should have said something closer to 'if people in Iblydos have Greek inspired names, but then so does Cheliax in a completely unrelated way, I wonder if there is any kind of background info on why'.

You're right though, Iblydos is not nearly the same as IRL Greece in terms of influence. That's sort of why I was confused as to the Greek names in Cheliax, since as noble family names they are likely at least a few generations old.
The term poleis was developed in archaic Greece, however, and Iblydos likely would refer to their administrative centers using a similar term as was common in Ancient Greece; cities like Dionysiopolis in Phrygia are referenced several times in ancient history, so the naming convention is QUITE old; maybe some Iblydosians migrated north to what would become Taldor, and then ended up over in Cheliax?

Or maybe I'm over thinking it and they were just names the writers used without thinking too deeply into it. This is probably more likely.

Loving all this discussion on the geopolitical history of Golarion and its inspirations; the logistics of fantasy worldbuilding is the best.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

OoA in Part 2 has a section where you visit a Brighite temple. The entire written dialogue features a priest and her acolyte speaking about Brighs teachings, and it is presented as the acolyte reciting passages from the book as if it were a super in-depth instruction manual. It's Like 'Regulation 4:19, the individual must serve the whole, for the greater benefit of the whole and all its parts' that sort of thing. It's all in-universe, not a gazeteer or article, but is very clear about how the book is written and organized.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I'm loving everything I see here. I'm also weirdly exceptionally excited to see what an elemental plane of wood looks like. Wood as an element is so distinct from the others and so little used in western fantasy that I don't have a good frame of reference for it in terms of... A realm. Colour me extremely excited. Maybe a massive endless forest of every tree imaginable? A realm of treats and such? Maybe some connection to branches (haha) of the Green Faith?

.... Green Faith Kineticist who fights deforestation with literal forests? I can't wait to see what we get.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

See, that's what I thought too. The big thing is that Iblydos is clearly Ancient Greece But Current and they don't nearly have the historical dominance and wide-spread influence you'd expect from a Greek Analogue in the Mediterranean, so the name origins had to come from somewhere else. I wonder if we'll get some connections in a future book.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Quick little question here: I noticed in at least two instances, old Chelaxian families having noticeably Greek sounding names (Kalepopilis in Crimson Throne, and Narikopolous in Hell's Vengeance, iirc). Is this a pre-Thrune thing, or were those types of names an outlier and not indicative of a typical old Chelaxian name?


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

As one of my favorite PCs is a former Order of the Nail Hellknight who abandoned the order after falling in love with an Ulfen druid in a very accidental parallel to Disney's horribly inaccurate take on Pocahontas, the concept of a Hellknight AP + a massive reformation of Cheliax AP would be... amazing. I have so much invested in the area and how a reformed/revolutionary Cheliax would look!

Consider this: Cheliax has a major revolt. Taldor, recently now under the rule of a new regime which was brought about partially by 'a group of heroes', along with Ravounel having the same, I imagine they put a LOT of effort into assisting the rebels. Nidal would be assumed to stand with Cheliax, but what if a major part of the AP is convincing Nidal to stand down? Since 'kill the evil super powered queen and save the nation' has already been done with CotCT, a more War for the Crown take on a Chelaxian Civil War would be a fantastic way to go, imo. Center the whole thing on the PCs being from one of the former Chelaxian colonies/vassals, or a citizen of Cheliax itself and tying the backgrounds into that.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

My bank account would be the opposite of Abadar's holy word, as it is nothing but 'Line Go Down' and an absolutely uncivilized amount of debt.

But to be honest, I love the description and lore of Brigh's holy book in OoA, and I think her text reading like an instruction booklet for living things is perfect. Maybe Cassandalee takes inspiration but hers is more digital, written like you'd find instructions on programming or coding written by a genius but still-new coding savant?

The sort of thing I'd personally love to see would be what the elemental lords worshippers who do not natively speak the relevant tongue would sound like. Imagine you walk into a hot, sweaty cavern and find a bunch of robed figures making really awkward crackly flame noises?


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
keftiu wrote:
Virellius wrote:
Land of Northern Lakes, huh? I feel like... perhaps... I like there. Is it decidedly mitten shaped?
I don't know what reference this might be, but the Land of Northern Lakes seems to pull a lot from the north and east of North America - most of the locals appear to be Fantasy Iroquois. Their big fantastical note is that the region is rich in skymetals, which has driven some really cool technological advancement.

Oh, a typo on my end and also perhaps me being stupid is all. Michigan is known for being in the northern part of the country and is surrounded by the Great Lakes, and is shaped like a mitten. I happen to live there, so any potential references to the Native people of this area always makes me happy is all. Extremely diverse and interesting histories of the peoples here. The Iroquois Confederacy absolutely covered this area so... my hopes are up! :D


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Land of Northern Lakes, huh? I feel like... perhaps... I like there. Is it decidedly mitten shaped?


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Virellius wrote:

Throwing out a mention to the additional Runelord archetype in 2e, where some members of New Thassilon are calling themselves Runelords, emulating the old ones, but without the levels of power the old ones had. I imagine Sorshen is pretty amused at these little Runelords running around, playing at her immense power.

While you're here, actually, am I remembering correctly that Sorshen and Nocticula are on pretty good terms? I imagine they'd have a lot to talk about considering their similar past areas of focus.

