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Sleepless Detective

Abraham spalding's page

RPG Superstar 2015 Star Voter. Pathfinder Society Member. 10,450 posts (15,256 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. 1 wishlist. 13 aliases.


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Star Voter 2015

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I suffer from HCSS... in ink.

I just prefer pen.

Usually my characters take the form of a note book, and when I rewrite the character for a new level I take the last blank page, fold it and put the new updated sheet after that.

Spoiler:

I've considered converting them to ascii extended and hexadecimal but it seemed like it might be overkill.

Star Voter 2015

Well remember we are just 'weighing' the list -- the judges are still going to go through and do what they do.

Any time I get to the point where I'm like, "Yuck" I remind myself that it's not the end of the judgement (or even really the beginning) and step out for a bit.

Star Voter 2015

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Another thought:

I have had GM's before that didn't allow debuffs to work like the should. For some reason no matter how much debuffing was applied it never seemed to have an affect.

Did these players have that sort of conditioning in the past?

Also (and again) all the debuff and battle field control in the world will not kill the enemy. At the end of the day you still have to but lead in the target. As why delay and waste resources on stuff that is still going to lead you to simply killing the enemy?

If you want them to use less than lethal tactics you need to have your foes use and expect the appropriate responses from those tactics.

For example I have had my NPCs disarm PCs before and expected them to surrender then (typically this would be guards that weren't really wanting to kill and were willing to let the PCs simply walk away if they would). If an NPC had been hit with stinking cloud and it worked on the majority of them they would surrender, and so forth.

Showing that these sorts of effects can have the response the players desire can help cause them to use them more often.

Star Voter 2015

Primitive doesn't mean of less value. Sophisticated does not mean of more value. These descriptors do not assign value in and of themselves.

Star Voter 2015

Multiple sources over multiple time periods. The idea of using shields as walls is nothing new, dating back to the Greeks, Egyptians and moving up through the more recent years with the riot shield.

The tower shield as it is presented in the game is more an amalgamation of the idea of a large shield you can hide behind than it is sourced from any single historical shield.

Star Voter 2015

Energy Drain is a specific thing in pathfinder. All death ward does is protect you from energy drain and negative energy.

So It will stop you from taking a negative level from a vampire's attack or from a succubus. It will not help against strength damage or strength drain unless the effect is from something that specifically calls out that it is negative energy or death magic.

Please note the last line -- this spell does not protect against other sorts of attacks, even if those attacks might be lethal.

Star Voter 2015

thejeff wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:
thejeff wrote:
alexd1976 wrote:
I would argue that those who need saving most are those who have fallen farthest. Now, Demons and such don't have children, so that's out, but without resorting to metagame information, characters (if good) should at least think about trying to save/reform ANY youngling, as long as they have the capacity for thought! Is the baby black dragon to blame for it's parents transgressions?

Dragons fall into a different category, both from humanoids and from evil outsiders. Dragons have young, but those young appear to be independent and quite capable from near birth. They're not paying for their parent's transgressions, they're quite capable of committing their own - on a smaller scale, but that's a matter of power not moral culpability. Wyrmling dragons make good BBEGs for low level adventures. They're smart, dangerous and can pretty easily get a tribe of kobolds or something for minions.

It's a bit of stretch to think that even wyrmlings need to be treated as innocents despite their own actions, just because they're technically young. Much less, for example, a CR 11, 40 year old, juvenile red dragon.

Yeah that's why I did wyverns for my dragonish write up. Going with a full blown dragon considering the age categories and so on was just too much for what I wanted to write.

And interesting thought though would be if different dragons matured at different rates than other dragons did. For example if white dragons 'matured' quicker than say gold dragons.

But even without the length of the age categories, the very youngest seem quite independent. Dragons are never helpless innocents in the way a human child is.

Yeah dragons tend to be more like cats -- get them past that initial spot and they are probably going to be alright.

Star Voter 2015

I agree with everyone else on the formatting though. My main concern with that is:

1. Are the proper fields in the proper places?
2. Are the fields filled properly?

The correct use of bold or italics are good, but as said above by others I'm not going to kill someone over BBC code unless I have to.

