Lini

TheDegraded's page

RPG Superstar 8 Season Marathon Voter, 9 Season Marathon Voter. FullStarFullStarFullStar Pathfinder Society GM. 19 posts (20 including aliases). 215 reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 19 Organized Play characters.



151 to 175 of 215 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | next > last >>

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Fey, time and portals

**( )( )( )

Contrary to some (or most) of the reviews below, I actually quite enjoyed the scenario for the most part. Then again, a portion of it takes place in a town best described as 'An Alchemist's Heaven' and I was playing an alchemist, who specializes in knowledge Engineering. The whole idea of visiting that lovely place where there's a mechanical tower having issues, just suited her. I was on the edge of my seat as a player.

The first portion, in the forest, was fairly straight forward and honestly not that interesting. It felt like a little out of place, but in the end it's worth it if you were a good Pathfinder. The city and the tower, were fun. The portal-mechanic was nice and created some hilarious role-playing, as one might expect when there's a curious gnome alchemist around, but also offered some interesting strategic options. The final encounter(s) and fight were interesting as well. At this point I have to admit we nearly aced every knowledge check possible, which really helped us understand what we were dealing with and what was going on. That extra information really adds on exponentially and I fear people might miss out on a lot of important information.

What they will not miss out on though, is that puzzle. I still don't understand it, but it was too difficult and unnecessarily timeconsuming. Thankfully while I had a blackout of sorts, the other players of the table managed to solve the puzzle eventually through a combination of brainstorming out of character, help from the GM and the always useful-yet-dangerous tactic of 'well, lets just do random things and see what happens'. I honestly think that this puzzle forces the players to think too much out of character and also takes too long to figure out. Even the additional clues weren't that helpful. All this puzzle achieves, is to lose any immersion present, which is a shame considering the way the tower is described.

As the alchemist, I'm a little biased towards liking the scenario, for that class will love it. As a player, I liked the atmosphere, use of portals and the different uses of time throughout the scenario. The puzzle however was a disappointment. It's doable, but overall has a negative impact in my opinion for reasons mentioned before. I do think I'd recommend it to other players, as long as they enjoy challenging puzzles and aren't time-constrained.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Mindblowing, both in a good and bad way

**( )( )( )

Between the Lines is comprised of two parts. First you get to do some chores, and after that you get to traverse an interesting location of sorts. Sounds simple and easy, right? Well, it's slightly more complicated. The location of the second part is completely different than what you'd expect. It's mindblowing and an interesting way to start this new season and celebrate some of the recent releases. It's certainly unique and a really nice angle for a scenario. Bravo to that!

It's obvious that the idea behind the scenario is solid. The execution, however, is lacking and at times completely frustrating and simply no fun. Early on, there's a small mini-game, should the party choose to. When I say small, I mean it could be small if every player wants to participate. In our case only one player decided to participate because of valid reasons. Sadly that meant that the next 15 minutes (if not more!) were just him and the GM rolling dice while the rest was doing nothing. Any immersion that was there was lost. I really should not have to point out why that's a major design flaw.

Speaking of rolling dice, having to roll dice to progress sounds fun on paper. However, both succeeding and failing should mean something tangible. In this case, failing didn't do anything other than a 'try again!'. That means you again risk the chance of having to keep rolling until finally the result is good enough. My party, through sheer bad luck, had to roll over 24 times (and come up with over 24 different reasons to do so) in order to finally be able to progress at some point. Again, that's more frustrating than fun. Out of character we know enough to progress and it's only time before we get the right roll. We might be 'unique' in that situation, but even having the option there to have this happen is honestly bad design. It became extremely tedious and frustrating. Once more all momentum and immersion is lost.

Given that second point, I can understand why people chose the 'easy' way out. They just wanted to be done with it and seized the opportunity when it presented itself. Honestly, they didn't miss out on much. The final fight was utterly lacklustre compared to the two fights before that one, both of which were more than rather challenging. I know there's a different early season 7 scenario that's described as 'potentially lethal', but it honestly feels not as threatening as this scenario when played on low tier. I can easily see a TPK happen here.

