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Alzrius's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 1,593 posts. 72 reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist.


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I'm glad I'm not the only one asking for a Pony character.

In my case, it's my character Lex Legis:

Spoiler:
Lex is a unicorn pony, with his coloration being light grey. His mane and tail are both dark brown, with his eyes being a slightly lighter shade of brown.

While the base of his horn is the same color as his skin, the rest of it is a bright, blood red, with the change in color being abrupt (due to that horn being a graft). He also wears a plain, silver circlet on his head. Like most ponies, he doesn't wear clothes, but does keep a few small bags (filled with gemstones, as spellcasting aides) slung across his back.

His cutie mark - that is, the tattoo on each flank - is of a podium in front of an amphitheater.

He's fairly dour, more prone to scowling than smiling.


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Paths of Power has magic that's based around "paths" - which are clerical domain-like progressions of a small suite of individual spells.

Basically, you start off with a smattering of paths, and can gather more over time, though the book's default setting is that you won't gain very many over time. Each path is roughly equivalent to a feat.

The initial book, linked to above, is free - the expansion is a pay-for product.

Of course, there's also the combined book (in hardcover and softcover), if you want them both at once (and these have a bonus - a listing of all the new spells in the books on traditional spell lists!).


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A few more about magic items:

Enhancement bonuses can defeat material- and alignment-based damage reduction. According to a table that's found only in the Glossary of the Core Rulebook (under the "Damage Reduction" entry, larger enhancement bonuses can overcome DR as per cold iron/silver (+3), adamantine (+4; but does not overcome hardness), and any alignment (+5).

Enhancing a double weapon requires each end to be enchanted separately. So when enhancing that quarterstaff, you'll need to pay double for it to be a +1/+1 item.

Enhancement bonuses on ranged weapons and ammunition don't stack, but (most) special abilities do. Many of the magic weapon abilities for ranged weapons have a notation saying that they bestow that property on ammunition that they fire. Given that this is bestowed, it's not subject to the total +10 limitation that a magic weapon can have.

So if you have a +5 holy longbow of speed, and you fire a +1 thundering shocking burst flaming burst bane (outsiders) arrow at an enemy, it's going to be a +5 holy thundering shocking burst flaming burst bane (outsiders) arrow, which has an effective bonus of +13!


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Muh freedoms.


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Gorbacz wrote:
Dragon Rider

What about ninja dragon riders? They can strike back at that accursed Chibi-chan!


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Kolokotroni wrote:
I firmly believe there is room for both Team KISS and Team MOAR in pathfinder. We just gotta figure out how to do it. Maybe it wont be a happy marriage, but we can be casual roomates, cant we?

Clearly, the way for Team KISS and Team MOAR to go from being just roomies to being happily married is to have moar kissing going on.

...what were we originally talking about again?


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Christina Stiles wrote:
Alzrius wrote:

Or you could try the excellent d20-based supplement that does this.

Didn't Mutants and Masterminds essentially do this?

If you mean make a point-buy system that's built on the d20 engine, then yes - I'm a huge fan of Eclipse, but it was by no means the first book to attempt to make a point-buy d20 System book (for that matter, neither was Mutants & Masterminds).

That said, I'm of the opinion that Eclipse did it much better. For one thing, it's entirely compatible, instead of being somewhat compatible (since Eclipse isn't meant to be a complete RPG on its own) the way M&M is (e.g. there are no hit points in M&M). Also - and this didn't get mentioned in End's review - Eclipse allows for greater flexibility with what's there, so that you can modify literally everything in the book to function as you need it to.

This is done via a system of introducing a weakness into a particular mechanic, and in return receiving either a price-break, or enhancing the mechanic in some other regard. Of course, the nature (and overall worth) of that weakness, is something that the player and GM will need to agree to, but that's part and parcel of any point-buy system (and, to my mind, is part of the larger social contract inherent between players and the GM in a role-playing game).

