Advice on Elf Wizard for PFS


Advice


1 person marked this as FAQ candidate.

was hoping for some general advice on the build below. it is my first pfs character. my main focus will be on battlefield control, summoning, and general support. i plan on getting improved initiative and improved familiar later on. i will also pick up augmented summoning if i end up using summons a lot.

i am still unsure about equipment. do i need to have two spell books? do i have a place to leave unneeded equipment when adventuring?

character:

elf wizard (teleportation sub school, oppositions enchantment and necromancy)
NN
Init +3

AC 13, touch 13, flat-footed 10
hp 7
Fort +1, Ref +3, Will +1

Speed 30 ft.
Melee dagger -1 (1d4-1 19-20/x2)
Ranged shortbow -1 (1d6-1 /x3)

Str 9, Dex 16, Con 12, Int 20, Wis 9, Cha 7
BAB +0; CMB -1; CMD 12
Feats
spell focus(conjuration)
cosmopolitan (perception and either sense motive or survival. languages, not sure)

traits
mathematical prodigy
scholar of the great beyond

familiar: cat

Skills ranks/total

craft 1/9

knowledges:
arcana 1/10
history 1/10
nature 1/9
religion 1/9
planes 1/10

perception 1/7
spellcraft 1/9
stealth 0/6

languages
common
elven
celestial
draconic
gnome
sylvan
orc
??
??

equipment:

item gold/weight
dagger 2/1
shortbow 30/2
arrows 1/3
backpack 2/2
bag, waterproof .5/0.5
rope, silk 10/5
clothes 0/5
pouch, spell components 5/2
flint and steel 1/0
tourch .01/1
waterskin 1/4
rations, trail (2 days) 1/2
Paper 10 sheets 4/0
vial, ink 1/0
traveling spellbook 0/1
gold 91/1.75
left over gold: 91-ish

spells:

0 - all but opposition schools
1 - grease
obscuring mist
summon monster 1
color spray
silent image
enlarge person
feather fall
protection from evil

background:

backgroud (short version):
young life was with traveling merchant clan. one night, when he was young, the caravan was attacked. during the attack his leg was badly injured. the recovery left him weak and with a limp. fearing he would not be able to handle a traveling life, his parents sent him to live with friends of the family in a large city. there he discovered wonders of a grand library.

he would spend weeks hidden away in the library, reading, researching, and learning. it is here he stumbled upon a simple spell book full of simple cantrips. from this book he slowly taught him self the ancient art of magic. in this library his mind grew sharp. he learned many different tongues and gained knowledge.

moving heavy tomes helped him regain some of his lost strength. climbing, sneaking, and crawling around in the hidden areas helped make him nimble again. to avoid falling piles of books or get to hard to research places, he learned to will his self to move with out moving.

it is also here that he gained his cat familiar. the cat started following him around, chasing after the mice that he scared out into the open while searching for the next ancient text.

due to spending much of his life studying books and ancient texts, his social skills and street smarts are some what lacking.

he was advised to join the society in order to gain more knowledge.


PFS characters only get 1 trait (unless something has changed since the last time I checked the rules for PFS).

The Exchange

Abraham spalding wrote:
PFS characters only get 1 trait (unless something has changed since the last time I checked the rules for PFS).

PFS has allowed to traits for at least two years now. I can't speak for the 3.5 version of PFS since I didn't play back then, but it's been two since Pathfinder was released.

The Exchange

HowlingWolf wrote:
was hoping for some general advice on the build below.

Overall your character is fine. I'd suggest dropping summon monster I for mage armor or shield (summon monster I sucks. The line doesn't start getting good until III or IV). You'll also find that in a few levels you're blowing knowledge checks out of the water, but traits reactionary (+2 initiative) and Eastern Mysteries (+2 DC to one spell per day, Qadiran only) will never go out of style.

Unless you're just really fond of cats I'd go with a toad. Three hit points is never a bad thing, especially on a character that gets -2 con. The first skill you should get when you gain more intelligence is linguistics. Take it for the skill modifier, but make sure to pick up all the summon monster languages (celestial, abyssal, elemental planes, etc).

