White Estrid

Taja the Barbarian's page

377 posts. Alias of Darren Rodriguez.


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Shadow Lodge

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My rogue is about to hit level 5 and I'm considering an investment in Crafting:

  • Use one of my 5th level stat boosts to increase my Int from 10 to 12
  • Take 'Crafting' as my additional trained skill from my Intelligence bonus
  • Upgrade 'Crafting' to Expert with my level 5 skill upgrade, and
  • Take Assurance(Crafting) as my level 5 skill feat.

This should give me an automatic 19 on crafting checks, which should be enough for level 4 items. This is significant because the party has a number of Level 4 Striking Runes we're going to want to transfer.

Transferring Runes

Transferring Runes wrote:
The DC of the Crafting check to transfer a rune is determined by the item level of the rune being transferred, and the Price of the transfer is 10% of the rune’s Price, unless transferring from a runestone, which is free. If you’re swapping, use the higher level and higher Price between the two runes to determine these values. It takes 1 day (instead of the 4 days usually needed to Craft) to transfer a rune or swap a pair of runes, and you can continue to work over additional days to get a discount, as usual with Craft.

Our Striking Runes are 65g each, so the transfer price should be 6.5g and the base time to complete is 1 day, and I can work for additional days to reduce the cost. So far, seems simple enough.

Trained Action: Craft
Trained Action: Craft wrote:

You must supply raw materials worth at least half the item’s Price. You always expend at least that amount of raw materials when you Craft successfully. If you’re in a settlement, you can usually spend currency to get the amount of raw materials you need, except in the case of rarer precious materials.

...
If your attempt to create the item is successful, you expend the raw materials you supplied. You can pay the remaining portion of the item’s Price in materials to complete the item immediately, or you can spend additional downtime days working on it. For each additional day you spend, reduce the value of the materials you need to expend to complete the item. This amount is determined using Table 4–2: Income Earned (page 236), based on your proficiency rank in Crafting and using your own level instead of a task level. After any of these downtime days, you can complete the item by spending the remaining portion of its Price in materials.

So, do I have the following correct?

If I want to transfer a rune, I need to spend 50% of the Transfer Price or 3.25g of materials right away.
Once I make my (hopefully automatic) check, I can either:
  • a) Spend the remaining amount of the Price, or
  • b) Spend another day crafting to reduce the remaining amount by 1g (based on being a level 5 expert).

Financially, my options are:

  • One day of work and 6.5g,
  • Two days of work and 5.5g,
  • Three days of work and 4.5g, or
  • Four days of work and 3.25g.

Shadow Lodge

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Ediwir wrote:

The actual, more specific reason is that level DIFFERENCE is relevant and creates the feel of progression. Removing level difference does not make a game grittier, it makes it flatter

...

This.

One of the biggest issues people have with D&D 5.0 is its 'lack of progression' feeling: You can advance multiple levels and barely need to edit your character sheet at all. It's not really a mechanical flaw with the system, but it contributes to a feeling that some players really don't like...

Somewhat ironically, PF2 follows D&D 4.0's lead in a lot of features:

  • Blatantly adding level to nearly everything.
  • Choosing a class power from a handful of options every other level or so
  • The entire multiclassing system.

Shadow Lodge

iNickedYerKnickers wrote:
Also, Serenrae allows for redeeming evil doers. A Cleric of Sarenrae could drop a dude to Dying 1, heal him a bit, and then say, "Okay. Are ready to repent and give up your evil ways?"
Wrong thread, but the Dying rules don't apply to most creatures:
Knocked Out and Dying wrote:

Creatures cannot be reduced to fewer than 0 Hit Points. When most creatures reach 0 Hit Points, they die and are removed from play unless the attack was nonlethal, in which case they are instead knocked out for a significant amount of time (usually 1 minute or more). When undead and construct creatures reach 0 Hit Points, they are destroyed.

Player characters, their companions, and other significant characters and creatures don’t automatically die when they reach 0 Hit Points. Instead, they are knocked out and are at risk of death. At the GM’s discretion, villains, powerful monsters, special NPCs, and enemies with special abilities that are likely to bring them back to the fight (like ferocity, regeneration, or healing magic) can use these rules as well.

Basically, the guy you attack on the street will just die, while a significant NPC might use the Dying rules if the GM desires...

Shadow Lodge

thenobledrake wrote:

Definitely needs errata to clarify if the intent is to add 5 per proficiency rank to the repair rules, or up the per-tier part to 15 for both success and critical success.

I'd expect the intended function is to increase the total by 5 per proficiency rank across the board.

Odd that they didn't phrase it like that, though they might have wanted to avoid the possibility of someone stacking the buff (technically, you could wear multiple eyepieces at once).

Shadow Lodge

Thomas Keller wrote:
Taja the Barbarian wrote:


The main advantage is if get any further sorcerer class features, they will definitely work with all of your cantrips instead of just the two you get from the dedication.