It helps that some of those weaknesses are fairly easy to agree upon in the first place. For example, if you want to buy some BAB as a back-up measure (e.g. you're playing a wizard-type character) and don't care about iterative attacks, that's "corruption" (a lesser weakness), and so reduces the cost by one-third, so that each point of BAB costs 4 Character Points instead of 6 (alternately, you could count each point of BAB as +1.5 per 6 CP spent, though that's rarer). So now you don't get iterative attacks from BAB, regardless of how high your attack bonus is, but can spend those extra Character Points elsewhere.


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Tarantula wrote:
Otherwhere wrote:
I'd love for Pathfinder to evolve to the point where they say: "Here - take these and run with them! Create your own "classes", using these as templates, "buy" feats and abilities that fit your character concept, but (and here's the tricky part) in a manner that is balanced so that everyone, Player and GM alike, can have fun!" This is what I am waiting for - the freedom to take all these pieces and play them in a system designed to use them.
So GURPS then?

Or you could try the excellent d20-based supplement that does this.


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So I was looking over the list of Paizo employees and their job titles, and I noticed that there are several developers alongside a few designers.

I'm curious what the difference is between the two jobs? It sounds like the designers are responsible for creating new materials, and the developers are responsible for shepherding these ideas to (greater) completion, but is that correct? Or are they something else altogether?


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Chris Lambertz wrote:
Removed some more posts. Guys, we asked you to please not derail this thread. If you want to have a discussion about real life gender issues, there are plenty of ongoing threads for this purpose.

For everyone's convenience, when deleting posts because there are "other threads about that," would you mind posting links to those threads so that people know where they should go?


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Happy belated birthday!


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Rysky wrote:
Alzrius wrote:
Mikaze wrote:
Rysky wrote:
@ Alzrius This it?
That's some excellent Google-fu right there. :)
Holy crap, that's it! I'm amazed you found that! Your Google-fu is stronger than mine!
Only when art is involved :3

On a minor note, the piece linked to above (which still awes me) has moved slightly, and can now be found over here.


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Nathanael Love wrote:
Keep in mind though-- in 3.5 there are no core races with a +2 to Intelligence.

That depends on how you define "core races."

If you mean "in the PHB," then you're right. If, however, you mean, "in the PHB, DMG, or MM," then that's not the case. The gray elf sub-race has a +2 to Intelligence, -2 to Strength as their racial ability score adjustments.


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"What's wrong? Don't you want to be inside me?"

- Jacob Kell, Highlander: Endgame

A line guaranteed to make the other guy uncomfortable!


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Guy St-Amant wrote:
Alzrius wrote:
Guy St-Amant wrote:
Alzrius wrote:

Honestly, the whole "getting off-topic" reason for locking threads has always struck me as being incredibly poor.

Conversations, by their very nature, are fluid; topics change organically as people talk, and that's not a bad thing. I've been the OP in threads where the nature of the discussion has changed, and I've been a part of that change, only to suddenly find the thread locked for getting away from the original topic - it's frustrating, and unnecessary.

I honestly wish the mods here would stop doing that, or at least tone it back.

There are differences between evolving naturally and intended thread derailment (even if the derailment can be made in subtle manners).
When someone is intentionally derailing a thread, that's cause for removing their posts - locking the entire thread because of that is just giving the derailers what they want (e.g. the original topic is no longer being discussed).
There are two types here; one person derailing someone else thread, and someone trying to make a "false front" topic (basically, title and opening post are about something, but the thread creator quickly change subject). Also take into account how early in the thread the derailment occurs.

You're artificially conflating these two. If one person is intentionally derailing a thread, then just remove the derailing post instead of giving them their wish and locking the entire thread.

If the thread creator changes the topic of the thread that they started, that's just another aspect of "the thread topic changes course organically over time" - it's certainly no reason to shut the entire thread down.


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Guy St-Amant wrote:
Alzrius wrote:

Honestly, the whole "getting off-topic" reason for locking threads has always struck me as being incredibly poor.

