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Once again, the Gap *can't* start at the beginning of 1e, because the conclusion of one adventure path absolutely *is* known: Iron Gods. Cassandalee's backstory ( and successful ascension to godhood ) is not only known, its a major loadbearing element of the modern setting.


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I am not aware of any swarm rule for ships. The closest is the armada rules in the Starship Operations Manual, wherein anything smaller than a capital ship is handled as a fleet. Mind, I am considering giving a try at using the armada rules to replace normal ship combat ( for simplification purposes ), but that isn't the officially intended purpose.


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Also, if the one appearance is any indicator, "Modern Earth" probably resembles something closer to Hellboy meets Marvel than anything realistic.


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Oh, I'm not imagining the Stewards conscripting citizens of other governments into their organization. Rather, that part of the promises would be "In the event of an emergency, you provide X amount of soldiers and ships, that are part of your own military force, to the Combined Forces".


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Azelator Ereus wrote:

We are doing this in my group right now. The idea is that we are on a scientific expedition to explore the reasons for the Gap, and as a result we are not to operate the Drift drive on the main ship in order to provide consistent data. We are essentially moving out from Pact World space on 'impulse' systematically and seeing what happens, dropping drift beacons along the way. There is a very large crew aboard the ship, and the PCs are not in absolute command.

We are doing troupe-style play where every PC makes a 7th level, 5th level, and 3rd level character. Two are supposed to be crew members, while one can represent another interest that has found its way on board*. The groups can be mixed together, or used in parallel, depending on whats going on. So sometimes you are in command of the away team, and sometimes you are the red shirt. We have only done a few sessions with this configuration and its going well.

I think the issue we're running into immediately is that the original concept was each session plotline would be self-contained, like an TV episode, and pulling that off in a TTRPG setting is no easy task.

We had a pretty cool starship battle where a lot of the side characters with Piloting skills got pulled into smaller fighters as gunners, whether they were any good at it or not.... Looking forward to seeing where this goes.

*Mine is a Teifling Bureaucrat from Hell.

Silly question, but what time scale is the campaign operating on? If the main ship is not using its Drift drive, it should take years to get to even the closest adjacent star system from its starting point. Does the crew spend intermittently long periods of time in stasis?


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Arguably, several of those examples would not be considered Powered Armor in Starfinder rules, simply Heavy Armor.


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I mean, yes. Its a Tier 20 Supercolossal vessel, of course its powerful. However, I did some quick wargaming with it, and even against the other Tier 20 sample vessel, it utterly obliterates them. The ability to turn all weapons from all angles against a single target for a turn is just ridiculously effective, even if it immobilizes the ship and costs a -2 penalty to attacks.

Now, granted, the Driftmaven isn't just a giant vessel, its very heavily hinted to be a major investment and resource for Triune herself, possibly even an avatar. It makes perfect sense that this would be a "bonus boss" level opponent ( also, why are you fighting Triune in the first place? ). Still, it does make me wonder what kind of fleet you would need to put together to actually stand a chance of winning against the Driftmaven.


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You know, thinking about it, something I'd probably recommend to a player is that, for each of your Solarian revelations? Come up with some descriptive flavor and imagery that ties it to your particular manifestation.


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These are all reasons why Abadar is probably the second most overall powerful and influential of the deities and religions in the setting, following only Triune ( being the purveyor of cheap FTL to the galaxy is worth a *lot* ). It also leads to an interesting philosophical question:

"Abadar is the God of Law and Civilization and Commerce. Anyone engaging in trade or writing and following laws or governing is serving Abadar's domain. As such. . . does this mean that every secular government, simply by engaging in the act of governance over a society, is effectively a 'theocracy' of Abadar? Even if they don't intend it, or actively don't wish it?"


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One of my own rules of thumb, when adjudicating the plans and options of high level PCs? Look at whether the challenge that they are trying to overcome with their unexpected plan is something the players seem like they would enjoy, versus something they just want to overcome.