Though in the "mental points" of one over the other if I'm having trouble and your item is fully and correctly formatted and the other person's isn't you probably just got the pass.

On grammar and the rules:

It's less of if I like the mechanics or think your use is balanced and more of, "does this person get how these specific mechanics are used, and is the use of this item going to require more paperwork than it is worth?"

If you say, "If the victim passes a reflex save with a DC of 12 the damage is halved" compared to "A reflex save (DC 12) halves the damage" tells me the same thing. I might like the second one better but hey I know the first person also understands the rules. The grammar and formatting of such phrases matter, but not as importantly as being sure to include all the needed information.

Star Voter 2015

Jeff Lee wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:
How long is it? I've noticed an inverse relationship between length and awesomeness this year. Also the longer it is the more formatting issues I've noticed.

I've noticed no such relationship. The majority of extremely short entries seem to be below average. The same can be said for many of the longer entries. Those in the middle also run a gamut. I think it's less about word count and more about structure and flow.

Some longer entries seem like stalling walls of text. Others I can read through without hesitation. That's a definite sign of writing quality.

Yeah the extremely short aren't 'better' it's just the really long ones aren't either.

There have been some really nice long ones, but I yeah, I don't need a full wall and description of how the item is supposed to be made, or a break down on what it is called in a specific culture of a specific world.

I mean if it's a single line and quick I don't mind it but get to the item.

The "sweet spot" on text seems to be between 120~180 words. Though of course some are longer and some are shorter.

And the point that I fought so much at first, everything is relative.

Star Voter 2015

How long is it? I've noticed an inverse relationship between length and awesomeness this year. Also the longer it is the more formatting issues I've noticed.

Is the formatting close? Alright formatting is super important but this is the internet and things happen. I'm not going to fail someone just for an HTML screw up.

Does the item work? Cool ideas are alright but if your item shows you have no clue how the base mechanics of the game work you are a pass -- we've had too much of that stuff happen already in the hobby.

Is the item well written? I'm not an English major but if your spelling makes me winch, and your grammar is atrocious you are going to get a pass.

Is the item made correctly? If you have a sword of magic missile and it requires grease to make it I'm going to be confused.

Is the item flat out cool? If so you can get a pass on some of the above.

Star Voter 2015

thejeff wrote:
alexd1976 wrote:
I would argue that those who need saving most are those who have fallen farthest. Now, Demons and such don't have children, so that's out, but without resorting to metagame information, characters (if good) should at least think about trying to save/reform ANY youngling, as long as they have the capacity for thought! Is the baby black dragon to blame for it's parents transgressions?

Dragons fall into a different category, both from humanoids and from evil outsiders. Dragons have young, but those young appear to be independent and quite capable from near birth. They're not paying for their parent's transgressions, they're quite capable of committing their own - on a smaller scale, but that's a matter of power not moral culpability. Wyrmling dragons make good BBEGs for low level adventures. They're smart, dangerous and can pretty easily get a tribe of kobolds or something for minions.

It's a bit of stretch to think that even wyrmlings need to be treated as innocents despite their own actions, just because they're technically young. Much less, for example, a CR 11, 40 year old, juvenile red dragon.

Yeah that's why I did wyverns for my dragonish write up. Going with a full blown dragon considering the age categories and so on was just too much for what I wanted to write.

And interesting thought though would be if different dragons matured at different rates than other dragons did. For example if white dragons 'matured' quicker than say gold dragons.

Star Voter 2015

Well it may not technically qualify but:

I had a room that had a teleportation circle on the floor that linked to the ceiling both of which are cloaked in a deeper darkness spell. The room itself is round and about 5 stories in total with no floors. Boulders are constantly falling from the ceiling to the floor and of course teleporting back to the top of the room and continuing to fall. There are doors out of the room at various heights. Each "floor" is actually a 5 x 5 foot Wall of Force trap set to creatures stepping on that 5x5 section. These "floor traps" are set in horizontal intervals ten feet from each other vertically. Once a creature step to the next square the wall of force that was acting as the floor in the last square disappears (until someone else steps into that square.