You also seem to be a point over on your stats. Drop strength to an 8 and call it a day.


Thanks for the advice.

I like that trait that gives + 2 to initiative.
greater adept of society looks nice too.

Sorry I accidentally marked this as faq and can't see how to undo it on my phone.


HowlingWolf wrote:

was hoping for some general advice on the build below. it is my first pfs character. my main focus will be on battlefield control, summoning, and general support. i plan on getting improved initiative and improved familiar later on. i will also pick up augmented summoning if i end up using summons a lot.

i am still unsure about equipment. do i need to have two spell books? do i have a place to leave unneeded equipment when adventuring?

Level 1 summons aren't so useful, might I suggest the 'mount' spell? It has a great duration and you can use it in interesting ways.

Likewise unseen servant is an incredible spell, and you can get use out of it early.

I tend to favor diviners (fortune) for wizards as the abilities are so much stronger than the others out there. Even if you focus on conjuration spells and summoning there's nothing stopping you from being a 'diviner' specialist. After all a few divinations should always be taken by a wizard imho.

Also I would look at and plan to take some of the arcane discoveries in UM as there are some that are very, very good.

I wouldn't really take cosmopolitan as I don't see it doing enough for you. I would suggest you look to traits to do that kind of thing. Likewise your traits are not giving you their worth imho.

You can roleplay all of them with or without those traits mechanically written down on your character sheet. Don't confuse roleplay for mechanics and vice versa.

Lastly I would suggest that you plan out your character's 12 levels. You can alter this plan, but it's best to HAVE a plan from which to alter rather than painting yourself into a corner and asking 'how do I paint my way out?'.

There are some very good feats along the lines of spell specialization and the like.

In fact there are so many good wizard feats out there that you might wind up taking your first level feat as something you can't use for a few levels in order to make room for them all. Hence where the planning comes in.

-James


HowlingWolf wrote:

was hoping for some general advice on the build below. it is my first pfs character. my main focus will be on battlefield control, summoning, and general support. i plan on getting improved initiative and improved familiar later on. i will also pick up augmented summoning if i end up using summons a lot.

i am still unsure about equipment. do i need to have two spell books? do i have a place to leave unneeded equipment when adventuring?

Kudos for taking the familiar. Just make sure you realize the familiar is pretty weak in combat. Don't put your familiar in an overly dangerous scouting position (e.g., don't try to scout out a dragon).

Kudos for not taking abjuration as an opposed school. Many people recommend this, but it's ultimately not a good idea.

Cosmopolitan isn't the strongest feat choice mechanically, but perception is so good that it's not a horrible choice either.

Quote:

1 - grease

obscuring mist
summon monster 1
color spray
silent image
enlarge person
feather fall
protection from evil

Remember, you'll be making scrolls from most of these, so most of these look like great choices. Summon Monster I is the weakest link. Feather fall is a nice choice for a bit later, but it's hard to justify a slot for it in the early game. I'd switch those 2 out for burning hands and identify. You need an AoE damage spell and you need identify as a utility spell (at least for a little while).

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meabolex wrote:


Remember, you'll be making scrolls from most of these, so most of these look like great choices. Summon Monster I is the weakest link. Feather fall is a nice choice for a bit later, but it's hard to justify a slot for it in the early game. I'd switch those 2 out for burning hands and identify. You need an AoE damage spell and you need identify as a utility spell (at least for a little while).

In a home game I might agree with you. This is for PFS, though, and as such this advice should definitely not be taken. Especially the part about scrolls since you can't craft in PFS.

Divination is definitely a good school. The initiative bonus is outstanding. Conjuration, however, has far better spells and its teleportation powers aren't bad in their own right. Overall the schools are equal, with my personal preference tilting slightly towards conjuration (because grapples suck for wizards).


I thought scroll making was not allowed in society play.

