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Alzrius's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 2,095 posts. 70 reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist.


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Alzrius wrote:
Lemmy wrote:
Man... Re:Zero can get really freaking dark sometimes... I enjoy the series, but the latest episode was... emotionally exhausting. X(
Very much so. When I first started watching the series (mistakenly thinking that it only had one cour), I binged on the first thirteen episodes. In hindsight that was a mistake, because the series puts so much punch into its plot and characterization that it works better if you take it a few episodes at a time to let what happens digest.

So Crunchyroll is now streaming Re:Zero Breaktime, a series of three-minute shorts with chibi (super-deformed) versions of the characters (much like the Pure Pure Pleiades shorts from Overlord). These are openly being presented as lighthearted breaks from the main series' heavy presentation, though so far they seem more "cute" than "funny."

Eleven are up so far; I have no idea if there's more to come or not.


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Belle Sorciere wrote:
Also, I don't see how your quote discredits Polygon for all time.

Leaving out the hyperbolic "for all time," it demonstrates disdain for the topic that they ostensibly cover. That, in turn, hurts their credibility. It's the same reason why ESPN doesn't say "all sports are a waste of time, of course."

That's just one of Polygon's recent issues; I won't even get started on the fiasco that was their review of Doom.

Quote:
With such standards in place no media would be remotely credible.

No, I don't believe it's unreasonable to have a standard of "don't hold your core audience in contempt."


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Stone Dog wrote:
Demiurge 1138 wrote:
It's shaped like a tree, it's got branches on it!
It's shaped like a star with a little flame inside it!

I can almost hear a shoggoth on the roof.


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Krensky wrote:
Lemmy wrote:
I got curious about Susei no Gargantia... But I'm not a fan of series about giant robots... So I lost interest. :/
Whigh is funny, because it's not a show about giant robots. It has them, but that's not what it's about.

Krensky is correct; Gargantia isn't a giant robot anime as that genre is usually defined.


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Belle Sorciere wrote:
The point being that Ghostbusters isn't being discussed as a flop.

Consider the source. You cited Polygon, the video game news website that once said "all video games are stupid, of course."


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Rednal wrote:

What, was there not enough incest in GXP? XD

(You think I'm joking. Then you see the series' Family Tree.)

Hm, I should pester AstroNerdBoy to update that; it doesn't have Kenshi in there.


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Krensky wrote:
If it's Genimar, well, that has something to do with the water near the Masaki shrine and the hero being related to 'gods'. Or something. It's a Tenchi show, don't think too hard about the relationships and how everyone is related.

Isekai no Seikishi Monogatari (I can't call it by that awful "War on Geminar" name) was where the Tenchi Muyo! OVA series lost its luster for me.

The Tenchi series - or at least that continuity - primarily works based on the strength of its cast, which is absolutely required because the plot is typically thin-to-nonexistent. As such, going with an entirely new cast is a serious risk, one that Seikishi Monogatari wasn't able to capitalize on; its characters felt like a collection of tropes more than unique, interesting individuals.

(GXP pulled this off because director Shinichi Watanabe - the famous "NabeShin" - knows how to make a credible comedy series, and that held things together while we got used to the new cast, who were actually rather fun to watch; ironically, this ticked off series creator Masaki Kajishima enough that he's rewriting GXP in a series of novels.)


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"Get ready to be in the black...and blue!"


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Greylurker wrote:
Dragon78 wrote:
So, is the Gargantia anime any good?
Yes it is and it doesn't quite go the way you originally expect it to

Very much so.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
Jessica Price wrote:
Given that there does seem to be a physiological component to it (much like how painkillers like aspirin have been shown to reduce the intensity of emotional pain), I suspect that straight-up healing spells would help with the intensity but not solve the problem.

That was my initial reaction as well, until people pointed out the broad language in greater restoration, which I hadn't noticed before (game-play has conditioned me to think of the restoration spells as being purely for dealing with fatigue/exhaustion and ability damage/drain).

Looking at this some more, it seems like there's a continuum of effectiveness that healing magic would have on such a condition, but because there aren't strict game rules in this regard there's quite a bit of ambiguity for most specific magical remedies.


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Claxon wrote:
What I am saying is, "Does PTSD qualify as an insanity?" PTSD isn't even a game term. PTSD is a mental disorder, does it also qualify as an Insanity?

Depending on how one interprets the "similar mental effects" clause of greater restoration, it might be something of a moot point with regards to what is and is not insanity.


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There's no particular mechanism (at least in first-party materials) that I'm aware of for modeling trauma (e.g. PTSD) in the Pathfinder rules. My guess would be that it could be modeled via mental ability score damage/drain, or possibly the madness/insanity rules, but that's just a guess.

In that case, would spells such as heal or restoration be able to fix trauma instantly?


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Lemmy wrote:
Man... Re:Zero can get really freaking dark sometimes... I enjoy the series, but the latest episode was... emotionally exhausting. X(

Very much so. When I first started watching the series (mistakenly thinking that it only had one cour), I binged on the first thirteen episodes. In hindsight that was a mistake, because the series puts so much punch into its plot and characterization that it works better if you take it a few episodes at a time to let what happens digest.


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Paladins are powered by their own sense of self-satisfaction.


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Aranna wrote:
Torturing yourself for credibility? Are you a professional?

Quite so; the name's 13. Golgo 13.


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Lemmy wrote:
Alzrius wrote:
When I finished watching Aethetica of a Rogue Hero - which I did purely because of the two-minute crossover omake it had with Queen's Blade Rebellion - I found myself wanting to know whom to call to demand back the five hours of my life that I'd wasted.
Let's be fair... If after 1~2 hours you still didn't know it was a waste of time, it's your own fault for watching the next 3~4! XD

Oh, I knew. But I do my damnedest to always finish what I start, if for no other reason so that I can assert that I know what I'm talking about when I tear it a new one later.


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Grey Lensman wrote:
The Testament of Sister New Devil shouldn't have been a surprise - it's by the same manga writer as Aesthetica of a Rogue Hero, which was another anime with gratuitous fanservice shots. Also featuring a 'daughter of overlord' magical boom powered girl with twin tailed hair.

When I finished watching Aethetica of a Rogue Hero - which I did purely because of the two-minute crossover omake it had with Queen's Blade Rebellion - I found myself wanting to know whom to call to demand back the five hours of my life that I'd wasted.

By contrast, Testament of Sister New Devil was...okay. I wouldn't go so far as to call it "very good" or anything, but it was certainly a not-unenjoyable piece of ero-filled fluff.


