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Alzrius's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 1,610 posts. 72 reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist.


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Sissyl wrote:
Well... not exactly. DVD! was never released under the Planescape product line, and deviated pretty seriously from what Planescape was. You could just as well call it a Ravenloft scenario.

The issue with it not being released under the Planescape line was that WotC (which had acquired TSR a few years prior) had determined that product lines - that is, the appearance of campaign specific logos on the the cover/front of a product - tended to narrow the target market they were aimed at. As such, it had been dialing them back for years.

It's no coincidence that Warriors of Heaven, Vortex of Madness and Other Planar Perils, and Guide to Hell didn't have Planescape listed on them, the same way that Die Vecna Die! didn't. Likewise, Bastion of Faith didn't have the Greyhawk logo despite being about Heironeous and Hextor, Carnival didn't have the Ravenloft logo despite being about a Ravenloft-specific organization, etc.

Likewise, I'm not sure how you could say that it "deviated pretty specifically" from what Planescape was. Harbinger House was a Planescape adventure that dealt specifically with deities in Sigil (using the work-around that some mortals were ascending to godhood while in Sigil), and had an item that specifically kept out the Lady of Pain's awareness. Likewise, Dead Gods has a god (or rather, some pieces of a dead god, that still have some awareness) in Sigil.

The major point that most Planescape fans seem to find upsetting is that it shows the Lady's limitations (she can't instantly force Vecna out), that it implies that she has a "true, resplendent form" (which it says she'd have to take to battle Vecna directly), and that she speaks aloud (to repair the damage done to the planes by Vecna's time in Sigil). Even the latter isn't without precedent, as it's implied that she speaks directly to Duke Darkwood at the end of Faction War.

Quote:
Most likely, it was the module for the Generic AD&D line that updated from 2nd to 3rd.

As you noted, the module for "generic" AD&D to be updated to Third Edition was The Apocalypse Stone. Die Vecna Die! is pretty clearly meant to be an edition-changing event for the whole of the AD&D multiverse, even if it can't deal with every campaign world specifically.

Quote:
Also worth noting is that the proposed changes to the settings laid out in the appendix never happened whatsoever (though some were sort of awesome). It also didn't touch on Forgotten Realms, but rather Greyhawk.

I need to go back and reference what those changes were, but some of them did happen, and others were plausible. The idea that the "half-worlds" of Tovag Baragu became multiple, parallel Material Planes is indeed something found in Third Edition, which now has multiple Material Planes as its default assumption. There are also far fewer Inner Planes now (no more quasi- and para-elemental planes, for example, in the Third Edition Manual of the Planes), though we admittedly aren't told anywhere else that any of them "ran aground" on a Prime Material world.

Depending on how you take MotP's existence of things like the Plane of Faerie or the Plane of Mirrors, you could also say that there were new Outer Planes being introduced (though to be fair, I don't recall any Outer Planes being lost).


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So lately I've been watching a lot of anime on Netflix. I've taken to posting my thoughts on them on another forums after I've finished various series, and decided to cross-post them here as well:

Having just completed Yamada's First Time ("B Gata H Kei"), I found it to be a comedy that was much more enjoyable than the one I talked about a few posts back.

A twelve-episode series, Yamada's First Time is about a high school girl who loves sex, to the point of wanting to have a hundred different men as casual sex-friends. Of course, being that she's a virgin who's never even kissed a boy, she's looking for someone with no experience (all the better not to judge her) but who isn't a total loser to have her first time with. She settles on her classmate Kosuda, a shy boy-next-door type; the anime is the story of their relationship.

A sex-comedy, the humor in this series is largely based around the fact that Yamada can't tell the difference between what she thinks she wants and what she actually wants. Because of that, she spends the majority of the series coming on very strong to Kosuda, only to find herself becoming highly embarrassed, uncertain, and anxious when she does so, at which point she immediately retreats from the situation (and usually leaving Kosuda shaken and confused). These situations - Yamada launching some crazy plan to make things get raunchy, and then sputtering out when it actually begins to work - are the core of the show's hijinks.

What makes the series work isn't just the plausible nature of Yamada's cognitive dissonance, however, but also the fact that the relationship between her and Kosuda evolves in a believable manner. By the middle of the series, Yamada has started developing real feelings for Kosuda, though she doesn't realize it. This causes her actions towards him to change, becoming less aggressive as she grows more excited, and thus more embarrassed, at the thought of them doing it; though this also makes her more morose when he doesn't make a move, and highly jealous when other girls look at him.