I can't make heads or tails of this. What "further...features"? And what do you mean "work with all your cantrips"?

If you later get an feat or magic item that applies to sorcerer spells only, it won't work with your innate spells from the Rogue feat.

Maybe there isn't such an effect right now, but the game is still new...

Shadow Lodge

Crafter's Eyepiece
Relevant section:
When you Repair an item, increase the Hit Points restored by 15 per proficiency rank instead of 10.

Repair (Crafting Untrained Actions)
Relevant section:

  • Critical Success: You restore 10 Hit Points to the item, plus an additional 10 Hit Points per proficiency rank you have in Crafting (a total of 20 HP if you’re trained, 30 HP if you’re an expert, 40 HP if you’re a master, or 50 HP if you’re legendary).
  • Success: You restore 5 Hit Points to the item, plus an additional 5 per proficiency rank you have in Crafting (for a total of 10 HP if you are trained, 15 HP if you’re an expert, 20 HP if you’re a master, or 25 HP if you’re legendary).

So, the repair action indicates you only repair 5 hp per proficiency rank on a success while the eyepiece seems to believe this should be 10 per rank, which it boosts to 15 per rank.

Are these two sections using different versions of the rules that require an errata, or is it intended that your 'per rank' bonus is increased to 15 if you score a success or critical success (so an expert crafter would repair 35hp on a success or 40hp on a critical success)?

Shadow Lodge

Thomas Keller wrote:
Taja the Barbarian wrote:
Wheldrake wrote:
As an rogue, he could also take Minor Magic to get 2 more cantrips.
Basic Blood Potency (Cantrip Expansion) is probably a better option (assuming you don't have other plans for Basic Blood Potency).
What's the difference, other than one being a second level class feat and the other being a fourth level class feat?

You presumably already spent your level 2 class feat taking the dedication, so they are both effectively level 4+ feats.

The main advantage is if get any further sorcerer class features, they will definitely work with all of your cantrips instead of just the two you get from the dedication.

Also, you might want to keep the rogue feat available for taking cantrips from another tradition.

Shadow Lodge

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Offhand, I'm guessing it is considered rude to use an attack cantrip on everyone you meet...

Likewise, being 'evil' isn't generally illegal (selfish gain is pretty much the cornerstone of capitalism), so in any civilized realm, this technique will probably be considered 'assault' or 'murder' (depending on how well you rolled).

Shadow Lodge

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Qaianna wrote:
siegfriedliner wrote:

It defiantly more brutal I had my first party tpk in the plaguestone game, I went in as a level fighter hit a bad guy twice (double slice) doing about 15hp and then the boss who was 3 to 4 levels higher than the partycrit me (on a 14 or 15) which put me down to 5 hp and got a free action shove which pushed me in a trap which knocked me out.

The rest of the party flailed in effectively against his AC as he took 1 out per turn. Unfortunately we didnt have a healer because the gm told me afterwards he didn't have that many hit points and if I hit with another double slice I could have taken him out. It kind of killed the game but that roll20 for you.

..didn't have a healer? This might be a party composition issue. You don't want your cry for 'Medic!' being answered by Pharasma. Healing was generally considered relatively subpar in PF1, but even then it had its place of 'get the damage dealer on their feet'. My group came close to one in our 1e Rise of the Runelords campaign, and our cleric used up all of his healing (but did it at the right times and tossed some buffs and spells and summonses too), and our barbarian ended the fight with about ten HP ... and on her feet covered in the blood of her enemies. (The bard needed Raise Dead, tho even there he took a nasty shot, got Breath of Life, used his action to land some nasty debuff, and THEN got whacked for good).

The utility of a healer is a bit 'hit or miss' in PF2: Yes, one could have gotten the fighter back up, but he'd probably have to take multiple actions picking up his weapons and standing up (possibly provoking an AoO), and he'll have Wounded 1 at best and probably not be at full health, which makes it much more likely he will actually die the next time he goes down (which might be when trying to stand up).

Healers work best if they can keep you from going down in the first place, which was not really an option in the 'sudden character drop' example given. I'd probably recommend Shield Other if my group hadn't been AoE'd so horribly last session (Our cleric did go down, but I used my brand new Healer's Gloves to get him back up before my own inability to roll better than a 4 on a saving throw put me down: Apparently, I play on Roll4 instead of Roll20).

Speaking of our last session and PF2 Brutality, my Rogue's saves that fight were:

  • Critical Fail vs. Sound Burst
  • Failure vs Fireball
  • Critical Fail vs AoE Harm (rolled a 4, spent a Hero Point for a reroll and got a 3 instead)
So, critical failures on saving throws is another thing that can make PF2 brutal.

Shadow Lodge

Wheldrake wrote:
As an rogue, he could also take Minor Magic to get 2 more cantrips.