I'm sorry for being harsh and blunt, but I'm going to have to say that while the idea was great, the execution was simply not good. The intention and potential are there, yet it just didn't work out for anyone present at the table. I can not recommend this scenario, though I will say that this scenario features a place that's rather interesting to visit for sure. That alone gives it an extra star.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Dangerous, but don't worry too much

***( )( )

I played this scenario earlier today in the low tier. I have to admit, the horror-stories in the threads had me extremely worried. But let me assure you right now: unless the GM is after your blood and has his or her mind set to kill as many of the players as possible, you can survive this scenario. That is not to say that the final fight is a walk through the park. It can and will hurt, but tactics such as spreading out go a long way. It's not a guaranteed TPK, but it can go that way. None of the players died during our session, and given we had 5 squishies I consider that an accomplishment. I think only my level 3 psychic was knocked out.

The role-playing part was fairly frustrating though. We struggled a lot to make any decent diplomacy check, which completely spiralled out of control. It was, in character, a gigantic mess which only got worse and worse. While definitely hilarious, it was certainly frustrating to see that our good intentions and decent dice rolls were just not enough. It happens, I know. In the end we were and still are completely oblivious as to how we were supposed to approach a certain character(s).

That said, I did enjoy the scenario. While it does pack quite a punch, it's not as lethal or scary as I thought it would be. If you have a GM who's not out for your blood and who has read the suggestions in the GM discussion threat, you shouldn't worry too much about this scenario. Do not worry, but also do not underestimate it. Above anything else you should try to enjoy it and remember: not everything is supposed to last.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

If only every test in real life was like this!

*****

This is an amazing scenario. The premise is simple, the execution sublime. At least, from a player's point of view. I felt challenged to come up with creative solutions for certain problems, surprising even myself with the flexibility of some spells. Of course you buy spells with an idea in mind of how to use them, but finding myself using them in these tests to great success was a fun surprise.

The tests were varied and offer opportunities for every character to shine at least once. The fights were rough, but challenging and fair. Having the environment influence the battles at the same time, is in this case a nice extra touch as well. Being able to use Knowledge (Engineering) further increases my enthusiasm as I continue to struggle finding things I did not like about this scenario. I honestly can't think of any and am really looking forward running this for other players.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

A dangerous investigation

****( )

One of my friends described the scenario as a level 1-5 scenario with tough, dangerous fights. I thought at first he was kidding, but little did I know he was spot on. The fights are indeed harsh and can easily kill characters. Especially near the end, when you can trigger everything to happen at the same time, has the potential for a TPK written all over it. You really don't want to fool around in this scenario, for it will cost you dearly.

Other than the fights, the investigating and role-play elements in the first part were pretty fun. They didn't exactly stand out from other similar situations, which is neither a problem or a necessity. It's just a calm before the storm, one could say. They were an adequate way of slowly improving the pace of the scenario.

However, one thing really did bother me in this scenario: the names of the various characters. One of the most important rules a writer should remember, is to add variety to the names. No two names should start with the same letter and, unless used to help deliberately deceive the reader, should they sound the same. The majority of the names in this scenario were far too similar to eachother, which made the game at times more confusing than necessary, ruining the flow somewhat.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

A memorable ending

***( )( )

I was one of the players in Quentin's game – see the review below. I liked the concept of the scenario. Stopping a high priority Aspis agent from damage the Pathfinder Society any further than she already has, is a good plot. It's simple, yet effective. Sadly though, she was a bit of a weak foe to face. If her first spell fails, she'll likely get run over quickly. It's a bit too hit or miss for an opponent that gets hyped up throughout a season. I honestly expected more of her.

The plottwist at the end though is great. However it is sad that your actions don't really stick. Regardless of the outcome of the fight, the result will be the same. Still, the look on our faces when it unfolded was probably priceless. Us turning the tide due to my mesmerist casting a successful spell combined with a great follow-up from the rest of the party made us lose our minds. It was a moment of 'did we really just do that?' and filled us with pride and sense of accomplishment.

While it was a bit disappointing at times, it definitely is a very memorable scenario. Based on the ending alone, I'd recommend it. Just don't expect one of the best scenarios out there though.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

A great story that really requires 5 to 8 hours to do it justice

****( )

I had the pleasure and stress of running this scenario as a GM yesterday. I deliberately picked those two words to describe my experience. First and foremost: pleasure. When I first read the scenario, I was captivated by the idea of four factions fighting for control in a suffering city. The fact that players have a direct impact on the course the city takes is really interesting. You have the idea that your actions have a huge influence on the future, something I often miss in other scenarios. Add to that some really fun NPC's with their own identity and quirks, and you can really create a lot of immersion for the players.