Yamada's First Time is a very good comedy series, but it's not without its flaws. The major strike against the show is that it's too short. Usually when people complain that "this show was too short" that's a thinly-veiled compliment that it left them wanting to see more, but that's not the case here; the series' brevity actually works against it.

The main reason for that is that the show is three-fourths over when it suddenly starts to bring the supporting cast members out of the proverbial dugout. Prior to that, they were largely background that did little besides acting as foils for the two main characters. It's only in the last fourth of the show that they start getting actively involved in the goings-on. This works to the show's advantage, since it has several of them act in the same "leap before you look" manner as Yamada. Given that Yamada's zaniness was enough to drive the show by itself up to that point, having, in effect, several Yamadas bouncing off of each other ups the ante considerably...and then the show suddenly concludes. It's highly frustrating, since the series reveals that it's fully capable of reaching new heights just before it signs off.

My other complaint is less egregious: while only twelve episodes long, the show takes place over a period of twenty-one months. That's rather awkward, particularly since the time-skips tends to occur in the middle of the series (e.g. a Christmas episode, followed by Valentine's Day episode, followed by a spring school trip episode, etc.). Given that this is the point in the series where Yamada and Kosuda are trying to figure out how to advance their relationship - or what sort of relationship they have to begin with - this leads to the awkward conclusion that there are periods of weeks, or even months, where they were essentially in limbo regarding each other.

There's also a slight tonal shift that occurs just as the series ends. Despite its nature as a sex-comedy, the former is always presented in service of the latter - this is a show that's meant to amuse, rather than arouse. Don't expect to see any fan-service here, besides the occasional flash of cleavage or thighs. By the end of the series, however, the two of them have gotten far enough along that things start to become genuinely naughty, to the point that

Spoiler:
in the last episode, we get multiple scenes of Yamada bare-breasted, with no censoring.

Overall, this was a very good slice-of-life comedy. Never taking itself too seriously, but knowing better than to go completely over the top, Yamada's First Time is awkward for her, but a great deal of fun for the rest of us.


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Brian E. Harris wrote:

Great review.

I'd love to see you review one of the later books, and see how much your suspicion holds true.

Thanks! I currently have the second book, but beyond that I'm not sure if I'm going to continue with the series (if only because it's apparently up to thirty-three books now; that's quite a lot!).


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Rynjin wrote:
Is it? Last I heard there was already another season ordered.

My understanding is that Jensen tweeted that there was going to be an eleventh season, but there hadn't been any official confirmation yet.


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Tarnsman of Gor by John Norman (Published 1966)

I dislike forming opinions about things based solely on second- and third-hand information. Far better, to my mind, to actually sit down and engage with a thing directly; that's a large part of the difference between an opinion and an informed opinion.

It was with that thought in mind that I ordered an old copy of Tarnsman of Gor off of Amazon. I'd heard about Gor (and things "Gorean") for years, but this was the first time I'd gone straight to the source. (As a quick aside, it seems silly to warn about spoilers for a book that's almost fifty years old, but I'll do so anyway for those who care: spoilers ahead.)

For those who don't know, a quick primer: the Gor books tell the tale of a sister planet to Earth, in the same orbital plane as us but on the opposite side of the Sun, where the mysterious "Priest-Kings" have been clandestinely bringing humans to live for millenia. The most popular (or perhaps infamous) aspect of Gor, however, is its slave culture, particularly where female pleasure slaves are concerned.

My expectations for the book were mixed. I knew that the series as a whole was famous for its focus on female sex slaves; but I'd also heard that the first half-dozen or so books were much more muted in that regard, serving instead as thin veneers for the author's own thoughts on society.

What I found was that neither of those descriptions were entirely true. Rather, Tarnsman of Gor is a rather standard sword-and-planet adventure. It proceeds to tell the (slightly convoluted, but fairly standard) tale of an Earthman named Tarl Cabot, brought from Earth to Gor, where he has an adventure that sees him helping to destabilize the existing power structure among Gor's city-states, while at the same time meeting and falling in love with a beautiful woman.

What struck me most about the writing (which is entirely in the first person) was the sense of distance that the author's tone conveys. Tarl tends to describe things in a very straightforward, almost clinical manner. Even when overcome with emotion, he rarely focuses on how he's feeling, instead talking about what it drives him to do.

I'm uncertain if this tonal presentation is purposeful on the author's part. While it's easy to simply chalk this up to John Norman not being a very good writer, I hesitate to do so for two reasons: the first being that narrator, Tarl Cabot, is British born and raised. While he expresses some disdain for his homeland in the beginning of the book, it's amusing to think that his detached tone is due to his having internalized the whole "stiff upper lip" mantra.

