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Shandyan's page

Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber. Organized Play Member. 26 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 1 Organized Play character.


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James Jacobs wrote:
Shandyan wrote:

Is there a way to stop a dead person from coming back as a 'spontaneously created' undead like a mohrg or spectre? The write-ups in Bestiary 2 make it sound like those undead can form without the intervention of a necromancer, but are there any other requirements/limitations? For example, does a proper burial ceremony stop this happening, or is it basically something that you can't ever prevent 100%?

Some context from my game: I'm running Kingmaker, and my players have recently killed the Stag Lord. He sounds like the perfect candidate for becoming a spectre or mohrg, but the PCs gave him a proper burial ceremony.

It's left pretty vague so that writers can have more freedom for storytelling. There are methods you can use to prevent it. Gentle repose will prevent it but the spell'd need to be recast on the body each day. In 1st edition, there was a spell called hallow that prevented it as well, but we haven't updated that one to 2nd edition yet.

The right solution for your game is to let the PCs do the proper ceremony, and then respect their work by not having him come back as an undead later. You as the GM are the one that gets to make the decisions when a creature becomes undead, after all, so by just not running a plot where the Stag Lord comes back from the dead as an undead, that's all you need to do.

If you DO intend to do this plot, you should foreshadow it somehow so that it doesn't look like you're just arbitrarily undoing the PCs' work.

And if you've done this plot many times before in your games, you've already trained your PCs to expect such a plot. In this case, I'd suggest NOT having the Stag Lord come back, telling the PCs that "By performing this ritual you are consecrating the body and hastening its trip to the Boneyard" or something like that. And then give them a bit of extra XP as "proof" that they prevented a future undead Stag Lord. And then honor that by never having him come back as undead.

Thanks for the insight in how this works in universe. The last thing I want to do is to make the players feel like I've cheated them, which is mostly why I was asking. In some settings I've run games with, you can't stop things like this happening; if that'd been the case for Golarion my first step would have been to let the players know, so they could properly plan.


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Is there a way to stop a dead person from coming back as a 'spontaneously created' undead like a mohrg or spectre? The write-ups in Bestiary 2 make it sound like those undead can form without the intervention of a necromancer, but are there any other requirements/limitations? For example, does a proper burial ceremony stop this happening, or is it basically something that you can't ever prevent 100%?

Some context from my game: I'm running Kingmaker, and my players have recently killed the Stag Lord. He sounds like the perfect candidate for becoming a spectre or mohrg, but the PCs gave him a proper burial ceremony.


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Thanks very much for the response and explanations - I didn't realise there was a specific date to get items shipped when first subscribing, or about the relationship between ordering, shipment, payment and pdf release.

Thanks also for arranging Bestiary 2 to ship out. I look forward to being able to read the pdf soon!


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Looking into this some more, should I be concerned that my order of Bestiary 2 is in my sidecart?

If I'm reading this correctly, my copy of B2 won't be shipped until the GMG is released, which entirely defeats the purpose of subscribing for Bestiary 2. Is there any way to adjust this?

I was hoping on using the Bestiary 2 in my home game this weekend, but it now looks as though I won't get access to either the print or pdf for several months. I don't know if I entered the wrong information when subscribing, but this has been a fairly confusing and frustrating process so far.


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I started a Pathfinder Rulebook subscription for Bestiary 2 on the 18th May, but still haven't got a shipping notification. Is it possible to get access to the pdf now that it's for general sale, or do I have to wait for my book to ship?

If I have to wait for the book to ship, this is quite disappointing. My rationale for subscribing was to get access to material more quickly, not more slowly (when you factor in international shipping, there's no price saving for subscription).

Is it possible to get an estimate of when my book will ship? I don't need a precise date, but it would be nice to know if I can expect shipment in the next week or so, or if it's more likely to be mid-late June. I'm quite dissapointed to find out there is at least a 10-day delay in shipping orders following accepting orders. I hope that this won't be the case for subsequent books, as otherwise I will be unlikely to continue with the subscription.

Thank you.


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Coming up with the contents of a NPC wizard's spellbook can be a pain as a GM. To help out, this thread a place to enter in wizard spellbooks from actual play. What are the spellbooks like for wizards in your campaigns?