Basic Blood Potency (Cantrip Expansion) is probably a better option (assuming you don't have other plans for Basic Blood Potency).

Shadow Lodge

BellyBeard wrote:
Really interested in that Spike trap. It sounds to me like the GM used a higher level trap because simple traps are low XP value. I don't have the hazard creation rules available right now, but looking at AoN a level 3 trap is DC 20 to spot, probably has around a +10/12 to hit, and could plausibly do 44 damage on a crit but usually only with very high rolls. So it does seem likely to me that the trap was quite a big stronger than what you should be facing at that level, possibly due to the GM thinking that a simple trap should have XP value of a full encounter (to be fair, the CRB doesn't make it clear what an appropriate use of simple traps would be like. Would 5 simple traps actually be appropriate? Would one Pl + 3 trap be trivial like it's XP budget suggests? Is an encounter that can't kill more than one person, but is quite likely to kill one person, considered trivial still?).

Apparently, the published adventure trap was:

Level 4
DC 26 to detect (so I needed a roll of 15 or higher with my +11 Perception vs Traps)
+17 attack bonus (so a roll of 14+ was a critical against my AC 21)
I don't know what the actual damage dice are.
Found in a completely non-combat part of the adventure, so there was nothing to prevent the rest of the party from keeping you alive (as long as you didn't try to stealthily search the building alone) which made it basically a waste of time.
I'm under the impression that a fair amount of Age Of Ashes was written before the actual rulebooks were finalized, so traps might have been toned down a bit...

Shadow Lodge

  • It's a bit easier to hit in this edition, as your proficiency bonus to AC is offset by their proficiency bonus to attack rolls (and vice versa) and actual armor provides less of a bonus.
  • It's a bit easier to Crit in this edition as there is no longer a confirmation roll required and bosses can generally hit the '10 higher than necessary for a success' criteria with a fair number of high rolls.
  • It's a bit easier to get multiple attacks at low level (stride once, strike twice).

This all combines into making life rather brutal for the person who opens the door into the next room, and it's not unusual for a PC to be dropped before they have a chance to act: My Rogue 4 has already spilled a great deal of his own blood

A Few Encounter Results:
  • Sneaking Giant Bat Stride + strike + strike before I had a chance to act (the other bat dropped the party barbarian with a crit the same round, though he at least got to swing first: We nearly lost the Barbarian to the bat's AoE reaction to being melee-ed)
  • Colorful Birds confusing the NPC behind me, leaving me surrounded by hostiles until they beat me into unconsciousness (at least I got to act once or twice that fight).
  • Spike Trap that crit me for 44 damage at level 3 (My rogue is pretty much optimized for trap finding and apparently still needed a 15+ on the d20 to find this one, and it only needed like a 4 to actually hit me).
  • One AoO from a boss reduced me from full to half health (luckily, he started attacking the rest of the party, probably because the GM felt he was picking on me too much).
    Swarmed by spiders before my initiative came up (I didn't go down that fight, but only barely).

Shadow Lodge

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David knott 242 wrote:


It is a legacy from 1st edition. Wizards were the only spellcasters not proficient with all simple weapons in that edition, and that was carried over to the new edition.

It's far older than this (in spirit, at least): AD&D 1.0 Magic Users only had proficiency in 'Dagger, dart, staff' as far back as 1978.

Shadow Lodge

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K1 wrote:
Ediwir wrote:

...right... sure... uhu...

Tell ya what. Let’s draw a picture.

Without ancient elf:
Lv1: heritage, class feat
Lv2: dedication
Lv4: multiclass feat

With ancient elf:
Lv1: dedication, class feat
Lv2: class feat
Lv4: multiclass feat

?????

You can get class feats in many ways. You only get heritages once. No retraining.

It’s a good heritage, but requires you to understand how multiclassing works - praising it like the end all be all of multiclassing, in a thread where someone asks for help to understand it, turns it into nothing short of a newbie trap.
Don’t be like that.

Absolutely not.

I could take 1st dedication

and 2nd lvl Basic stuff

Then go from 4 on with more interesting main class perks.

Don't even try to belittle what a heritage like this could do.

Simply don't.
Yuk

Because of lvl 1 dedication, that specific heritage is allowed to do those specific choices.

You are simply arguing that "not necessarily you will be taking a 1st dedication", which is a fraud argument.

Lvl 1 heritage
Lvl 2 Basic dedication feat

Lvl 4. A lvl 4 main class feat

Vs

Lvl 1 class feat ( you will have a way thinner feat pool than lvl 4 )

Lvl 2 dedication

Lvl 4 Basic dedication feat.

If you can't see the difference, you are definitely trolling.

Ancient Elf: You essentially trade the bonus you might have gotten from a different heritage for a Multiclass Dedication feat.

Everyone Else: You essentially trade your Level 2 (or higher) class feat for a Multiclass Dedication feat.