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So should entries just be posted here in this thread or what?


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Re: Zero episode 15.

...damn, Subaru can't catch a break!


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This is such awful news.

I talked to Steve a bit back when I was still reviewing, and it was always very clear to me how passionate and dedicated he was to Rite Publishing. Losing someone of such talent is a loss for us all.


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Tectorman wrote:
Huzzah! It got moved up a week!

I noticed that too. Good times!


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Steve Geddes wrote:
FWIW, you seem to be handling the understandable annoyance pretty well, so kudos for that. In my opinion, this is one of those 'nobody's wrong, you just all turned up to play different games' kind of situations.

I think so too.

That said, a lot of people here have noted that I shouldn't have gone into this game with such an optimized character, and I can't bring myself to disagree with that. What I find notable (and a little uncomfortable) about that, however, is - since the GM was aware of what I was doing and greenlit it ahead of time - the idea that I should have had less faith in his judgment.

Given that I'm a proponent of players putting more trust in their GMs, that just doesn't feel right to me, even if it honestly does seem to be the right answer here.

Steve Geddes wrote:
dysartes wrote:
Steve Geddes wrote:


I think you should take the moral high ground and create a player more along the lines of what the rest of the group expects of a level 18 character.
Creating a new player is a little Frankenstein-y, don't you think?

:)

From what I've heard so far, Alzrius is pretty talented!

You should see what I have in my basement...or perhaps not. ;)

phantom1592 wrote:

I recommend an Antipaladin.

As bad a party as it is having 3 of a kind in it... what's one more :D

Given that that seems to be the group's idea of a "protest" character, I was considering going that route, in half-seriousness.

Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Quite frankly, I'd bolt any group that had your character in it, and I don't play anti-paladins.

Quitting the group is the "nuclear option" for me, and I hope that the other players feel the same way. I'd like to think that our friendship is strong enough to survive an instance of not liking the character that someone brings to the table.


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Fergie wrote:
Just a random side thought. Look up Solars. CR 23, 20th level cleric caster, 2X treasure. That Solar was the most powerful thing at the table, and would have been the one calling the shots. Also, there is basically no amount of treasure in the world that would make a Solar join a party with anti-paladins and a undead making cleric.

In this case, I'd won the opposed Charisma check to get it to serve me for one day per caster level (nineteen days altogether, since I had an orange prism ioun stone). I didn't actually roll that, however; the GM hand-waved it under the idea that if I'd failed, I'd simply have been able to try again later, and so would have succeeded eventually.

Insofar as joining a party with evil characters goes, the backstory was that our party hadn't known each other prior this mini-campaign. There was an explanation that there'd be some intra-party conflict for alignment reasons, but we never got that far (that and there were a few members of the group who were extremely opposed to the idea of a PC vs. PC fight, regardless of reasons).


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On a semi-tangential note, here's a fun thought-activity with regards to population breakdown in a given country/region/area using the 3.X demographics tables.

Basically, what if the percentages given for each type of settlement were taken as the distribution for how the population was spread out throughout a country?

That means that, if we look at table 5-2 on page 137 of the 3.5 DMG (table 4-40 on page 137 of the 3.0 DMG), we can see that on a d% roll, a 1-10 is a thorp, an 11-30 is a hamlet, etc. So under this idea, 10% of a kingdom's population lives in thorps while 20% lives in hamlets, etc.

If we also utilize the population-per-settlement column on that table (that is, we pick a number within that population range that divides evenly into the total population for that settlement type) then we can calculate some quick averages for both how many of a settlements of a given type there are, and how many people live in each one.

For example, the Generic Kingdom has a population of 5 million people:

  • 10% of the population (500,000 people) live in thorps. Presuming about 50 people to a thorp, then the kingdom has 10,000 thorps within its borders.

  • 20% of the population (1,000,000 people) live in hamlets. Presuming about 250 people to a hamlet, then the kingdom has 4,000 hamlets.

  • 20% of the population (1,000,000 people) live in villages. Presuming about 800 people to a village, there are 1,250 villages in the kingdom.

  • 20% of the population (1,000,000 people) live in small towns. Presuming about 1,600 people to a small town, then the kingdom has 625 small towns.

  • 15% of the population (750,000 people) live in large towns. Presuming about 3,500 people to a large town, then there are 250 large towns within the kingdom.

  • 10% of the population (500,000 people) live in small cities. Presuming about 10,000 people to a small city, then the kingdom has 50 small cities.

  • 4% of the population (200,000 people) live in large cities. Presuming about 20,000 people to a large city, then there are 10 large cities within the kingdom.

  • 1% of the population (50,000 people) live in a metropolis. Since there's no upper limit on the population of a metropolis (minimum 25,001 people), it's easiest to say that this will give us a single metropolis of 50,000 people.

Altogether, the Generic Kingdom has 16,186 population centers of various sizes, with an average of just over 300 people per population center.

Of course, this won't work for regions with a total population of 2,500,000 or less, because at that point 1% of your population no longer meets the minimum number of people necessary for a metropolis. In that case, just divide the remainder among the next largest settlements (e.g. if you had a kingdom of 1,000,000 people, the 1% set aside for a metropolis would only be 10,000 people, which isn't enough for a settlement that size. In that case, you'd simply add an additional 10,000 people to the 40,000 that you've already allocated among your large cities).

At that point, you can start plugging in the numbers regarding what classed NPCs of what levels live in a given community as you need to, and voila! You have an easy-to-make kingdom!

(Fun fact: Notwithstanding their organization, the community-generation tables in the 3.0 and 3.5 DMGs are identical. However, most people don't know that the Epic Level Handbook introduced alternate versions of a few of these tables (pg. 113-114), stated to be used to retcon in modifiers to make the game world more epic.

The major changes for these are that they vastly increase the GP limit in communities and inflate community modifiers for each settlement listing (and how many times you roll for the larger communities). They also introduce a new size of settlement above metropolis: the planar metropolis, population 100,000+. It doesn't have a percent listing, despite appearing on the random community table; it's listing is given as "special.")


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Doomed Hero wrote:

WTF?

How old are the people in your gaming group?

A spread of late-20's to mid-30's.


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zainale wrote:
why did they make anti-paladins in protest?

From what they told me, it was because - in the event that we came into conflict with the GMPC (who was viewed, rightly or wrongly, as a not-so-subtle threat should the party go too far out of line) - they'd be able to lay into him with melee attacks while also dropping multiple debuffs on him via their cruelties.