Guess I will look at switching my feat and traits. I like the greater adept one. Was hoping to find a trait that made perception a class skill, but I have not been able to find one yet that is allowed in society play. Although I think council of thieves has one, but not sure if that source is allowed.

Also, do I need to go a head and start a back up spellbook?


With conjuration as your focus, I like summon monster I due to the extended duration you receive with your conjuration focus. I would propose the option of going divination as an opposition school since spells like identify and locate object can be used when you have downtime. I do, however, prefer to ready spells that support combat either as battlefield control, buff, debuff, etc. If you drop enchantment as an opposition school I would pick up sleep at first level over feather fall.

The Exchange

HowlingWolf wrote:

I thought scroll making was not allowed in society play.

Guess I will look at switching my feat and traits. I like the greater adept one. Was hoping to find a trait that made perception a class skill, but I have not been able to find one yet that is allowed in society play. Although I think council of thieves has one, but not sure if that source is allowed.

Also, do I need to go a head and start a back up spellbook?

There is a trait that gives you perception as a class skill but I don't remember where it's located. Really, though, it's just a 15% difference (+3). The wizard can get by without that bonus; especially if you have an improved familiar.

I have never seen an instance where a second spellbook is needed in PFS. It's pretty much a gentleman's agreement not to destroy PC items. Especially PC items that cost tens of thousands of gold.

The Exchange

Karameikos wrote:
With conjuration as your focus, I like summon monster I due to the extended duration you receive with your conjuration focus. I would propose the option of going divination as an opposition school since spells like identify and locate object can be used when you have downtime. I do, however, prefer to ready spells that support combat either as battlefield control, buff, debuff, etc. If you drop enchantment as an opposition school I would pick up sleep at first level over feather fall.

Again... it's PFS. There is no downtime.


I have seen in other posts that swarms can be a pain in pfs. I don't see any 0 level spells that so area damage. Is burning hands the best option other than torch or alchemist fire? My spell slots are limited, but so is my gold and carrying capacity.

Also noticed infernal healing, would that be good to have for self healing or am I better off upping my ac with made armor or shield?

I chose a cat as my familiar because I like cats, the stealth bonus, and kinda want to get a silvanshee as a familiar later on.


Demoyn wrote:
In a home game I might agree with you. This is for PFS, though, and as such this advice should definitely not be taken. Especially the part about scrolls since you can't craft in PFS.

Hehe, you can tell I don't play PFS. Dang, a world without massive scroll creation makes a wizard a sad panda. . .

I still think you need some kind of AoE damage at the maximum level you're at. . . often it comes down to "we need you for your special role" -- even if you're not optimized for AoE damage.

I guess if there's no downtime and item identification isn't an issue, feather fall is probably a better choice. You might want to go ahead and pick up magic missile -- you'll eventually get it anyway. . .

The summon monster spell basically will take a hit. That's about it.

The Exchange

HowlingWolf wrote:

I have seen in other posts that swarms can be a pain in pfs. I don't see any 0 level spells that so area damage. Is burning hands the best option other than torch or alchemist fire? My spell slots are limited, but so is my gold and carrying capacity.

Also noticed infernal healing, would that be good to have for self healing or am I better off upping my ac with made armor or shield?

I chose a cat as my familiar because I like cats, the stealth bonus, and kinda want to get a silvanshee as a familiar later on.

If you purchase 1 alchemist fire and 2 acid flasks at character creation you'll do fine against swarms until you're high enough level for better options like fireball and cone of cold.

Torches don't work against swarms in Pathfinder (they did in 3.5), but since swarms take 150% damage from AoE affects now the consumables are fine. You get 150 gold to start which, for a wizard, is more than max. You can afford it.

Isn't infernal healing an [evil] spell? Even if not I wouldn't waste the slot on it. Wizards should be controlling the battlefield and not be taking damage. Take toughness and just tank stuff in the rare times when you fail controls.

Personally, I wouldn't use a valuable feat slot on a silvanshee. The only reason to take improved familiar is to get something with opposable thumbs and the ability to speak so that they can UMD wands for you, thus increasing your action economy and not costing you rounds to cast spells like enlarge person or grease (to stop charges only) with your own actions.

