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Should I really need to make a spellcraft check? In The Order of the Stick, a famous webcomic, mages loudly shouts the name of the spell whenever they cast a spell. Maybe the name of a spell is the verbal component? So maybe I can find out which spell hit me because the enemy spellcaster would say "Fireball!" or "Charm Person!"?


Then a paladin who places a much higher value on bringing evildoers to justice than on protecting innocent people is not a proper paladin and thus on the verge of falling? For example, let's say there are fifty seemingly innocent people but one or more of them are actually faceless stalkers sent by a veiled master. To protect the town, a Hellknight would gladly choose to kill all of the fifty people, but a paladin would not dare to do so even though it would put the town in danger?


Derklord wrote:
For completeness, heres the actual rule: "Likewise, if a creature’s saving throw succeeds against a targeted spell, you sense that the spell has failed. You do not sense when creatures succeed on saves against effect and area spells." CRB pg. 216f

So, if an evil wizard cast Charm Monster, Dominate Monster or Suggestion on me, I cannot pretend to be enchanted, but if she cast Mass Charm Monster or Mass Suggestion on me, I can pretend to be enchanted?


Violating the code of conduct would clearly be an evil act. But what if a paladin violates it for the greater good? In Dragon Age series, if a Circle appears to be lost to demons or blood magic, the Templars indiscriminately kill every mage within, including women and children, to protect innocent people from evil or crazy mages. Thus, even though a paladin commits an evil act or violates the code of conduct, if that was done for the greater good, he would still remain lawful good and thus not fall?


It seems that there is no such a feat that would do the trick and I have to cast Enchantment Foil or become a rogue or buy a seducer's bane. Thank you for your help, everyone.


Let's say an evil wizard cast Charm or Dominate on me. I successfully resisted the spell's effect but wish to pretend to be enchanted, so that when she least expects it, I can give her a hard punch in the face. How can I do that? Normally the caster would know whether her spell was resisted or not, right? Then how can I conceal the fact that I resisted her spell? Is there a suitable feat that lets me do that?


I have always thought that the Templars in Dragon Age series would be the perfect role model for my paladin character. They are noble protectors of the just that serve nothing but the greater good. Yes, they have killed many mages, but that was because mages tend to use blood magic, become evil, and harm innocent people. At worst, they can be considered as well-intentioned extremists. So, can I assume that, if the cause is just, paladins can willfully commit an evil act or violate the code of conduct and still be lawful good?


Treerazer hates elves. Does he hate drow, aquatic elves, snow elves, and wild elves as well? Maybe he likes drow very much because they are chaotic evil and worship demons?


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Rysky wrote:
Aenigma wrote:
In Pathfinder: Goblins! #5, I saw a goblin chief eating a living human baby. I honestly have no idea how can people say they are not evil.

In Pathfinder 1: Burnt Offerings there’s an Aasimar that worships Lamashtu.

Therefore all Aasimar are evil.

Only one aasimar among millions of aasimars in the world is confirmed evil(according to adventure paths, at least). But goblins? Many, many of them are confirmed evil and only a very small handful of them are confirmed non-evil. They are notorious for being baby-eating, fire-mongering monsters that have little to do with the creature comforts of a civilized humanoid society. Most of the goblins wouldn't think twice before sticking a sword throuh each and every human in the world and vice versa. So, while seeing some good goblin NPCs in adventure paths or making them as a PC race is good, outright making them as a non-evil race is bad, I guess.


Can you tell me which feats or abilities do I need to pretend to be enchanted in both First and Second Edition? I ask this because I really wish to use this tactic someday!


In Pathfinder: Goblins! #5, I saw a goblin chief eating a living human baby. I honestly have no idea how can people say they are not evil.


Gypsy is a racial slur? In the famous Disney film The Hunchback of Notre Dame, the word gypsy was very frequently used by almost everyone in the film, I remember. So I thought that word is not a racial slur at all. Well, if using that word would anger many people, I would stop using it.


In both First and Second Edition, if Feiya cast Charm Person or Dominate Monster on Ezren and the spell failed or Ezren successfully resisted the spell's effect, would the caster(in this case, Feiya) immediately know her spell failed or was resisted? I ask this because I'm not sure whether Ezren can pretend to be enchanted or not.


First Edition Core Rulebook was published in 2009 and Occult Adventures was published in 2015. Does that mean we have to wait six years to actually play other occult spellcaster classes in Second Edition?