Essentially, they were "anti-babysitter" characters.


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Vutava wrote:
Wait, Alzrius? You wouldn't happen to be this Alzrius, would you?

Yep, that's me. :)

Hi Vutava!


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captain yesterday wrote:

This is the part that cracks me up.

You didn't rein yourself in at all

Oh no, trust me, there were quite a few ways that I could have gone further (I mentioned previously not taking gratuitous advantage of the solar angel's 3/day permanency and 1/day wish SLA's, for example). Several minor points about my character weren't focused on optimization (e.g. spending a feat slot on Toughness, despite that only bumping my hit points up from an anemic 77 to a pretty-much-just-as-bad 95).

That said, the consensus seems to be that I'd already gone too far, and that "not having made it even worse" isn't really a mitigating factor.


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Thanks for the continued responses everyone. I appreciate all of the feedback on this situation.

As a minor note, I misremembered two points from my original post. These weren't anything major, and certainly don't change any of what happened, but I'll note them anyway:

  • I said before that we played two combat rounds in one hour. Looking back, it was actually closer to four combat rounds in two hours.
  • Rather than three antipaladins, it was actually two antipaladins and a barbarian.

thejeff wrote:
You can't rely on the GM to do it for you, because he doesn't understand the consequences of what you're asking him.

This is a point that a lot of people in this thread have noted, and they (and you) aren't wrong to do so. Looking back, there were a lot of red flags regarding the GM's level of understanding about what would happen (some of which I haven't mentioned so far), and I probably should have realized that and reined myself in more than I did.

I really don't have any excuse for that, beyond that I honestly wanted to believe that he'd stepped his game up. This level 18 mini-campaign was one that he'd been talking about for two months before we got started (this includes my voicing my initial round of concerns), and then we had two game sessions of building and talking about what we were doing before we got started (plus half a session before we started play).

I mention that because, whenever I brought up a point of concern and he brushed it aside, I wanted to believe that he knew what he was doing, even when signs pointed the other way. As a friend, I genuinely wanted to think "wow, he's stepped his game up, and now has a couple of aces up his sleeve," rather than "oh my god, he has no idea what he's doing." Obviously I'm using some hyperbole there, but it reflects the fact that I wanted to give him the benefit of the doubt.

dysartes wrote:
Question, OP, to deal with an assumption that keeps cropping up - you mentioned in your original post that this group hasn't had a campaign go past 12th level before. Have you had previous experience with high-level play outside of this group?

Yes, as part of an old 3.0 campaign that I GM'd shortly after those rules came out. That was my first time running anything that took longer than a couple of sessions, and we were all making mistakes left and right, so the entire campaign was about as stable as a rickety rollercoaster, but I learned a great deal from it all the same (that was the first and last time I had an open-door policy on anything first-party, for instance).

Marcella wrote:
Perhaps you could cede control of some followers in a similar manner?

I mentioned this before, but I'd honestly be surprised if they went for that. Simply put, I've tried this on previous occasions with this group when I was GMing, and I'm still stumped about how utterly uninterested they were in this idea. Given the tension present now, I'm exceptionally nervous about proposing that they run my minions.

Cavall wrote:
Is it appropriate to take 12 minutes to do a turn while everyone waits to play? Do you think that is fun for a hobby player or a casual player to wait that long? Not for their turn to come up, but for one player to do their action?

I'll absolutely cop to the idea that time-management was a problem (in fact, I did that in my first post). Ideally I'd like to figure out how to reduce that without changing anything, but I suspect that that's a pipe dream since, 1) that seems to be almost unavoidable for having that many characters at that level, and 2) that's only part of the issue at this point.

Feral wrote:
I'm not sure what you're asking OP. You created a character to break the game and you broke the game. What was the expected result?
Kaladin_Stormblessed wrote:
You indicated that were you the GM, you would have restricted stuff more. You knew better, and took advantage of a GM who you admit couldn't have known what he was getting into. Don't be that guy.
swoosh wrote:
A GM that you yourself described as not particularly experienced or well versed in the nuances of the system.

I want to reiterate that my issue isn't that the rest of the group has a problem with how things have turned out; I'm not at all unsympathetic to the points they raised. Rather, I'm upset because I feel like I had the rug pulled out from under me with regards to getting the thumbs-up multiple times only to then have the entire group suddenly turn on me.

I know that's not what happened, but that's how it feels. You could say that's entirely my fault for having too much faith in the GM, undeservedly so, and you'd be right...but at the same time, I didn't want to be that guy who was certain that he knew better than everyone else. I wanted to work with the GM, rather than thinking that he was out of his depth.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

Thanks to everyone that has responded so far! Several replies that I wanted to answer specifically:

Nohwear wrote:
Maybe if you offered to only have one summon at a time?

Technically, I only had the one summon spell active; the rest where two calling spells, a cohort, and a permanent animated object...but I understand what you're saying. ;)

Nohwear wrote:
If you tend to build more powerful characters, then offer to help the others tweak theirs.

It's interesting that you brought this up, because just before the game started that seemed to be where things were going. The guy playing the necromantic cleric pretty much asked me to build his pit fiend bloody skeleton for him, and one of the antipaladins was picking my brain for information about intelligent items as Leadership cohorts.

Unfortunately, that was about a half-hour before the game got started, so there wasn't enough time to keep going on that particular track before everything was derailed.

DominusMegadeus wrote:
The fact that your group is entirely casual should have been your first clue to tone things down.

Please tell me more about not going over the top, O DominusMegadeus. ;)

But seriously though, I think part of the problem was that I thought that this was toned down, at least compared to what I could have done (e.g. I didn't use my solar angel's 3/day permanency SLA to do anything except make a single animated object, and a second demiplane, permanent, etc., let alone it's 1/day wish SLA).

Daw wrote:
You recognize that the other players were unhappy with your monopolizing the playtime. Do you feel your character is more valuable to you than your friends?

I'm trying to figure out how this got to a question of "you need to make a choice" and walk it back. My objection is largely based around feeling blindsided, with a side-helping of feeling punished for being too good at what I did.

Klara Meison wrote:
Give control of your summons/minions/henchmen to other players.

This is something I've tried to do when I was the one GMing; I'd ask other players - especially if their PC was unconscious or absent - to run NPCs. But for whatever reason, it's always gone over like a lead balloon. I'm honestly not sure why, but no one else seems to want to run a character besides their PC. Between that, and the current tension, I suspect that asking them to run my minions would go badly.

