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All the people mentioned in the Italian language edition of the Swedish role-playing game Kult were ex-communicated by the pope.


And the oldest Swedish RPG, Drakar och Demoner (originally a translation of Chaosium's Basic Role-Playing, was first published 30 years ago.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

There are 31,536,000 seconds in a typical year.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Sanakht Inaros wrote:
I had to be treated for hyperthermia before I could go in for surgery. It did almost as much damage to the tissue as the fire did. When I was finally coherent enough to talk to the surgeon he told me that. It broke my skin cells down enough that they couldn't reproduce and I ended up having to undergo three surgeries instead of two.

I think you mean hypothermia. Hyperthermia is too much heat. Hypothermia is not enough.

Scarab Sages

Samnell wrote:
Sanakht Inaros wrote:
I had to be treated for hyperthermia before I could go in for surgery. It did almost as much damage to the tissue as the fire did. When I was finally coherent enough to talk to the surgeon he told me that. It broke my skin cells down enough that they couldn't reproduce and I ended up having to undergo three surgeries instead of two.
I think you mean hypothermia. Hyperthermia is too much heat. Hypothermia is not enough.

I always get those terms mixed up. For some reason they sound the same to me.

Scarab Sages

Aberzombie wrote:
Sanakht Inaros wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Liverpool FC is not even going to be close to winning the Premier League this year either. :(
I just started reading a book by Ramsey Campbell that takes place in Liverpool.
A lot of Ramsey Campbell books take place in and around Liverpool. Are you talking about Creatures of the Pool?

That's the one. Interesting read so far. I bought it a good while back and finally got around to reading it on my flight back from San Diego yesterday.

I love Campbell. Not so much for character, but because of setting/description. There were parts of that novel that had me wanting to take a shower.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Sanakht Inaros wrote:
Samnell wrote:
Sanakht Inaros wrote:
I had to be treated for hyperthermia before I could go in for surgery. It did almost as much damage to the tissue as the fire did. When I was finally coherent enough to talk to the surgeon he told me that. It broke my skin cells down enough that they couldn't reproduce and I ended up having to undergo three surgeries instead of two.
I think you mean hypothermia. Hyperthermia is too much heat. Hypothermia is not enough.
I always get those terms mixed up. For some reason they sound the same to me.

Me too. Took years to get them straight. They don't look like they should sound that much alike, but they do.


David Bowie has declined two British honors, a commander and knighthood of the OBE (Order of the British Empire). As far as I can tell he's the only pop/rock musician to have done so, let alone twice.

Which makes him extra cool in my book, as if he needed help.

Liberty's Edge

Samnell wrote:
Sanakht Inaros wrote:
Samnell wrote:
Sanakht Inaros wrote:
I had to be treated for hyperthermia before I could go in for surgery. It did almost as much damage to the tissue as the fire did. When I was finally coherent enough to talk to the surgeon he told me that. It broke my skin cells down enough that they couldn't reproduce and I ended up having to undergo three surgeries instead of two.
I think you mean hypothermia. Hyperthermia is too much heat. Hypothermia is not enough.
I always get those terms mixed up. For some reason they sound the same to me.
Me too. Took years to get them straight. They don't look like they should sound that much alike, but they do.

Could be worse. You could be my mother, who thinks that burns are classified in degrees one through five, not one through three, and insists that you can get a third-degree sunburn while still on Earth.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
The Eldritch Mr. Shiny wrote:


Could be worse. You could be my mother, who thinks that burns are classified in degrees one through five, not one through three, and insists that you can get a third-degree sunburn while still on Earth.

My mother is convinced that my father's heart attack was caused by him being struck by lightning a few weeks before despite warning signs appearing well before she thinks he was struck and, uh, the fact that he was never struck by lightning.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The opposite sides of a six sided dice add up to seven.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

VHS stands for Video Homes System.

Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

Aberzombie wrote:
The opposite sides of a six sided dice add up to seven.

The opposite sides of any dN should add up to N+1, no matter how big the die is. This is why you can't use a spin-down life counter as a d20.


meatrace wrote:
David Bowie has declined two British honors, a commander and knighthood of the OBE (Order of the British Empire). As far as I can tell he's the only pop/rock musician to have done so, let alone twice.

It probably conflicts with his role as The Sovereign.

The Exchange

Saint Caleth wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
The opposite sides of a six sided dice add up to seven.
The opposite sides of any dN should add up to N+1, no matter how big the die is. This is why you can't use a spin-down life counter as a d20.