More germane, however, is the explanation given in the epilogue. While several first-person perspective novels never bother to explain why they're being presented that way, Tarnsman of Gor explicitly states that Tarl's writing all this down six years after the fact - presumably the distance he feels from those events is affecting how he writes about them.

What's not notable - at least not as much as I think new readers (who've heard of the series) might expect - is the focus on female slaves.

Simply put, slave-girls aren't important to the overall plot of the book. Indeed, Tarl notes his disgust at how slavery is an integral part of the cultures of Gor, to the point of silently swearing to himself that he'll bring the entire institution of slavery down. While he doesn't have a chance to act on this during events of the story, he does free the first slave-girl he's given (who has been instructed to perform a suicide mission in order to help him achieve his own task, which horrifies Tarl).

The area of the book where slavery and sexual politics are highlighted the most are with regard to its main female character, Talena. The daughter of the ruler of the city-state of Ar, Talena is abducted by Tarl when she interferes with his mission to steal the "home stone" (essentially the flag) of Ar.

From the first, she seems to be a completely formulaic character. She starts off as a b*+&+y, pampered princess, who grows closer to Tarl as they travel together, until she inevitably falls for him and, upon doing so, begs for him to formally enslave her. Rather ironically, she's kidnapped before he can, and by the time he rescues her at the end of the book, he ends up taking her to be his "free companion" - that is, his spouse - instead.

I said "seems to be" in the above paragraph because there's a more subtle aspect to Talena's character - and here, I do think that this was done purposefully on John Norman's part: her antagonism towards Tarl is in direct proportion to the degree that he breaks from the cultural expectations she has for him. Literally, the more he acts the way she expects a "tarnsman" (a warrior-raider that rides a giant, ill-tempered tarn bird) to act, the more warmly she treats him.

Specifically, she explains her original antagonism as being not due to his having stolen Ar's home stone (which destabilizes the city and drives her father from power), but because he didn't do what tarnsmen traditionally do when they kidnap a noblewoman from another city-state: strip her naked right there on the back of their bird and toss her clothes to the city streets below (in a gesture of "this is what I do to one of the revered daughters of your city!"). Tarl had no idea that was the custom, but by failing to perform it, Talena interpreted it as the act of a coward - someone with a "get in, do the job, and get out" mentality, rather than showcasing the boldness that tarn-riders are supposed to exhibit.

Likewise, as they journey together, they both take on disguises to protect themselves from other raiders. Since this necessitates that Talena appear to be a slave-girl, Tarl is forced to treat her like one. It's no coincidence that this is the period when she starts to become amorous towards him, since now they're acting a role that's in accordance with her understanding of how things should be progressing. He's finally, in other words, acting like a man she can respect, despite (or perhaps because of) his being her enemy.

While my suspicion is that later books eschew this level of subtlety in favor of the more blase "she's happier because she's a slave now; that's how all women are" idea, taken unto itself Tarnsman of Gor's main idea seems to be less about the peculiarities of a slave-owning culture, than it is about the idea of a stranger trying to navigate a foreign culture's values. Much of the book is about Tarl either stumbling through Gorean customs that he is (mostly) unaware of, or attempting to turn those customs to his advantage.

Ultimately, Tarnsman of Gor is a fairly straightforward sword-and-planet adventure, with little to distinguish it from its better-known fellows in the genre (at least unto itself). It's largely unconcerned with slavery, except as a vehicle for pushing the idea of "when in Rome" as well as the romance between Tarl and Talena. Had the series not eventually decided to make that background element into the primary focus of the series, I'm not sure how much Gor would even be remembered today (for better or worse). As it is, I can recommend Tarnsman of Gor only to those who would be interested in a fairly average sword-and-planet tale, or are otherwise curious about the beginnings of this infamous series.


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The answer to this one is "no." Neither the 2E to 3E transition, or the 3E to 3.5E transition, had any sort of "Realms-shaking event" happen.

Now, there were still things going on, some of them shaping events in a very big way, such as the return of Bane or the appearance of the Shade enclave, but nothing that'd affect the reality of the world enough to justify a change in the basics of how things worked (e.g. the game rules).


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I so love this time of year. :D

Bundle 3 for me!


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Hama wrote:
Salvation was pretty decent.

Salvation would have been better, in my opinion, if they'd stuck to the original script, rather than what we got at the end.

That said, I thought Terminator 3 was a great movie. Not a "classic," per se, but a lot of fun and with some very cool ideas.


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Krensky wrote:
Ad hominens, victim blaming, kooky conspiracy theories...