Klara Meison wrote:
You are playing a GOD class, so behave like a GOD-control the battlefield while letting plebeians(in the form of various martials) have their fun finishing enemies you have set up in front of them on a silver platter.

I didn't mention this in my original post, but I was sort of trying to split the difference between that and summoning. Most of my conjurer's spells were focused around battlefield control; I went with the conjuration school largely so that I could get summoning spells as bonus spell slots, rather than a focus. Heck, even the initial summons that brought three more characters to the field was cast by my cohort. (Rather ironically, other than some pre-battle buffs, my actual wizard character didn't cast any spells at all.)

...that said, I recognize that that's not really a useful distinction, at this point.

swoosh wrote:

I don't know how you can start saying you were worried about balance issues and end by saying you were playing a conjuration wizard with leadership.

Those are like, completely contradictory statements.

I thought I explained this in my original post, but I'll say it again here: the reason I went with this character even after being worried about balance issues was because I brought it up with the GM - repeatedly, and sometimes in front of (at least some of) the group - and nobody said a thing. Quite the opposite, after those few restrictions, the GM expressed total confidence that what I was doing wasn't going to be a problem.

For me to do that, and then to have everyone else suddenly have a problem after we started actual play, caught me completely off-guard.

Fergie wrote:
Yeah, your GM let you walk all over his game, but it was your choice to bring all this stuff... Honestly what do you think would happen?

Not this, mostly because I kept getting the go-ahead when I brought these up. I trusted that when the GM said that what I was making was alright - and that the other players didn't say anything when I voiced some of what I was doing in front of them - that things really would be alright, not that they simply hadn't thought things through.


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So one of the guys in my weekly group decided that he wanted to run a brief mini-campaign. The hook was that it was for 18th-level characters; naturally, we were all quite excited, as the highest this group has ever gotten has been about 12th level.

Some necessary background here: the GM for this is a fellow who has only run a game twice before, both of which were short campaigns that got mixed reviews from us. He has a good grasp of the rules, but (like most of the group) treats gaming as a pastime rather than a hobby, which meant that he had only passing familiarity with some of the game-breaking shenanigans that can happen at high-level play.

As such, while I was eager to make a level 18 wizard, I was also nervous about the impact such a character would have. This was especially true since he said we could use all first-party materials, buy ability scores with a 25-point buy, could spend our WBL on any item we wanted (including custom items), and had 11 RP to build a custom race if we wanted.

I voiced my concerns, and this prompted a long discussion within our group about what should and shouldn't be allowed. In the end, he chose to ban a few things (e.g. no use of blood money, no adjusting wealth by level if you have item creation feats, etc.), but for the most part said that he was very confident he could handle whatever we came up with.

The major limitation he invoked on my character, and that I was fine with, was that I couldn't use more than one instance of planar binding, though he was fine with my using other spells that brought in outside help. However, he was fine with my taking Leadership and having my cohort be an intelligent magic item, which I made a level 16 psychic. I also decided that I wasn't going to try and exploit every loophole that I possibly could (e.g. no carrying around a 5-foot section of wall with a permanent shrink item on it that was covered in permanent symbol spells).

We spent a few weeks making characters (if that sounds like a long time, it was because a lot of the group only did work on their characters during our weekly get-togethers). In the end our group looked like so:

  • Three players made level 18 antipaladins (this caught me by surprise; apparently it was in partially in protest to the fact that the GM wanted to include a GMPC with our party. He capitulated when he heard about this, but the other players kept their antipaladins anyway). They mentioned all having glabrezu companions, though only one person actually had that on the board.
  • A level 18 cleric with a necromantic focus (he wanted to make full use of animated dead for minions, but by the time we started had only made a single pit fiend bloody skeleton).
  • A sorcerer 8/dragon disciple 10 (built with a focus on getting into melee).
  • My wizard (conjurer) 18...and company.

More specifically, I sat down at the table with my wizard, his intelligent item psychic cohort (my followers from Leadership were back in my private demiplane where I was astral projecting from...and in my other private demiplane tending to my clone), the solar angel that I'd called via greater planar binding (utilizing Augmented Calling and Spell Perfection), a bythos aeon that my cohort had brought via greater planar ally (via the Faith psychic discipline), and a Gargantuan animated object (animated and made permanent by the solar angel). This rose to eight characters when I had my psychic cohort use monster summoning VII to bring in three (I rolled high) celestial triceratops in the first round of our first combat. (I should note that I'd mentioned all of these to the GM before we sat down to play, and he signed off on all of them.)

Our first combat lasted two rounds, and took us an hour to get through. What caught me by surprise was that, at the end of it, the entire group was upset...at me.

I don't just mean that they were a little ticked off; they were pissed, to the point where two guys said that if I sat down with this character next week, they weren't going to bother showing up. When I asked what was going on, they made it clear that they had two complaints:

1) I was taking too much time. Each turn it was taking me about 8-10 minutes to resolve what all of my characters were doing. This wasn't because I was looking stuff up (I knew to do that during everyone else's turns), but simply because it took that long to move minis around, roll attacks, damage, saves, spell penetration, etc. Still, this one struck me as a legitimate complaint, even if there was little that I could do about it.

2) I was overshadowing everyone else. They made it clear that they felt completely superfluous compared to what was essentially my own adventuring party.

It culminated with the GM pulling me aside and telling me that I had to make a new character by next week, because my current one was too disruptive. I tried to point out that he'd given me the okay for everything that I was doing, and he admitted that he hadn't realized just what effect all of that would have. I likewise pointed out that, with only 95 hit points (I'd had some bad Hit Dice rolls) and an AC that was in the mid-20's, that I'd essentially need to redo my entire character, since just getting into direct combat would pretty much be the end of my character.

His reply went something along the lines of, "I feel like I have a worthwhile story to tell, and your character's distracting from that."

Needless to say, the entire thing has left a bitter taste in my mouth. I quite like my character, and want to keep running him, but at the same time I'm quite ticked at having had the gauntlet thrown down. I have no idea what to do before next week's game, and time is running out...


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Because it's the perfect size when your character...is a munchkin.

*puts on sunglasses*

YEEEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHH!!!


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MeanMutton wrote:
Pathfinder has done quite a few things to make magic more readily available than it was in D&D 3.5 - all wizards get Scribe Scroll

That was in 3.5.


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thejeff wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
An excellent follow-up question would be: why are white people called "white"?
Shouldn't that be "Why are pinkskins called 'white'?"

Because we're trying not to appropriate Andorian culture.