However, stress is also a huge factor if you're looking to GM this scenario. As others have noted, this scenario can run extremely long. I warned my players in advance that I'd keep some sections on a tight leash just to make sure they wouldn't miss their last train home. I managed to succeed in ending the scenario in four hours and fifteen minutes. Mind you, that was only possible because they didn't visit half of the city and didn't have to pursue the Dark Archives sidequest. I'm dead serious: there is way too much information for the players to discover and keep track of in just four hours of time.

Honestly, it's quite taxing for a GM to run this scenario and to keep track of both the mechanics and time left. Yes, the scenario is a lot of fun, but it's simply too much for just a scenario. I really think that this would have been better as a module. That way you do all the information, factions and locations justice. It would severely reduce stress for the GM and would actually give the players enough time for the roleplay Out Of Anarchy deserves.

The fluff is amazing, though it could have been better organised and fleshed out, but it simply is too much for just four or five hours. The idea behind the story is good, but a scenario doesn't do it enough justice. A module would have been a better fit. As much as I like to recommend this scenario, I cant bring myself to do so. If you got a four hour timeslot, do yourself a favor and stay clear of this scenario. Only offer to GM this scenario if you like role-play and have between 5 to 8 hours to do so. If you got the time for it, this can and will be a blast. When rushed, it's best to pick something else entirely.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Really creepy, but also really good

*****

A big part of this hobby relies on immersion. A scenario can have a great story, but without a proper setting it will give the player(s) a hard time to actually enjoy it. In other words: the descriptions of places and faces really have an impact on how a scenario is perceived and experienced.

Based on that notion, this scenario is pure gold. The fact that last night all the players were wondering what was going on and increasingly became more paranoid because of the tiny details says enough. Add some really peculiar and creepy NPC's, and you got a great setting. This, dear reader, is a perfectly executed horror/mystery and is truly best played on a dark evening with friends.

If I have to point out a detail that was a little subpar, I'd have a hard time. In the end I would say that the monsters are a bit repetitive at times, but they mostly still fit the situation. All I can say is that this scenario is amongst the best I've played to date, though it might rely on a good GM to emphasize some of the creepiness. I can only say that I hope the sequel to Black Water, namely 7-05 School of Spirits, will be equally stunning.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Be sure to have a group of likeminded players!

****( )

I ran this scenario earlier today. When I first read this scenario, I was rather eager to guide players through it and, after having done so, I'm still fairly optimistic. The storyline is nice and the mechanics are simple but effective. Sure, the whole 'if X, then Y happens' could have been made a bit more clear, but it is manageable with proper preparation.

That said, I have to say there are two potential problems. The first is when the players aren't familiar enough with the lore regarding to the Sky Key and the tapestry, and also don't have access to the proper knowledge skills. Without being a nice GM and giving them the information regardless, things are left unclear and certain parts of the scenario can be a bit confusing. Newer players might end up missing out on really appreciating it.

The second issue is more prominent. Fact is that you can go through the whole situation without fighting a lot. This diplomatic approach, while viable and fun, has the potential to not be to everyone's liking. Some people just prefer to fight more often, which is fine. The issue is when you have players at the table who prefer to tackle this scenario in different ways. There's a chance that some players will be left without feeling satisfied. The freedom that is being offered to the players to shape the scenario is, in short, a double-edged blade.

For any GM looking to run this, I would thus recommend to make sure a likeminded group of players will be attending. Right now, I feel like I let some of my players down. They wanted to kill things, but things got solved with soothing words instead. It happens, I know, but it doesn't really sit well with me at the end of the day. I'm happy I ran the scenario though. It's fun and offers a lot of options for the players, so you should definitely give the scenario a go. However I do caution that it might not be to everyone's liking due to the choices the group makes.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Where did the storyline and background go?

**( )( )( )

I was one of the players in Quentin's session – see the review below for his opinion. The start indeed was awkward. Normally you get a briefing and more or less a general idea of what you have to do. Now you apparently got robbed and are stranded in the middle of nowhere, faced with suddenly having to enter a city. It's not 'standard procedure' so that threw us off as players.

Yet that's not the biggest complaint I have about this scenario. The real problem with this scenario is a gigantic lack of context. Every scenario has encounters, but most of the time they make sense. In this particular scenario, almost all of the (potential) fights are just there and are without any form of explanation. Why are those 'creatures' there in the first place, what's their motivation? Right now it seems to be nothing more than just random encounters put together without a storyline behind it. It makes no sense for the players whatsoever.