Inanimate objects do not set off the floor sections but they can be set off from below, and the teleportation effect is only from floor to ceiling. At the outside of each door is a 3 foot radius metal ring. If you set the ring before stepping on a new floor section you can cause the wall of force to form around the ring allowing people to pass through it to the floor above or below the on you are currently on. A successful disable device can stop a wall of force floor tile from appearing as well if you have the trapfinding class ability.

Of course you have to dodge the falling rocks and any attacks of enemy creatures in the room.

Star Voter 2015

DominusMegadeus wrote:
"I only eat people if I'm hungry, don't smite me bro!"

Meh, cannibalism in extreme need might be a plausible excuse for neutrality. It's not like the dungeon ecosystem is a vast and fully stocked one I guess.

If nothing else it would be funny in game.

Star Voter 2015

Mythic Evil Lincoln wrote:

Wraithstrike and Lemmy...

Why am I hearing the Car Talk guys when I read your critique of that statblock?

You should have a thread where you do just that. Block Talk or something.

You just ruined my day because now I remember that one of them recently died.

Star Voter 2015

Ascalaphus wrote:

You can't Slashing Grace the sword cane, it's a piercing weapon.

You can use Finesse on the sword cane though, which means you could also get an Agile sword cane.

Good point thamks for correcting me.

Star Voter 2015

If you want dexed based you might want to consider the sword cane still.

It can be finessed which means you can use slashing grace with it, which you can't do with a short sword. Of course you lose out on the crits but it can still be inspired.

So Dex to damage or higher crit range. Of course if you get an agile inspired short sword then forget the sword cane.

Depends on if you want to spend gold of a feat, and how early you want that damage.

Rapier is still a better choice though (due to all of the above and the crit range).

Star Voter 2015

Ms. Pleiades wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:
Ms. Pleiades wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:
The Human Diversion wrote:
Does Pathfinder have something akin to the old Anticipate Teleport spell?
Better and worse: They have some feats that can cover it.
Well, 1/10th of your character's most scarce resource to prevent Demonic cheesing of powers, if your GM is the sort to use their teleport in such a manner, I doubt they'll let the feat be honestly effective if you take it. I bet the feat has some hefty taxes on it too.
The tax is not too onerous, skill points mostly, range is a bit of an issue, it is a constant ability so that is nice. A gm can kill anything so that is really a non-argument.
Can I get a link to this feat? Might be useful as a flavor feat for builds that aren't feat-starved. Just one guy in the party knows when somebody is teleporting in, so he yells out "Incoming!" to the group.

There are two:

Teleport Sense

Teleport Tactician

Teleport Sense is better for avoiding ambushes, and teleport tactician is better for stopping them from getting away (also the more expensive of the two).

Star Voter 2015

Avatar-1 wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:
Games workshop dice pull 1s almost 30 percent of the time. Saw an article on it recently, ...
Source/link?

Not ignoring still looking, I have plenty of links to posts about it, I'm looking for the actual study. It was on the Fark geek tap last week or the week before.

Star Voter 2015

Ms. Pleiades wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:
The Human Diversion wrote:
Does Pathfinder have something akin to the old Anticipate Teleport spell?
Better and worse: They have some feats that can cover it.
Well, 1/10th of your character's most scarce resource to prevent Demonic cheesing of powers, if your GM is the sort to use their teleport in such a manner, I doubt they'll let the feat be honestly effective if you take it. I bet the feat has some hefty taxes on it too.

The tax is not too onerous, skill points mostly, range is a bit of an issue, it is a constant ability so that is nice. A gm can kill anything so that is really a non-argument.

Star Voter 2015

The Human Diversion wrote:
Does Pathfinder have something akin to the old Anticipate Teleport spell?

Better and worse: They have some feats that can cover it.

Star Voter 2015

Scythia wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:
Games workshop dice pull 1s almost 30 percent of the time. Saw an article on it recently, you are best off with vegas dice for d6s.
As I recall, the Game Science dice didn't do much better. As I also recall, there were questions about the rolling method, and issues with repeatability of those results. :P

Rolling methods always matter of course,and I have no doubt the study will be and will continue to be contentious.

Star Voter 2015

Games workshop dice pull 1s almost 30 percent of the time. Saw an article on it recently, you are best off with vegas dice for d6s.

Star Voter 2015

Warhammer's dice are really bad too.