If, as per your own prior arrangements, their solution would utterly negate an encounter that would not simply be challenging, but that they would find entertaining, resulting in a more boring scenario? Don't negate it, but make sure that there are ( most likely newly conceived ) complications and challenges that following this plan requires them to overcome. After all, "player skill vs character skill" applies for GMs too; even if you didn't foresee this angle as a GM, the *NPCs* can entirely plausibly have done so, depending. So, maybe you didn't have a guardian robot inside the vault the players want into, because you anticipated that sneaking past or fighting all the guards in the building would be challenge enough. However, they did something clever and figured out how to get teleport coordinates, and bamphed straight in. So now there *is* a guardian robot, and the challenge of the scenario is "Beat the robot and hold a defensive line against reinforcement until you can loot and escape", instead of "Sneak and fight past a gauntlet of guards". Same overall CR, but shaped and defined by player actions.

If, on the other hand, you have reason to believe the players *won't* find this particular encounter especially fun? Like, maybe they dislike stealth missions, or maybe they are clearly focused on some other goal for which this is just a resource grab? Let the clever plan simply work. Their reward for doing the unexpected is that they don't need to solve a problem they don't enjoy solving. You can balance this out with some other, more entertaining, encounter later.

( So, why would you have a "predictably un-fun encounter" in your adventure? Because high level play almost always trends at least a bit into the sandbox, and you won't always be able to control what kinds of problems and solutions will logically show up. )


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Still *theoretically* valid and useful, I'd say. I mean, are the metaphysics of the planes different? No, not really. However, the time scale between Pathfinder and Starfinder is long enough for things like politics, diplomacy, and current events to have changed. After all, we *know* for a fact of several elements that would have a major impact on planar affairs: the disappearance of several major gods, the birth of another really major god, and also, the Gap and its impact on all mortal life.


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AnimatedPaper wrote:
The game does assume you'll have a gun, even as a caster. The player in question did not make the same assumption. Waterslethe is trying to solve the problem without forcing a rebuild, that's all.

Simply put, though: why *not* force a rebuild? Your the GM, you have both the power and responsibility to do so when players accidentally or deliberately bring unworkable builds to the table. Its not even like it would take that much rebuilding: trade one +1 worth of caster stat to Dex, spend some money on gun. There, done.


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Maybe, but unless the Stewards have a bizarrely large "innate" size, any serious military activity is going to require people, as well as equipment. All the ships and guns in space won't help if you don't have enough people to use them, after all. Now, yes, Starfinder technology logic does mean that you could take the same total planetary GDP, and spend it supplying the same number of Stewards with better quality equipment. However:

1. I'm not sure everyone would want to play in a setting where even the lowest level Steward deployment has Level 20+ gear.

2. There are ultimately many problems that simply can't be solved without having *more* people and ships, rather than just better ones.


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One of my ideas from the new FTL rules is a giant ship run by the Kuthites ( mortal or velstrac or a mix ). . . as a prison ship. It basically arrives in a system, and offers to take any prisoners the local government wishes to punish. They get brought onboard, where as prisons go, its actually kind of okay. Decent if spartan living quarters, plentiful food, recreation equipment.

And then the Shadow Drive fires up for its next journey.

The thing is. . . this is not actually just arbitrary cruelty, though most governments that would actually consider doing business with them are looking for exactly that. The nice-ish prison accomodations aren't to make the pain worse. Rather, the whole thing is, effectively, a Kuthite *indoctrination scheme*. Most of the prisoners eventually go mad from the recurring agony, but those who don't are given all the encouragement to eventually have a "Come to Zon-Kuthon" moment. They've survived the pain, and moved beyond it, and now view it as a source of pride, strength, and enlightenment. And so join the crew, taking the ship to new systems to spread the word of Zon-Kuthon to other disciples who don't realize it yet. . .


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Honestly, the issue with Triaxus, in my eye, is more the social stability than the weather. They are evolved to the climate, and have modern tech, but a lot of the ways to maximize productivity ( and thus population ) are just really contra-indicated by the recurring warfare. Besides, thematically speaking, the place reads to me as "Post Soviet Russia", and that is a formula for big, but not *that* big population wise.


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Also, why exactly is the presence of great choirs and dominions of shining celestial bees and beetles supposed to be a bad thing?


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You know, that could itself be a metric for voting rights on the Directorate: military strength, or rather, military contribution. Like, every voting member gets a vote, but how much weight that vote gets is not set by population, but by military power offered to the Pact. Presumably there would be some elaborate set of rules that amounts to "This many points for a soldier, this many for a ship, etc". Each voting member can decide how much they want to declare as "contributed for mutual defense" ( which probably has its own set of definitions ), but the less they promise the fewer votes they will win.