Except for d10s, because instead of putting down a 10 they put down a 0. The 0 is on the opposite side of the 9, so all of the numbers add up to 9.

Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

In Zoroastrianism, Ahuras are good deities and Daevas are evil.
In Hinduism it is the other way around. Asuras are evil and Devas are good.


Some linguists think that "asura"/"ahura" and "aesir" share the same root-word in PIE.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Did you know?

R.H. Macy, founder of the department chain Macy's, was born on Nantucket to a Quaker family during the Age of Whaling. He shipped out on a whaling ship when he was 15, and during this voyage he had a red star tattooed on his hand. The red star later became the iconic logo of his store.

Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

Kajehase wrote:
Some linguists think that "asura"/"ahura" and "aesir" share the same root-word in PIE.

Asura and Ahura certainly, since Vedic Sanskrit and Avestan were basically the same language. I'd buy that Aesir comes from the same root too.

I know that Daeva and Deva are both congate with the "Tues" in Tuesday.

The Exchange

Saint Caleth wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Some linguists think that "asura"/"ahura" and "aesir" share the same root-word in PIE.

Asura and Ahura certainly, since Vedic Sanskrit and Avestan were basically the same language. I'd buy that Aesir comes from the same root too.

I know that Daeva and Deva are both congate with the "Tues" in Tuesday.

Linguistically not to mention in practice most if not all Hindu beliefs are tied to most of the beliefs of northern Europe, from Ireland to Iran. You start getting it broken when you throw in Ancient Egyptian and African beliefs.

Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

Indo-European languages generally share cognate words for "boat/ship" and "navigate" but do not share congate words for "ocean".

The Exchange

I knew that river, "dan, dani or danu" was very common, but was unaware of ocean not having a commonality.

Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

It is how they know that the Proto-Indo-Europeans lived inland, probably somewhere in modern day Ukraine.

They also probably first domesticated the horse and invented the chariot.


Saint Caleth wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Some linguists think that "asura"/"ahura" and "aesir" share the same root-word in PIE.
Asura and Ahura certainly, since Vedic Sanskrit and Avestan were basically the same language.

That's why I separated them by a slash rather than a comma, too show they're basically the same word in their "current" forms (which has been around for quite a while, if I recall correctly).


-The clay ziggurat you use as the material component of Comprehend Languages is a reference to the story of The Tower of Babel.

-Ancient Babylonians were well-versed in the art of air conditioning. Those who could afford it built tall houses with several floors, and only lived in the top, leaving a big open space below for hot air to cool off as it went up and create a ventilation system.

-It is thought that one of the reasons behind the heavy emphasis in Peninsular Castillian (ie, the Spanish spoken by Spaniards in central Spain) was due to the way King Charles I of Spain (also known as Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire) pronounced it, as he was raised speaking German. The Spanish Court, as a way to avoid insulting him, began imitating his way of speaking, and thus ended up influencing the language itself.

-Charles I/V's son, Phillip the II, was the man for whom the phrase "An empire where the Sun never sets" was coined, as he ruled the first empire ever to have territory in all continents (whith the exception of Australia).

-The type of Latin most people know about is not the same Latin spoken by the Romans. They spoke what is called Classical Latin, while the one used today is Canonical Latin, which is the one perpetuated by the Catholic Church. Classical Latin is easily identified by the way the letter "C" is pronounced, sounding like a "K", unlike the "S" sound of Canonical Latin.


Which is why the Germans say Kaiser and not Saiser.


The police in the Swedish city of Uppsala recently put a cat in a drunk's cell all its own while the cat's owner sobered up.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Speaking of Kaiser, the Slavic Tsar/Csar also comes from the Roman Caesar.

-Caesar, in turn, was Gaius Julius Caesar cognomen (ie, hereditary nickname), which only became a title after the first emperor, Caesar Augustus (who in turn got it after being adopted by Caesar. His original name was Gaius Octavius) used it to stress his relation to the former Dictator.

-Originally, Caesar was a nickname meaning "Hairy". So you know better than to complaint if your Caesar Salad comes with a hair, because it is exactly as advertised.