Star Voter 2015

thejeff wrote:
Gaberlunzie wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:
The idea that people deserve to die just because they are jerks is completely outrageous.

No it really isn't. Everyone is going to die over something -- the fact you (generic sense, not you specifically Big) constantly cause grief and it finally catches up to them isn't tragic. It's a better reason to die than simply being in the wrong place and someone not liking the way you look (Zimmerman I am looking at you).

You piss off enough people and eventually it's going to come back and bite you. People forget that humans are social creatures, if you don't play in the society eventually the herd (or pack) will cull you or something else will.

Thing is, this argument is never used when a cop is shot. Then it's all "oh they were a hero dying to that criminal scum". Despite that they cause grief all the time.

It also ties in nicely to the "It's the black people's fault" theme. If it's not because they're criminals, it's because they must just be jerks to cops more often.

Agreed -- I was only talking to the initial point of jerks and what they get. There has been many a jerk die in the line of duty and thereby had their questionable qualities overlooked when they really shouldn't have been.

Star Voter 2015

BigDTBone wrote:
The idea that people deserve to die just because they are jerks is completely outrageous.

No it really isn't. Everyone is going to die over something -- the fact you (generic sense, not you specifically Big) constantly cause grief and it finally catches up to them isn't tragic. It's a better reason to die than simply being in the wrong place and someone not liking the way you look (Zimmerman I am looking at you).

You piss off enough people and eventually it's going to come back and bite you. People forget that humans are social creatures, if you don't play in the society eventually the herd (or pack) will cull you or something else will.

BigDTBone wrote:
The idea that cops killing innocent people should be less outrageous because they were jerks is frankly nauseating.

However this I agree with. Cops shouldn't just kill people because they are jerks.

However like anything else just being a jerk shouldn't protect you from things either, and if all you do is be a jerk all I can do is shrug when it finally gets back to you.

A lot of these sorts of people cause their own deaths or problems more often than not (again not that we should "darwin police" as much as the idea doesn't quite appall me as much it should).

Star Voter 2015

1 person marked this as a favorite.
UnArcaneElection wrote:

(Somehow I missed this before.)

Icyshadow wrote:
I find nothing wrong with that. Only canon ones that come to my mind are places where the Clerics of Shelyn and Sarenrae operate though.

Reportedly, in Wrath of the Righteous, Desna is at least experimentally into this as well. Although not all of the Good deities seem to be into this, and even the ones that try to be don't seem to get very good efficiency with it.

Which is actually kind of understandable -- after all it's one thing to sit here all and talk about how it would be accomplished...

it's another thing entirely to actually spend years of your life trying to do it and not mess it up.

Add to this the complexity of not really having a full grasp on the physiology, psychology, and initial culture of the creatures in question plus the worker's own cultural bias and unspoken assumptions and it's hairy. I mean just look at some of the various issues we have had on this planet with just one species... now you got how many and the other such baggage we have plus the rest of the pathfinder world too?

Hard times.

While I'm all about it and think it's great I also realize that the success rates are not likely to be phenomenal especially when first starting up.

Star Voter 2015

Bad planning by the GM makes bombs more powerful. They are supernatural and therefore don't have to worry about spell resistance, and they target touch ac. With the availability of the discovery that lets them throw more than one in a round an alchemist can nova pretty hard -- once or twice a day.

After a bomb nova the alchemist still isn't done because he still has his mutagen and extracts to fall back on.

These two things can easily be overlooked at early levels and take a GM by surprise when they come into play.

Star Voter 2015

Aelryinth wrote:

The problem here is defining the energy.

Exactly how many names are there for magic/ki/psionics? Every single Anime seems to call it something new. In Bleach, it's reitsu. In Airbender, it's Karma or something. IN Naruto, it's chakra. One Piece, Haki. In other places, it's mana. In others, chi. Then akasha, and whatnot.

So, the nature and name of the power changes radically from place to place. Clear definitions between them start to blur.

I've seen ki used as the definition of every single type of power out there, from spirituality to berserkergang to spellcasting to alchemy. In others, it is the reward of self-perfection, meditative power of spirit. In The Gamer, Magic points are used in both spellcasting and martial combat, they are the same thing.