In a lot of cases, a different heritage bonus might be better for you than your level 2 class feat options, so I'd expect your mileage to vary...

Shadow Lodge

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Castilliano wrote:
Technically, you can take a Multiclass feat whenever you qualify, though for now that's only at 2nd or higher other than the Elf Ancestry Feat which circumvents that.

Minor but important clarification: Ancient Elf is a Heritage, not an ancestry feat.

I am aware of three 'variations' on multi-classing:

  • Take the appropriate Multiclass Archetype Dedication feat in place of a class feat, which requires you to be at least second level and have a 14 or higher in one or more specific ability scores.
  • Have the Ancient Elf heritage at character creation, which allows you to skip the archetype prerequisites (Note that this does not appear to be PFS Legal at this time).
  • Humans at level 9+ can take the Multitalented Ancestry Feat to get a multiclass Archtype Dedication even if they already have one without the required 'two additional feat' to multiclass again (note that if you are a half-elf, you don't even need to meet the Dedication feat prerequisites).

The major thing to keep in mind is that most multiclass abilities don't scale automatically, so you'll need to keep taking the archetype feats if you actually want to be good at your second class's features (Cantrips are the one major exception to this). This makes multiclassing highly variable: My rogue MC'd into Cleric at levels two and four, but I'm not seeing an opportunity to take another Cleric feat for quite a while (Rogue feats at 6, 8, 10, and 12 look pretty good to me).

Shadow Lodge

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tivadar27 wrote:
Honestly if I was going to MC, I'd probably look to either Bard, Sorcerer, or Wizard to get access to True Strike. With a single powerful attack, it's a good go-to to boost your damage.

A 14 wisdom is a lot easier to fit into a Ranger build than a 14 Charisma or Intelligence.

K1 wrote:

I suggest you twin take down.

It is Normal to swap weapon if enemies come close to you, and as a ranger would be nice to be at least slightly versatile.

You could go with animal companion by lvl 2 ofc, but try not to always rely on a ranged weapon, because sometimes you will eventually have to switch to melee.

Twin Takedown doesn't seem very good for switch-hitting like this, since it's an action to draw each weapon.

Shadow Lodge

Chapter 9: Playing the Game / General Rules / Checks / Step 4: Determine the Degree of Success

Step 4: Determine the Degree of Success wrote:

...

If you rolled a 20 on the die (a “natural 20”), your result is one degree of success better than it would be by numbers alone. If you roll a 1 on the d20 (a “natural 1”), your result is one degree worse. This means that a natural 20 usually results in a critical success and natural 1 usually results in a critical failure. However, if you were going up against a very high DC, you might get only a success with a natural 20, or even a failure if 20 plus your total modifier is 10 or more below the DC. Likewise, if your modifier for a statistic is so high that adding it to a 1 from your d20 roll exceeds the DC by 10 or more, you can succeed even if you roll a natural 1! If a feat, magic item, spell, or other effect does not list a critical success or critical failure, treat is as an ordinary success or failure instead.

Shadow Lodge

Tender Tendrils wrote:
Taja the Barbarian wrote:
Gavmania wrote:
Seisho wrote:
Quote:


Thirdly it’s not limited to elves. By a quirk of the rules, half elves would also be able to pick up the ability.

That is not correct, half-elf is an heritage, the possibility to pick up a dedication at level 1 also

Not quite sure what point you are trying to make. Yes, half elf is a heritage, but one of their 1st level feats (Elf avatar) enables them to pick up the heritage of their elf parent, including the ability to get a dedication feat at first level. Depending on the gm, their other race could possibly be any other race, meaning that any race could theoretically get it, though not all gms would allow it. At the very least, humans with the half elf heritage would be able to get it - which was the point that I made: it’s not limited to elves.

Well, technically that could work, but there is a big 'GM's Discretion' issue:

The Elf Avatism feat does allow you to take an Elf Heritage, but it includes a 'You typically can’t select a heritage that depends on or improves an elven feature you don’t have' caveat.

Ancient Elf is the heritage that grants you a multiclass dedication feat at character creation, but the very beginning of the text is 'In your long life, you’ve dabbled in many paths and many styles.' which indicates the long lifespan of elves is a bit of a prerequisite: Half-Elves 'only' live about 150 years compared to 600 years for full elves, so you could argue they just don't live long enough to qualify as 'Ancient'.

So, your mileage may vary greatly with this.

Ancient elf has this requirement spelt out in its prerequisites - you have to be over 100 years old, which is 50 years under the age limit for being a half elf (though it means your character is probably starting to go a bit grey)

The Ancestral Longevity feat has this specific prerequisite: the Ancient Elf Heritage does not (at least, not in the online version).