Fraxinus, Level 4 Illusionist Wizard
Cantrips:
* Acid Splash
* Detect Magic
* Daze
* Electric Arc
* Ghost Sound
* Mage Hand
* Light
* Prestidigitation
* Shield
* Telekinetic Projectile
* Ray of Frost
* Read Aura
* Tanglefoot

1st level spells:
* Alarm
* Color Spray
* Fear
* Illusory Disguise
* Illusory Object
* Jump
* Longstrider
* Mage Armor
* Magic Missile
* Magic Weapon
* Ventriloquism

2nd level spells:
* Dispel Magic
* Flaming Sphere
* Illusory Creature
* Invisibility
* Spider Climb


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TheGentlemanDM wrote:
Shandyan wrote:
Will you cover divine sorcerers too? With the Blessed Blood feat from G&M, their choice of deity is also quite impactful.
Divine Sorcerers and Champions get mentioned, but not their own full star systems. Divine Sorcerers basically use alignment and granted spells from Cloistered Clerics, while Champions use alignment and domains from Warpriests.

That makes sense! I look forward to reading the completed guide.


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Will you cover divine sorcerers too? With the Blessed Blood feat from G&M, their choice of deity is also quite impactful.


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It's great to hear that Paizo are thinking of this - thanks for listening to the community (despite the occasional bout of bickering!) and communicating with us!


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easy tool has pages sorted by spell type and level, with all the monster stats.


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Isn't Bravery just as specific as Dirge of Doom though? It's interesting to contrast Bravery's wording with Aura of Courage.

Bravery says: "Anytime you gain the frightened condition, reduce its value by 1." The relevant part of Aura of Courage says: "Whenever you become frightened, reduce the condition value by 1 (to a minimum of 0)." It's odd that Bravery doesn't specify a minimum value, but I think that's an editing issue; you can't have a negative Frightened condition!

Both abilties pretty directly contradicts Dirge of Doom, which says: "Foes within the area are frightened 1. They can’t reduce their frightened value below 1 while they remain in the area". It's also interesting to wonder how Shatter Defenses works with Bravery/Aura of Courage. Shatter Defenses says: "If the target was already flat-footed to you when you damaged it with this Strike, it can’t reduce its frightened value below 1 until the start of your next turn."

So you have two abilities that automatically reduce Frightened by 1 (one specifies to a minimum of 0), and two abilities that prevent you reducing Frightened to less than 1. Which ones takes precedence?

I think I'd rule that these abilities are all contradictory, and are all equally specific, so the higher level character takes precedence. If both sides are equal level, either defer to the PC's ability, or flip a coin (DC 11 Flat Check) to see which one wins.


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Thanks for the input everyone. Most of my questions were a bit rhetorical - I agree that magic items are fine, and ditto buff spells.

masda_gib wrote:

As for illusions... that's more difficult. I'd say illusionary objects and invisibility on your ally still work since they are not cast ON the willowhisp.

So if the wizard uses Illusory Object to 'create' a wall to protect the sorcerer from the wisp (ie boxing in their ally in the Illusory Object), does the wisp need to disbelieve it or not?

I'm really not sure on this one! My party has an illusionist wizard and so illusions are something I definitely need to be able to answer in play.


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Will-o'-wisps have the following ability: "<b>Magic Immunity</b> A will-o’-wisp is immune to all spells except faerie fire , glitterdust, magic missile, and maze."

I'm trying to work out how this affects indirect or buff spells. For example, does a Blessed fighter benefit from +1 to hit vs the wisp? Are wisps automatically immune to illusion spells? Can the wisp ignore the effects of Sanctuary? Can summoned creatures and sustained spells like Spiritual Weapon affect it?

And to go further down the rabbit hole, what about magic items that duplicate the effects of spells? Is a wisp not affected by the an oil-of-potency'd weapon's bonus accuracy and damage? What about if the weapon is enhanced using the Magic Weapon spell?

My feel is that buff spells continue to work normally, but the wisp is unaffected by illusion spells and effects like sanctuary and summons. Is there a definitive list anywhere, and what are other people's thoughts?


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Is the signature spell you get at level 3 in addition to the new spells in your repertoire, or do you pick one of those spells to become a signature?


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gnoams wrote:

At level 10, you could be a master in a skill. So your assurance at that level would give you a result of:

assurance (10) + proficiency (10 level +6 master)= 26.

Your skill modifier if you invested in being good at it would be:
proficiency (10 level +6 master) + ability score (5) +item (2), which is a +23.

So by using your assurance feat you are effectively taking a 3 on your die roll. That's... terrible.

Assurance is an awful feat. It's completely useless for a skill you are going to be good at. Maybe you could use it for a skill that you max proficiency, but dumped your ability modifier for? I duno. It's pretty much just bad.