Of course, there is a difference between promising forces and actually *delivering* forces. Technically, a member state could just renege on their promise if the bill came due. In practice, this is prevented by quite a number of factors, not the least being the active and present existential threats, against which no one wants to suddenly find themselves cast out of the now ragingly hostile Pact. I imagine that a good chunk of behind-the-scenes politicking would revolve around everyone making sure that no member state gets presented with a use-of-forces request that they would feel inclined or obligated to reject, because That Would Be Bad.


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My own cosmological guess, btw, re: Damaritosh and Hell? Damaritosh's domain is *not* in Hell, its in Axis. It is, however, on the *border* between Axis and Hell. . . and Damaritosh is either invading to take territory away from Hell, or is preparing for a future invasion to take territory from Hell.

This does not please Asmodeus, not one bit. However, it does please a *lot* of other gods who don't like Asmodeus, or want to otherwise remind him to stay in his lane. And while Abadar might not normally want to start a cold war with Asmodeus over such conflicts, Abadar is *definitely* feeling like he has a strong negotiating position in this age of ubiquitous interstellar civilization.


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. . .huh, I just had a weird thought. Could a character with some form of mind-altering power use it on *themselves*, with a command of "Refuse to obey any order that comes from another person", and then voluntarily fail the save against their own spell? That way, if someone comes along and tries to mind control them, not only do they have to face a will save, but they would also have to beat the preexisting "control" in an opposed charisma check.


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Likewise. Given the really marginal effect, I'd just allow a player to define their Solar Weapon or whatnot as "Twin Swords". Well, actually, what I'd probably do is say "You can define your Full Attack style as 'I summon a second weapon and go hog wild'".


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Ixal wrote:
Senko wrote:


What kind of AI do we have in starfinder? Is it closer to a real person (Digital nature notwithstanding) or is it an emotionless, alien mindset?

Considering that androids, anacites, SROs etc. exist I don't see why ship AIs would be any less evolved.

The question is, do you want your ship to have an AI? What is the benefit? And I already assume that ship AIs are already made in a way that they are ok being a ship with very limited social circles, ways of entertainment or other ways to interact with society (or you have ship AI poker sessions like the hotels in Altered Carbon)

Honestly, would they even necessarily have limited entertainment or interaction? Sure, a ship AI doesn't have a body, but they do have both a central mainframe computer and a communications system. Unless they spend all their time in unknown star systems or whatnot, social interaction with countless entities is just one virtual click of the space-internet away. When the organic(?) crew have shore leave on a space dock, the ship AI is just as free to spend time chatting it up and gossiping with all the other ships, the space dock's own AI(s), and also any and all organic life willing to take a phone call.


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Hahahaha, yeah. I mean, its a mystic practice that grants magical powers, so there's a certain minimum floor for how wildly off-target their teachings could go even in a McDojo. However, I can readily imagine the existence of low tier, schlocky schools for Solarians where the masters only really teach ( or know ) those enlightened philosophical practices that are minimally necessary to actually do Solarian magic-fu, and only just even for those. Like, 90% of their students never make it past the "one feat minor power" version of the class, and those who do are mostly those with enough natural talent that they could have probably taught themselves how to Solarian with some decent educational videos in their own basement.


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Honestly, how many Mystic and Witchwarper spells actually do things that technology can't, either? Its not like you can't even outright cast spells themselves as a non-spellcaster, thanks to spell gems and the spell thrower fusion.


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*cough* Honestly, this mostly sounds like an argument for why taking 18 at start really shouldn't be treated as the norm. Ability increases are really, really generous, there's strong reason to trade out absolute min maxing for flexibility.


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As for theocracies, sure, in theory a theocracy could exist for any of the deities in the setting. However, note that "theocracy" is simply "government by a religious structure". In the context of Starfinder, that would usually be a "top down" thing where the deity actively approves of and encourages such. . . but it could also be a bottom up affair. A god might be indifferent to secular rulership, but as long as the simple fact of priests engaging in governance doesn't conflict with their religious duties, there's little reason why they would necessarily ban their priests from engaging with, or becoming, government. After all, not all followers of a given deity have identical beliefs and philosophies ( they don't even all have the same basic alignment, after all ), nor do they have the same cultural circumstances.