Shadow Lodge

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Atalius wrote:
Let's say I'm a Warpriest and want to MC into Sorcerer, I get Sorcerer Dedication at level 2, then I get Basic Sorcerer Spellcasting at 4. What does Basic Sorcerer Spellcasting Enable me to get? Does it let me cast 1st and 2nd level Sorc spells (my choice of either arcane/primal/divine/occult depending on which one i choose) or how does it work? Thanks for all your help, still trying to wrap my head around caster MC'ing.

The specific spellcasting rules are Chapter 3: Classes / Archetypes / Spellcasting Archetypes

Shadow Lodge

Throwing weapons have always been weak spot in the D&D/Pathfinder rules, so you probably shouldn't hold your breath on this: At least Returning (PF2) doesn't wait until your next turn like Returning (PF1) did, which means you don't need to have multiple throwing weapons enchanted.

Shadow Lodge

Gavmania wrote:
Seisho wrote:
Quote:


Thirdly it’s not limited to elves. By a quirk of the rules, half elves would also be able to pick up the ability.

That is not correct, half-elf is an heritage, the possibility to pick up a dedication at level 1 also

Not quite sure what point you are trying to make. Yes, half elf is a heritage, but one of their 1st level feats (Elf avatar) enables them to pick up the heritage of their elf parent, including the ability to get a dedication feat at first level. Depending on the gm, their other race could possibly be any other race, meaning that any race could theoretically get it, though not all gms would allow it. At the very least, humans with the half elf heritage would be able to get it - which was the point that I made: it’s not limited to elves.

Well, technically that could work, but there is a big 'GM's Discretion' issue:

The Elf Avatism feat does allow you to take an Elf Heritage, but it includes a 'You typically can’t select a heritage that depends on or improves an elven feature you don’t have' caveat.

Ancient Elf is the heritage that grants you a multiclass dedication feat at character creation, but the very beginning of the text is 'In your long life, you’ve dabbled in many paths and many styles.' which indicates the long lifespan of elves is a bit of a prerequisite: Half-Elves 'only' live about 150 years compared to 600 years for full elves, so you could argue they just don't live long enough to qualify as 'Ancient'.

So, your mileage may vary greatly with this.

Shadow Lodge

K1 wrote:

Remember also that a monk could be self sufficient with wholeness of body.

And also that reducing dmg is somehow good as healing.

Remember also that during rests you could full heal your party with medicine checks.

That only to say that an healer is not necessarily needed, and a supporter, given the fact the monk has high defense and will take a self heal and the fact you have 2 ranged character, could also do the job.

Finally, the caster you bring down enemies, the better.

By bringing down enemies you won't need that much heals.

I suggwst you to consider a dps class instead, or simply what do you want to play.

I'd actually consider a healer to be fairly important: At low levels at least, it's really easy for characters to go down before they even get a chance to act in this edition (Stride + two attacks is really bad if your GM's dice are 'hot' that day).

Shadow Lodge

K1 wrote:

Lvl 1 is not that hard. You will simply go down if they happen to crit or hit you too much.

Remember that being a healer and a tank is pretty hard because of aoo which disrupting your actions.

Remember also that in this version tanks are used to be hit. They can mostly work towards not being critted than not being hit.

Better focus on healing an let melee to take dmg. Eventually you could use your champion reaction too. But if you have to heal stay back.

As a cloistered cleric, he'd get neither armor proficiency nor shield block at first level, which means he's probably going to take way too much damage (remember, only the Warpriest Cleric Doctrine gets these features).

Shadow Lodge

David knott 242 wrote:

And you may be giving them ideas about what to spend their 2nd level skill increase on.

I believe only Rogues get a skill upgrade at level 2: Everyone else gets them at 'odd levels greater than 1' instead. If no one has Thievery, I'm guessing they don't have a rogue in their party...

Now, you might have a character with a 12+ Int, which makes the Skill Training feat an option at 2nd level...

Shadow Lodge

SuperBidi wrote:
I'm with noble drake on that. Treat Wounds is not supposed to be able to put everyone to top between fights.

If you are willing to invest a feat or three, Treat Wounds is great for healing up the party: After a fight, you typically have a couple of folks searching for 10 minutes and then maybe identifying magic items for another 10, so it's not even adding much to your down time between fights...

Shadow Lodge

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Personally, I'm running a 'bandage spec' Thief* with a 16 wisdom, upgrading my Medicine skill to 'Expert' at level 2, and the following skill feats:

  • 1) Assurance (Medicine) (not useful at 1st level, but useful at level 2 and higher and you can take it at level 1, unlike the rest of these choices).
  • 2) Continual Recovery to allow for multiple treatments in a short time period, and
  • 3) Ward Medic so you can treat multiple people
It's a lot of feats, but Rogues get a ton of them and I'm not really planning on taking any more at the point. We do have a cleric in our group and he's taken most of the same feats (took Rogue Dedication at level 2 to get another skill feat), which means the party can bounce back pretty quickly after a fight.