D&D is fairly unique in that psionics, ki, magic, rage, and alchemy are all different power sources, some of which interact, some of which do not.

I think how you define the energy(ies) and how they interact is one of the defining things of your campaign, really.

==Aelryinth

I typically go by the definition of where the energy is supposed to come from as the defining characteristic with "what it can do" being secondary.

Magic is inherently not of this realm by every reading of it I have come across. This is not to say it isn't 'natural' is a cosmic sense but that it's non-physical, non-mental. You can be a mental giant and not use magic. You can be top form physically and not have magic -- it's tied intrinsically to an outside source metaphysically speaking (this would be why you call down the corners and such in most magical traditions).

Psychic is by definition of the mind, and of a personal nature.

Ki is of the world and is life itself -- you have life and therefore with training can access it but that training is going to include physical and mental rigor because life is both so to speak.

I agree that these are called multiple names in different cases but while names are important (a keypoint in magic in fact) most traditions break down on those lines (that I have seen).

Star Voter 2015

FWIW:

James Jacobs has some thoughts about this in this thread.

Star Voter 2015

You probably realize it with a name like that but this is the same can of worms that is opened when you have an ability that says, "you can choose to reroll after your roll but before you know if you succeeded or not."

Star Voter 2015

cnetarian wrote:
ElementalXX wrote:
I actually complain about the dagger doing less damage than a greatsword. I believe players shouldnt be penalized for wanting to play an specific trope.
It isn't as if there is a major difference between the two, a +3 holy bane dagger wielded by a smiting paladin using power attack in two hands for 1d4 + 40 + 4d6 does on average about 93% of the damage a similar greatsword similarly wielded for 2d6 + 40 + 4d6 does; and the dagger is easier to throw, lighter, and can do slashing OR piercing damage. Sure at lower levels there might be a difference between the dagger and the greatsword but comparisons were only valid at level 15+. /sarc

Can't two hand a dagger.

Ooooh, now I see the sarcasm slashie...

Star Voter 2015

1 person marked this as a favorite.
thejeff wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:
deusvult wrote:

One might express the original question in another way:

Why do people consider magic and psionics as compatible in a fantasy setting? Psionics, afterall, is what you call magic in a sci-fi setting!

Metaphysically speaking they aren't. Same with Ki -- they are different sources developed in different ways and used completely differently for different effects.

In game settings, yes. In genre literature? I can't actually think of anything offhand that has both. It's certainly not common.

Most fantasy sticks with one kind of magic - even having different divine and arcane magic is pretty rare. Some fantasy uses psionics, usually, but not always when they're trying to be more science fantasy than straight fantasy.

Science fiction stories use psionics or similar things - The Force, for example - if they're playing around with any kind of magic at all.

There are probably some true crossovers that I'm not thinking of, but it's very, very rare. The two things serve the same role in different stories. Having both is rarely necessary.

Edit: Major exception would be superhero comics, but those are a mishmash of different genres anyways.

No I meant more in the same sense people were talking about alchemy earlier different.

Psychics claim that what they are doing is more tied into either an over-conscious or through exploration of their own mind. That it's an inherent step in evolution or something natural to the human mind that can augment human interaction with the world through use of the mind's power. It's powers tend to stay in line with "common" science -- you have to have a 'line of power' the energy to exert and the means of activation. You should theoretically be able to use telekinesis in space but it's not really going to be "easier" since you are moving the same mass. In effect the spoon is real, but your interaction with it isn't physical.

Ki comes from development of the total self (more akin to alchemy than alchemy is to magic really) and allows transcendence over the universe not through "mastery" of the universe but through the growth of your own energy. Transcendence isn't a matter of changing the world around but instead changing how you interact with the world. All the world is still the same you just have a better control over your own reactions/responses to it. With enough mastery over self you can begin to feel and understand the follow of ki through other things but this does not let you change the 'truth' of the object -- but instead simply understand how to best interact with it.