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meabolex wrote:


I still think you need some kind of AoE damage at the maximum level you're at. . . often it comes down to "we need you for your special role" -- even if you're not optimized for AoE damage.

I definitely agree with this (thus the swarm conversation just above and below), but I'd rather pay 20 gold for 2d6 fire damage (alchemist's fire) than spend a spell slot for 1d4 fire damage that forces me to get close to the enemy (burning hands).


Demoyn wrote:
I definitely agree with this (thus the swarm conversation just above and below), but I'd rather pay 20 gold for 2d6 fire damage (alchemist's fire) than spend a spell slot for 1d4 fire damage that forces me to get close to the enemy (burning hands).

It's debatable that alchemist's fire causes an entire swarm to take the same damage that a single target would take (the swarm does take the 1 point of splash damage, as this doesn't target a specific creature). . . but that's beyond the scope of this thread (:

Most people would play with the alchemist fire doing full damage to a swarm.


I guess I will looking at doing the following for feats:

1 toughness
3 improved initiative
5 augmented summoning
7 improved familiar

if I read improved familiar right, I should be very flexible in my options since I am true neutral.

not sure about bonus feats yet, haven't planned that far yet.

for traits:
greater adept of society - for extra 0 level spell slot
reactionary


Demoyn wrote:


Divination is definitely a good school. The initiative bonus is outstanding. Conjuration, however, has far better spells and its teleportation powers aren't bad in their own right. Overall the schools are equal, with my personal preference tilting slightly towards conjuration (because grapples suck for wizards).

Divination gives more than 'just' the huge init bonus.

Here's what Divination gives you (with foresight subschool):

Quote:


Forewarned (Su)

You can always act in the surprise round even if you fail to make a Perception roll to notice a foe, but you are still considered flat-footed until you take an action. In addition, you receive a bonus on initiative checks equal to 1/2 your wizard level (minimum +1).

Prescience (Su): At the beginning of your turn, you may, as a free action, roll a single d20. At any point before your next turn, you may use the result of this roll as the result of any d20 roll you are required to make. If you do not use the d20 result before your next turn, it is lost. You can use this ability a number of times per day equal to 3 + your Intelligence modifier.

Foretell (Su): At 8th level, you can utter a prediction of the immediate future. While your foretelling is in effect, you emit a 30-foot aura of fortune that aids your allies or hinders your enemies, as chosen by you at the time of prediction. If you choose to aid, you and your allies gain a +2 luck bonus on ability checks, attack rolls, caster level checks, saving throws, and skill checks. If you choose to hinder, your enemies take a –2 penalty on those rolls instead. You can use this ability for a number of rounds per day equal to your wizard level. These rounds do not need to be consecutive.

And here's what Conjuration (teleportation) gives you:

Quote:


Summoner's Charm (Su)

Whenever you cast a conjuration (summoning) spell, increase the duration by a number of rounds equal to 1/2 your wizard level (minimum 1).

Shift (Su): At 1st level, you can teleport to a nearby space as a swift action as if using dimension door. This movement does not provoke an attack of opportunity. You must be able to see the space that you are moving into. You cannot take other creatures with you when you use this ability (except for familiars). You can move 5 feet for every two wizard levels you possess (minimum 5 feet). You can use this ability a number of times per day equal to 3 + your Intelligence modifier.

Dimensional Steps (Sp)

At 8th level, you can use this ability to teleport up to 30 feet per wizard level per day as a standard action. This teleportation must be used in 5-foot increments and such movement does not provoke an attack of opportunity. You can bring other willing creatures with you, but you must expend an equal amount of distance for each additional creature brought with you.

Now the first conjuration power quickly becomes near useless (until 20th which I didn't even quote because PFS caps at 12th) as 5 rounds vs 7 rounds isn't going to matter. It's only in the first 3 levels where that 1 extra round might do something.. and by 3rd level it's really done.

