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Does Ventriloquism work with verbal components of a spell?


Rules Questions


I was creating a sorcerer specializing in illusion for a game I am running, and noticed that ventriloquism has a duration of 1 min. per level. Since verbal components are sound I was wondering if a caster with ventriloquism running would be able to use it so that the verbal components of the spell seem to come from some other location. The sorcerer would be invisible or hidden at the time. What I am trying to achieve is to have the sorcerer be in one place casting spells and have others think the sorcerer is actually in a different location. Would it make a difference if the sorcerer had the feat silent spell.

Since I am the GM in this case the answer of ask your GM is not really helpful. What I am asking is that if you were running a game would you allow a caster to use ventriloquism to make the verbal component of a spell seem to come from somewhere else. Also would hearing the spell be cast be enough to be considered to be interacting with the illusion? If the answer is no what would be required to achieve this?


Hearing = interacting, I think a dev clarified that at some point.

However, regular spellcasting (or the use of spell-like abilities) cannot be made unnoticeable. There's an undefined aspect to it, other than verbal or somatic components, that can always be detected. No-one knows what it's supposed to be though.


You might want to consider adding Dancing Lights or possibly Prestidigitation to create false visual casting manifestations as well. Ghost sounds to create more distractions and confusion might help you out too.


The undefined portion of casting is confusing so I am just going to assume that if the sorcerer is hidden from sight they do not come into play. Since this is not for society play and I am GM it becomes my decision so that is not really the concern.

The sorcerer will be behind a secret door with a peep hole to allow him to see the party. His spells will mostly be indirect spells so there will be no glowing ball of energy coming from the secret door. I was thinking of giving him the feat silent spell to cover the verbal component, but thought that having the players think the spell originated from another location would be a better way to go. Since ventriloquism allows you to make your voice seem to come from another location this seemed to be the perfect solution.

I guess my question is would you allow ventriloquism to work on the verbal components of the spell, or would silent spell also be needed to mask the verbal components?

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