Magic is a linking with powers beyond this realm. Through the use of the principles of influence, sympathy and transference (to name but three) the use of these external energies are brought to effect the mundane. This does not actually require "personal growth" but instead greater underestanding of those energies and the ability to pull them through. However these energies are easiest to use through indirect means. Throwing a fireball would be truly impressive as it represents a very... 'vulgar' expression of magic -- the sheer amount and control over the energies would be astounding. However to set up influence with a place have it express a sympathy with fire and then use transference of that sympathy to cause... "a series of unfortunate events" to cause a place to burn down would be easier. However magic is more fraught since the use of outside energies can bring the attention of outside beings, and magic itself tends to cause the user to be bound by the same laws that are used to invoke magic -- hence the care in regards to black magic and the admonition of the rule of three.

TL:DR


  • Psychic is internal use of mental energy to affect the world but is still "bound" by 'science'. Typical expressions will see use of wavelengths (usually claimed to be unknown to current science), and mental energy within the bounds of reality. If you can use a radio then the mind should be able to be tuned to be a radio, for example.
  • Ki is life, and grows "up" -- requires both physical and mental mastery of self, and allows the self to change how things interact with it. At peak levels there is some ability to affect how the flow of Ki moves through others. This does not affect 'fate' but allows greater control of self and transcendence of normal interaction by understanding how to reinforce the self against that interaction.
  • Magic requires outside energies not of this realm pulled through. Principles exist for magic but through use tend to also bind the user to them. The same effect can be achieved through multiple means and no "personal growth" is 'required' for use -- though knowing the rules before 'playing' is highly recommended.

Some literary examples include Full Metal Alchemist (brotherhood), a certain magical index, a certain scientific railgun, blue exorcist to pop a couple of anime off the top of my head. I'll have more later but I have to do some quick checking to make sure I name the right books.

One key thing to remember about general metaphysical studies is that you really can't lump all systems into the same pot and call it even. While several traditions do lend themselves to one of the three above if you look at how each does things I think you'll find a trend where the above break out is the 'baseline' that most forms build out of (speaking only in generalities).

Star Voter 2015

deusvult wrote:

One might express the original question in another way:

Why do people consider magic and psionics as compatible in a fantasy setting? Psionics, afterall, is what you call magic in a sci-fi setting!

Metaphysically speaking they aren't. Same with Ki -- they are different sources developed in different ways and used completely differently for different effects.

Star Voter 2015

Artemis Moonstar wrote:

Technically, the 'transmute lead into gold' is metaphorical for transmuting the base self into enlightenment.

Also, for those who didn't know, Alchemy was very much influenced by Astronomy. Positioning of planets, constellations, and so on. Each day was attributed to a planet (Mars, Uranus, Jupiter, etc), and often used certain elixers which were more effective on a given day.

It was rather transcendental as a practice. The real alchemists were those who were seeking to better themselves. The posers were the ones trying to get rich (and derogatorily called 'Puffers' due to the fact that they kept pumping their billows thinking heat was the answer to everything).

Information brought to you by various books on the history of Alchemy.

I aware but the "object lesson" of the stories was such. The practice of alchemy was largely allegorical.

Star Voter 2015

1 person marked this as a favorite.
MagusJanus wrote:

Technically, through nuclear power, we did achieve the alchemist dream of being able to transmute materials.

We just figured out it comes with a bit of a higher cost than the alchemists wanted and involves some very nasty byproducts.

Isn't that one of the oft repeated lessons of the philosopher's stone story though?

Yeah you can do it but by the time you realize how to you don't want to any more and you realize the price is much more than it's worth.

Star Voter 2015

Charon's Little Helper wrote:
Noh Masuku wrote:
You know I remember seeing pictures of some device they had to lower knights onto their horses that were in full plate it was so heavy and awkward...makes you wonder how many times they fell off! And good lord there is that little line on page 169 of the rule book...you would think they could at least put some of these really important ones in BOLD! Thanks for pointing that out...just when you think you know all the rules, sigh...

Full plate wasn't really that heavy. It was 40-60lbs (tops), and that's spread across the body of someone who was in good shape. The main thing would be the joints making your movement a bit stiff, but the weight itself is basically a non-issue. Jousting armor specifically could be somewhat heavier - but it was tournament only.

Heck - back in college I used to wear a 40lb weight vest for strength training pretty much all day, and that's considerably less spread out. The worst thing about it was that the cops were called on me a couple of times because folks thought it was kevlar and I was going to go on a shooting spree or something. (Not that kevlar is ilegal for anyone but ex-cons to have anyway.)