Conversations, by their very nature, are fluid; topics change organically as people talk, and that's not a bad thing. I've been the OP in threads where the nature of the discussion has changed, and I've been a part of that change, only to suddenly find the thread locked for getting away from the original topic - it's frustrating, and unnecessary.

I honestly wish the mods here would stop doing that, or at least tone it back.

There are differences between evolving naturally and intended thread derailment (even if the derailment can be made in subtle manners).

When someone is intentionally derailing a thread, that's cause for removing their posts - locking the entire thread because of that is just giving the derailers what they want (e.g. the original topic is no longer being discussed).


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Honestly, the whole "getting off-topic" reason for locking threads has always struck me as being incredibly poor.

Conversations, by their very nature, are fluid; topics change organically as people talk, and that's not a bad thing. I've been the OP in threads where the nature of the discussion has changed, and I've been a part of that change, only to suddenly find the thread locked for getting away from the original topic - it's frustrating, and unnecessary.

I honestly wish the mods here would stop doing that, or at least tone it back.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
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The Fiend Fantastic wrote:

What if we gave the succubus a delicious icecream?

Nudge nudge

I'd prefer succubi with cake; optimally, with her inside of one.

...of course, being Chaotic Evil, the cake would be a lie.


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Umbral Reaver wrote:
For my next game, players will only be allowed to be catgirls.

I'd also like my next group of players to be catgirls - though I don't really care what sort of characters they'd make.


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OldSkoolRPG wrote:

Another interesting discussion has been taking place in another thread on whether you can force someone that you have grappled to stand up from prone.

So in the context of this thread the question would be if a succubus has been knocked down and is prone and I have successfully grappled her can I then knock her up?

Clearly you'll need to try many, many times in order to find out for certain.


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From an excellent essay on the topic:

Quote:
Well known chaotic evil characters from film or literature include: Gollum (Lord of the Rings), The Joker (DC Comics), Lord Voldemort (Harry Potter), and Lore (Star Trek).


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CrimsonVixen wrote:
It says in the Demons Revisited book, that Succubi don't actually have a gender being Outsiders. They take forms to suit their purposes and desires at will. But yes, some of us ladies would not say no to play-testing the grapple rules with a Succubus.

Wait, being an Outsider means that a creature has no gender? As in, no sense of gender identity (presuming they didn't mean to go with the technically-incorrect-but-more-widely-used definition of "naturally has no ability to procreate")?


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MMCJawa wrote:

Cats and hyenas are more closely related to each other than either are too dogs, but it still really isn't accurate to refer to them as cats

With similar logic, if you are going to call hyenas cats, than you should also be referring to walruses, seals, bears, and skunks as dogs, since all of those are in Caniformia.

...and trying to cross-breed them is what's known as Canifornication.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:

Piffle. This is conservative fantasy revisionism at its worst. Prior to the Resurrection, humans did not organize themselves into communities. Compassion did not exist before the Christians discovered it. Riiiiiight.

Every belief system, atheism included, recognizes the value of community, charity, and compassion, because humans are social animals.

This is worth underlining. Reciprocal altruism has existed since we were apes, and can still be observed among many primates today - it's simply a mechanism to increase survival via strengthening group dynamics.


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The Fiend Fantastic wrote:

Come to think of it, wouldn't this qualify for Golarion geographic?

They're always searching for new stuff to show the masses.

I hear that some succubi like it when the masses watch.


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xavier c wrote:
Orfamay Quest wrote:
Wiggz wrote:
I'm trying to learn what, if anything, that I'm not considering.

On the one hand, I think you're underestimating what "legal convenience" actually amounts to. It has been estimate that there are something like 2000 individual legal rights that accompany a legal (heterosexual) marriage by default, many of them traditions (like spousal testimonial privilege) that date back to common law and that may not have been formalized into statute, depending upon where you live. If you assume that each right requires one document to formalize, and each document, in turn, requires an hour to prepare, that's a full-time job for a lawyer for a year to draw up an equivalent of marriage..... and then you have the risk that there were actually 2001 rights, and he through ignorance, mischance, or error missed one.

