Calybos1's page

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"Help me fill in the continent of Azlant."

I thought the ocean did a pretty good job of that. *rimshot*


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For fairness' sake, here's a player gripe: NPCs who somehow know exactly how long to delay confronting the PCs until all their buffs have had time to expire.

And for that matter, NPCs who must have a constant Seek Thoughts ability to ensure that they will never, ever take the action you just readied for. Example: "I ready to fire Scorching Ray at the first guard who comes around the corner in response to the alarm." "Hmm, for some reason they all seem to be hanging back....."

This is such a reliable thing that at times, I've declared a readied action just to guarantee that none of our enemies will use a given tactic. "I ready to cast Glitterdust--huh, they've all decided to stay visible, what a huge surprise."


Freehold DM wrote:
Calybos1 wrote:

Secretive casting: The rule I use in my games is that casting a spell, under any circumstances, is treated exactly the same as drawing a sword: Always Obvious, Always Noticed, Always Treated As Hostile. And still my players ask if they can sneak in a cast while someone else is talking to the NPC.

On the disabilities side, I did play a one-armed monk. Never slowed him down in the slightest, including Two-Weapon Fighting. ("A knee is a weapon!")

Additional gripe: Knowledge checks. I have one player who always, always, always asks about "Special Abilities"--meaning all of a monster's special attacks, defenses, spells and SLAs, auras, supernatural senses, flight speed, etc. No matter how many times I tell him that his questions need to be more specific, he always ignores me and defaults to asking "Tell me all its special abilities."

what about still silent and eschew materials? How do you handle those?

Those are what allow you to attempt to cast in secret; they're the price of admission, so that just saying 'I whisper the magic words and turn my back' isn't good enough to replace a feat.


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Secretive casting: The rule I use in my games is that casting a spell, under any circumstances, is treated exactly the same as drawing a sword: Always Obvious, Always Noticed, Always Treated As Hostile. And still my players ask if they can sneak in a cast while someone else is talking to the NPC.

On the disabilities side, I did play a one-armed monk. Never slowed him down in the slightest, including Two-Weapon Fighting. ("A knee is a weapon!")

Additional gripe: Knowledge checks. I have one player who always, always, always asks about "Special Abilities"--meaning all of a monster's special attacks, defenses, spells and SLAs, auras, supernatural senses, flight speed, etc. No matter how many times I tell him that his questions need to be more specific, he always ignores me and defaults to asking "Tell me all its special abilities."


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It's a powerful roleplaying aid for people that are, essentially, amateur actors trying to pretend to be someone else and needing all the characterization support they can get. I love it and my games will always use it.


Our party battled its way to a torture chamber and encountered a prisoner that had been poisoned (incurably) and was dying a slow, agonizing death. After confirming that we had no way to save him, the bard decided to do a mercy-kill coup de grace with his shortbow.

"Wait, can you do a coup de grace with a ranged weapon?"
(checking rules)
"Hmm... looks like you can. OK, put him out of his misery."

"Got it. I deliver a Mercy Bow Coup."


Resurrecting the thread because the issue has cropped up again in our group.

I'm still trying to pin down the second part of the requirement: High Int/Wis. How to make THAT come across in a character who's still Chaotic Neutral?

The basic definition of CN is straightforward, I agree: freedom and individuality over every other consideration. There's plenty of advice on what matters to a CN character and how they would act in different situations. And there are plenty of CN character archetypes out there. But how many of them are also smart and/or wise? THAT's the piece I need ideas for.


Basically I'm looking for mithral-equivalent dragonhide--a Medium breastplate that could count as Light with the right material.


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Thinking in another direction... what if x-per-day items were flat-out eliminated entirely? Nothing with charges (no wands, staffs, etc.), just two types of magic items: one-use consumables and permanent effects. If you want to keep wands and staffs around for flavor, give them a different permanent effect instead of extra spell charges--for example, metamagic such as heightening.


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The part I like best has nothing to do with mechanics. It's the setting. I love all the nations, the history, the lore, the cultural clashes, and the different beliefs and philosophies you can encounter.


I've got a large-size group (7 players plus me, the GM) that's about level 10. They'd love to do a level-appropriate scenario or module with LOTS of undead. Any recommendations?


One experience was mercifully brief: a tag-team of players who always did the same thing in every game.

These guys had played a LOT of systems and sessions at our local game shop. And they always created two characters who were soldier/brawler types that absolutely hated each other. No matter what the other PCs were doing or what the story was, they simply cracked jokes about how much their PCs hated each other and spent all their time trying to kill each other, using whatever weapons and resources the system provided. They found the experience hilarious. Everyone else found them infuriating.


In my own case (Southeast as well), I've simply played most of the scenarios already and I believe many of our local players have too. It's hard to get signups for anything but the brand-new stuff... which, I note, is always heavily attended (even overloaded) on the first weekend of each month when it comes out.