*Back at the beginning of 'World of Warcraft' there were fights in the Molten Core raid that Rogues were so bad at that their best option was to use 'first aid' on more useful characters, which lead to the joking recommendation to take the 'bandage spec' for endgame raids...

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Malk_Content wrote:
Taja the Barbarian wrote:
wynlyndd wrote:

As the title says, can a Ranger with Rogue Dedication combine a Twin Takedown with Sneak Attack if the target (Hunted Prey) is flat-footed?

I'm using my Animal Companion(Cat) as its Support action to make the target flat-footed. Sneak Attack says if the target is flat-footed to get some Precision Damage and Twin Takedown allows me to use one action for two Strikes.

Is the above situation plausible?

This technically works, but doesn't seem plausible in most situations:[list]
  • First, Twin Takedown only works against your marked target, so you need to spend an action to Hunt Prey first.
  • One think to note is any ranger worth their salt will already have their target marked before combat begins, except in situations in which the party is ambushed (and even then a lot of the time still)

    So far, most of the encounters our group has had have jumped right to combat, so pre-hunting hasn't been an option most of the time. Even when it is, that's only helpful for your first target of the fight (which might die before you even get to act, or you might not be able to reach in the first round as a melee character) and you are still taking two actions to set up your combo on the next target (and the one after that, and the one after that, etc.).

    Shadow Lodge

    Blave wrote:

    Wouldn't it be much more effective to have a bear companion and actually flank with it while it's using its support ability? I don't see a rule stating that a supporting animal companion can't be used for flanking. That way, you'd get another d8 on top of sneak attack.

    Becomes even easier to do once you get Side by Side at leve l2.

    The geography won't always allow for actual flanking (such as a pair of opponents with their backs to a wall), which is what makes the Cat bonus so nice: It just takes so many actions to get set up...

    That being said, when I was looking into the Ranger Archetype for my rogue, the fact that I could get the Gang Up feat at level 6 instead of my second Ranger feat kinda put the final nail in that idea's coffin...

    Now, I could see Rogue + Short Bow + Ranger Archetype + Cat Companion + Hunted Shot as a Ranged Sneak Attack build: Being possibly able to attack without moving makes a significant difference in the action economy.

    Shadow Lodge

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    wynlyndd wrote:

    As the title says, can a Ranger with Rogue Dedication combine a Twin Takedown with Sneak Attack if the target (Hunted Prey) is flat-footed?

    I'm using my Animal Companion(Cat) as its Support action to make the target flat-footed. Sneak Attack says if the target is flat-footed to get some Precision Damage and Twin Takedown allows me to use one action for two Strikes.

    Is the above situation plausible?

    This technically works, but doesn't seem plausible in most situations:
    • First, Twin Takedown only works against your marked target, so you need to spend an action to Hunt Prey first.
    • Second, getting the Support Bonus from your Cat requires you to command your companion to provide this specific benefit, so there's another action lost (also note that your companion can't attack in any round it uses it's Support ability).
    • Finally, the actual benefit from the cat only kicks in after you actually hit once, so the target is not automatically flat footed against your first attack (though, as long as you hit at least once per round, you can keep it permanently flat footed for the rest of the fight if it can't kill or avoid your companion).

    I looked into this for my Rogue and finally concluded it wasn't worth the effort (plus the complication of needing a weapon in your offhand all the time): Any fight long enough for you spend all these actions is probably a fight where your cat is going to die.

    Shadow Lodge

    Arrows shot from a bow do tend to 'wobble' at the beginning of their flight before they stabilize, so there is some level of justification for being slightly less effective at really close ranges.

    Of course, if this trait were based on actual physics, the short bow would need to have it as well, so it's pretty clear this was a 'we don't want everyone to use a longbow, but we can't just drop it from the game entirely without sparking a riot' issue.

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    Zwordsman wrote:
    Buckler I think is the only choice currently. Which is a shame. I think it would've been great design space for Slings to work with shields. Since its not really hard to do logistically

    Actually, I'd think loading a sling while wielding a shield would be a logistical nightmare: Remember, sling bullets/stones don't fit into convenient quivers, so you'll probably have to reach into a bag or pouch that is not so loose that it would easily spill your ammunition, which is kinda hard to do with a hand that is also holding a shield.

    Offhand, I'd guess the best process for doing this would be:

      First, Transfer the sling to your shield hand, but choke up on it at the same time (Grab it closer to the 'cup' with your shield hand).
    • Next, draw a new bullet from your pouch using your main hand.
    • Next, load the bullet into the 'cup' of the sling, still using your main hand.
    • Then, you need to get the 'grip' end of the sling back into your main hand, which is probably dangling down from your shield hand without letting the bullet fall out (I'm not certain how susceptible sling bullets are to accidentally falling out, but I'm guessing wielding a shield in one of your hands is not going to help the situation).
    • Finally, you can attack with the sling.