James Jacobs wrote:
If we decided to keep the bard as an arcane spellcaster, it wouldn't have been in the core rules. Likewise, if we'd decided to keep the druid as a divine spellcaster, it wouldn't have been int he core rules.

I'm not sure what does the pronoun "it" refer to in this context. Does the paragraph above mean "If we decided to keep the bard as an arcane spellcaster, the occult spell list wouldn't have been in the core rules. Likewise, if we'd decided to keep the druid as a divine spellcaster, the primal spell list wouldn't have been in the core rules."? Or does that mean "If we decided to keep the bard as an arcane spllcaster, the bard class wouldn't have been in the core rules and other occult spellcasting class would have been included instead. Likewise, if we'd decided to keep the druid as a divine spellcaster, the druid class wouldn't have been in the core rules and other primal spellcasting class would have been included instead."?


When I found out the occult spell list was included in the playtest, I was very confused, because no occult class was present in the book. Then I found out that, in the playtest and in Second Edition, the bard class is an occult spellcaster instead of an arcane spellcaster. Then if Paizo decided to make the bard class as an arcane class intead of an occult class, would there be no occult spell list in the playtest and Second Edition Core Rulebook?


There is a spell called Magic Missile in Pathfinder. What does the word missile mean in this context? Does it mean any object used as a weapon by being thrown or fired through the air, such as stone, arrow or bullet? Or des it mean a self-propelled projectile whose trajectory can be adjusted after it is launched?


How did Cressida Kroft become the queen of Korvosa? At the end of Curse of the Crimson Throne, the Sable Company had been disbanded and the Order of the Nail had left the city. That conveniently made the Korvosan Guard led by Cressida Kroft as the sole military force in the city. Realizing this, did she initiate a largely bloodless coup and seized the throne? Or did the people of Korvosa hold a royal election and Cressida won?


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Thank you for the kind answers. But it seems that you forgot to answer my eighth question. Can you please answer that as well?


I have not paid much attention to Cressida Kroft at all. I only regarded her as a reasonable authority figure, not a potential candidate for the kingship. I thought a member of the five Great Houses, or a member of House Porphyria, the former ruling family of Korvosa, would be the new king. I cannot guess the reason behind this decision. Have you or Paizo already chosen Cressida Kroft as the new queen of Korvosa long ago?


At first I thought that, if Sorshen truly returns and is redeemed, she would claim Korvosa as her capital for two reasons: It was her capital before Earthfall, and after Ileosa died the Kingdom of Korvosa supposedly fell into anarchy without a legitimate heir to the throne. So I thought Sorshen can easily sit on the Crimson Throne and found New Eurythnia. But later I found out that Cressida Kroft was chosen to be Korvosa's next queen. Sigh. Have you always decided to make Xin-Shalast her capital, instead of Korvosa?


Wait, Andoran is the first true democracy in Avistan and Garund? But I thought Galt was founded before Andoran. While Galt is a tough place to live, no one can say it isn't a true democracy, right?


James Jacobs wrote:
Aenigma wrote:
In New Thassilon, are monsters like goblins, giants, orcs, scyllas, and lamias treated as legitimate citizens? I honestly think giants and lamias would be treated as enemies because they were in league with Karzoug. Also, lamias are extremely evil.
Depends on the monster. Goblins and orcs and scyllas are not citizens. Giants are slaves. Lamias are monsters when they're obvious or citizens when they're sneaky.

I thought Sorshen was redeemed and opened her new capital city up to outcasts and exiles from across the world, promising them a safe place to live their lives free from the oppression of their enemies. Turns out monster races are exempt from her protection, then? Also, I mentioned scyllas because there was scylla who was Sorshen's minion in The Dead Heart of Xin. So I thought scyllas would flock to New Thassilon once they realized Sorshen's return.


James Jacobs wrote:
Aenigma wrote:
Originally it was mentioned that in Beyond the Veiled Past a guidance on how to play a campaign in historical Azlant would be included. But later, that particular description somehow creeped off somewhere. What was the reason behind this unfortunate turn of events?

I don't know. Wasn't involved in that Adventure Path much beyond approvals. You'd have to ask Adam for details, but my guess is that it simply wouldn't have fit in the book, and was too big a topic to summarize.

Frankly, I agree. Rules for playing in the past would require an entirely new campaign setting, and I'd rather not split the audience that way.

Sigh. I really wished we would have a campaign setting book for ancient Azlant. Anyway, the fact that Paizo actually considered to include that particular article in the book means that, though it wasn't revealed to the public, Paizo had made a map of ancient Azlant, right?