It ruins the immersion for players when you face an opponent and there's absolutely nothing the GM can say about him/her/it because there is nothing written about it. That last fight is the most obvious example featuring this flaw. You face something you wouldn't expect, but there's no motivation why that creature is even there. There's nothing written about how the creature feels, how he/she should act or what the players can do to influence him. The writer of this scenario clearly was convinced that players would fight that particular foe. That is a terrible mistake to make as it now offers no options to solve that situation through diplomacy or other non-violent ways.

Honestly, I'm pretty disappointed in the scenario. Do note that I deliberately say scenario there. The GM and the other players still made it an enjoyable evening for me due to the hilarious interaction we had. The moments we were in a sandbox and more or less outside the scope of the scenario, were by far the most enjoyable parts.

I can't say I recommend this scenario. I can only say that once you've played the first part of this trilogy, you might as well just stick with it and keep going.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Demons & Dinosaurs

***( )( )

When my level 7 summoner was invited to play the high tier of this scenario, I was a little bit worried. The prospect of facing high level creatures was daunting. Add to that the idea of fighting mammoths and other huge or even gargantuan creatures while being but a mere gnome, and you can see why I felt as if I was going to be nothing more than a snack to them.

Luckily every single partymember had a pet of sorts, ranging from a roc or celestial crocodile to an actual mammoth or undead T-rex. In short, we brought an entire menagerie to the table. Fights ended up being trivial due to the four-player adjustment and with me casting Haste on every heavy hitter. As the GM also rolled a bunch of 1's on saves, I honestly felt bad for him.

For my party this D&D session – Demons & Dinosaurs – was relatively straightforward and easy. I'm convinced however that this scenario can be fairly challenging when your party brings less of a punch. Opponents can be quite nasty. They have the possibility of hitting fast and hitting hard. The role-playing sections are a bit limited on the other hand. Yes, they're there and they can be potentially interesting, but for the sake of time-management you more or less go through them quickly. They also felt a bit lacking on details and felt relatively underdeveloped.

Overall I did have fun, but didn't feel challenged. That's mostly due to the composition of our party and the four-player adjustment. Bringing 11 player controlled beings to the table is pretty powerful after all. Still, it's a fun scenario with some rather intriguing foes. They will make it memorable, but I just cant say it's as good as some of the other scenario's I've played. It just misses that extra oomph.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

A flavorful challenge

*****

Above anything else, I have to say this scenario is full of flavor. The mere mention that you're about to visit a sphinx which coincidentally is also a temple to a demonic lord, is enough to set the stage successfully. I was lucky enough to bring my summoner with me, a character who loves riddles, planes and obscure deities. That I was playing out of tier actually didn't bother me and is probably what helped us survive the entire ordeal.

This scenario does a great job at combining scenery with languages, symbols, deities and planes, while at the same time being nothing more than a long but challenging dungeoncrawl. There are a couple of instances for roleplaying with NPC's, but they really aren't the major focal point of this adventure. That said, those few moments can indeed be very fun and memorable. I really do hope to see Teenoch again, though I reckon he/she/it prefers to stay hidden from a certain paladin that was accompanying us.

A word of caution is in order as the fights are indeed nasty. Even on lower tier the first couple of fights hurt, yet it does not compare to the final fight. That one can easily get a character killed, which sadly also happened to us last night. The occultist took a couple of arrows too many and got turned into a lifeless pincushion. I can see why entire parties have been butchered here.

I do have to say that it felt like the real boss in the low tier is not the BBEG, but rather his henchman. Ok, a Fireball can potentially hurt, but it pales in comparison to the damage output of that archer. That is probably the biggest complaint I have about this scenario: the final fight is fun and challenging, but the actual boss doesn't feel like being the boss. I assume this is completely different at high tier though, as is the case with most casters. It didn't stop me from having fun though, and I do recommend this scenario for prepared parties out there.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Lackluster compared to the newer scenarios

**( )( )( )

I was one of the players in Quentin's game – read his review below. While he did a great job, I do have to admit the scenario is a bit lackluster at times, especially compared to the newer releases. The initial fight was a good way making us pathfinders feel unwelcome. At the same time we're forced to ask around for information, which we received. That, to some extend, made me feel welcome. So instantly I feel a bit confused: I'm welcome, but also not welcome.