I'll be honest, even in a breastplate and spaulders not made or fitted to me I have pretty good range of motion.

Star Voter 2015

Noh Masuku wrote:
You know I remember seeing pictures of some device they had to lower knights onto their horses that were in full plate it was so heavy and awkward...makes you wonder how many times they fell off! And good lord there is that little line on page 169 of the rule book...you would think they could at least put some of these really important ones in BOLD! Thanks for pointing that out...just when you think you know all the rules, sigh...

I have never seen any actual evidence for the crane thing. I've heard it a couple of times but generally only from folks that don't know any better (no offense, not knowing something is a normal part of life).

Star Voter 2015

thegreenteagamer wrote:
Aelryinth wrote:
Lastly, these are the two completely non-magical classes in the game.

I'm assuming you mean rogues and fighters...?

Cavaliers, Slayers, Brawlers, Barbarians, Monks?

Barbarians and monks are not completely non-magical, though they can be built as such.

Star Voter 2015

Losobal wrote:
Yeah, our monetary system represents 'promise' as opposed to true value of the coins/metal.

I'll be nice and assume that's supposed to be facetious.

Star Voter 2015

My reasonings:

1. Some people are just jerks that want to have power so they can "use" it.

2. Working in a crappy field where you get to see the dregs of society day in and day out leads not just to burn out but to something even worse -- cynicism. That point where you just can't believe good of people. This leads to assumptions outside of what the actual circumstances might lead a reasonable person to think.

3. The pay isn't great. Don't get me wrong it's not minimum wage. But when you are supposed to be one of the upstanding (and kept to a higher standard) and people regularly treat you like crap and you get paid crap too... it's just not a good situation.

4. An "Us versus Them" attitude. On both sides of the divide. Dehumanization is a huge problem for people as a whole.

5. An easy solution and oversimplification of the outcome of using that 'easy solution'.

6. A lack of clear and direct leadership with outcomes for the force and individuals being directly tied to the actions of the individuals in question.

**************************************************************

Basically it's all the things military forces do their damnest to inoculate themselves from.

I'm not saying the police are a military force -- they are not. However any workforce can suffer from the same issues.

Star Voter 2015

Icyshadow wrote:
So wait, how many people here actually like magitek / blending magic and science together?

I'm down with it in general. I don't think you see much technomancy but that doesn't mean you can't have technological things that have magic put onto them. For example a magic gun, or a good luck cellphone, or a cellphone that can call other cellphones even when it is (or the target handset is) in an area with no reception.

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Related:

The thing people forget is magic can have the same effect but be arrive through different means -- the principle of sympathy is huge and is only one of several ways this works. For example I could use bat guano as a spell component for a fireball since it's explosive, or I could use a torch since it's actual fire, or I could use ash since it's invocative of a fire -- especially if the ash is from an explosion itself (in which case not only the fire but calling on the memory of the explosive event to recreate it).

I would suggest that while the pathfinder system tends toward a more simple system it still allows (and expects this) for the same in that every caster has a different means of casting each spell, and that the same spell can be different levels, with different components and different sources (arcane versus divine).

Further more if magic was science then the casting of a sleep spell would work or not every time which is not the case.

honestly an even cursory study of metaphysical principles would quickly dispel the idea that magic and science are in the same sphere of influence (another major magical principle) at all.

Star Voter 2015

Oh, coins will still be the primary form of income. There's a reason we still use money and why every culture has developed some form of it.

In general coin is going to be the bulk of trading done even in an agricultural setting. However you will still see the "chickens for doctor bills" routine too.

I don't think people realize how warped our monetary systems became with the industrial revolution or how we are still not finished working out the kinks of that little happening.

Star Voter 2015

Sorry been a bit busy:

I agree that the "untrained" bit could probably go the way of the dodo at this point -- there really isn't much point to it and I think allowing profession to be untrained wouldn't be a bad idea.

Personally in my games I have reorganized the skills some and the entirety of the "craft, profession, appraise" skills are covered under the new skill of "Trade(type)" -- so if you have "Trade(blacksmith)" you can forge stuff, make a living doing so and can appraise goods that a blacksmith would deal with.