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Tacticslion wrote:
Snowlilly wrote:
Astral Projection wrote:
To enter one, you leave the Astral Plane, forming a new physical body (and equipment) on the plane of existence you have chosen to enter.

You do, in fact, occupy a physical body while using Astral Projection to enter another plane.

Trap the Soul is one of the few ways to stop a high level wizard meddling with the world from the safety of his personal demi-plane.

I kind of thought the original question was about the floaty version in the astral plane, not the meaty copy on another plane. So, if I'm in the astral, what happens?

Sorry, that was me being unclear. I was referring to what happens when someone using astral projection exits the Astral Plane and goes to another plane (where they form a new body), since that's 90% likely where you'd find someone using that spell anyway.


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Snowlilly wrote:
Astral Projection wrote:
To enter one, you leave the Astral Plane, forming a new physical body (and equipment) on the plane of existence you have chosen to enter.

You do, in fact, occupy a physical body while using Astral Projection to enter another plane.

Trap the Soul is one of the few ways to stop a high level wizard meddling with the world from the safety of his personal demi-plane.

By that virtue, a temporal stasis, imprisonment, or even flesh to stone would also work, right?


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Sundakan wrote:
2.) Naruto retains some very good moments and SPECTACLE in their fights. The sheer scale of the battles is enough to be engaging. But there is quite a lack of strategy in much of the latter half, and the plot meanders a lot. ESPECIALLY the bits with Sasuke and Naruto's obsession with saving him.

With regard to the meandering plot and lack of strategy, this is definitely the case insofar as the filler material goes - that's unsurprising, as filler is handicapped right from the get-go - but I don't think that that's true with regard to the main post-timeskip plot. It might be a little bit slow to ramp up, but once it does it really takes off.

Naruto's obsession with saving Sasuke is somewhat eye-rolling, but... (I'll spoiler this next part just to be safe):

Spoiler:
...it gets better because we see Naruto slowly growing out of this. It's never expressly stated as him giving up on that goal, but we do see him maturing away from it as the series goes on, largely when his repeated attempts to save Sasuke end in failure every time. This culminates in some personal losses for him, and he slowly comes to realize that 1) he can't save someone who doesn't want to be saved, and 2) it's not just about Sasuke, it's about everyone who loses someone they care about.

This eventually turns him into a much more palatable character, although it takes quite some time for him to get there. (Even better is that Sasuke's character arc goes through a number of very believable changes which, rather gratifyingly, have almost nothing to do with Naruto at all.)


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Sundakan wrote:
I agree it was a somewhat jarring shift, but very much to the benefit of the manga.

You and I are really going to need to agree to disagree here. :D

That said, I think you're explaining your points very well; I'm replying mostly because I'm quite enjoying the conversation.

Quote:
Harem shows, on the whole, are obnoxious and generally pointless (none more so than Love Hina).

I'll admit that the harem genre seems to have more than its fair share of sub-par shows, but I attribute this to those shows repeatedly making the mistake of pinning everything on fan-service while ignoring things like characterization and plot-development. Fan-service, in my opinion, works best as a layer of frosting, rather than a foundation upon which a show is built.

Quote:
Crafting a situation where the existence of the harem makes sense (such as they being part of a very large adventuring company) is something more should do.

I would have agreed with this a lot more a few years back. I used to be of the opinion that establishing plausibility for how a situation like that could develop was the most important thing (e.g. buy the premise, buy the bit).

Now, though, while I still think that's important, I see that as being more of an aspect of each individual character than something situational. It's not so much a question of circumstances as it is why the characters involved reacted to their circumstances in the way that they did.

Quote:

It also avoided the main problem that Love Hina had: why is this group of girls so hot for a worthless loser like Keitarou?

Negi at least has many admirable qualities. Bordering on Mary Sue territory sometimes, but you can see why girls fall for even a creepily young person who is intelligent, focused, determined, and powerful.

Also a fair point; the whole idea of a main character who is "ineffectual but kind...and that's enough," is one that I do think is overrated (though going too far in the other direction is just as bad).

That said, I think there's a salient point to be made in that these qualities - that is, being focused and determined, etc. - is only applied to areas of problem-solving, and not to romantic relationships. In Negi's case, this is lampshaded by his being too young to fall in love, but the end result is the same: the center of the harem is entirely passive with regards to the girls around him, and they in turn seem to remain doggedly in love with him despite their feelings being continually unrequited. I find that that grows stale very fast.

(Incidentally, you should check out the Magika no Kenshi light novel series I mentioned a little while ago, as it has both very smart circumstances and a more proactive main character.)

Quote:
I think the source material is pretty solid, at worst par for the course for shonen action shows, and does IMO have one of the best ways of handling the "dangerous forbidden technique" I've seen and quite a few fights involve the protagonist actually OUTSMARTING the opponent instead of overpowering them. It's closer to Yu Yu Hakusho and Hunter x Hunter (though not as good) in the way it handles its fights than Dragonball Z and post-timeskip Naruto.

It's been forever since I read the Negima manga (and I stopped at vol. 30), but I found the tactical aspects of the fights to be less about outsmarting and more along the lines of the story making up new rules mid-fight for the heroes to use to win. While I've only seen a few movies for YYH and nothing of HxH, I think that post-timeskip Naruto did have some very intelligent fights (albeit virtually all of those were ones that didn't involve Naruto himself).

Quote:
The fanservice elements are pretty cringey on the whole, but the same could be said for 90% of fanservice in ANY series, most of which somehow manage to pull it off even worse.

I don't think most of them were worse than Negima. Quite the contrary, Negima seemed to be quite keen on the "quantity, not quality" philosophy in that area, which I feel is exactly the wrong tact to take (though again, that's apparently a common mistake where fan-service is concerned).

Quote:
It would NOT be at all hard to adapt it into a successful anime series, particularly if they skipped or trimmed down chapters 4-~40 and just started with Negi's introduction and went straight to some of the more action-y parts of the early chapters (exploring the insane library, the school trip, etc.), leveling out the curve from "Harem comedy" - "S$@! just got real in .25 seconds flat" to "Light-hearted action series" - "S@#& got real-er". - "Now it's really real for real".

If it got its head on straight about keeping one vision for what it wanted to be, and stuck with that from beginning to end, then that would definitely be an improvement. But I question how much I'd like it even then, because it's very clear how much the series favors its heroes in terms of handing them superior numbers, easily-acquired powers, and moral certitude (or at least a lack of any serious bevy of doubts) all as a package.