I had thought Core would make up for this, but there doesn't seem to be much interest in doing scenarios in Core (at least, in my area). Starfinder has definitely made a major dent in PF activity as well. I've even gone to a few D&D5 sessions simply because they're available more often and don't have the "I've already played that one" problem.

ETA: It's purely subjective, but it seems some of this is happening with PFS online games as well; a lot of the announced games don't happen simply because so many people reply 'already done that one, sorry.' Again, I would have expected to see more Core games in response. Is Core unpopular for some reason?


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Sorry to hear that. Good luck to you.


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"I'm bored, I pick a fight." Seen it way too many times, and with multiple players.


Algarik wrote:
Calybos1 wrote:
The fact that no weapons can harm it is a pretty big hurdle at such a low level.
That is straight up false, i don't know where you got that info. He's even weak to electric damage.

He's incorporeal, immune to flame/laser/plasma weapons, and can drain life. That's pretty nasty for level 2 characters. It was sheer luck that one of our party had happened to buy a shock pistol and that we had a technomancer to cast Magic Missile at him. Everybody else was helpless.


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johnlocke90 wrote:
Metaphysician wrote:
Calybos1 wrote:
We have a dragonkin soldier in our group. His primary function is to provide cover for our enemies against all other PC attacks. Once he goes down, then the rest of us can participate in the fight.
Why are they not shooting at other enemies? Or using abilities that aren't dependent on cover? Or, if there's only one enemy, just maneuvering so their one big ally is *not* between them and the foe anymore?
Splitting damage is bad. So is depending on everyone to have abilities that ignore cover and environments that allow you to easily maneuver around.

Correct. I keep hearing about these "maneuver around" ideas and wondering if we're the only group that never gets to fight in wide, open terrain. All of our fights are in narrow, cramped spaces with zero maneuvering options. Once the dragonkin blocks the only access point, the rest of us sit around behind him, unable to do anything until he drops.


The fact that no weapons can harm it is a pretty big hurdle at such a low level.


Yes, the garaggakal is unbeatable. Our GM ruled that it had a morale condition, so after it took a certain amount of damage or fought for X number of rounds, it ran away. That's the only reason we survived.


Also keep in mind that "level 1 thugs" are devastatingly powerful in Starfinder... far tougher, faster, and more accurate than mere level 1 PCs.


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How to deal with this? Encourage it. This should be a standard element of every good sci-fi game. Stealth and cunning and cool technology should ALWAYS provide a significant advantage over a frontal attack.


Our group is at level 4, and we still rely almost completely on the technomancer's Magic Missiles to do all of our damage. Nobody else can hit the enemy. Without MM, we'd be losing all of our combats even faster.


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We have a dragonkin soldier in our group. His primary function is to provide cover for our enemies against all other PC attacks. Once he goes down, then the rest of us can participate in the fight.


My group has one, and only one consideration when a new edition comes out: "What does it COST?" If the number is too high, we stick with the current edition.


The Fusion Queen was a dead-end for our group, but mainly because there's no way to get into the back room. Weapons are confiscated, so the party can't fight; hacking DCs are too high to break into the systems; and there's no amount of Bluff or Stealth that works on a closed door. We just stood around and shrugged, then went back to the hotel. The GM is trying to figure out how to get us the needed info now that we know the Fusion Queen is unbeatable.


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Someone pointed out yesterday at a PFS game that I have an uncommon character on several points. She's a non-spellcasting elf, good-aligned and in the Silver Crusade. And she's a rogue, with low Charisma (8).


Aren't metamagic options unusable by spontaneous casters like bards?


That's less of an option for PFS sessions, though.


It seems like a lot of creatures are flat-out immune to spells of the Enchantment school, especially at higher levels. Are there any ways to make an enchanter wizard (or bard) more viable in PFS-legal games?

I'm not talking about boosting save DCs or increasing Charisma; I mean dealing with enemies who simply ignore anything Enchantment-based.


How about Brorag, god of creatively forging IDs?

And Ibrori, god of workouts and being all-around awesome at everything?


Imhrail wrote:
Calybos1 wrote:

Courtesy of far too many online sessions, including TPKon today:

You get to the table and the GM, while present, hasn't even BEGUN to set up the VTT. "Maybe we'll get started in a half-hour or so... maybe...."

And five minutes in, it's clear he never read the scenario either.

As mentioned when you brought it up in the discord channel if you have an issue with the conduct of a GM bring up with them privately. If you are unable to resolve the issue escalate it to convention organizers. You've discussed this with one of us already but if you feel the need to discuss more contact one of us either via discord or PM here.

Nope, no need. But it's still a strong indicator of a session that will go badly.


You know your GM hasn't read the scenario when the response to EVERY player question or PC statement (to an NPC) results in a five-minute search through the scenario PDF to find the answer. And sometimes longer as he gets distracted by reading further to find out what's supposed to happen afterward.

If you haven't read it, DON'T RUN IT.


Courtesy of far too many online sessions, including TPKon today:

You get to the table and the GM, while present, hasn't even BEGUN to set up the VTT. "Maybe we'll get started in a half-hour or so... maybe...."