Ironically, both of your posts so far have been ad hominems, have ignored the fact that I explicitly said what happened to Felicia Day wasn't her fault, and the fact that the "conspiracy theories" are demonstrably true (or are you saying that gaming journalists mailing list doesn't exist, and that no "gamers are dead" stories were written?).

Quote:
Could you use Social Justice Warrior and Victim Olympics in a sentence so I can fill out my bingo card?

Once again, you complain that it's not an "intelligent discussion" while actively threadcrapping. So you're about at par for an anti-GamerGater.


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Krensky wrote:
You like to redefine words to make having an intelligent discussion with you difficult, don't you?

This post makes it clear that you have no idea what constitutes an "intelligent discussion."

Mephron wrote:

Ask Felicia Day how much of a hate group that the GamerGaters are.

Hint: 30 minutes from "I'm afraid of their actions" to them actually taking those actions is not a good sign.

Full disclosure: my twitter account is on their ban list.

Felicia's piece was about her being afraid of what *might* happen - telling trolls on the internet that you're afraid of them attacking you makes it unsurprising that they then turn around and do so. Tragic, to be sure, and in no way whatsoever Felicia's fault, but unsurprising.

Other than the fact that she conflates "GamerGate" with "misogynists," this has no ties to GamerGate at all - particularly since whomever doxxed her was anonymous about it, making the very idea that GamerGate did that to her an unsupported claim (particularly in light of anti-GamerGaters doxxing Gamergate supporters) - and that's likely due to her having mistaken them for being a harassment campaign to begin with (which is understandable, given that the video game journalists took over that message almost immediately and with great coordination, e.g. the "gamers are dead" stories).


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Scott Betts wrote:
I very much doubt Paizo would ever put themselves in a position where they would be left open to that kind of threat. This isn't the sort of product they would host on their site to begin with.

It's exactly the sort of product that they would host on their site to begin with, right alongside the Hentacle card games (by the same designer), the aforementioned Carcosa and Choice and Blood, etc.

thejeff wrote:
My suspicion, based on knowing little more about the game than you wrote, is that they wouldn't have hosted it in the first place.

My suspicion is that your suspicion is wrong; see above.

That said, I'm not at all clear on how what I wrote would convince you that this was something Paizo wouldn't host, since I didn't talk about the actual content, mechanics, or artwork in the game itself. I included a link to where it's currently being sold - if you take a look at the examples, you'll see it's thoroughly benign.


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For those that haven't heard, James "Grim" Desborough published a GamerGate card game via his publishing company, Postmortem Studios, which went up on various OneBookShelf sites (e.g. RPGNow and DriveThruRPG) on December 4th. (Note that, while Postmortem has a Paizo outlet, the game has apparently not been uploaded here.)

Very shortly after it was uploaded, the guys at Evil Hat Games started threatening to pull their products from OBS unless the GamerGate card game was dropped.

Rather saddeningly, the game went down almost immediately. While Grim eventually put it up for sale elsewhere, it's still upsetting that this happened at all. Somewhat hopefully, the line from OBS is that internal discussion is still going on over this. They seem to be fairly open to input as well.

Now, I'll be the first to admit that I think that Grim courts controversy, often in a manner that could charitably described as lacking nuance. That said, I find it to be beyond disgusting that Evil Hat Games thinks that they can try to coerce a vendor into removing products that they personally don't like.

Apparently they're also fine that people can buy books such as F@$* for Satan, Choice and Blood (which can be summed up as "d20 Modern: Abortion"), and the infamous Carcosa, but a card game that leans in support of GamerGate? That's apparently a bridge too far.

A few caveats here:

I'm a supporter of GamerGate, having read more than a few articles about both the movement itself and what it means when viewed against a broader cultural context. Simply put, it doesn't live up to the "harassment campaign" that its detractors have labeled it as. I mention this because I'm guessing that some people will respond with something along the lines of "it's not wrong to take a stand against something that glorifies a hate group." That stance is based on a fundamentally incorrect premise; namely that GamerGate is a hate group to begin with.

Secondly, I'm anticipating that some people will respond with "Evil Hat has the right to determine where they sell their games." That's true, but questions of "rights" are questions of legality, not ethics. You have the legal right to ignore someone who's injured and needs help, but doing so is ethically corrupt.

While (what I call) a "personal boycott" is simply choosing whether or not you want to patronize a given business or outlet, that's different from what Evil Hat is doing, which is an "organized boycott" (again, my term). An organized boycott is a public pressure group that's designed to use the threat of economic harm in order to use coercion against a business or other entity in order to make them comply with your demands. As the ACLU states:

Quote:
In contrast, when private individuals or groups organize boycotts against stores that sell magazines of which they disapprove, their actions are protected by the First Amendment, although they can become dangerous in the extreme. Private pressure groups, not the government, promulgated and enforced the infamous Hollywood blacklists during the McCarthy period. But these private censorship campaigns are best countered by groups and individuals speaking out and organizing in defense of the threatened expression.