There is also an issue is that many of the privileges attendant upon marriage are in fact policy decisions that depend upon a third party. Insurance companies, for example, don't generally have a choice about whether or not to cover a legal spouse, but they can and do play games about unmarried partners (see pH unbalanced's comments above). The middle of a medical crisis is not a time to have to worry about legal and financial ones as well.

On the other side,.... religion. Nothing brings out the crazy obstructionism like religion.

You know there are progressive christians and gay christians

gaychurch.org or gaychristian.net are some gay christian websites

And there are LGBT affirming denominations like

Ecumenical Catholic Church

Metropolitan Community Church

Old Catholic Church

Quakers

The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Don't forget the Dudeists, man! As an ordained minister, I can say that we, like, totally abide the whole same-sex marriage thing; weddings serve a lot of white russians.


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Arikiel wrote:
Zhayne wrote:
Arikiel wrote:

I don't.

Once you set the animal-people precedent then you have to start allowing squirrel-people, and giraffe-people, and aardvark-people, etc. While magic can be used to take on such forms they just don't exist as species in my world.

Your logical fallacy is: Slippery Slope.

True but the only way to avoid going down that slope is to arbitrarily limit it to only "cool" animals.

Which doesn't really make any sense.

It's not arbitrary if you posit that many of these races were created by meddling wizards and interventionist deities.

God of Awesome: I'm going to create some cat-people, it'll create a cool contrast to the minotaurs and lizardfolk that the world has.

God of Nerds: But that'sh totally illogical! You can't jusht arbitrarily create new raches bashed on shome animalsh and not oth-AAGH!

*God of Awesome uses Wedgie on God of Nerds! It's super effective!*


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TheAntiElite wrote:

That was stronger than old cheese.

Second greatest 'gag dub' series ever!

I'm normally disdainful of dubs, preferring subtitles, but what they did for that show was epic to listen to (particularly the opening and ending themes).

Hence why I referenced that instead of being a psionic cat-lady who hides her powers from the rest of her crewmates. I suspect that that would have resulted in a great deal of Righteous Indignation.


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Because I want to play a samurai that makes pizza, and since that's already two-thirds of the way there...

(A free internet to anyone who gets the reference!)


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thejeff wrote:

Thing is, this is how it happens. It's what's happening now in the videogame industry. It doesn't just happen. There's lots of pressure and complaints and accusations and maybe even boycotts and backlash and eventually you get tokens and everybody complains about that and then eventually things change enough that it's not unusual and the former unrepresented minority can just happen to be in a movie without a big deal being made out of it.

But you don't get there without the fight.

Your "this" in "this is how it happens" seems to refer to the fight itself, which I agree with. Raising the issue to a large enough degree tends to shake off ennui and galvanize those who are inclined to act.

However, this doesn't necessarily correlate to the ideas of either side that are fighting. In this case that includes the idea that the principles of social justice - as a positive duty, which means that any instance of failing to apply them is therefore an instance of immorality, which can thusly be attacked on moral grounds - be applied to art, fiction, and media, which is what the "social justice warriors" are fighting for.


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RJGrady wrote:
Social justice is, broadly speaking, correct. And so Social Justice Warriors are, broadly speaking, on the right side.

This statement seems to ignore the distinction I was making in my prior posts. The philosophy of social justice - applied to the realms of legal, workplace, and social situations - is one that I would indeed classify as (morally) correct. "Social justice warriors," by contrast, are those who feel that it should also be applied to art, fiction, and media, which I think has legitimate points of critique.


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thejeff wrote:

Except quite often, especially when it comes to a marginalized social group, they do collectively ignore the supererogatory duties. Black representation in movies before the 70s. Gay representation before the 90s.

I'm sure you can find individual exceptions (and I'm handwaving the dates) but the general pattern is strong.

Except that the patterns are broken, by rising tides of supererogatory actions; hence why representation began after the general dates you cited. That can be taken as this system of moral philosophy tending (using history as an example) to self-correct for this problem over time, on a macro scale.