Assurance is very good if you have lots of penalties. For example, if you Trip after making two attacks, you've got 26 with Assurance or (13 plus 1d20) without, i.e. Assurance is giving you a guaranteed 13.

Obviously it's still only good if you're facing low level low/medium Reflex creatures regularly.


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Unicore wrote:

THe fact polar ray doesn't have a crit effect is what makes it look like a spell that slipped through some kind of editorial process where the reader thought all spell attack rolls had a default critical success mechanic when they do not. It is a very bad spell for players to prepare, in part because true strike feels like a waste on it because it can't do anything with a critical hit.

Polar Ray is also missing the Attack keyword, which makes me think the absence of 'double damage on critical hit' is an editorial oversight.

I checked the spells which do have Attack as a keyword. They all do something on a critical hit, and generally they do double damage if they do damage at all.


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Ishyna wrote:
Now here is a question I'd have about that situation. Using RAW does the rogue even need to roll stealth? They don't have either a precise or imprecise sense that can be used against him. If he runs up and starts attacking them does he remain undetected? I feel like he does by RAW. Vague senses can at best make a target undetected and those are all the senses left to the goblins. I suppose that's the point of having GM rulings but I really like to have explicit rules with which to work with.

I think an invisible/silenced rogue doesn't need to make the Sneak action to remain undetected - their enemies are unable to sense them with anything beyond vague senses, which aren't good enough to get the rogue out of 'undetected'. The exception is if the rogue is moving on snowy ground, or through deep vegetation. They're invisible, but their footprints aren't and other people can track the moving vegetation. If the goblins were blind and deaf instead of the rogue being invisible and silenced, the rogue would never need to make Stealth rolls, as the goblins can't detect the rogue or their traces.

If the rogue attacks a goblin in melee, I think the rogue is now hidden, because the goblin clearly knows where the rogue is. If the rogue moves, they become undetected - and because the goblins have no precise or imprecise senses to detect them, the rogue can Stride rather than needing to Sneak (if the terrain allows this, as described above).

If the rogue made a ranged attack against a goblin, they might drop down to hidden. It would depend on how obvious the ranged attack was (e.g. a flaming arrow vs. a shuriken), how far away they are, and so on. The rogue is invisible, but their ranged projectile isn't, and that could be used to detect them. I'd let the rogue make a Stealth roll to hide the origin of their ranged physical attack, with circumstance bonuses and penalties as appropriate.


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The hexploration rules! I'm just about to start running Kingmaker in 2nd Edition, and the timing is perfect.

The monster, hazard and item building guidelines also look super useful, and ditto the NPC gallery. I'm quite tempted to use the Ancestral Paragons tweak (where you get twice as many ancestry feats) as well.


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Zapp wrote:


Even the answer "at the same level a PC of the 'real' class gets 'em" would be appreciated. I don't see why this question must be met with hostility.

Doesn't the GMG extract on Monster Building cover this? There's a page or two on recommended stats for different classes, and suggested signature abilities by level. The suggested abilities and feats are focused on active abilities, rather than number boosters


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Under the default rules, using recall knowledge to identify creature abilities is a bit vague - you get 'one of the creatures best-known attributes' on a success, and need a critical success to learn about 'something subtler, like a demon's weakness or the trigger for one of the creature's reactions'.

I'd like to make creature identification more useful, and more under the player's control, as I think it adds to the tactical fun if the player's have more information to go on. I've played quite a bit of the Kingmaker cRPG recently, and it's really helpful being able to see a creature's saves and key powers before deciding what spell to launch at them.

My suggested tweaks are:
When you recall knowledge on a creature, pick one of the following types of fact to find out: offensive abilities, defensive abilities, or other ability. If you get a success on the recall knowledge check, the GM will tell you one thing from the relevant category. If you get a critical success, the GM will tell you two things (or maybe the player can pick one thing??).

If you asked to learn about offensive abilities, the GM will tell you about a single attack ability, including a narrative overview of its range, damage etc. For example, "the river drake can launch a blob of caustic mucus over a medium range, that does acid damage in a small burst" or "the wolf get a bonus to damage if it attacks a target that's adjacent to the wolf's allies". Any power that hurts the PCs falls into this category, and the GM will start with the most dramatic/cooler powers first. An offensive reaction power (like attack of opportunity) falls into this category