The shift is nice, except like d.door it ends your actions for the round. So you might escape a grapple, but you're now beside the thing that grabbed you. It just grabs you again. If you have people to help you then they'll help you. Get wands as you can use them in grapples, and PFS gives them away.

Dimensional steps is nice, and is quite useful, but not up there with 'never being surprised', or here's a roll that you know what it is before you apply it, or a -2 to all enemies without save/SR. And we haven't added in that +6 init modifier (on top of improved init & the trait, etc). If you are doing battlefield control you want to go first.

I would be a conjurer with the divination(foresight) school and just not need to have to ddoor/teleport as often.

-James


I like the powers from the divination school, just not its spells. that's the only issue I have with the school. glancing over the list, most I wouldn't mind as a scroll, but none beyond the 0 level ones really stand out as spells I want to use a slot for.

The Exchange

james maissen wrote:
Stuff

I went back and read my original post before responding and it seems that I just summarized. I'm well aware of the positives and negatives of both schools, but I didn't go in depth enough to prevent your rebuttal.

What I meant to say was that divination has the moderately better powers and conjuration has the infinitely better spells. This leads me to rate conjuration slightly above divination.

Personally, though, I have a PFS conjuration specialist wizard and a home-game Kingmaker divination specialist wizard. I don't really think you can go wrong with either one, but my statement was made to rebuke a previous statement claiming that divination was far superior.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

I have a level three wizard is society play and you definitely want to have some kind of solution for swarms. I rarely prepare burning hands but I always have a scroll or 2 of it with me for back up.

If you want perception as a class skill you are looking at being Osirion and taking the tomb raider trait

After getting 2 PP I definitely recommend picking up a wand of Infernal Healing with it. Its great out of combat healing (guaranteed more healing than the max possible from a wand of cure light). Yes it is an evil spell but since you are True Neutral that isn't a problem for you.

Take a look at the Inner Sea guide for languages to look at. Any ancient language, (Jistika, Ancient Osirion, Azlanti, etc...) has a good chance of showing up as well as some regional languages such as Kellish. Your knowledge of languages along with the Linguistics skill can sometimes be indispensable, especially when you want a chance at getting full prestige.


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Demoyn wrote:


What I meant to say was that divination has the moderately better powers and conjuration has the infinitely better spells. This leads me to rate conjuration slightly above divination.

You only need to take 1 spell slot per level in divination as a diviner. That doesn't seem to tip it over for me.

Each level has some good spells that can see use, many of which are not as good in scrolls for the action to take them out, frequency that you will want to cast them, some cases level dependence and for saves associated with some of them.

1st level:
Anticipate Peril (+1/level(max 5) insight to init, creature touched, 1m/lvl)
Comp Langs
Detect Secret Doors

2nd level:
Detect Thoughts
See invis
locate object
share language
share memory

3rd level:
Arcane sight
clairvoy/aud
seek thoughts
blood bio (has save)
seek thoughts

4th level:
arcane eye
detect scrying
scrying
locate creature
share senses

5th level:
telepathic bond!
contact other plane

6th level:
true seeing
analyze dweomer

I figure that you can spare one slot per level for these spells as they tend to work towards what a wizard should be bringing to the table- a force multiplier. Knowledge is a key component to this and the wizard is and should be the go to character for knowledge.

-James

The Exchange

james maissen wrote:


I figure that you can spare one slot per level for these spells as they tend to work towards what a wizard should be bringing to the table- a force multiplier. Knowledge is a key component to this and the wizard is and should be the go to character for knowledge.

It's really hard to argue which is better. They're so close that the argument seems silly.

Having said that, though, there's no way that I take see invisibility over glitterdust. See invis is nice, especially when you don't know where to target the glitterdust, but glitterdust does so much more (and isn't good off a scroll where see invis is).

Nothing on the third level list comes near stinking cloud or spiked pit. Sure, some of the spells have uses, but these two conjuration spells are in the top six for the level (along with fly, haste, fireball, and slow).

