[Base Class] The Renaissance Man: Why limit yourself?


Homebrew and House Rules


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For the past few months I have been putting together a homebrew class, and I thought I'd share with all of you.

The Renaissance Man

The basic concept of the class is that he is an expert in a variety of fields, which grant more and more powerful abilities as they increase in rank. There's a tremendous amount of freedom and versatility, without destroying balance, or stepping on any existing class's toes. It fills a niche of a genius character (anything from the Davinci or the Doctor to Batman or Tony Stark), and provides enough flexibility and choices that with a little skinning you should be able to make almost anything.

I'd appreciate any feedback you guy's have. I know there's a tremendous amount of content (I've run multiple playtests and still have yet to touch even half of it) but I'd love to hear what you guys think. Are there any problems you can see? Does it look fun to you? Would you want to play one, or allow one in your game?

Hope you guys like it.


So, I've not jumped in the the fields yet, but reading the initial post, I immediately thought it troublesome that the Caster Level is equal to ranks. This means it will often be 3 higher than their actual character level. Unless the abilities aren't that great, that's pretty awesome. Maybe have it be ranks capped by actual level.

Also, the ability to crit uncritables is gained at a pretty low level for something that good. It's probably worth specifying whether or not it also allows them to sneak attack such foes. (I have no idea but I assume not)


Davick wrote:
So, I've not jumped in the the fields yet, but reading the initial post, I immediately thought it troublesome that the Caster Level is equal to ranks. This means it will often be 3 higher than their actual character level. Unless the abilities aren't that great, that's pretty awesome. Maybe have it be ranks capped by actual level.

Ranks refers specifically to the points invested in the skill, before adding in any bonuses or modifiers. I've never seen it used any other way. As such, it is limited to the character's level.

Quote:
Also, the ability to crit uncritables is gained at a pretty low level for something that good. It's probably worth specifying whether or not it also allows them to sneak attack such foes. (I have no idea but I assume not)

It does not affect any other kind of precision damage, only critical hits. I didn't really bother to add that in, but for clarity sake, I suppose I could.

As for how early, my thinking there is that there aren't all that many uncritable enemies out there. It's a powerful but highly situational ability that usually requires more than a little luck anyway. In 8 playtest sessions, I think it came up only once, only to fail the confirmation roll.

But, still, definitely something to consider.


Makeitstop wrote:


Ranks refers specifically to the points invested in the skill, before adding in any bonuses or modifiers. I've never seen it used any other way. As such, it is limited to the character's level.

Pfft. I don't know why my brain shifted to 3.5 thinking all of a sudden. Please disregard my crazy rambling.


Davick wrote:
Makeitstop wrote:


Ranks refers specifically to the points invested in the skill, before adding in any bonuses or modifiers. I've never seen it used any other way. As such, it is limited to the character's level.
Pfft. I don't know why my brain shifted to 3.5 thinking all of a sudden. Please disregard my crazy rambling.

Perfectly understandable. I'm just happy for the feedback.


To me one of the things that separates the core classes from others is clarity. You can read the class description and quickly glimpse the abilities and have a pretty good idea what the class is all about. Heck, even the class name is a good summary of what to expect.

This class is definitely not so. Initial impression is that it may step on the bard's toes a bit.


Tormsskull wrote:

To me one of the things that separates the core classes from others is clarity. You can read the class description and quickly glimpse the abilities and have a pretty good idea what the class is all about. Heck, even the class name is a good summary of what to expect.

This class is definitely not so.

Agreed. It's definitely less focused than the core classes, and instead provides a much wider variety, and versatility. I don't think that's a bad thing.

Quote:
Initial impression is that it may step on the bard's toes a bit.

I'd say that of the core classes, this one's base abilities most closely resemble a bard. But that's a small part of the class, and really comes down to (probably) using knowledge skills and the ability to use skills untrained. Really, whose toes you might step on depends on your build, and even then, you will always be a bit different.

One of the characters from playtesting took Geography (Ki) and local which made him essentially a ninja. But while he had Ki and sneak attack, he didn't have as much as a ninja of his level, or as many tricks. Instead, he was a bit tanky and had an animal companion. Consequently, despite the overlap, he played differently than a ninja. He made a good skirmisher that could stand his ground once all hell broke loose. Basically, he was never going to out ninja a ninja, but he could certainly out ranger a ninja.

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