Actually I really like the new downtime rules with the crafting and trade goods because I agree that straight coin is probably not how most the world runs... but coin does move and isn't that strange of an item to see.

Star Voter 2015

BBC just had a story tonight about how the widening gap between in income has cost the USA something like 7% gdp growth in the past several years.

Star Voter 2015

So again -- is there any reason my points on the first page about this doesn't work for you?

Star Voter 2015

1. 5 gold for 52 weeks is 260 gold a year.
2. Profession cannot be performed untrained. Which means no such check for you, meaning unskilled labor rates.

Really I covered this on the first page of this entire thesis.

ALSO:

I'm uncertain why you are doubling that for the year, and helping is covered under "aid other" -- which would just be 1 extra gold per check (+2 on the check).

Finally:

Again I assumed (as mentioned in earlier pages) that any such wealth being brought in by the children would be going to providing for their own "starting equipment" as it were -- the house, tools, and so on for their own family and life once they are an adult.

Also schooling isn't actually as odd or rare as a lot of people want to assume it was during most of history -- and schooling can easily eat up half or more of children's time.

Honestly the "kids labor all the time" was more of an effect of the debtor's prisons and industrial revolution and such than an actual historical norm of the human condition (really picked up in the mid/late 1800's to early 1900's when we started to get some start of sanity back). As that's actually fairly recent history it is of course something we assume has "always been the way history was" -- it's psychological hiccup in our nature.

Most apprenticeships started around 10 or 14 and continued from there, and yes children have had a part to play in labor, but it has usually been phased in -- not full blown work.

Have you taught a child to bake a cake? The first several (and I mean several) times it's going to take much longer than it normally would. After some time it might get back to your 'average' time before you taught the child. Eventually the help of the kid might help you save some time, but even then you are still going to need to keep an eye on everything they do because, well, kids will be kids.

Also as a parent, and young man of the 'modern' era I think you sell ourselves and our youth short.

But that's a subject for another thread.

Star Voter 2015

Oh good gods no. Never Greensting Slayer -- that is a trap of a trap. It's melee only, you give up good class features for it and it only works on one attack a round and to get this you have to spend a swift action and worse an arcane point too.

It's the worse thing since moldy bread.

Star Voter 2015

Alright so I normally don't recommend this but...

Magus/Alchemist(vivisectionist) might be a decent choice. You'll be armored and you options from the alchemist to help you buff. Lots of skills and you can actually fight. If you stick with half-elf you can go with a sawtooth saber as an exotic weapon. That and slashing grace will mean you can put up respectable damage with the weapon.

If not an archaeologist bard and ninja combination would be very nice too.

Star Voter 2015

My wife played one in legacy of fire -- she went with 14's in strength, dexterity, constitution and wisdom, and used a falcatta and buckler. She did fine with no issues.

Star Voter 2015

boring7 wrote:
Abraham spalding wrote:

Science is predicated on the natural and is a systematic enterprise that builds knowledge by repeatable experiment and observation.

Magic is not natural, not systematic (even if it is psuedo-systematic in pathfinder) and not always subject to observation.

As such it's not that they are incompatible in that they react violently against each other but more in that they operate in completely different circles.

Nah.

If magic is not repeatable or observable it ceases to be usable. A spell of any sort is only a spell if it does the same thing with the same actions. If there is no causal relationship between certain actions and certain outcomes then they are unreliable, and in fact all of reality is insane. If there *is* a causal relationship, then the scientific method and the methods of rationality still apply. A different rule set than physics doesn't mean there aren't rules.

Also, natural means "of nature," which magic totally is in fantasy-land where magic is real.

It's not systematic. I can do cast a spell twice and then not be able to again. I can cast a spell someone else can do the exact same motions and not get the same result. I can cast a spell more or less often than someone else. I can cast the spell multiple times in the same environment and not get the same result each time.

It's semi-repeatable, and it's pseudo-systematic but it's not fully repeatable and again it's not actually natural (hence why it's not labeled extraordinary instead of one of the magical choices).

It might be a fact of life but that doesn't mean it's actually covered by science.

Could science fine out why things happen differently with magic at different times -- possibly, after all science is a process -- but it would take much more information and study than we have now.

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