And five minutes in, it's clear he never read the scenario either.


The Online Collective may be a good resource for you.

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/pathfinder-society-online-collectiv e

There's even an online 'convention' happening this very weekend: TPKon.

http://tpkon.com/


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Setting. Golarion's nations, cultures, history, races, factions... all of it. I snap up every nation book I can find. Some dismiss it as 'fluff'--I call it the core of the game and its main attraction.


All the other players scheduled for the session call the organizer to say they're running late (to varying degrees).

Then, the scheduled GM does the same. And he'll be latest of all.

And there's a second session that day....


You'd be a sucker to stop now!


1. Set character alignment to Chaotic Neutral.
2. Done.

CN is indistinguishable from low Wisdom.


Has anyone else gamed with someone and started to suspect they have a personal problem, or even a psychological condition, based on how their PCs act? Not how the player acts sitting around the table, but just the actions of their PCs?

My example: A friend of several years who's laid-back and funny, always fun to hang around with. But his PCs are, without exception, always absolutely furious. Every character he plays is seething with rage and eagerly advocates torture, mutilation, and vicious murder wherever possible. They're always boiling over with hate. But I must emphasize: this is ONLY when he's roleplaying. Outside the game, he's his same old self.

And it has me wondering if something is bothering the player.


My home group is going through Rise of the Runelords, and they've decided that an invading army is something best met with a horde of paid mercenaries, which they'll stay home and direct via messenger. They're around level 10, so they've got a good amount of GP--but needless to say, this doesn't fit the fantasy-hero tone and would be a huge waste of game time.

Any suggestions on how to derail this plan and get them back to tackling their problems personally? (I've also got a wizard PC who's determined to hire one or more 'shieldmen' to stand between him and any attackers because he can't be bothered to cast defensive spells, but that's another story.)


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My home group wants to fight some undead... has anything been published that takes place in Geb, other than You Only Die Twice? Something around 9-11 would be ideal, maybe involving Arazni.


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NaeNae wrote:
As for character concept, yes... I don't have to be optimal in combat. In fact it would fit Elana's personality not to be.

Side note: With this comment, you have probably caused several dozen posters' heads to explode. Well done! Keep the focus on fun.


With a core-rulebook rogue, you probably want to seek out opportunities for flanking, or else surprise attacks (such as going first in initiative, or striking from cover) to get a better to-hit bonus. That makes up for your lower Base Attack numbers compared to fighters, and lets you add in your Sneak Attack damage.

From your character concept, it sounds like you want to focus on Dex and Charisma; maybe look into bumping your stat points around a little, if allowed, to really focus on making those the best you can. A high Int is not really needed for rogue-level magic abilities.

Two-weapon fighting is hard to do, and it's especially tough for rogues who already have a lower attack bonus than most warrior types. One popular option for rogues is to take the feat Weapon Finesse, which adds your Dex bonus to attack rolls (instead of your Str bonus). If you're usually in the thick of melee, you might also look at the Combat Reflexes feat, which lets you make some extra attacks. And of course, the Dodge feat is a nice little boost to anyone's AC, and is a pre-requisite for the Mobility feat.

For ranged attacks, bombs are fun but require some investment. Otherwise, a short bow (or even a thrown dagger in emergencies) is fine.

It sounds like you've got a fun concept that you'll enjoy roleplaying, and that's what matters most.


Part of being Good is opposing Evil, even from a teammate. My good characters, both paladins and non-paladins alike, regularly intervene if a party member tries to commit an evil act.

Where is the notion coming from that evil acts should somehow get a pass if they're by someone you know? "I don't care if we've been adventuring together since we were kids--you're not torturing anybody while I'm alive" is something ANY good character can say.


Ever been in a party with a Pharasmin or Sarenite cleric and tried to bargain with some intelligent undead? If you succeeded, somebody should have required at least an atonement.


Quantum Steve wrote:
blahpers wrote:
The paladin code of conduct is a class feature, same as "don't wear metal" is for druids or "don't piss of your deity" for deity-based divine casters. There is no way to separate them other than actually altering the rules--which is fine, naturally! But that particular class feature spawns proportionately far greater whinging. It's puzzling.

Not so puzzling.

Many, many players like to differentiate "crunch" from "fluff". While the crunch is actual rules that must be followed (or house ruled away), the fluff can be freely changed around with breaking "da rules".

Role-Playing choices are firmly in the category of fluff, which is why a class like the Paladin, which has RP baked into the crunch, creates such a dissonance with many players.

Excellent point. I distinguish between the two as well: "crunch" is the unimportant mechanical garbage, and "fluff" is the important stuff that represents the indispensable essence of the game.


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Oh, Reginald...

I disagree!


Agreed.

And, as a reminder: Pathfinder Unchained DOES exist. No group is forced to use alignment if they don't want to.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
One of my players never levels up until game time. He spends ALL his free time on comic book and Dr. Who forums.

To be fair, that sounds like a life well-spent.


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A lot of GMs seem to have Favored Enemy: Paladins, don't they?

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