Another thing that bugged me were the last two fights. Let's start with goblins in a small corridor. That basically turns into a 'let the melee folk deal with that, while some levels 1's have to roll a 20 to actually hit something unless they have a spell or something'. It's not really gameplay that's enjoyable for those players. It basically made me lose interest in the fight. It was a situation that we'd obviously win, but also gave me zero impact. I contemplated just asking the GM to remove me from initiative just to get this fight over with more quickly. I don't have to explain why that is a major problem with the game.

The last fight also was weird. No one would willingly place himself in a corner to fight an opponent. That tactically makes no sense and an Ulfen want-to-be leader should have known better. Furthermore, why would the PC's be honorable and go down to face them? We could just blast them to pieces from the relative safety of the second floor. But that's not my only issue with that fight: it honestly felt rather easy and was pretty anticlimactic. Storywise, the suspension builds up really nice, but then there are some fights that just flat-out ruin that.

However, there was a part of this scenario that I really enjoyed: the barfight. Seriously, if the players actually treat it as a barfight and favor throwing chairs at people over tossing a fireball, it's an incredibly fun and memorable scene. That alone gives this scenario two stars in total. I'm interested in how the storyline continues, but I do have to say I hope the next two parts are substantially better.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Simply outstanding

*****

At the start of the scenario, I thought this would be a 'babysit this NPC' scenario. I've played similar scenario's in the past and they typically were too focused on the social aspect and involved an incredible amount of talking to that NPC. While I personally don't mind that, it's not something everyone will enjoy, which can influence the mood at the table severely.

This scenario however is not like those instances, and in fact offers an adventure that everyone can easily enjoy. Of course you still have to accompany an NPC, but you still have a fair amount of freedom to do other things. Characters that aren't tuned to do well in social situations in terms of diplomacy can still contribute through other ways, be it by scaring wildlife, hunting or gathering herbs and fruits.

The social aspects of the scenario also flow over nicely into (potential) fights. The last fight in particular can be considered as hard and particularly challenging, but at the same time is not impossible. The fights make sense and are interesting. It's worth noting this is not your average safari!

I was pleasantly surprised by the way the scenario provides options that cater to every character. Regardless of how niche your character may be, you will be able to contribute in a wide variety of ways. Combined with great storytelling by the author, this scenario features fun for everyone and remains enjoyable from the start until the very end.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

A simple task is never easy for a Pathfinder

****( )

I was one of the players in Quentin's game, see the review below and I have to echo some of his thoughts.

The Golden Serpent is a scenario that is wickedly fun, but does have a few problems. Let me start by saying that the plot is a lot of fun. You are asked to perform a simple task, but nothing is ever easy for a pathfinder. You'll end up dealing with a volatile, even potentially explosive situation, and also encounter some pretty interesting foes you hardly ever get to see. For me, that's always a good thing.

Yet as I mentioned, the scenario does have some issues. For the players the storyline was unclear. We had no ideas why certain foes were even there and sadly we also couldn't find a note or two to explain that to us. The backstory, which we heard from the GM after the scenario was over, is however really good. It's a shame you just miss out on it as a player.

Another issue is that I noticed the GM struggled a bit with the rooms and tactics at times. Turns out that certain important sentences are scattered over multiple pages, as well as different tactics. The formatting in other words is a bit of a mess. If you're looking to GM this, and I recommend you should, you really need to be aware of this, but even then I can see you forget things in the heat of the moment.

Finally there's a small issue with the gold. Having to rob a store or miss out on 17 gold is just weird. The same applies for taking a bunch of clothes and torches. To put that in perspective: taking some of the extravagant furniture fetches no coin. That really doesn't make sense at all. It's just an arbitrary way of 'well, the PC's are entitled to this much gold, so let's toss in some random stuff to reach that number.'It felt weird and really unsatisfying.

That said, The Golden Serpent is a fun and challenging scenario with a lot of potential. There's enough opportunity to roleplay, fight and investigate and there are multiple ways to overcome certain challenges. Players have a decent amount of freedom and that is always a good thing. The potential boons, I may add, are great as well. If it wasn't for the issues I pointed out, this scenario would have gotten five stars from me. Regardless of that, I highly recommend this scenario to everyone.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Simple, fun and full of flavor

****( )

The best scenarios are those that are simple, easy to understand and still present the players with a unique experience. With unique experience, I don't mean monsters you've never faced before, or overly complicated mechanics. I just mean something that's small, yet rather impactful and also has a ton of flavor. This scenario has that in the form of a specific artefact.