    I'm guessing that loading a sling this way would at least require additional actions for all the juggling you'd need to do.

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    The DM of wrote:
    Cold resistance is not uncommon, and shield counters MM. What's the defense against mental?
    Shield isn't really much of a counter to Magic Missile spell anymore: You can use your reaction to Shield Block the spell, but unlike previous editions:
    • You need to spend an action each round to use the spell,
    • Assuming both casters are the same level, it only reduces the damage taken from 3d4+3 to 3d4-2 per four caster levels, and
    • You can't use the Shield spell again for 10 minutes after blocking anything.
    Given that the +1 AC bonus is pretty valuable by itself, most casters would be unlikely to actually use the Shield Block option until either it was necessary to survive or the it's obvious you probably won't be needing it for another 10 minutes (your opponents are nearly defeated or you are unlikely to be attacked again the way things are going).

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    Saros Palanthios wrote:
    So despite poring over the 2e CRB in detail for the last two months, i somehow failed to notice until yesterday that *arcane spell failure chance from armor doesn't exist in PF2*! Literally the only thing stopping Wizards (and Sorcerers) from armoring up is lack of proficiency-- a problem easily solved with a single feat.
    Things to keep in mind:

    • A 'single feat' is half the general feats you get in the first half of your career and 1/5th of your general feats in your 20 level career.
    • Proficiency from feats generally don't ever increase from 'trained'.
    • The better Light armors have penalties if you don't have at least a 12 strength.
    • The better light armors only grant a +2 bonus.

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    One thing you might want to keep in mind is that Age of Ashes has Campaign Specific Backgrounds: My understanding is that aren't mandatory by any means, but they do connect with the storyline somehow...

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    Magda Luckbender wrote:
    Taja the Barbarian wrote:
    The Longspear was good if:
  • You are fighting in a tight, disciplined, military formation ...
  • This is a very common incorrect opinion. [Youtube: Spears are better than swords]. In fact, a spear is vastly superior to a sword in an unarmored one-on-one fight. This makes sense, as spears are primary battle weapons, while swords are typically sidearms. Sword is to spear as handgun is to rifle.

    Spears are okay in close combat, but longspears are not: There is a world of difference between a 5' spear and a 20' spear like the Macedonians used.

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    CMantle wrote:
    Magda Luckbender wrote:
    baggageboy wrote:
    I disagree that longspear is the "best" simple weapon.
    Thousands of years of Asian martial arts tradition disagrees [Wikipedia: Qiang]. In Pathfinder terms, what other weapon can nearly every 1st level PC use to delivers multiple attacks per round at full BaB and damage? P.s. I've wandered off-topic, so maybe ignore this post.
    The Greeks and every other ancient civilization also disagree. The long spear was a revolutionary weapon as much as the longbow, crossbow, and black powder firearms. It forever changed how warfare was done. It was an incredible weapon for its time, so much so that it’s first major battle (the battle of Megiddo) is what our coined term “Armageddon” is based on. The longspear is legit
    The Longspear was good if:
    • You are fighting in a tight, disciplined, military formation,
    • You are fighting in open terrain, and
    • Your flanks and rear are somehow protected.
    If any of these conditions aren't met, you are probably in deep, deep trouble.

    It's worth noting that when the Romans defeated the Macedonian Phalanx, they were using 18" short swords to massacre men using 18' spears.

    As for the original question:

    • Sacred Weapon can be used with your diety's favored weapon and any weapon you have the 'Weapon Focus' feat in.
    • Therefore, your diety's favored weapon is always a sacred weapon for you, but not all sacred weapon are your diety's favored weapon (The fact that an angry woman is human does not mean all humans are angry women).
    • Weapon of the Chosen specifically requires your diety's favorite weapon, so you can not use this feat with a weapon that is not your diety's favored weapon, even if it happens to be a sacred weapon for you.

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    If you are using stealth or in Difficult Terrain, the increase from a 25 to a 30 base speed becomes an increase from 2 squares to 3 square per move, which can be significant.

    As for stats, the +3 boosts a non-human gets allows for a 18 / 16 / 14 'good stat' array (with the caveat that two of those scores need to be Dex and Int) while the +2 boosts a human gets only allows for a 18 / 16 / 12.

    Of course, the Con flaw is pretty much always going to be painful for elves, so your mileage will vary...

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    Full Round Action: Takes both your Standard and Move actions for the round but is otherwise a normal 'action' (i.e., it is complete at the end of your round and before the next player or NPC gets to go.

    1 Round Action: Takes both your Standard and Move actions for the round, but these are spread out over the entire 6 second round, completing just before your initiative comes up for the next round.

    All 1 Round Actions are Full Round Actions, but Full Round Actions are not 1 Round Actions unless specifically stated as such.