Quote:
It's a series that as an action show is IMO at least as good as Naruto or Bleach, and I'd say better than their latter halves. It's kind of weird that it's not more popular even disregarding quality since for a lot of otaku it's two great tastes that taste great together.

There's much to indict Bleach on, but I think that Naruto gets a worse rap than it deserves. If you cut out the filler material, the post-timeskip stuff is actually better than the preceding material, to my mind (certainly the main character becomes more likeable, to my mind).

Quote:
You can't tell me that in a world where shows like High School of the Dead were intensely popular, an adaptation of this series could never make it.

And yet that's the world we're living in.


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Sundakan wrote:
As a tangent, given the overwhelming popularity of both Shonen action and fanservice Harem series', WHY by all that is holy is there not a good adaptation of Negima! Magister Negi Magi?

I agree with Bjorn that the source material isn't very good, but I disagree as to why.

Negima initially portrayed itself as the spiritual successor to Love Hina (and given a few easter eggs, that might have been more than just spiritual). Love Hina itself was less than perfect - to me, its cast became the embodiments of various tropes to such an extent that it inhibited showcasing who they were as characters - but it still managed to become an archetype among harem shows.

Negima initially posited itself as being the same but taken to a whole other level, what with having a harem of over thirty girls. But then something happened...the series underwent a genre shift. It became less and less romantic/sexy hijinks and more and more shonen action/adventure. This, at least to me, was a deal-breaker.

They key here (again, to me) wasn't due to what it started as, nor what it became. I like harem shows, and I like shonen action/adventure shows (for the most part). The problem was that it tried to change its tone; this is something that as a rule is extremely difficult to pull off, because once your audience has bought the initial premise, changing that underlying premise is essentially you pulling the rug out from under them. The show is no longer what they signed on for, and now you have to sell them on why they should stick with you even after you snatched back what you initially sold them.

I've seen shows that have been able to do this. Negima wasn't one of them.

EDIT: I also hated the fact that the series kept portraying the good guys as being the opposite of underdogs; "overdogs," if you will. If you have the heroes being consistently more numerous, more powerful (to be fair, Negima usually split the difference on this one), and receiving more popular support than the villains, then I find it incredibly hard to root for them. Heroes feel heroic when they're struggling against unfavorable odds, and yet Negima just kept giving advantage after advantage after advantage to its ever-expanding cast of good guys. It was boring at best, irritating at worst (since it meant we had to listen to the heroes bemoaning their situation despite having virtually everything in their favor).

Again, some shows can get away with having the protagonist be far and away greater than all of their opposition, but Negima wasn't one of them.


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I'm uncertain if a trap the soul spell would be impeded or otherwise affected if you cast it on the astral body of someone using an astral projection spell.

Mainly, this is because trap the soul says that it also pulls your physical body into the gem, but in this case your physical body is presumably on another plane, far outside of the spell's range. In that case, what happens? Does your original body get pulled in even though it's on another plane? If not, does the spell work on your soul/astral body? What if your original body dies after you've been trapped?


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Freehold DM wrote:
I f&*!ing love koihime musou. But that's because I play the game.

Yeah, the game is undeniably better than the show.


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Adapting a work from one medium to another often entails having to make alterations to the presentation. Sometimes the reasons for these changes are self-evident, and other times they leave you scratching your head in confusion over why they did what they did. In the case of Koihime Musou ("Love Princess Unmatched"), it had elements of both, but leaned quite a bit more towards the latter.

The anime version of the eroge of the same name, Koihime Musou is a thirty-six-episode anime divided into three cours of twelve episodes each. My experience with the original games is limited, but from what I can tell each cour is loosely adapted from the three versions of the game (from what I can tell, the subsequent games in the series are expansions to the original, rather than sequels).

I use the word "loosely" here for a reason; while the anime keeps the setting and characters from the source material, it jettisons almost all of the plot elements, only to find that it has very little with which to fill in the gaps. That's the major reason that I've spent the last few paragraphs harping on how the anime isn't the game; in firmly deciding what not to be, the show struggles to define itself.

The basic outline of the show is that it's the story of Romance of the Three Kingdoms (e.g. set during the turbulent times of China in the late second century), with all of the major characters being presented as beautiful girls. To this end, the show puts most of its emphasis on Kan'u, showing her early travels through the countryside as she tries to figure out how she can make a difference for the better. During these wanderings, she falls in with Chouhi, Koumei, Chouun, and pretty much everyone you'd expect from the "Shoku" faction of the novel, as well as having meetings with almost every other major player from the original Romance story. Later episodes take more latitude in spotlighting other characters.

Unfortunately, this large cast comes at the cost of any actual plot or character development. Kan'u and her sworn-sisters never actually engage in the large-scale fighting that was the subject of the original Chinese novel. The warring that the titular three kingdoms are supposed to be engaged in has been pushed so far into the background that it's only referenced obliquely, with the characters making reference to "these turbulent times" more than once. (Naturally, this completely precludes the game's meta-plot about time-travel and parallel universes.)

So given everything that the show isn't, what is it actually about? Well...not very much. In terms of genre, the show is essentially a low-grade comedy series. The gags are fairly nonstop, and usually of middling quality at best (e.g. the running joke about people saying to Kan'u, "Wait, you're the famous 'Black-Haired Bounty Hunter?' But I thought the rumors said that she was supposed to be a real beauty!") What fight scenes there are make absolutely no attempt to create any kind of dramatic tension, nor visually impress. Instead, we're just supposed to laugh over things like the recurring thugs who get continually launched into the air Team Rocket-style, or Chouun's obsession with menma (pickled bamboo shoots), or Enshou's combination of complete incompetence and unwarranted arrogance, etc.

The show does have one other thing going for it, that being the ecchi factor. The show treats this as largely being yet more fodder for humor, and so is fairly casual in its presentation. In this regard, the series straddles keeping these vaguely-naughty bits in-character (e.g. some of the girls needling each other about the size of their boobs or being lesbians, etc.) and meta-contextual (e.g. the many times we get scenes of the girls bathing). Of course, these latter scenes are censored with pervasive steam-clouds, which further weaken one of the show's few remaining draws.

The end result is a show that has very little going for it. A paper-thin plot combined with a wide cast of one-note characters makes for a show that's lacking in substance. To be fair, the series is eminently aware of this, but rather than taking steps to address it seems to take an attitude of "why try hard?" Ironically, this works in its favor, as it helps to lower expectations.