So I think that what Evil Hat is doing is founded not only on a fundamentally misdirected sense of outrage, but is ethically corrupt as well.

If the GamerGate card game had been hosted at Paizo, I wonder if they would have received the same threat (and I wonder how they would have responded).


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Vincent Takeda wrote:
Quite liked it actually. I wont even qualify my 'optimistic' with a 'cautiously'

That sums it up for me. I'm glad they're moving away from the whole "okay, let's focus on the future war itself" that they did in Terminator: Salvation.

The idea of this being the events of the original Terminator, but something's gone wrong, is awesome!


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VrisKCa wrote:
Second: How would you guys feel about me making a tumblr blog for RPG character posts, sketches, WIP's, and updates? I'd also livestream occasionally. tell me what you think :P

Sounds like a very cool idea! You should go for it.


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Sorcerer Bloodlines, please!


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Alzrius wrote:
VrisKCa wrote:
Alzrius wrote:

I'm glad I'm not the only one asking for a Pony character.

In my case, it's my character Lex Legis:

** spoiler omitted **

Done!

This is my first time ever drawing one of those MLP ponies. I hope he looks enough like the ones in the show.

Lex Legis - Colored Sketch

Awesome! Thanks so much, V!

I'm definitely going to repost this up on my blog later (if you don't mind).

And the promised blog post is up!

Thanks again, KC, and I hope this draws some more eyes to your thread!


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VrisKCa wrote:
Alzrius wrote:

I'm glad I'm not the only one asking for a Pony character.

In my case, it's my character Lex Legis:

** spoiler omitted **

Done!

This is my first time ever drawing one of those MLP ponies. I hope he looks enough like the ones in the show.

Lex Legis - Colored Sketch

Awesome! Thanks so much, V!

I'm definitely going to repost this up on my blog later (if you don't mind).


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

I'm glad I'm not the only one asking for a Pony character.

In my case, it's my character Lex Legis:

Spoiler:
Lex is a unicorn pony, with his coloration being light grey. His mane and tail are both dark brown, with his eyes being a slightly lighter shade of brown.

While the base of his horn is the same color as his skin, the rest of it is a bright, blood red, with the change in color being abrupt (due to that horn being a graft). He also wears a plain, silver circlet on his head. Like most ponies, he doesn't wear clothes, but does keep a few small bags (filled with gemstones, as spellcasting aides) slung across his back.

His cutie mark - that is, the tattoo on each flank - is of a podium in front of an amphitheater.

He's fairly dour, more prone to scowling than smiling.


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Paths of Power has magic that's based around "paths" - which are clerical domain-like progressions of a small suite of individual spells.

Basically, you start off with a smattering of paths, and can gather more over time, though the book's default setting is that you won't gain very many over time. Each path is roughly equivalent to a feat.

The initial book, linked to above, is free - the expansion is a pay-for product.

Of course, there's also the combined book (in hardcover and softcover), if you want them both at once (and these have a bonus - a listing of all the new spells in the books on traditional spell lists!).


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A few more about magic items:

Enhancement bonuses can defeat material- and alignment-based damage reduction. According to a table that's found only in the Glossary of the Core Rulebook (under the "Damage Reduction" entry, larger enhancement bonuses can overcome DR as per cold iron/silver (+3), adamantine (+4; but does not overcome hardness), and any alignment (+5).

Enhancing a double weapon requires each end to be enchanted separately. So when enhancing that quarterstaff, you'll need to pay double for it to be a +1/+1 item.

Enhancement bonuses on ranged weapons and ammunition don't stack, but (most) special abilities do. Many of the magic weapon abilities for ranged weapons have a notation saying that they bestow that property on ammunition that they fire. Given that this is bestowed, it's not subject to the total +10 limitation that a magic weapon can have.

So if you have a +5 holy longbow of speed, and you fire a +1 thundering shocking burst flaming burst bane (outsiders) arrow at an enemy, it's going to be a +5 holy thundering shocking burst flaming burst bane (outsiders) arrow, which has an effective bonus of +13!


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Muh freedoms.


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Gorbacz wrote:
Dragon Rider

What about ninja dragon riders? They can strike back at that accursed Chibi-chan!


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Kolokotroni wrote:
I firmly believe there is room for both Team KISS and Team MOAR in pathfinder. We just gotta figure out how to do it. Maybe it wont be a happy marriage, but we can be casual roomates, cant we?