Originally it was mentioned that in Beyond the Veiled Past a guidance on how to play a campaign in historical Azlant would be included. But later, that particular description somehow creeped off somewhere. What was the reason behind this unfortunate turn of events?


Do Haldmeer Grobaras have a wife or children? Magnimar, City of Monuments didn't give me any information.


On Golarion, clerics can cure every disease... in exchange for money, of course. I understand that evil clerics would gladly receive money. Neutral clerics would receive money, as well. But how can good clerics receive money? I mean, I know even good clerics need money too. But how can they kick poor, crying people out of the temple just because they have no enough money to ask for healing magic? Can they really be considered good? Do good gods turn a blind eye to these misdeeds?


In New Thassilon, are monsters like goblins, giants, orcs, scyllas, and lamias treated as legitimate citizens? I honestly think giants and lamias would be treated as enemies because they were in league with Karzoug. Also, lamias are extremely evil.


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The Gray Corsairs of Andoran are infamous for raiding slavers. Then why didn't those slaver countries like Cheliax, Rahadoum, Katapesh, and Qadira do anything to stop this threat? I mean, once they found out Andoren Eagle Knights frequently raid their slaver ships, shouldn't they demand Andoran to stop this piracy at once unless it wishes to start an all-out war?


I thought the blond characters in Taldor, Cheliax, or Andoran actually have Ulfen ancestors. But if the real world Polynesians have blond as well, then maybe those blond Southern Avistanis have nothing to do with Ulfen, right?


I have always thought that Germanics and Celts were originally 100 % blond, but after being conquered by Romans, they started to marry the invaders and thus became... un-blond? Heck, many arts in many books depict Vikings as blond warriors. So I thought, "Oh, blond hair was originated in Northern Europe, and thus the blond French, blond Italians, or blond Greeks are the result of interracial marriages!" It seems it's not the case, maybe?

CorvusMask, I thought Finnish are not blond because they are descendants of Fino-Ugric people instead of Vikings. Well, if there are quite many blond Finnish, then can I assume that there are many Swedish people living in Finland?


Rysky wrote:
Aenigma wrote:
Is the woman with red hair King Thira? I thought Ulfen have blond or gray hair.
Or, being analogues to Scandinavians, they have red hair as well. They don't come in blonde only.
Quote:
Also she doesn't seem like old enough to be Sveinn's daughter. Shouldn't she be his granddaughter?
That's not how baby making works. Also neither of their ages are mentioned.

But I thought that pureblood Nordic people are 100 % blond! Those Scandinavians who are not blond? They are not blond because their ancestors married non-Scandinavians like Latins or Slavs. Thus I thought Ulfen should be 100% blond because they seem much more isolated than the Scandinavians nowadays.

It was mentioned that Sveinn was born in 4632 AR. If Thira is indeed his daughter, chances are good that she is in her forties or fifties.


Alghollthus had manipulated sociopolitical events as a means to secretly control the world. Did they only control and dominate Azlant? Or did they also control and dominate other countries like Thassilon, Ghol-Gan, Koloran, Sekamina, or the pre-Earthfall Garundi civilization?


Maybe the energy field surrounding Ironcloud Keep would protect those inside from the negative effects of space exposure?


I have always thought that Sorshen is the queen of New Thassilon. But this post implied that Belimarius and Sorshen are co-rulers of New Thassilon. Seems like they somehow agreed to unify their two countries into one. What a wonderful friendship!

Is the woman with red hair King Thira? I thought Ulfen have blond or gray hair. Maybe Sveinn married a Taldan woman? Also she doesn't seem like old enough to be Sveinn's daughter. Shouldn't she be his granddaughter?

Is the mammoth rider a human or an orc? He seems like an orc to me because his skin looks green.

I have never heard of Ostog before, yet it seems that some people have already known his existence. Was he mentioned in First Edition?


Androffa is your home campaign's world. Androffa is a world strangely similar to Golarion. So can I assume that there are alghollthus in Androffa nowadays as well?


Well, about the planetary defense program... maybe the PCs from Giantslayer can lend a hand? I have always thought that the cloud castle can be used as a starship. Nothing in the book said it cannot fly into space, right?