Which is good, because otherwise I'm not sure what the practical solution would be - if you admit that nothing immoral is taking place on an individual level, it's hard to mandate a solution.


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LazarX wrote:
It's not much... it's a question whether or not there is a SINGLE scene in a movie where two women talk to each other, and it's not about a man.

Forgive the nitpicking, but the requirement is actually that two named female characters talk to each other about something other than a man. The caveat that they be more than nameless background characters tends to be overlooked a lot when the guidelines of the Test are relayed.


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thejeff wrote:

See I'd put it somewhere in-between.

There's certainly nothing wrong with making a movie that doesn't include a positive black representation, for example. There are plenty of very good movies where that wouldn't make any sense and even of those where it would work, not every one needs to.
The problem comes when the industry as a whole doesn't make any movies with positive non-stereotyped black representation. Or makes only token efforts to do so, at far below the statistically expected numbers.

Substitute whichever group we're concerned with at the moment and whatever industry you like.

It's almost a positive duty on the larger Industry level? Which doesn't make sense, really, because the industry as a whole isn't a moral actor. It's a matter of many, many individually justifiable (or at least not provably immoral) actions adding up to a moral wrong.

This is probably the most legitimate critique of the results of this system - if everyone eschews supererogatory duties all of the time, then there's a great deal of moral virtue that's left unfulfilled, to the point where it could result in immorality.

Unfortunately, insofar as I know there's no good remedy for this situation - at least under this system of moral philosophy, save for the practical caveat in that people don't completely ignore the supererogatory duties en masse (though you could certainly say that they don't, collectively, perform them enough).


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LazarX wrote:
That makes absolutely no sense. The people who crusade in the banner of "GamerGate" are doing a ton of nasty things which they feel quite justified in doing so. How could something they hate be so important without being perceived as a threat?

Because what they don't agree with, and what they perceive as a threat, isn't the media - it's the people on the other side of the debate, the "social justice warriors," whom they perceive to be trying to reshape the nature of what's acceptable in the media along ideological terms (or at least, ideological terms that opponents of "SJWs" don't agree with).

Quote:
What's important without being significant? If it's significant, it's because it's perceived as a threat, either to your person, or what you perceived as your "god given right".

It's not a question of "important without being significant"; you've substituted the word "significant" - which in this context is essentially a synonym for "important" - with "powerful," which was the word used previously.

Something can indeed be important to you without it meaning that that thing is powerful. The people with a philosophical opposition to "SJWs" don't - in my understanding of them - think that the media has much power (if any at all) to shape attitudes and beliefs. However, they do think that people have a great deal of power to shape the media. It's that attitude amongst the "SJWs" that's perceived as the threat - not as a threat to their person, or to their "god given anything," but that they don't agree with the idea that media is immoral if it does not adhere to the standards of social justice.

RJGrady wrote:
Many of my interactions with people who have a problem with "social justice" end up complaining about "censorship" and "reverse racism" and feminism ruining discussions. So, they clearly believe privilege exists, they just think that women, minorities, people with disabilities etc. have too much of it, and white, heterosexual males have too little.

To be clear, the discussion that I've been having has largely been about people who have a problem with "social justice warriors," rather than the concept of social justice itself. Notwithstanding trolls and other self-absorbed jerks who are using the term as blanket disparagement without giving any thought to the philosophy behind it, those who are concerned with "SJWs" have an ethical issue they're trying to debate; by contrast, those who disagree with social justice as a whole are coming from a very different place (in my opinion, of course - I don't speak for everyone).


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Voadam wrote:
Not doing an active good in an action does not mean the action is morally corrupt, just like not doing evil does not mean the action is actively virtuous.

Well, there's the rub.

This system of moral philosophy is called deontological ethics (though I should note I'm presenting a very simplified overview), wherein you determine the morality of an action by judging the nature of the action itself (rather the intent behind it, or by the consequences of it) on a ranked scale. That scale is as follows (as a note, the reason it's scaled is that - in the event of a conflict between tiers, you should follow the higher tier even if it's at the expense of the lower one):

1) The Negative Duties - these are the things that you must not do; they are immoral if you do them (e.g. murder).