If you asked to learn about defensive abilities, the GM will tell you about one of:
* the creature's general HP, resistances and weaknesses in narrative terms. E.g. "it's not got very many HP for something of this level, but it's resistant to acid and weak to fire", or "this flesh golem is empowered by lightning and vulnerable to cold"
* the creature's AC and saves. e.g. "it's physically very tough and hard to hurt, but weak-willed and slow, so focus on Reflex and Will!"
* a defensive power, e.g. "the animated statue is hard to hit and resistant to damage - but once you break its armour, it's much more vulnerable. You can do that either with straight damage, or with a critical hit"

If you asked to learn about other abilities, the GM will tell you about a relevant type of ability. Not all monsters will have these, but examples could be: "barghasts can take the shape of a wolf or goblin, as well as their natural form" or "ghosts often reform after being killed, unless you can fix the curse that anchors them". If the creature has no weird abilities, the GM might be nice and give you something from the offensive or defensive category.

What are people's thoughts on this? Is it too complicated, or too powerful? Are there any major flaws with the categorisation of powers/information?


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Draco18s wrote:


Shandyan wrote:
It's a bit odd really - if you want to craft something without spending money, then batching doesn't make a massive difference to the time required to craft. If you're level 1 and trying to make a 3g potion, it takes 32 days to make four potions sequentially vs. 30 days making them as a batch (assuming standard successes on all craft rolls). If you're willing to chuck cash at the problem, then batching is great - it's 20 days to do them sequentially vs. 4 days for the batch.

I'm not sure how you got these numbers. You spend 6gp up front and then spend days crafting at 5sp per day:

You are either applying that progress towards the total of 12gp (12...

Yeah, I misread the batch crafting rules entirely, and so my numbers were totally off. Sorry for any confusion caused!


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Aratorin wrote:
Shandyan wrote:

Another consequence of 'fast batch' approach is that it makes crafting batches of items cheaper than buying them, which doesn't apply to non-batch items.

This kicks in regardless of the size of the batch, e.g. buying four 3g potions costs 12g. With the 'total price' approach, the maximum cost via crafting is also 12g, but with the 'fast batch' approach, the maximum cost via crafting is only 7.5g.

I'm not sure what's intended by the rules, but it's perhaps a point in favour of the 'total price' approach. It means that you have the same potential savings for crafting batches of items as for crafting single copies of items.

I don't understand this logic. If the batch totals 12gp, you still have to spend 6gp up front, and 6gp to finish.

I thought Mathmuse was saying that 'fast batches' reduces the time to finish the batch, which means that it would cost less if you decide to pay up rather than spend more days (because if it takes fewer days, it must have a lower target amount of gold). On a re-read, I think I misread that - with fast batches, the extra days generate more money towards the same total.

It's a bit odd really - if you want to craft something without spending money, then batching doesn't make a massive difference to the time required to craft. If you're level 1 and trying to make a 3g potion, it takes 32 days to make four potions sequentially vs. 30 days making them as a batch (assuming standard successes on all craft rolls). If you're willing to chuck cash at the problem, then batching is great - it's 20 days to do them sequentially vs. 4 days for the batch.


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Another consequence of 'fast batch' approach is that it makes crafting batches of items cheaper than buying them, which doesn't apply to non-batch items.

This kicks in regardless of the size of the batch, e.g. buying four 3g potions costs 12g. With the 'total price' approach, the maximum cost via crafting is also 12g, but with the 'fast batch' approach, the maximum cost via crafting is only 7.5g.

I'm not sure what's intended by the rules, but it's perhaps a point in favour of the 'total price' approach. It means that you have the same potential savings for crafting batches of items as for crafting single copies of items.


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I plan on tying them to roleplay, rather than spending HP or similar.

I'm currently preparing for running Kingmaker, and will probably have a Champion of Sarenrae. If the Champion succeeds in redeeming one of NPCs like Akiros, then Sarenrae will reward them with a boon. If one of the other PCs helps out significantly, they might also get a boon, even if they're not worshippers of Sarenrae. I plan on checking out the anathema and edicts of the PC's gods and other significant campaign deities to see what king of actions might trigger boons or curses. I think they'll be a really nice way of making the religion of the world feel real and impactful, rather than choice of god being only relevant for cleric types.


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I ran the Mosquito Witch (a PFS adventure), which worked really well. The reviews on the product page go into more detail about the adventure, but it's got a reasonable amount of investigation/roleplay, and a few fights.


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I'm considering subscribing to the adventure card game, as it's quite a bit cheaper than buying it in the UK. I'm concerned about getting hit by customs charges, as they'll end up making it more expensive than if I brought the updates in the UK.

Have other UK-based subscribers been hit with customs charges for the adventure card game so far?

Thanks!