At first I thought alghollthus are extremely evil and Azlanti are innocent. But after reading Ruins of Azlant, my opinion changed. Alghollthus enhanced primitive humans, drawing them from their caves and nomadic lifestyle and setting them on the path to civilization and high culture. Azlanti were able to flourish and eventually form humanity's first great empire all thanks to alghollthus' generous and wise guidance. But what did they give in return? When Azlanti first realized the veiled masters really exist, instead of trying to establish diplomatic ties with alghollthus, they started creating doomsday weapons to exterminate alghollthus ruthlessly! Alghollthus had to call down Earthfall upon the upstart empire to save themselves. So can I assume that Earthfall was just an act of self-defense and Azlanti(especially those in the highest echelons) somewhat deserved it?


James Jacobs wrote:
Aenigma wrote:
There is an artifact called the soul anchor which is a lasting corruption of the River of Souls that would allow those who died nearby to retain their mortal memories once they achieved the afterlife. Does that mean those who died near a soul anchor can escape from the River of Souls freely and thus escape Pharasma's judgement and thus would not become a petitioner?
Nope. Not at all. The soul still moves on to the afterlife; the fact that it retains memories is irrelevant to that.

I thought souls do not or can not escape from the River of Souls because they lose all their memories once they die, and thus those souls whose memories are intact would be able to escape easily without becoming a petitioner or losing class levels. Am I missing something?


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Sigh. Does that mean those settlement stat blocks published under First Edition will be obsolete and thus cannot be used?


There is an artifact called the soul anchor which is a lasting corruption of the River of Souls that would allow those who died nearby to retain their mortal memories once they achieved the afterlife. Does that mean those who died near a soul anchor can escape from the River of Souls freely and thus escape Pharasma's judgement and thus would not become a petitioner?


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Inner Sea World Guide showed us a list of coin names of Cheliax, Andoran, Katapesh, Absalom, and Brevoy. Will Lost Omens World Guide include coin names for other countries like Taldor, Magnimar, New Thassilon, and Azlant?


Well, I know some orcs are not evil(though most of them are). So eating innocent orcs would be evil. But how about eating the dead bodies of orcs who invaded human settlements with the intent of killing and burning? They have to be killed anyway. Actually, killing these evil orcs would be considered good. I'm not sure. Killing evil orcs are good, but eating evil orcs are... evil? If that's the case, my PC would not be able to realize his dream of eating a red dragon steak someday. :(


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James Jacobs wrote:
1) We'll get to settlement stat blocks eventually but as of the time of workng on this adventure we hadn't figured out how to do them in 2nd edition. Later volumes will have some settlement stat block experiments, but until the Game Mastery Guide is done we won't have a final look for them.

Wait, what? I thought we already have complete rules regarding settlement stat blocks. I thing the rules presented in GameMastery Guide seem decent and perfect enough to be used in Second Edition without further change.


Orcs look like pigs. That means they must taste like pigs! Thus I ask you, if some humans eat orc meat, would they be considered as cannibals and be punished accordingly? Maybe eating orc meat is a crime in metropolises like Oppara or Magnimar, but how about in rural areas that are exposed to orcish threat(Trunau would be a good example)? Orcs are evil creatures who kill and raid innocent humans everyday and thus must be killed as soon as possible. It would be much better if their bodies can serve as additional food source.


There are several errors in the weapon naming and categorization in Pathfinder First Edition and D&D. For example, the term longsword is incorrectly used to mean what is more properly called an arming sword, the term bastard sword is incorrectly used to mean what is more properly called a longsword, falchion should be categorized as one-handed weapon instead of two-handed, and the like. Will these errors be corrected in Second Edition?


Before Earthfall, Thassilon used Thassilonian instead of Azlanti. But I'm not sure. Is Thassilonian different from Azlanti? I mean, American English and British English vary little in their essential features, with only occasional noticeable differences. Maybe that's why we call both of them English, instead of American and British. So I must ask you. Are Azlanti and Thassilonian essentially one and the same? I really wish that in Second Edition Thassilonian would be erased entirely and be replaced with Azlanti.


Well, if the colonists in Sargava wish to escape but Cheliax refuses to accept them, maybe they can simply go to Taldor, Andoran, Ravounel, or Varisia?


The art of the elohim on page 86 of Bestiary 4 was gorgeous. What inspired this art? I mean, was the artist inspired by some ancient paintings or sculptures? Or was the art purely an imagination of the artist(Wayne Reynolds, maybe?)?


If the colonial government was overthrown by the natives, what happened to the Order of the Coil that established their headquarters near Eleder? The order is very hostile to the native people and seeks to wipe out all evidence of Sargava's native cultures. Do they still live in Vidrian?

Also, what happened to Pridon's Hearth, the newest colony of Sargava? Did the native people conquered this town too?

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