2) The Positive Duties - these are the things you are morally obligated to do (that is, you must do them), and failure to do them is immoral. For example, "render assistance to someone who appears to be seriously injured, so long as doing so does not place myself or others at risk of harm."

3) The Supererogatory Duties - these are the things that are good if you do them, but not bad if you do not (e.g. spend your weekends volunteering to help the homeless).

The thing here is that everyone determines for themselves what falls under each of these rankings. As such, there tends to be differing views about what's grouped where - in my experience, there's a lot of disagreement between certain actions being on rank 2 or rank 3. Some people think that certain virtuous actions are important enough that a failure to apply them is immoral. Others think that such actions are virtuous, but not to the point where you're morally obligated to fulfill them each time you have a chance to do so.

As a note, this system works best when the actions ranked under it are highly specified, since that helps to eliminate ambiguity about how you'd define the action, and thus where it'd rank (hence why the example I give for rank 2 is so specific).


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Voadam wrote:
Can you explain what social justice principles applying to legal, workplace, and social situations that should apply similarly to media you are talking about?

Presuming that I'm reading your question right, you're asking what are the principles of social justice that "social justice warriors" are understood to be trying to promote in the media, correct?

If that's the case, I'd posit that these principles can be summarized as "the greater inclusion of groups that have historically (and contemporarily) been marginalized in terms of their representation, and that members of such groups be treated with the same degree of respect typically afforded to the members of non-marginalized groups" - in other words, the basic idea of social justice itself.

Many (if not most) people can agree that the above is a positive duty - by which I mean, it is morally virtuous when this is done, and morally corrupt (e.g. immoral) when it is not done - in the context of legal, workplace, and social situations. The difference of opinion comes with applying the above principles to instances of art, fiction, and media.

A "social justice warrior" will posit that these principles are a positive duty when it comes to any instance of media, the same as they would be otherwise. If you write, animate, film, etc. media that violates these principles, then you've committed an immoral action. Immorality, here, is understood to not only be damaging to the community at large (in this case because it normalizes immoral values), but it is also understood that it is morally laudable (attempt to) destroy, suppress, or otherwise expel something immoral from your community (so long as doing so does not in-and-of itself entail taking immoral actions).

By contrast, those who oppose "SJWs" will re-classify the above principles when they're applied to the context of media; in such a case, the above principles become supererogatory - "above and beyond the call of duty" - which means that they're morally laudable if you adhere to them, but not morally corrupt if you do not.

To put it another way, both camps (broadly speaking) agree that instances of social justice in media are good, but one side holds that instances of their absence are immoral, whereas the other side holds that instances of their absence are amoral.

Sexualization and sexual objectification are popular topics in this regard. It's broadly understood to be immoral to treat women like sex objects; hence why we have laws, workplace codes of conduct, and social mores that object to such behavior (though it's widely understood - correctly, in my opinion - that such objections require further strengthening at all three levels). However, sexualizing a female character in the context of media raises the question of whether such a portrayal is immoral (e.g. it normalizes sexist attitudes towards women in real life) or amoral (e.g. virtually no one thinks that how a sexualized woman in a work of fiction is treated is analogous to how a woman should be treated in real life).

Hopefully, that makes the issue clearer.


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LazarX wrote:
You're wrong. the people who mock, whose culture created the term "Social Justice Warrior" as a pejorative, DO believe in the power of media. Otherwise they wouldn't give a flying f&!$ about Fraiser wrote in her iconic writeup.

I disagree.

There's obviously a disclaimer that needs to be made in that I can't speak for anyone besides myself. Likewise, there are obviously a lot of people using the term "social justice warrior" who aren't concerned with the philosophy of what they perceive as the misapplication of social justice to art, fiction, and media.