For the rest it's a fairly straight forward, yet somewhat outdated scenario. Don't get me wrong, it can still be a challenging scenario for some parties and murderhobo's will, without a doubt, make things much harder than they have to be.

It's flavorful, fun and doesn't try to impress the players with being fancy, unlike some of the more recent scenarios. As result, this scenario works flawlessly and is memorable enough to recommend it to others.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Simple and enjoyable

***( )( )

Sometimes you end up playing a scenario that's simple, yet fun. No special mechanics, just an adventure with a clear theme. This is such a scenario and it's a great opening to a series of quests. The storyline itself is pretty straightforward, but that doesn't mean there's only fighting to be done. There's plenty of opportunity to role-play a certain situation, allowing the players to have a nice mixture of fighting and interaction.

As for the fighting, I can indeed say that this scenario can be pretty lethal for level 1 characters. The strategies and skills can lead to a partywipe if players aren't lucky or careful. It can lead to a TPK. All I can say that it was nice to roll maximum damage with my musket master to deal with some of the threats. That said, I would describe this as a fun, yet simple scenario.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

An enjoyable and role-play-heavy Special

****( )

The Dutch Pathfinders ended up playing this special this Sunday with 7 tables. It always surprises me to see so many people show up and Explore, Cooperate and Report. Oh and have fun. That too is important. For me this was my third special. I had previously played Blood under Absalom and the Legacy of the Stonelords. For the purpose of comparison, I will quickly recap my opinion on those two. Blood Under Absalom was just a meatgrinder and that I don't consider fun in the slightest. The Legacy of the Stonelords, on the other hand, offered a wide variety of everything and this made every character feel useful.

That's fun and all, I can hear you say, but I'm not here to read your opinion about that. So how does this special compare to those two? Compared to Blood Under Absalom, this special is far, far better, but I'd say it's a bit weaker than the Legacy of the Stonelords. The thing is that this special, like others have pointed out before, requires your party to do some things that certain alignments would simply not do. And while a lot of skills can be useful, it's really centred around diplomacy and a bunch of talking to solve things.

Now I personally enjoy that – I was happy to play my mesmerist as she's build for these sort of things – but it is not to everyone's liking. If you're not into talking a lot and prefer to outwit your opponents in terms of martial prowess and tactics, this is maybe not for you. The few 'you have to fight these' encounters are pretty challenging though and can easily cause some casualties if you're not careful.

That said, the variety of encounters and 'quests', really was a pleasant surprise to me. At the end of the day, I felt like every small thing we did, had a significant impact on the development of the auction. Speaking about the auction: that was the weakest part. While it was a nice touch, the mechanics didn't feel easy enough to wrap my head around and it doesn't really help if there are 7 tables and 7 'NPC's' shouting at the same time. It's just too messy for my taste.

All things considering I can only say that at the end of the day, a lot of facets came together into a nice story and that I personally had a great time. Objectively, I rate this as a solid 4 stars since there are some aspects that are a tad problematic for certain players and groups.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Complicated mechanics don't necessarily make for a fun and 'short' scenario

**( )( )( )

I played this scenario two nights ago, and I’m sad to report that my party failed to defeat the final boss. It doesn’t really help that two of us were level 6 and had to play up. That, however, will not overly bias this review.

First things first: the length of the scenario. The whole idea is that a scenario is a short adventure that can be finished in around 4 to 5 hours. This scenario completely failed at that. It took us 6 hour to even reach the final boss, and that was with skipping some patrols as apparently detailed in the optional rules. I can’t even blame it on lots of roleplaying, it were just the encounters that dragged on and on, especially the second one. I’m pretty sure that a big part of why we failed were that we were all tired. Fleeing was one way of just ending it.

Next up for me to complain about, is the fact that I really missed a logical storyline. Why are those greyskins there in the first place? Why are we suddenly having that issue with the riverfolk? I don’t get it and I’m fairly convinced this is not the GM’s fault either. To me this scenario is a bunch of encounters tied together, just because certain mechanics or ideas seemed fun to the author. To me that’s not fun: in addition to challenging encounters, I need a storyline to immerse myself in.

So is it really all that bad? I’d say no, but role-play heavy characters aren’t the most optimal here for all but one encounter. In fact, the first encounter features a creature type I’d really love to see more of. Furthermore, the mechanics involved in some of the fights are really clever, but it’s just too much and too complex to completely fill a scenario with.

In the end I have to admit to myself that this is the season 6 scenario I liked the least. It has some nice elements, but also really lacks a consistent storyline that actually gets explained to the player, which is a real shame considering how vital this scenario is for the meta-plot.