Hypothetical example: Ibra's general philosophy and domain has exactly zero to do with secular governance. Ibra certainly isn't going to encourage the acquisition of rulership. However, lets say that on a certain planet, the Priests of Ibra had an important cultural position, as purveyors of the pursuit of enlightenment and cosmic knowledge. The secular government, of whatever form, slowly involved them on various levels, because they were a source of both good mystical advice ( prophecies et al ) and also a solid neutral peacemaker between factions. Then something causes the overall secular government to implode in one way or another, and suddenly the Church of Ibra is the biggest, most influential, and most trusted public institution. At this point, its really really easy to imagine people going "Screw it, just let the Ibrans run things", and eventually this becomes the norm.


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Ixal wrote:
Master Han Del of the Web wrote:
Hylax is probably pretty heavily into full communism being a goddess favored by hive minds and favoring community action herself. Ironically, she is noted as working well with that classic god of capitalism Abadar
Wouldn't Hylax be as anti-hive mind as possible, at least from the perspective of shirren?

Yeah, Hylax specifically rejects hive minds, in the "one group will dominating all" sense. She's all about diplomacy and *voluntary* cooperation, the kind involving multiple individuals working together. Basically, she's the non-stupid version of what Arcadia was supposed to be back in D&D 2e. Its just, "voluntary cooperation" can still come from a perspective that is really, really lawful, seeing group harmony and coordination and mutual concern as the highest achievable virtue.

Does this mean she is "pro communism" in any meaningful sense? Well, sort of yes, but sort of no. A Hylax-dominant society would certainly emphasize collective well-being over individual benefit, sure, but it wouldn't need any particular economic structure for that to be the case. Basically, its the old "Utopia cannot come before the Utopian" truism. Hylax certainly wouldn't be in favor of violent redistribution of wealth or power, at least not without truly extreme justifying necessity. Remember, Hylax is not just a goddess of diplomacy, but also in large degree of pacifism.


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I don't know, I'm partial to something less diabolical, more militant. Bright gold with purple highlights, perfectly chiseled physique, immaculate metal armor, probably a billowing cloak. Something that would look right at home in a Nazi or Soviet propaganda poster, basically. Militant superiority and rulership personified.


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Claxon wrote:
Yeah, Planar magic just aint what it used to be.

I think it'd be more accurate to say "they haven't published a lot of planar spells yet, having not published information about the planes". After all, it does no good to write up a bunch of spells that screw with planar travel until you've detailed enough information to make planar travel meaningful, on a non-improvised level.


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I generally agree with most of these assessments, though they do remind me that, really. The size and population figures for both Absalom Station and the Idari really should have an extra zero, given their intended setting importance.

Anyway, the main thing I would add is that political importance is not just for nation-states. "Non-governmental organizations" like religions and corporations totally have political power in the Pact Worlds social system. It may not always be "votes in council", but its definitely real. Thus, I wouldn't discount the Sun's political power too much, because the overlap between "the Sun as a nation" and "the Church of Sarenrae as a religion" is extreme. This would also be a big part of why Absalom Station is so politically important. Its not just the pragmatic or symbolic effects of the Starstone, the place is effectively a central holy site for one of the most important deities in the era, Iomedae.

Basically, political influence tends to accumulate where a lot of different sources of power overlap.


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Ixal wrote:
Metaphysician wrote:

My own take: its been about two and a half centuries since the Idari arrived in system. That's quite a few generations for all the shorter-lived races, which at least as I read the setting is "most of them". So, while there probably was a point where Solarians were super rare, that point ended probably a century ago, or more. Solarians are now not substantially rarer than any other PC class.

Does this mean that its as easy to become a Solarian as a Soldier? Well, yes and no. In theory, sure, anyone could be trained in combat skills, whereas becoming a Solarian ( probably ) requires some kind of baseline "talent". In practice, just because you train a random dude how to shoot a rifle doesn't mean he becomes a Soldier, as in PC class. The level of talent and drive needed to actually become a Soldier, as opposed to a soldier, is similarly rare to the mystical enlightenment predilection needed to become a Solarian. Its just a different kind of potential.