The Eldritch Mr. Shiny wrote:
Samnell wrote:
Sanakht Inaros wrote:
Samnell wrote:
Sanakht Inaros wrote:
I had to be treated for hyperthermia before I could go in for surgery. It did almost as much damage to the tissue as the fire did. When I was finally coherent enough to talk to the surgeon he told me that. It broke my skin cells down enough that they couldn't reproduce and I ended up having to undergo three surgeries instead of two.
I think you mean hypothermia. Hyperthermia is too much heat. Hypothermia is not enough.
I always get those terms mixed up. For some reason they sound the same to me.
Me too. Took years to get them straight. They don't look like they should sound that much alike, but they do.
Could be worse. You could be my mother, who thinks that burns are classified in degrees one through five, not one through three, and insists that you can get a third-degree sunburn while still on Earth.

Your mom sounds weird.

Shadow Lodge Marathon Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
-Charles I/V's son, Phillip the II, was the man for whom the phrase "An empire where the Sun never sets" was coined, as he ruled the first empire ever to have territory in all continents (whith the exception of Australia).

Is this supposed to be Antarctica?

Liberty's Edge

Freehold DM wrote:
Your mom sounds weird.

She's like a much more unstable version of Michael Westen's mother from Burn Notice. It's a combination of the family tendency towards bipolar disorder, combined with her life as a 1970s party girl.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The WD in WD-40 stands for Water Displacement.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

During WWII, the US paid people to go looking around the world for the best mold to produce penicillin from. They found it on a cantaloupe in Peoria, IL, in 1943.

Before the mass production was running along smoothly, soldiers who were dosed with penicillin were required to save their urine. It transpires that most of a typical dose (circa 80%) washed through in very short order and so could be reused if isolated from the urine. Back in the day, penicillin cost a lot and was difficult to synthesize so urine conservation was very helpful.

The first person treated with American, mass-produced penicillin consumed half the supply produced to date.


Patrick Curtin wrote:

Did you know?

R.H. Macy, founder of the department chain Macy's, was born on Nantucket to a Quaker family during the Age of Whaling. He shipped out on a whaling ship when he was 15, and during this voyage he had a red star tattooed on his hand. The red star later became the iconic logo of his store.

No, I didn't make the connection, but one of my players is a tattoo artist and he says that red star is still one of the most popular tattoos out there even though nobody really goes to sea anymore.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The electric toothbrush was invented in 1939.


Native American Olympian Jim Thorpe never lived in, or even visited the town that would later take his name for its own.


Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:

Did you know?

R.H. Macy, founder of the department chain Macy's, was born on Nantucket to a Quaker family during the Age of Whaling. He shipped out on a whaling ship when he was 15, and during this voyage he had a red star tattooed on his hand. The red star later became the iconic logo of his store.

No, I didn't make the connection, but one of my players is a tattoo artist and he says that red star is still one of the most popular tattoos out there even though nobody really goes to sea anymore.

What's the significance of the red star and how does it connect to ships? I'm more of an air force guy myself. I don't really understand a lot of nautical stuff.


He explained it to me, but I forget...


I guess it represents the North Star.

The Exchange

I had planned on asking the same thing.

Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

The Pornocracy is an actual period in the history of the Papacy.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Porsche also builds tractors.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

As does Ferrari

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

FAWESOME!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Did you know?

Thanks to crushing taxes imposed on a postwar recessive economy, a Massachusetts veteran named Daniel Shays organized a rebellion in the central and western portions of the state. The coastal elite organized a private militia to defeat them, and the last remnants were defeated in 1787.

When asked his opinion about Shays' Rebellion while at his embassy post in Paris, Thomas Jefferson repied with his famous quote: "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure"

In contrast to Jefferson's generally favorable take, the Constitutional Convention took the implications of the rebellion seriously. Some historians argue that the first steps down the road to a strong federal governmental system were taken in response to this rebellion against taxation.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The Eiffel Tower has 1,792 steps.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Isaac Newton invented the cat door.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The Titanic was built in Belfast.


During the late Middle Ages, the power structure of the Holy Roman Empire had led the Emperors to grant increasingly more rights to increasingly more atomized states, reaching a situation where save for a handful of medium-sized realms, the domain was a swamp of micro-territories. This caused widespread poverty and horrible bureaucratic issues, to a point that travelling through the inner parts of the HRE was considered the most dangerous journey in Europe, as the local lords, desperate for wealth due to being the rules of a few acres of land, actually ordered their guards and troops to assault travellers.


If you were to ask the leaders of the parties represented in the Swedish parliament who they'd prefer to win the US presidential election, all of them, except possibly the leader of the "we're not racists, honest, we just don't like people with different skin-colour, or religion, or language than us, but we're not racists" party.

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