The "new runelords" thing is a new story thread we've not yet started to really explore, but hopefully some day we'll get a chance to do so.

Sorshen and Nocticula have a fair amount in common, and her faith is one of the most prevalent in eastern New Thassilon, yes. But Nocticula is a full-fledged deity these days, and so doesn't really "talk" to mortals much. And Sorshen has a lot more pressing matters to face in the meantime anyway, so they don't really "talk much" at all.

That makes sense. I think it was her faith being prevalent that I was thinking of. And the new runelords sounds like so much fun, I hope you guys get to do something with it maybe in a region book or something. Thassilon is my favorite; can't wait to see what y'all do!


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Throwing out a mention to the additional Runelord archetype in 2e, where some members of New Thassilon are calling themselves Runelords, emulating the old ones, but without the levels of power the old ones had. I imagine Sorshen is pretty amused at these little Runelords running around, playing at her immense power.

While you're here, actually, am I remembering correctly that Sorshen and Nocticula are on pretty good terms? I imagine they'd have a lot to talk about considering their similar past areas of focus.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Amos Anpunefer was an Osiriani medic travelling with an ambitious mercenary company, seeking to cross the manawastes and make their name in Alkenstar. A manastorm of exceptional intensity hit the caravan, however, and caused irreparable damage if not immediate death to everyone... Except for Amos. Internally mutated beyond his former human ken but with his body mostly intact, and with his mind bereft of almost everything save for his medical knowledge, he did what he knew best: stitched flesh.

For what seemed like an eternity, he stitched. A good arm here, a perfect leg there... The worms dug holes and he followed their lead with his needle. After reassembling his crew as best he could, leaving macabre flesh-based mannequins scattered about their ruined campsite, he left in search of new flesh to fix.

His wandering brought him to Geb, a land they had only briefly stopped in, and he found his skills in high demand. The Reanimators needed skinstitchers, after all... Time passes, however, and Amos began to develop something of a folksy personality and a fondness for the mindless dead. After all, all they needed was a bit of tending and someone to look after them.

Becoming a farmhand was the greatest joy in Amos' new life. As something beyond human, but not quite dead, he found a kinship with the mindless farmers. It didn't hurt that he found he had a lingering connection to the natural world which, in his mind, lined up just fine. Zombies weren't alive, per se, but where he lives? They sure are natural, and the worms and bugs need something to eat too.

Now, Amos and his trusty steed Ol' Creakin' Jim, the zombified donkey, seek to make a better place in Geb for the lowly mindless farmhands, all the while ensuring the worms and flies get their fill too.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I am vibrating with excitement for this to ship.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I was really hoping subscribers would be able to avoid the DnD Beyond situation of having to pay for things we already own, especially since we already have them in digital form. I can't see myself ever using Pathfinder infinite when I have the pdfs from subs and Pathbuilder exists. :/


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I don't know why they went with a Cthulhu theme for the vaults when he, and tentacles in general, have absolutely nothing to do with the eldritch being involved in the vaults story. Sort of an unusual, generic 'great old one' theming with these. Not bad by any means, but when the article reads that they based these on the lore and plot... I don't think they did.

They could have for example used a mossy skull instead of a Cthulhu head, because those are listed numerous times and specified to be on the walls. These don't even work for the top floor, as that is mostly just a ruined building around a lighthouse, neither of which are oozing with octopus vibes.

Disappointing. Feels like some sort of something was lost in translation here, so to speak. Quality looks nice though and these would work well for a different old god themed dungeon.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

So, I was doing some thinking, and something strange stuck out to me. Golarion doesn't have a 'wildmother', Mother Earth, Gaea type deity.

There's Gozreh, but in every depiction I've ever seen, they seem very closely tied to weather, wind, and waves, and less to animals and green things.

There's the Green Mother, but she's very much DANGEROUS flora, seductive aspects of nature, and also evil.

There's a few empyrean lords focused on things adjacent to the concept, like farming.

Am I just missing something? The Green Faith exists, as does worship of individual Green Men, but afaik, there is no neutral or good aligned plant and animal themed natural divinity.

I wonder why that is? I feel like such a clear and obvious gap in traditional divinity concepts is intentional.

On a side note, IS there anything in setting tying Gozreh more strongly to terrestrial nature? It may be just my recent reading of Mwangi Expanse but They seem so specifically tied to a more... Wet nature.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I'm just rocking back and forth waiting for my pdfs. This is gonna be amazing!


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Otari as a whole is a pretty tolerant/chill town. I mean, they openly just allow a thieves guild to exist. The sheriff is a bit of a curmudgeon, but a reasonable party face could easily pull 'he almost died, isn't that punishment enough? No harm done!' type of argument.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Sprites are unique among ancestries in that their heritages specifically are what KIND of sprite they are; a jungle orc or an Arctic orc are both orcs, but a Melixie and a Grig are two entirely different things. So if instead, you choose undine for example, what is the 'base pixie' you are assumed to be, RAW?

In my own game, I'm house ruling that the type of sprite you are is mostly flavor if you choose a versatile heritage, since you technically can't be an ifrit Nyktera, but it SHOULD in theory be possible.

What's your input?


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Do you know/can you say if Malevolence and/or the upcoming Galt adventure will have Adventure specific backgrounds?

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