Just to get a frame of reference, two and a half centuries ago the 13th colonies were still ruled by Britain but about to start the revolution while the first white people have just entered what is now known as Kentucky. Also the first settlers arrived in Australia, Europe battled over who inherited Spain and Napoleon was born. The total population of earth was estimated to be 800 million.

And unlike earth the Pact System had modern communication and education structures in place.

Yep. Basically, for the majority of Pact World civilization, 250 years is plenty of time for this new useful mystical practice to spread and normalize. It might still have an air of exoticism to it, but that air of exoticism is probably like. . . martial arts in the late 80s US, which was "exotic" and also something you could totally learn at a dojo in most major towns.

Now, there might be some exceptions. The genuine long lived races, like the elves and undead, might still view Solarians as this new fangled thing that just showed up. OTOH, the *really* long lived 'races' like the Barathu, their oldest "members" might remember back when the practice was around the first time around. So weird takes balance out.


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I should say that, for the purposes of my very rough estimate, I consider Earth and Mars to be "the same size". We are talking "order of magnitude estimates", basically. The difference in population carrying capacity for that difference in total planetary surface area probably matters less than difference in habitable regions or population buildup or social stability.


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I kind of would prefer Paizo not delve too much into demographics, mostly because their numbers so far have been kind of terrible. *ahem*

Anyway, if I had to make estimates, I'd probably go with something like. . .

-Verces has roughly the same popular as modern day Earth. It has a smaller habitable area, but its much more heavily built up, stable, and with a lot of megalopolis arcology tech. Call it a wash.

-Castrovel and Akiton have smaller populations, but still in the billions. Both have less hospitable environments than Earth, without major balancing factors, but are still fully Earth sized with major long term habitation.

-Triaxus is less, probably under a billion. Smaller planet, more hostile environment, long term instability.

-Aballon and Bretheda are notably higher "population" than Earth, probably way higher. Both are inhabited by populous hive mind entities, with high stability and social development. Not only are they big, but they can probably go bigger if and when they choose.

-Eox and Apostae are probably both significantly smaller than Triaxus, for various reasons. Small worlds with habitability issues and either apocalyptic destruction or recent colonization. Maybe smaller than 100 million, though it depends on a lot of sketchy factors.

So, my overall guestimate of the Pact Worlds system population? Call it on the order of 50 billion, between the major worlds and the countless smaller moons, stations, and whatnot.


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My own house rule is that the cargo bay capacity rules are for the *smallest* size ship that can mount a cargo bay. Each size category larger increases the carrying capacity proportionately ( call it double per category ). So, a cargo bay on a Colossal ship can carry a *lot* more than one on a Small ship ( which is, IIRC, the smallest ship with an expansion slot ). This applies similarly for other types of expansion bays, generally scaling up how much they carry, or how many people can use them, as appropriate.


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Ixal wrote:
Senko wrote:
Yes that's something I've been discovering trying to map it out. Either my expansion bay's are massive, I've huge areas of unused ship or I scale it down to much smaller size only then I run into issues with the cargo hold since trying to make it a decent size forces a minimum width on the ship.
You could of course always take a page from the Traveller RPG and say that ships are 1/3 to 1/2 fuel tanks. It is of course weird why fuel is never mentioned, but Starfinder abstracts so much away anyway it doesn't really matter.

Doesn't have to be fuel. You can always say that major systems like power cores, engines, or drift drives take up a suitably large amount of space. I mean, think about the floor plan for the Space Shuttle, compared to its overall dimensions.

Likewise for superhuge vessels. The Executor might seem absurd at 19km long, but that size might be necessary in order to fit the giant docking bays full of ships ( not all of them fighter sized ), heavy guns the size of small skyscrapers, shield generators big enough to protect something the size of a mountain, and engines able to move a mountain. Plus, the power cores needed to supply all the above might well be as big as a somewhat smaller mountain, themselves.

Human warships in the Halo games actually are an even better example, as they are huge because they are essentially one giant spinal railgun the entire length of the ship, surrounded by as much empty space as the engines can manage. Because the primary defense in-setting against capital-class weapons is "Be hit in a place that won't cripple you". However, Halo leans to slightly harder sci-fi than either Star Wars or Pathfinder.