Clearly, the way for Team KISS and Team MOAR to go from being just roomies to being happily married is to have moar kissing going on.

...what were we originally talking about again?


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Christina Stiles wrote:
Alzrius wrote:

Or you could try the excellent d20-based supplement that does this.

Didn't Mutants and Masterminds essentially do this?

If you mean make a point-buy system that's built on the d20 engine, then yes - I'm a huge fan of Eclipse, but it was by no means the first book to attempt to make a point-buy d20 System book (for that matter, neither was Mutants & Masterminds).

That said, I'm of the opinion that Eclipse did it much better. For one thing, it's entirely compatible, instead of being somewhat compatible (since Eclipse isn't meant to be a complete RPG on its own) the way M&M is (e.g. there are no hit points in M&M). Also - and this didn't get mentioned in End's review - Eclipse allows for greater flexibility with what's there, so that you can modify literally everything in the book to function as you need it to.

This is done via a system of introducing a weakness into a particular mechanic, and in return receiving either a price-break, or enhancing the mechanic in some other regard. Of course, the nature (and overall worth) of that weakness, is something that the player and GM will need to agree to, but that's part and parcel of any point-buy system (and, to my mind, is part of the larger social contract inherent between players and the GM in a role-playing game).

It helps that some of those weaknesses are fairly easy to agree upon in the first place. For example, if you want to buy some BAB as a back-up measure (e.g. you're playing a wizard-type character) and don't care about iterative attacks, that's "corruption" (a lesser weakness), and so reduces the cost by one-third, so that each point of BAB costs 4 Character Points instead of 6 (alternately, you could count each point of BAB as +1.5 per 6 CP spent, though that's rarer). So now you don't get iterative attacks from BAB, regardless of how high your attack bonus is, but can spend those extra Character Points elsewhere.


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Tarantula wrote:
Otherwhere wrote:
I'd love for Pathfinder to evolve to the point where they say: "Here - take these and run with them! Create your own "classes", using these as templates, "buy" feats and abilities that fit your character concept, but (and here's the tricky part) in a manner that is balanced so that everyone, Player and GM alike, can have fun!" This is what I am waiting for - the freedom to take all these pieces and play them in a system designed to use them.
So GURPS then?

Or you could try the excellent d20-based supplement that does this.


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So I was looking over the list of Paizo employees and their job titles, and I noticed that there are several developers alongside a few designers.

I'm curious what the difference is between the two jobs? It sounds like the designers are responsible for creating new materials, and the developers are responsible for shepherding these ideas to (greater) completion, but is that correct? Or are they something else altogether?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
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Chris Lambertz wrote:
Removed some more posts. Guys, we asked you to please not derail this thread. If you want to have a discussion about real life gender issues, there are plenty of ongoing threads for this purpose.

For everyone's convenience, when deleting posts because there are "other threads about that," would you mind posting links to those threads so that people know where they should go?


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Happy belated birthday!


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Rysky wrote:
Alzrius wrote:
Mikaze wrote:
Rysky wrote:
@ Alzrius This it?
That's some excellent Google-fu right there. :)
Holy crap, that's it! I'm amazed you found that! Your Google-fu is stronger than mine!
Only when art is involved :3

On a minor note, the piece linked to above (which still awes me) has moved slightly, and can now be found over here.


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Nathanael Love wrote:
Keep in mind though-- in 3.5 there are no core races with a +2 to Intelligence.

That depends on how you define "core races."

If you mean "in the PHB," then you're right. If, however, you mean, "in the PHB, DMG, or MM," then that's not the case. The gray elf sub-race has a +2 to Intelligence, -2 to Strength as their racial ability score adjustments.


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"What's wrong? Don't you want to be inside me?"

- Jacob Kell, Highlander: Endgame

A line guaranteed to make the other guy uncomfortable!


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Guy St-Amant wrote:
Alzrius wrote:
Guy St-Amant wrote:
Alzrius wrote:

Honestly, the whole "getting off-topic" reason for locking threads has always struck me as being incredibly poor.

Conversations, by their very nature, are fluid; topics change organically as people talk, and that's not a bad thing. I've been the OP in threads where the nature of the discussion has changed, and I've been a part of that change, only to suddenly find the thread locked for getting away from the original topic - it's frustrating, and unnecessary.

I honestly wish the mods here would stop doing that, or at least tone it back.

There are differences between evolving naturally and intended thread derailment (even if the derailment can be made in subtle manners).
When someone is intentionally derailing a thread, that's cause for removing their posts - locking the entire thread because of that is just giving the derailers what they want (e.g. the original topic is no longer being discussed).
There are two types here; one person derailing someone else thread, and someone trying to make a "false front" topic (basically, title and opening post are about something, but the thread creator quickly change subject). Also take into account how early in the thread the derailment occurs.