Overall, Koihime Musou isn't so much a bad anime as a lazy one. If you go into it expecting nothing more, then there are certainly worse shows to kill some time with.


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So I'm not sure how many people have heard about this, but on Monday the U.S. Supreme Court made a 5-3 ruling in Utah v. Strieff.

Up until now, the "exclusionary rule" - the rule that says that evidence which the police gather illegally cannot then be used in a court prosecution - applied to instances where the police stop someone without a "reasonable articulable suspicion."

However, the new ruling says that if the police stop you even without any such suspicion, evidence that they subsequently seize could still be admissible. According to Justice Thomas, writing for the majority, this won't cause police overreach because the threat of civil suits will keep them in line.

There's a good op-ed about this over here.


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Pure fanboyism here, but I keep hoping that Dragonball Super brings back...

Spoiler:
...the Super Saiyan 4 transformation. It was one of the few things that I liked about GT, and it's a shame to see it being lost with the rest of that series almost certainly being de-canonized. Obviously that wouldn't happen with the heroes, but saiyan villains could potentially bring it back; hence why I kept hoping that we'd see it with the universe 6 saiyans, and now I'm hoping that we'll get that with Black Goku. It's unlikely, but hope springs eternal.


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I have to say, Bayonetta 2 was one hell of a great game, even without getting Bayonetta 1 for free with it.

Also, still playing the heck out of Hyrule Warriors.


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One of the characteristics of many harem shows is that they don't feature an actual harem, per se. That is, they typically feature a cast of three or more girls (having only two is a love triangle, rather than a harem) simultaneously competing for the same guy, rather than a featuring a stable polyamorous relationship between one guy and multiple girls.

Magika Swordsman and Summoner (Magika No Kenshi To Shoukan Maou) is one of the latter.

Magika is a light novel series with eleven volumes to date, and is ongoing. While there is a manga adaptation (which is receiving an official English translation), there's no anime that I'm aware of. At least, not yet. That said, the light novels have been translated into English via the fan community.

Set in the near future, Magika features a world where magic has come back, and completely changed everything. Everyone has at least some magic power, which can be used for defensive purposes, which is important because magic pretty much always trumps non-magic, making things like guns useless. Beyond mere physical enhancement, however, is summoning magic - the ability to bond with an astral entity (virtually always a god or spirit from a mythology), that allows for the use of stronger magical abilities. Only a few people have this, all of them women (since women naturally have greater magical affinity than men).

As a result of this, every country has exalted those who contract with its native mythology, becoming theocracies. The sole exception is Japan, where rather than the native mythology, the summoners contract with the spirits of the Lesser Key of Solomon.

It's against this backdrop that we meet Kazuki Hayashizaki, the only male to receive a summoning contract. Moreover, his contracted spirit isn't one that's among the seventy-two spirits that form the Pillars of Solomon.

It's not a spoiler to reveal that Kazuki's contracted spirit, Leme, is actually the incarnation of the Lemegeton (e.g. Lesser Key of Solomon) itself, as this forms the central premise of the series; Leme lets Kazuki use the powers of up to seventy-two other spirits, but his ability to do so is entirely dependent on how the girls contracted to those spirits feel about him. In essence, his power is directly tied to how many girls are in his harem, and how they feel about him.

It's this contextualization that really helps to ground the series, in terms of making everything adhere to the internal logic it presents. Kazuki, for example, is initially extremely leery of being a "harem king" - as Leme terms him - but given that summoners are needed to fight magic beasts (e.g. animals that have gained too much magic power and mutated) and rogue summoners, he quickly comes to realize that he needs to establish himself with multiple girls if he wants to have enough power to do anything.

Moreover, the eleven volumes (and counting) give the series enough room to spread this contextualization to other areas that a tighter focus would be hard-pressed to answer, such as why Japan's summoners don't use the native Japanese mythology, what mythology America's summoners use, or even what really constitutes a "mythology" in the first place and how that relates to these astral entities. There's some well-considered world-building here, even though it's doled out in small bits over the whole of the novels.

While I wouldn't go quite so far as to call the series lighthearted, it's far from being grim. The adventure portions of the series do stray into drama and tension with credible ability, for example. But the series never loses sight of the fact that it's home is in the harem genre. Even leaving aside the illustrations being focused primarily on beautiful girl after beautiful girl, the series placed a great deal of focus on Kazuki meeting new girls and increasing his "positivity level" - a handy numerical ranking that Leme gives him that lets him see what girls like him and how much - with them.

Overall, Magika is not just one of the better harem series around, but can credibly be called one of the best. Its adventure-focus means that it never gets completely lost in the sexy hijinks, while keeping said hijinks at the narrative forefront of the story and developing them as things progress (by the last couple of novels, Kazuki's relationship with the girls with the highest positivity level are very nearly pornographic). If you're a fan of harem stories, this one should definitely go in your reading list.


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Judy Bauer wrote:
Judy Bauer wrote:
I'd be interested to see whether there's been any change in the 19 years since that study was published, given how much more time people now spend reading online content, which is much more "they"-friendly.

Lo! I was just reading Stephen Pinker's The Sense of Style (tl;dr: linguist analyzing writing style advice based on linguistic data and a panel of folks who work on dictionaries), and he says

Quote:
Experiments that measure readers' reading comprehension times to the thousandth of a second have shown that singular they causes little or no delay, but generic he slows them down a lot (Foertsch & Gernsbacher, 1997; M. Liberman, "Prescriptivist Science," Language Log, 2008).

If that's the sum total of what Pinker says about this citation, then he's leaving out quite a bit of context.

The citation here is for a 2008 paper (the M. Liberman citation) that looks at the Foertsch & Gernsbacher 1997 paper and then compares it to a 2007 paper (A. J. Sanford & R. Filik, Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 60(2) 171-178, 2007).

In his paper, Liberman relates that the Foertsch & Gernsbacher paper determined that the singular they didn't impose any extra cognitive load as compared to "stereotype-mismatched pronouns (e.g. "truck driver … she" or "nurse … he")"

Liberman then goes on to compare this to the 2007 Sanford & Filik paper, which looks at "The plural pronouns they and them are used to refer to individuals with unknown gender and when a random allocation of gender is undesirable. Despite this apparently felicitous usage, “singular they/them” should raise processing problems under the theory that pronouns seek gender- and number-matched antecedents."

Liberman notes that Sanford and Filik's data shows the following:

Quote:

For him or her with a singular antecedent, the average was 1380 milliseconds, while for them with a singular antecedent, the average total reading time was 1414 milliseconds — a 34 millisecond difference! This difference was statistically significant, at least when the times were compared segment by segment. But the time for reading all three segments was only about 2.4% slower on average.