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I think the fundamental issue is that armor does too many things for Solar Armor to work as a substitute without being really awkward. A Solar Weapon means trading one source of melee damage for another source of melee damage. Substitutive Solar Armor would mean trading in innate armor, for a source of. . . armor, armor upgrade slots, life support, communications, magnetic boots, and probably some functionality I'm forgetting. That's a lot of things to either write into Solar Armor, or balance around not actually having.

And ultimately, its not *really* worth it, unless this Solar Armor also provides you with better protection than actual armor would provide. With Solar Weapon, this works. Note that Solar Weapon does *not* provide extra attack bonus, and thus doesn't disrupt the attack/armor balance math. Solar Armor pretty much would have to, in order to be worth it. Otherwise, you've taken a major class ability whose function is the super exciting "Lets you spend less money".


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Yeah, but the rules sidebar putting AI into GM's discretion does also establish that VI ships becoming AI ships is a thing that actually does happen, in setting. So, even if the players can't "make" their ship an AI, it is entirely possible for a VI to learn and grow and become an AI, even if this is not intended or desired. Presumably, it starts with a growth in greater creativity and independence, and at some point they become creative and independent enough to learn new skills without being programmed for them.


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My own take: its been about two and a half centuries since the Idari arrived in system. That's quite a few generations for all the shorter-lived races, which at least as I read the setting is "most of them". So, while there probably was a point where Solarians were super rare, that point ended probably a century ago, or more. Solarians are now not substantially rarer than any other PC class.

Does this mean that its as easy to become a Solarian as a Soldier? Well, yes and no. In theory, sure, anyone could be trained in combat skills, whereas becoming a Solarian ( probably ) requires some kind of baseline "talent". In practice, just because you train a random dude how to shoot a rifle doesn't mean he becomes a Soldier, as in PC class. The level of talent and drive needed to actually become a Soldier, as opposed to a soldier, is similarly rare to the mystical enlightenment predilection needed to become a Solarian. Its just a different kind of potential.


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The Ragi wrote:
With Aucturn as your neighbor, you'd want to walk around armed to the teeth.

And also, you'd want to save the last bullet for yourself. *ahem*


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Its only a problem if the players choose to make it a problem. Anyway, there are prebuilt ships in the SOM that explicitly use VI's as a replacement for *all crew*, so a VI absolutely can pilot a ship out of combat. Now, how it choose *where* to pilot, is going to depend on how exactly the ship and VI are defined. Is it a non-sentient VI, in which case it follows a pre established flight plan? Or is it a sentient AI, in which case it makes its own decisions like any other pilot or captain?


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Tarren the Dungeon Master wrote:

"Mech Attack = 1d20 + 8 + 1/5 the mech’s tier + bonuses from upper

limb components (upper limb weapons only) + the operator’s base
attack bonus or the operator’s ranks in the Piloting skill + bonuses
from the weapon + range penalty"

For the ranks in Piloting skill, are we including ranks for class skill and ranks from ability modifiers or just raw ranks the PC put in Piloting?

The latter. Its just like how you calculate the Gunnery bonus for ship combat.


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Lightning Raven wrote:
CorvusMask wrote:

Did anybody mention how prices of Starfinder don't make gameplay sense?

This has been known for ages and it's a lost battle at this point. Everyone has issues with the economy, both for character progression and Starship progression (that has been revamped, but only tweaked numbers, not the actual problem of dealing with abstract gamey points that rub some people off).

"Everyone"? That seems a little presumptuous. Everyone is certainly aware that there are people with issues with it. That is not the same as everyone *agreeing* that there are actual issues with the economy, or that these issues rise above the trivial level.

Note: I consider them largely trivial not because they are insignificant and minuscule. . . but because any issues or problems with a system only exists in comparison with other alternatives. *All* systems are flawed, the question is whether the particular flaws in a system are worth it compared to other, different flaws. And I've yet to see a convincing case presented for why the flaws in the Starfinder economy are intolerable, that doesn't boil down to some variation on "I want the entire system to have been rebuilt from the ground up with completely different, incompatible design axioms". Or, as I like to summarize: if you want to play GURPS Space, why aren't you playing GURPS Space?