You're artificially conflating these two. If one person is intentionally derailing a thread, then just remove the derailing post instead of giving them their wish and locking the entire thread.

If the thread creator changes the topic of the thread that they started, that's just another aspect of "the thread topic changes course organically over time" - it's certainly no reason to shut the entire thread down.


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Guy St-Amant wrote:
Alzrius wrote:

Honestly, the whole "getting off-topic" reason for locking threads has always struck me as being incredibly poor.

Conversations, by their very nature, are fluid; topics change organically as people talk, and that's not a bad thing. I've been the OP in threads where the nature of the discussion has changed, and I've been a part of that change, only to suddenly find the thread locked for getting away from the original topic - it's frustrating, and unnecessary.

I honestly wish the mods here would stop doing that, or at least tone it back.

There are differences between evolving naturally and intended thread derailment (even if the derailment can be made in subtle manners).

When someone is intentionally derailing a thread, that's cause for removing their posts - locking the entire thread because of that is just giving the derailers what they want (e.g. the original topic is no longer being discussed).


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Honestly, the whole "getting off-topic" reason for locking threads has always struck me as being incredibly poor.

Conversations, by their very nature, are fluid; topics change organically as people talk, and that's not a bad thing. I've been the OP in threads where the nature of the discussion has changed, and I've been a part of that change, only to suddenly find the thread locked for getting away from the original topic - it's frustrating, and unnecessary.

I honestly wish the mods here would stop doing that, or at least tone it back.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
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The Fiend Fantastic wrote:

What if we gave the succubus a delicious icecream?

Nudge nudge

I'd prefer succubi with cake; optimally, with her inside of one.

...of course, being Chaotic Evil, the cake would be a lie.


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Umbral Reaver wrote:
For my next game, players will only be allowed to be catgirls.

I'd also like my next group of players to be catgirls - though I don't really care what sort of characters they'd make.


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OldSkoolRPG wrote:

Another interesting discussion has been taking place in another thread on whether you can force someone that you have grappled to stand up from prone.

So in the context of this thread the question would be if a succubus has been knocked down and is prone and I have successfully grappled her can I then knock her up?

Clearly you'll need to try many, many times in order to find out for certain.


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From an excellent essay on the topic:

Quote:
Well known chaotic evil characters from film or literature include: Gollum (Lord of the Rings), The Joker (DC Comics), Lord Voldemort (Harry Potter), and Lore (Star Trek).


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CrimsonVixen wrote:
It says in the Demons Revisited book, that Succubi don't actually have a gender being Outsiders. They take forms to suit their purposes and desires at will. But yes, some of us ladies would not say no to play-testing the grapple rules with a Succubus.

Wait, being an Outsider means that a creature has no gender? As in, no sense of gender identity (presuming they didn't mean to go with the technically-incorrect-but-more-widely-used definition of "naturally has no ability to procreate")?


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MMCJawa wrote:

Cats and hyenas are more closely related to each other than either are too dogs, but it still really isn't accurate to refer to them as cats

With similar logic, if you are going to call hyenas cats, than you should also be referring to walruses, seals, bears, and skunks as dogs, since all of those are in Caniformia.

...and trying to cross-breed them is what's known as Canifornication.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:

Piffle. This is conservative fantasy revisionism at its worst. Prior to the Resurrection, humans did not organize themselves into communities. Compassion did not exist before the Christians discovered it. Riiiiiight.

Every belief system, atheism included, recognizes the value of community, charity, and compassion, because humans are social animals.

This is worth underlining. Reciprocal altruism has existed since we were apes, and can still be observed among many primates today - it's simply a mechanism to increase survival via strengthening group dynamics.


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The Fiend Fantastic wrote:

Come to think of it, wouldn't this qualify for Golarion geographic?

They're always searching for new stuff to show the masses.

I hear that some succubi like it when the masses watch.


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xavier c wrote:
Orfamay Quest wrote:
Wiggz wrote:
I'm trying to learn what, if anything, that I'm not considering.

On the one hand, I think you're underestimating what "legal convenience" actually amounts to. It has been estimate that there are something like 2000 individual legal rights that accompany a legal (heterosexual) marriage by default, many of them traditions (like spousal testimonial privilege) that date back to common law and that may not have been formalized into statute, depending upon where you live. If you assume that each right requires one document to formalize, and each document, in turn, requires an hour to prepare, that's a full-time job for a lawyer for a year to draw up an equivalent of marriage..... and then you have the risk that there were actually 2001 rights, and he through ignorance, mischance, or error missed one.