That said, you seem to be implying that because people who mock "SJWs" are concerned with the media, that means they're acknowledging that the media has an inherent power to shape attitudes and beliefs. I don't believe that to be the case - you can acknowledge that something is important without believing that it's powerful. Showing concern for what other people are doing to the media does not mean that you're granting any sort of premise regarding the media's ability to influence people.

EDIT: On an interesting note, that pastebin has been removed.


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Sissyl wrote:
The problem with the BoEF wasn't that it had porn illustrations, but that the illustrations were BAD, sometimes hilariously so. The actual rules were somewhat decent, though forced into the general d20 structure of the time, meaning feats and (most annoying) prestige classes. That said, it's not a style of playing that's easy to find players for, and arguably, the book failed at what it wanted to do.

That about sums it up. Between the use of photoshipped pictures, rules that needed another round or two of editing (coming out just as 3.5 debuted didn't help), and a severe lack of in-character justification for suddenly having sexually-themed materials cropping up in the game world all served to kill the book pretty quickly.


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Crystal Frasier wrote:
Probably relevant to this discussion that "social justice warrior" is originally an insult, not a self-description. A few people may call themselves that now--mostly in jest--but it's mostly just a mocking label applied by a certain category of people on the internet who don't like it when a minority says "stop insulting me."

It took me a while to understand that the people using the term "social justice warrior" weren't using it to refer to anyone who believes in/advocates social justice. Rather, they seem to be using it to make a mockery of the idea that the principles of social justice should be applied to artwork, media, and fiction to the same (or similar) degree as to legal, workplace, and social situations.

From what I'm given to understand, the basis for this is that people who mock "SJWs" fundamentally disagree with the belief that media has the power to normalize attitudes and behaviors - at least to any appreciable degree - and as such implicitly reject the assumption that changing what the media displays and how it displays it will necessarily make any positive changes to society at large. Rather, they're of the opinion that the media reflects attitudes already in place, and that changing the media requires making more fundamental changes to the social fabric of society, rather than vice versa.

This isn't to say that there aren't people using the term to justify acting like spiteful, self-centered jerks, of course. But the above attitude seems to be at the core of those with a philosophical opposition to "social justice warriors."

At the macro level, this is a debate about whether life imitates art, or art imitates life.


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Erik Mona wrote:
No employee has even left the company since we published our trans iconic, so the theory is nonsense on its face.

But perhaps there was an employee who left sometime between the conceptualization of the character and its publication, and that would explain...wait...

*checks*

Doggone it, which one of you jokers put this tinfoil hat on my head again?!

Seriously though, it's nice to have this so quickly and thoroughly debunked. Nothing more to see here, people! Carry on!


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So I was in link-freefall across the web, and somehow ended up in this pastebin, where the writer asserts that:

Quote:
I have a friend that works at Paizo, creators of Pathfinder, who complained that their new "iconic character" - a sort of example for whatever new character class is getting a book - was a very hamfisted attempt at pandering to the trans community. This friend is trans herself, and her complaints led to her losing her job.

I really hope that this isn't true. Can anyone shed any light on this?


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So this is like a Pathfinder version of The Elder Strolls (scroll down for the first parts of the series)?


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Personally, I've been reading game materials with Skreyn's name on them since back in the days of Second Edition, and I have a very positive impression of them.

In terms of the man himself, I've almost never interacted with him directly on these forums, and I suspect that I missed the majority of his posts, but what I did see was virtually always thought-provoking, even when I disagreed with it.

His thread about how there shouldn't be a material component cost for the raise dead spell, for example, was fascinating to consider.


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A while back I wrote a post on my blog saying that a good shorthand for a GM is to assume that each day a character - including NPCs - spends "training" (essentially, doing their normal job) is worth 1 XP.

So in other words, figure out a person's age in the number of days they've lived (minus pre-working childhood, and whatever their usual days off are), and that's their XP total, which will correspond to a given level.