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Sauce987654321 wrote:
gnoams wrote:
Dracomicron wrote:
I always kinda thought that low level Starfinder weapons were such garbage as a sort of stealth gun control initiative. Like, a tactical semi-auto pistol does 1d6 damage, which can theoretically kill a CR 1/3 goblin in one shot if and only if it rolls max damage.
I justify it as everyone is wearing armor all the time. That 1d6 is the damage you take after much of the force is absorbed by your protective gear. Otherwise low level weapons are the equivalent of bb guns and "frag grenades" are firecrackers.
I mean a round's worth of damage from a 1st level pistol is 2d6 against a CR 1/2 civilian's 10hp. It doesn't really need more than that, tbh.

Keep in mind, a "CR 1/2 civilian" is still a CR 1/2 character. They are low level, sure, but CR 1/2 NPCs include quite a few low level criminals, conscript grunts, and such. They may be weaker than a Level 1 PC, but they aren't helpless; if they were, they wouldn't be CR 1/2, they'd be even lower. And the system does not distinguish between a CR 1/2 "combatant" vs "civilian". CR 1/2 is CR 1/2, if the character is a 'civilian', they still have enough awareness and courage to be a challenging opponent at the CR 1/2 level.


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I've always taken "significant damage" to mean "damage inflicted by a significant foe". Its not about the amount of damage, its about being inflicted in an actual meaningful fight by an actual meaningful enemy. IOW, it can't be from an ally, and it can't be in a fight against trivial opposition.


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thejeff wrote:
Jhaeman wrote:
Omnipresent armor stretches my credulity a bit, but what really stretches it is that the Stewards and everyone else are perfectly happy with random visitors on Absalom Station walking around with rocket launchers/hand-held tactical nukes :) [If there was a "only small arms in civilized areas" cultural norm, it'd be far more believable and make those weapons more important for some classes.]
But even that doesn't make a lot of sense when high level small arms are much more damaging than low level rocket launchers.

More importantly, there is no particular point in restricting longarms/heavy weapons, when the other guy standing next to them can do as much or more damage in a speedo, because they have spellcasting, psychic powers, innate racial abilities, or whatnot.


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
Ixal wrote:
or how everyone is wearing armor all the time.
In starfinder armor can be just clothes with a force field. Peter quill could be/probably was wearing Freebooter armor the entire guardians of the galaxy movie, was that a problem?

Honestly, the only Guardians who *aren't* wearing the equivalent of some form of ( light ) armor are Drax and Groot. In both cases for the same reason- they have Natural AC well above anything available via armor. Which is something that happens regularly in a superhero setting, sometimes powers supplant gear.


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There's also that, the "forever" doesn't matter a lot in most circumstances, because unless you were running around naked when the hull breach occurred, you should be recoverable later. Its not like in modern day space flight where its very easy to lose an astronaut on a trajectory you would never, ever be able to meet before they run out of air. In Starfinder? Your ship can just fly after you, as long as they can find you. . . and if you have a functional set of space gear, they *should* be able to find you.


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Yeah, I think the confusion is the "have the elf and ryphorian subtypes". Subtypes are *not* races, and they don't grant the full set of racial traits. Subtypes simply mean that "for effects that depend on whether you are _____, you are considered _______".


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Honestly, at least as far as the ammo goes, I would almost be inclined to create a new Engineer action, called 'Reload' or some such. Basically, if the Engineer is willing to spend an action and make a suitably scaled check, success restocks a new set of missiles ( or possibly just one, with more on a good roll ).


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Basically, yes. The listed effects are "easy". Anything above that is possibly entirely at the GM's discretion. Does it enhance the plot, fit the themes of the story, and otherwise contribute to everyone's fun? Then allow it. Does it fit the intent of the story and characters, but would make things much easier than intended in ways that detract from drama? Give it unexpected side effects or extra requirements.

I actually *don't* recommend using monkey's paw logic as a way to punish unsuitable, munchkin wishes. This is because a player making wishes that don't actually contribute to the story at all, but exist solely to achieve some kind of munchkined advantage, is not a game mechanic problem. Its a player problem, and should be handled outside the game. Note that a player making an unwise, selfish wish in an attempt to gain advantage at the expense of the other players, is not the same thing as a *character* making an unwise selfish wish, as part of an intentional setup by the player for drama.


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Yeah, Stamina Points do *not* let you ignore critical effects, or any other "cause extra harm on damage" effects.

It seems like this really shouldn't come up often, though, since Wound only triggers on a crit. How often is someone going to be critically hit with a Wound weapon and *not* be knocked into HP?

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