There is also an issue is that many of the privileges attendant upon marriage are in fact policy decisions that depend upon a third party. Insurance companies, for example, don't generally have a choice about whether or not to cover a legal spouse, but they can and do play games about unmarried partners (see pH unbalanced's comments above). The middle of a medical crisis is not a time to have to worry about legal and financial ones as well.

On the other side,.... religion. Nothing brings out the crazy obstructionism like religion.

You know there are progressive christians and gay christians

gaychurch.org or gaychristian.net are some gay christian websites

And there are LGBT affirming denominations like

Ecumenical Catholic Church

Metropolitan Community Church

Old Catholic Church

Quakers

The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Don't forget the Dudeists, man! As an ordained minister, I can say that we, like, totally abide the whole same-sex marriage thing; weddings serve a lot of white russians.


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Arikiel wrote:
Zhayne wrote:
Arikiel wrote:

I don't.

Once you set the animal-people precedent then you have to start allowing squirrel-people, and giraffe-people, and aardvark-people, etc. While magic can be used to take on such forms they just don't exist as species in my world.

Your logical fallacy is: Slippery Slope.

True but the only way to avoid going down that slope is to arbitrarily limit it to only "cool" animals.

Which doesn't really make any sense.

It's not arbitrary if you posit that many of these races were created by meddling wizards and interventionist deities.

God of Awesome: I'm going to create some cat-people, it'll create a cool contrast to the minotaurs and lizardfolk that the world has.

God of Nerds: But that'sh totally illogical! You can't jusht arbitrarily create new raches bashed on shome animalsh and not oth-AAGH!

*God of Awesome uses Wedgie on God of Nerds! It's super effective!*


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TheAntiElite wrote:

That was stronger than old cheese.

Second greatest 'gag dub' series ever!

I'm normally disdainful of dubs, preferring subtitles, but what they did for that show was epic to listen to (particularly the opening and ending themes).

Hence why I referenced that instead of being a psionic cat-lady who hides her powers from the rest of her crewmates. I suspect that that would have resulted in a great deal of Righteous Indignation.


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Because I want to play a samurai that makes pizza, and since that's already two-thirds of the way there...

(A free internet to anyone who gets the reference!)


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thejeff wrote:

Thing is, this is how it happens. It's what's happening now in the videogame industry. It doesn't just happen. There's lots of pressure and complaints and accusations and maybe even boycotts and backlash and eventually you get tokens and everybody complains about that and then eventually things change enough that it's not unusual and the former unrepresented minority can just happen to be in a movie without a big deal being made out of it.

But you don't get there without the fight.

Your "this" in "this is how it happens" seems to refer to the fight itself, which I agree with. Raising the issue to a large enough degree tends to shake off ennui and galvanize those who are inclined to act.

However, this doesn't necessarily correlate to the ideas of either side that are fighting. In this case that includes the idea that the principles of social justice - as a positive duty, which means that any instance of failing to apply them is therefore an instance of immorality, which can thusly be attacked on moral grounds - be applied to art, fiction, and media, which is what the "social justice warriors" are fighting for.


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RJGrady wrote:
Social justice is, broadly speaking, correct. And so Social Justice Warriors are, broadly speaking, on the right side.

This statement seems to ignore the distinction I was making in my prior posts. The philosophy of social justice - applied to the realms of legal, workplace, and social situations - is one that I would indeed classify as (morally) correct. "Social justice warriors," by contrast, are those who feel that it should also be applied to art, fiction, and media, which I think has legitimate points of critique.


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thejeff wrote:

Except quite often, especially when it comes to a marginalized social group, they do collectively ignore the supererogatory duties. Black representation in movies before the 70s. Gay representation before the 90s.

I'm sure you can find individual exceptions (and I'm handwaving the dates) but the general pattern is strong.

Except that the patterns are broken, by rising tides of supererogatory actions; hence why representation began after the general dates you cited. That can be taken as this system of moral philosophy tending (using history as an example) to self-correct for this problem over time, on a macro scale.

Which is good, because otherwise I'm not sure what the practical solution would be - if you admit that nothing immoral is taking place on an individual level, it's hard to mandate a solution.


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LazarX wrote:
It's not much... it's a question whether or not there is a SINGLE scene in a movie where two women talk to each other, and it's not about a man.

Forgive the nitpicking, but the requirement is actually that two named female characters talk to each other about something other than a man. The caveat that they be more than nameless background characters tends to be overlooked a lot when the guidelines of the Test are relayed.

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