Our Price: FREE

Add to Cart

An interesting approach at introducing Pathfinder

****( )

I ended up playing the entirety of the Silverhex Chronicles in one sit, with every player changing characters every short adventure. It kept us off guard and offered us an opportunity to play a class we normally wouldn't play or even think of playing. I now have a new-found respect for all the different classes out there.

Crash was the first one we visited and in hindsight it was by far the most challenging of the bunch. The fight is extremely nasty and were it not for Kyra, the pregen of awesomeness, we'd have been completely mauled, beaten and crushed. It really demonstrated how challenging and lethal fights can be.

Mausoleum was next. It was a nice murder-mystery and role-play section, with an emphasis on solving a puzzle. New players will learn to be paranoid quickly, which is always fun to see happen. I really enjoyed this portion and would say it's one of the two best parts of the entire Silverhex Chronicles.

Third up was Colony. If there's one thing to be pointed out about this small quest, is the fact that there are multiple ways to use a skill. It's a good way of teaching new and reminding old players to be flexible and creative with their characters.

Following that, we played Mists. As others mentioned before, it's indeed a great mix of mechanics combined with a spooky setting and some unexpected foes. I quite enjoyed it personally and would say it's probably one of the better parts.

I can not really say the same about Webs. While it was fun being ambushed like that, I felt like the combat was a bit too easy, especially compared to Crash or Silverhex. It was nice, don't get me wrong, but just not on the same level of difficulty as the other parts.

Silverhex was the grand finale, or at least it's supposed to be on paper. I suppose it's more challenging that Mausoleum, Colony, Mists and Webs, but it's really not as scary as Crash is. The whole decision-making afterwards was a nice little touch though.

Overall the Silverhex Chronicles are nice short adventures which all provide a different experience. There's role-play, puzzle-solving, investigation and combat. For a free product, it's actually rather good, especially if you're new to Pathfinder and role-playing. Based on that I give it four stars.

It's just a bit unfortunate that the six parts don't really make a logical story. At times they're just a bit too standalone. That's not to say this approach is bad. I can see it working, especially if it's used to introduce the various factions in Pathfinder Society.


Add PDF $9.99

Print Edition Unavailable

Infiltrate, blend in and get revenge!

*****

My previous review got eaten or misplaced. Since that bothers me, Il'l just give a brief summary of my opinion this time around.

This module consists of two distinct parts. The first part focuses on infiltrating a cult and blending in. It requires a lot of roleplaying, which given the tasks and potential punishments is extremely fun to do. The second portion is all about escaping, shedding blood and taking revenge. After being tormented and possibly brainwashed, that’s a nice change of pace and, at some points, was rather challenging.

Overall this was a highly successful and fun module, something I hope to see more of in the future.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Among the Worst

*( )( )( )( )

As much as it pains me, I do believe the title of this review adequately sums up my opinion about this scenario. The only thing I liked about this scenario, was the fact I was playing it with friends. Let’s start by commenting on the plot. Wait, what plot? I’m sorry, but the storyline is pretty much non-existent. At best, you could call it very weak. Next up I’d comment on role-playing opportunities with the various NPCs, but I regret to point out there’s absolutely no possibility for that as well. And let’s not mention the very weird secondary objective. That one itself signifies issues with the scenario as that just screams ‘well, it’s better than nothing… ‘ and is just pretty weak.

Instead the scenario seems to be a bunch of combats mashed together in a seemingly random order and a few traps. That could be quite fun, but again I feel like the execution is over the top. You know things are bad when even the GM suspects the author of wanting to kill player characters. Without going into details, there’s just too many debuffs really. Some debuffing is fun, but this was too much.

Now, there’s always a chance you fail a save, but it's an issue when this results in having only one out of four partymembers being able to fight simply because he’s immune to something. Let’s be honest: that’s just no fun for everyone involved, especially since it’s a combat scenario. I know, it happens, but when over half the party is unable to participate in half of the encounters, something is wrong.

Even worse and I admit to being a bit biased here: I was only able to do something in one of the four encounters, purely because of the debuffs that were out of my control. In the end, I’m left with a feeling that I contributed nothing worth mentioning. I could see that everyone around the table was unhappy, annoyed or disappointed with how the scenario turned out to be. Luckily we could still make jokes out of character to keep our spirits up, but we have to be reasonable here: we’re playing this game to have fun and this simply didn’t happen.