The reason I call this a shorthand is that it's not meant to be an absolute. If you want to adjust them upwards so that they have a higher level, presume that they've utilized the standard methods of gaining XP - that they've killed some monsters or completed some sort of story-quest. Instantly, that triggers brain-storming about what they did, and presto! Instant fleshing-out of specific NPCs.


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Liam Warner wrote:
I should clarify this isn't to determine opposition to the party it's for the world setting. How much of the population are level x affects all sorts of things. For the opposition sure it's whatever necessary but if you walk into a village there's rules for highest level caster and the like but if 90 of the 100 people are less than 6th level it allows quick setting up of power balances.

Purely as a world-building exercise, I like to configure the population along a binary logarithmic scale. That is, I presume that one-half (e.g. 50%) of the population is first-level, and then halve that percentage for each successive level.

So 25% of the population is 2nd-level, 12.5% of the population is 3rd-level, etc. I think that nicely makes the higher-level characters (including the PCs) feel like they're major movers and shakers as they gain more and more power.


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JoeJ wrote:
Are you seriously asking for a realistic story about an invulnerable flying space alien who shoots laser beams out his eyes?

To paraphrase Wolfgang Baur:

"Realism" in this context is shorthand for "functions according to internal logic and consistency of the setting," not "functions according to real-world physics."


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boring7 wrote:
a buncha folk wrote:
...Sam and Dean from Supernatural...
Were using Ghost Salt Shotgun shells and magic rituals to banish spirits. Oh hey I just solved your irreconcilable equation. Are we done here?

I'm not sure you solved it.

The essence of this thread - as I understand it - is that when it asks if there's any concept that can't be made using the "existing rules," those last two words are meant to be taken as "class abilities."

In the case of Sam and Dean, they don't have any particular class abilities that grant them any non-natural powers (the major caveat being Sam's demon blood-powers in the second through fourth seasons...and I agree, he's since retrained those away).

Everything else they do is either using equipment (mostly mundane, occasionally magical), skill checks, or incantations, all of which are available to anyone.

Of course, that's all something of a moot point anyway. The fact is that Pathfinder can make Sam- and Dean-style characters just fine; the problem is that it can't make them viable 1) at the higher-levels, and 2) in a setting where magic and highly magical monsters are both prevalent and powerful.

Supernatural takes place on an Earth that's pretty clearly a low-magic, E6-style campaign. Pathfinder can do that easily - heck, doing that is just a matter of what you take away, rather than what you add. But something that's viable under those circumstances isn't going to necessarily be the case in "baseline" Pathfinder. (I once wrote stats for Sam, with his demonic powers in the fourth season, using a Pathfinder-compatible point-buy character-generator - I was able to place him as being a 3rd-level character).

There's really nothing wrong with that, that I can see. Unless they received some sort of major power-up (which might be the case for Dean going into Season 10...), they'd get their asses consistently kicked in a higher-power world. After all, we see them get their asses kicked in their own world quite often as it is.


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Does Charisma include a component based on a character's physical appearance? Sure it does; it's right there in the ability description (emphasis mine):

Quote:
Charisma measures a character's personality, personal magnetism, ability to lead, and appearance.

The issue here isn't that people misunderstand the nature of what Charisma represents - it's that when you try to divide the sum total of a person's physical and mental characteristics into a grand total of six categories, you're going to end up mashing different aspects of who they are together under a single umbrella. Charisma is the result of that. It's been awkward since its implementation, but like most of the warts associated with D&D, has become associated with the game's sense of identity.

For good or for bad, beauty is one of the defining characteristics of what Charisma represents, unintuitively combining that with personal magnetism, leadership, and other force-of-personality-related qualities.


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Gwen Smith wrote:
I assumed it was the convention that was "fake"...because that other stuff makes no sense at all.

That was the crux of the joke I made in the second post.

To reiterate, I was comparing the idea that there are "fake" geek girls with the idea that there could be an entire fake convention - it makes an analogy between the ludicrousness of the latter idea with that of the former, thus satirizing the fact that some people thought that "fake geek girls" were actually a thing (and a thing worth being very upset over, at that).

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