As for fourth level, no spell beats black tentacles. So I'm told, at least. I always seem to roll in the single digits when setting the CMB.

Sure, you can memorize all of these spells in your standard slots to make room for some divination spells, but why? It's especially tough during the second and third level selections where you can never get enough glitterdust/web and choosing between fly, haste, slow, and fireball (once you get a lesser rod of dazing spell) is nearly impossible as it is.

Again, I don't think conjuration is vastly superior to divination. I never said that. All I said was that they're about equal in order to rebut someone else's statement that conjuration was a sub-optimal choice.


Demoyn wrote:


It's really hard to argue which is better. They're so close that the argument seems silly.

I give you that conjuration is great for spells, but the school powers of divination are all insane.

It's not how these spells compete with your top choices for each level, but rather your last choices for each level.

With the advent of school powers the choice of wizard school should factor in the school powers and divination is hands above all the rest of the schools in power for that.

That they increased it with the foresight school still boggles my mind. Each combat round I roll a d20 and can use that result whenever I want! If I'm worried about rolling a 1 for a save, etc. It's an incredible amount of control.

The init boost and never being surprised for a control wizard is impossible to pass up in my mind.

-James
PS:
As to lesser rods of daze (awesome item) if you're not a summoner (for wall of fire with it) I tend to like it on acid arrow (will save each round no SR long range), fireball (ref area save against those with good will), flame arrow and flaming sphere (which becomes worth a move action at that point).

The Exchange

james maissen wrote:


That they increased it with the foresight school still boggles my mind. Each combat round I roll a d20 and can use that result whenever I want! If I'm worried about rolling a 1 for a save, etc. It's an incredible amount of control.

It's not for the entire combat, just the round you roll it in. Still, it's definitely a great ability and one I have on my divination wizard.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Demoyn wrote:


Personally, I wouldn't use a valuable feat slot on a silvanshee. The only reason to take improved familiar is to get something with opposable thumbs and the ability to speak so that they can UMD wands for you, thus increasing your action economy and not costing you rounds to cast spells like enlarge person or grease (to stop charges only) with your own actions.

I'm still not sure that's legal. It is however, a good way to make your familiar a target.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I would strongly suggest that you might want to think your stat allocation. You don't need to be starting with a 20 Int, a slightly more balanced allocation can go far in increasing your general survivability.


Demoyn wrote:


It's not for the entire combat, just the round you roll it in. Still, it's definitely a great ability and one I have on my divination wizard.

Well depends how many combat rounds you think you're going to be in any given day. Seeing as we're looking at 3+INT, I'd hazard a guess that you've got almost all, if not all of them covered.

So please forgive my possible slight exaggeration,

James Maissen

Scarab Sages

HowlingWolf wrote:
Was hoping to find a trait that made perception a class skill, but I have not been able to find one yet that is allowed in society play. Although I think council of thieves has one, but not sure if that source is allowed.

If you have not chosen your faction yet, would you care to join us Osirions? We have just the trait for an aspiring Pathfinder like yourself:

Tomb Raider (Osirion Faction): You’ve spent most of
your life exploring the ancient tombs and catacombs
of Osirion. You gain a +1 bonus on Perception and
Knowledge (dungeoneering) checks, and one of these
skills (your choice) is always a class skill for you.

Sustarre
"Always carry a torch!"

The Exchange

LazarX wrote:
Demoyn wrote:


Personally, I wouldn't use a valuable feat slot on a silvanshee. The only reason to take improved familiar is to get something with opposable thumbs and the ability to speak so that they can UMD wands for you, thus increasing your action economy and not costing you rounds to cast spells like enlarge person or grease (to stop charges only) with your own actions.
I'm still not sure that's legal. It is however, a good way to make your familiar a target.

It's 100% unquestionably legal and, please, target my permanently invisible flying imp with DR 5 and fast healing 2 that comes back at the end of every module even if you manage to find a way to kill it.