The only bright spot of this scenario, if I really had to try and find one, was the first fight. And that was simply because I liked that enemy, as I had never faced something similar before. As such, and I’m almost sorry to say this, I recommend everyone to stay clear from this scenario. You should only play this scenario if you want to smash things and a have a very hard time while doing so.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Outdated in some aspects, but more than just enjoyable.

*****

When I was searching for a scenario to GM, I stumbled across this one and thought that since it featured pirates, it would be a good pick. I was wrong: it was an excellent pick and easily surpassed my initial expectations.

Sure, the encounters are a bit outdated and can be a cakewalk for the players – unless you tweak things – and that might be a bit disappointing. Yet those easy fights do not negate the fact that the whole adventure oozes atmosphere and offers enough opportunities to roleplay. I'd even go as far as saying that there are more opportunities than first meet the eye. Players can easily have a fun time interacting with eachother and with the pirate crew, especially if you have some good-inclined partymembers facing you as they'll likely disagree with the pirate way of life.

As for a GM, I'd have to say it's pretty challenging to make a character appear as a standard, slightly evil NPC without giving away the whole plot. It's a bit difficult, but it can be done. If you can be creative with whatever takes place on the ship, you are bound to have a great time, as will your players. In the end my players really grew attached to two of the minor NPC's. The story wrote itself and it made the session fun for everyone around the table.

Yes, the encounters are a bit too easy and can hardly be called challenging, but the atmosphere and setting more than make up for it. I might be biased, but if I were to rate this scenario on how much fun I had, as well as on the reaction of my players, I have no other choice: this scenario was a magnificent success. Five stars might seem much, but based on my session, it's the only rating that does it justice.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

A whimsical and challenging scenario

****( )

Typically a morning is associated with being beautiful, if we are to trust various songs and lyrics. It is a description that in my opinion is also fitting for this scenario. I enjoyed it a lot. There’s just something whimsical and fun about dealing with fey-like creatures. It’s also not a creature-type you frequently get to face either, which in itself is a nice change of pace. I like facing uncommon creature-types, so it instantly gains some bonus-points in my book.

The storyline in this scenario is pretty straightforward and not all that unique, but it’s the encounters that really add a bunch of flavor and hilarity to the scenario. Let’s start by commenting on the role-playing aspect. You get to talk to fey. I think that says enough. One way or another you’re going to either burst into laughter or end up being completely baffled.

As for the fights, I can say they were rather challenging. Granted, we didn’t have an ideal party. Somehow we made our way through the first few scenario’s rather quickly - a crit from a musket has that effect on opponents at level 1 – but we really came close to failing our mission in the final encounter. We struggled tremendously and we only barely managed to prevent the insert-evil-plot-here from happening. It was the closest I’ve had a level 1 scenario be to date and that itself made it rather memorable.

Overall I’d say it was a challenging scenario. I can easily see other parties struggling as well. Still, I would definitely recommend this scenario, not in the least because of the whimsical nature of some of the encounters. Simply put: it was a blast to play.


Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart

Simple, enjoyable but missing something to make it stand out

***( )( )

I had the pleasure of playing this scenario last night and looking back, I’d have to say there are two distinctly different parts. The first part is role-play heavy. I won’t spoil the details, but it definitely is a section where players can be creative in dealing with a certain situation. Creativity gets rewarded there and I always enjoy that kind of encounters. It gives every character a chance to shine in his or her own unique way.

The second portion is best described as a small dungeoncrawl. It’s not that unique in the sense that, well, it’s a dungeon. However the scenery in the crypt itself makes it stand out a little. Even better is the fact that these objects also pay a vital part during the rest of the exploration, as well have an impact on the fights you’ll face – which isn’t a spoiler since I mentioned ‘dungeoncrawl’.

Speaking about fights, I think my party lucked out. We barely took any damage, for which poor dice-rolls on the GM-side are to blame. It happens every now and then, and there’s nothing wrong with that. To me the opponents didn’t feel extremely challenging. Granted I had two level 9 bloodragers with me who annihilated everything in sight, but it did feel a bit too easy. That’s not to say that the encounters weren’t enjoyable or had nice synergy with the surroundings.

Overall I liked the simple story of this scenario, as well as the locations themselves. It was an enjoyable scenario, but I feel like it missed that special something to make it really stand out. It was missing something, but don’t let that stop you from having a go at it.


151 to 175 of 215 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | next > last >>