In contrast, him or her with a plural antecedent required an average of 1521 msec to read all three segments, while them with a plural antecedent took an average of 1315 msec, or 206 msec faster. That's a difference of about 16%.

In other words, using "they" after having already established the presence of multiple people was faster than using a singular pronoun - whether male or female - after having established the presence of multiple people. Liberman further notes their conclusion:

Quote:

While the use of they as a genderless “singular” referential pronoun in certain contexts certainly occurs and does not seem to cause problems of felicity from the point of view of casual observation, some processing difficulties were nevertheless observed in our eye-tracking study. Earlier researchers (Foertsch & Gernsbacher, 1997) found that with neutral, apparently genderless, antecedents like someone, or a runner subsequent clauses referring to that individual by he or she, or they, revealed no reliable disadvantage in the case of using they. On the surface, this might be taken as compatible with the position that there is indeed no processing disadvantage to using they as a genderless singular. In the present experiment, we increased the sensitivity of the design in two ways. First, we used continuous eye-tracking, enabling more subtle measurement of any possible patterns of disruption. Secondly, we compared the effects of genderless referential plural antecedents with that of genderless singular referential antecedents. On total time for the pronoun region, we observed a strong, conventional, number-mismatch effect, such that plural pronouns created less processing disruption in the context of plural antecedents than in the context of genderless singular antecedents.

This result is compatible with the view that after encountering a plural pronoun (they, them), a search is initiated for a plural antecedent in the mental representation of the discourse and not for one that could be either plural or singular. So where does this leave the singular use of they/them? Since it is in common use, we suggest that although it gives rise to a mismatch, it is rapidly accommodated as an acceptable deviation. This is quite unlike the case with singular pronouns in the context of plural antecedents, because these are not in common use and, we claim, do not make sense without making an inference like “he or she refers to just one of the plurality in the antecedent”.

Most important, however, seems to be Liberman's ultimate conclusion after looking these papers over:

Quote:
But crucially, despite references to questions of usage, these papers are mainly oriented towards a debate among psycholinguists about the nature of pronoun processing, not towards a debate about pronoun usage among providers of writing advice. And as a result, the experiments don't directly address the issue that really matters in most practical cases — how should you refer to a non-referential singular indefinite antecedent ("anyone"; "a student"; etc.) when you need or want to leave sex unspecified? To be relevant to this real usage debate, experiments would need to test they against "he or she" (or "she or he", or "that person", or whatever); and would also need to check systematically for the cognitive load imposed by attempts to use he as a default pronoun.

So the idea that "singular they causes little or no delay, but generic he slows them down a lot," as Pinker notes, is eschewing a very large degree of data, to the point of not accurately representing the results...which don't really speak to the issue of wanting a non-gendered singular pronoun that isn't confusing anyway.


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I've long been of the opinion that the absence of something good in a show doesn't necessarily make it a bad show. There's a difference between an actual instance of failure, in any particular regard, and simply not doing something very well. That's the difference between a series that's genuinely bad versus those that are forgettable in their mediocrity.

This latter category is how I would categorize Linebarrels of Iron (Kurogane no Linebarrel). (I should also note that, in the English title, there really doesn't seem like there should be an "s" in "Linebarrels." That's because not only is there no such sound in the original Japanese, but the actual Linebarrel in the show is unique. But I digress.)

A twenty-four episode series, Linebarrels takes place in the extremely near future. It begins when a perpetually-bullied young man, Kouichi Hayase, is killed when a giant mech falls out of the sky and crushes him. Resurrected by the guilt-stricken (and very beautiful) female pilot, Kouichi finds that his newfound lease on life has not made him into the pilot of that mech - the eponymous Linebarrel - and in doing so dragged him into a war that's just breaking out between KATO-KIKAN (a ruthless terrorist organization determined to rule the world) and a small group fighting against them.

While the initial premise isn't anything to write home about, it's the execution where the series really fails to deliver. I enjoyed the fact that, once Kouichi finds out how much power he's been given, it almost immediately goes to his head, resulting in him lashing out at anyone who opposes him, regardless of the collateral damage, while pontificating about justice. That struck me as more interesting than his instantly becoming an archetypal hero.

Unfortunately, the show never develops that - or really much of anything - to its full potential. Once Kouichi is made to realize the error of his ways, the show largely develops into a situational comedy with periodic action/adventure breaks. Virtually every cliché you can imagine is utilized, such as the villain who self-confidently says that everything is going according to plan no matter what setbacks he suffers, the hero unlocking new powers with his mech when he becomes utterly enraged, several female characters all pining for Kouichi in their own way (the tsundere leading lady, the spitfire female mech pilot, the warm and caring other female pilot, the childhood friend who's good at cooking, etc.), and even a beach episode with a giant octopus monster.

The worst of these is with characters dying (or about to die), only to be revealed to actually have survived/be rescued/be resurrected later on. That particular bait-and-switch is pulled on us several times over the series, to the point where it becomes more unexpected for characters to actually stay dead (which only happens rarely).

The end result is a series that feels not so much bad as simply paint-by-numbers, and so is rightly overshadowed by other series that have done it better. I read on Wikipedia that the anime for this took a large number of creative liberties from the original manga, and while I haven't read the manga, the anime doesn't seem to have benefitted from having gone so far astray from the source material.

Ultimately, Linebarrels of Iron is such a low-impact show that it's not only not very good, but isn't even very bad, either. It's just sorta there, and can be overlooked with absolutely nothing noteworthy being missed for having done so.


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You don't need to worry, the chart you're thinking of using is entirely Open Game Content; that's why it's on that site.

The link you're referring to is slightly antiquated, but still has the 3.5 SRD on it; it's now under the "d20 System Archive" link on that WotC page.

As a note, the page with the defense bonus isn't from the 3.5 SRD anyway, but rather from Unearthed Arcana, which had a lot of its text made Open Gaming Content. As such, you need to include it in your Section 15 of your publication.

To keep it simple, your publication would need to reprint all of the text on this page above the words "END OF LICENSE."


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Thomas Seitz wrote:

Yeah well. Even still.

Did Dean finally punch God in the face?

Spoiler:
Nope. Rather, Dean treated God pretty much the way someone would treat a deadbeat dad who suddenly walked back into their life.

Appropriately enough, God said to Dean flat-out, "Don't confuse me with your dad."

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