The Exchange

LazarX wrote:
I would strongly suggest that you might want to think your stat allocation. You don't need to be starting with a 20 Int, a slightly more balanced allocation can go far in increasing your general survivability.

As an 11th level PFS wizard with nearly mirrored stats I can assure you that this character is perfectly survivable. There are other people in your party to handle things like speaking and lifting.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Demoyn wrote:
LazarX wrote:
I would strongly suggest that you might want to think your stat allocation. You don't need to be starting with a 20 Int, a slightly more balanced allocation can go far in increasing your general survivability.
As an 11th level PFS wizard with nearly mirrored stats I can assure you that this character is perfectly survivable. There are other people in your party to handle things like speaking and lifting.

Maybe, but choosing an 18 over a 20 at first level gives you 7 pts to allocate in other areas so that you don't have to go for the overdone trope of the giant brain on feeble body. at the low levels there really isn't that much of a difference in overall effectiveness that's worth the tradeoffs necessary. BTW when it comes to doing your faction missions, many of those tend to be solo efforts and you will be on your own for the most part.


how do I actually get a faction mission?

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
HowlingWolf wrote:
how do I actually get a faction mission?

Every time you go on a PFS scenario you get contacted by your faction superiors who ask you "Since you're going to be in the area anyway......."

They are bonus missions attached to modules.

The Exchange

LazarX wrote:
Demoyn wrote:
LazarX wrote:
I would strongly suggest that you might want to think your stat allocation. You don't need to be starting with a 20 Int, a slightly more balanced allocation can go far in increasing your general survivability.
As an 11th level PFS wizard with nearly mirrored stats I can assure you that this character is perfectly survivable. There are other people in your party to handle things like speaking and lifting.
Maybe, but choosing an 18 over a 20 at first level gives you 7 pts to allocate in other areas so that you don't have to go for the overdone trope of the giant brain on feeble body. at the low levels there really isn't that much of a difference in overall effectiveness that's worth the tradeoffs necessary. BTW when it comes to doing your faction missions, many of those tend to be solo efforts and you will be on your own for the most part.

The other stats don't matter to a wizard in the slightest. The only reason I even care about having a strength above 3 is because of ray of enfeeblement. On the other hand, that +1 extra save DC just might prevent a TPK. Oh, and that extra skill point means that I can afford diplomacy (after I get my headband of int), which is much better for faction missions than a few measly points in charisma.

The Exchange

HowlingWolf wrote:
how do I actually get a faction mission?

It's entirely your choice which faction you join before the first mod starts. Your missions themselves will come during mods like previously mentioned.

For a wizard it's pretty simple. If you want higher spell save DCs you go Qadira. If you want +3 to your perception you go Osirion. If you want +3 to your diplomacy (or more summoner-spec'd roleplay stuff) you go Cheliax.


LazarX wrote:


Maybe, but choosing an 18 over a 20 at first level gives you 7 pts to allocate in other areas so that you don't have to go for the overdone trope of the giant brain on feeble body.

It's always a difference.

It's another full skill, it's another bonus 1st level spell to start with, and higher DCs and higher modifiers for most of your skills.

For a wizard it's worth it.

As you max at 12th you might be tempted to start with a 19, but I wouldn't and would go with a 20 as that 12th level is only a few game sessions.

If a 7 stat was a 0 modifier but all the DCs were 2 harder I don't think that many people would have issues with them, but people tend to overemphasize 10s.

I'd rather have a +1 on all the skills that I use than a +2 for the skills I'm not even trained in.

One of the things a wizard brings to the table is knowledges. Sure a bard can stand up to a wizard in this (thanks to pathfinder), but bards aren't always there... and it's a wizard's forte. Be sure to have ranks in the knowledges for identifying creatures, and at least a single rank in the other 5 knowledges.

-James

The Exchange

james maissen wrote:


As you max at 12th you might be tempted to start with a 19, but I wouldn't and would go with a 20 as that 12th level is only a few game sessions.

Not only that, but a wizard is one of the few characters that can cover all of his base items and still be able to afford a +1 int tome at level 12.

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