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    I was looking at feats my halfling thief should probably take in the future and this one immediately popped out to me:

    Expeditious Search wrote:
    You have a system that lets you search at great speed, finding details and secrets twice as quickly as others can. When Searching, you take half as long as usual to Search a given area. This means that while exploring, you double the Speed you can move while ensuring you’ve Searched an area before walking into it (up to half your Speed). If you’re legendary in Perception, you instead Search areas four times as quickly.
    Search Activity wrote:
    You Seek meticulously for hidden doors, concealed hazards, and so on. You can usually make an educated guess as to which locations are best to check and move at half speed, but if you want to be thorough and guarantee you checked everything, you need to travel at a Speed of no more than 300 feet per minute, or 150 feet per minute to ensure you check everything before you walk into it. You can always move more slowly while Searching to cover the area more thoroughly, and the Expeditious Search feat increases these maximum Speeds. If you come across a secret door, item, or hazard while Searching, the GM will attempt a free secret check to Seek to see if you notice the hidden object or hazard. In locations with many objects to search, you have to stop and spend significantly longer to search thoroughly.

    Now, assuming my Halfling thief has speed 30 when I take this feat at level 7, how fast do I actually 'check everything' search? As far as I can tell, I still can only go 150 feet per minute, as that is half my 300 feet per minute travel speed (per CRB chart 9-2).

    Is this feat only supposed to help if you have a 35+ speed?

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    Volkard Abendroth wrote:
    The DR is going to be very difficult for most melee to get through.

    ^^^THIS^^^

    Worm That Walks

    Worm That Walks wrote:

    ...type changes to vermin....do not possess the standard mindless trait of most vermin

    ...darkvision 60 feet and blindsight 30 feet
    ...has no discernible anatomy, and is not subject to critical hits or flanking
    ...immune to any physical spell or effect that targets a specific number of creatures (including single-target spells such as disintegrate),
    ...takes half again as much damage (+50%) from damaging area effects,
    ...susceptible to high winds—treat a worm that walks as a Fine creature for the purposes of determining wind effects.
    ...gains damage reduction 15/—.
    ...gains fast healing equal to its CR.
    ...immune to disease, paralysis, poison, and sleep effects.

    Basically, these things are very hard to kill at low level and a lot of martial builds (and some casters) might as well not even show up, so consider your party composition before adding a fight like this...

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    Minigiant wrote:

    Well I am just looking at taking the Barbarian VMC

    Is that Chained or Unchained?

    If it grants a direct bonus to attack rolls and damage rolls (like the unchained version), you would get the full benefit as you are making the attack roll.

    If it grants a direct bonus to your physical stats (like the chained version), you would get nothing because "the synthesist uses the eidolon’s Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution" so your physical stats are essentially irrelevant.

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    Core Rulebook / Additional Rules / Age wrote:
    When a character reaches venerable age, secretly roll his maximum age and record the result, which the player does not know. A character who reaches his maximum age dies of old age sometime during the following year.

    If you die because you reached your maximum age, you can't be resurrected.

    if you died for any other reason, you can.

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    Fly Skill

    +4 from Good maneuverability
    +6 from Diminutive size
    +1 from 1 skill rank
    +3 for being a trained class skill
    +2 from Dexterity 15

    Grand total of +16 to Fly checks.

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    Adjoint wrote:
    Artofregicide wrote:
    Adjoint wrote:
    My stance is that Astrid Mountain-Puncher can, in fact, take a slab of a rock and smush a swarm. Such action isn't however covered by the rulers, so the GM needs to create rules on the fly.

    We're definitely on the same wavelength here, but improvised weapons are very much covered by the rules and thus the granite piledriver would do no damage by RAW.

    That said I'd totally allow it. And honestly your ruling it would be an area attack (+50% dmg) is awesome.

    By improvised weapons rules, they are supposed to mimic an existing wepon, with appropriate penalties. I don't think there exist a weapon that a great slab of stone would mimic.

    I was thinking more along the lines "topple a nearby wall to bury the swarm". Although a very strong character may be able to lift such slab of stone and drop it somewhere else. Still, it doesn't look to me like using any existing weapon.

    This sounds more like a 'make a save to avoid the large slab of rock' than a 'roll to attack with the large slab of rock' so this is less of an improvised weapon than a PC-assisted environmental hazard.

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    Lelomenia wrote:
    It appears it works with lighten weapon, and it doesn’t appear very problematic as ranged characters commonly combine movement with full attacks normally (mounts etc). This should be in the 3rd party product advice and rules question forum though.

    Projectile weapons (bows, crossbows, and firearms primarily) are not 'One Handed' weapons: They are 'Ranged' weapons, which is an entirely separate category.

    Ranged weapons may require one hand (hand crossbow, pistols) or two hands (bows) to use, but they still do not fall into the 'one-handed' or 'two-handed' categories.

    So, looking at Lighten Weapon's text:

    • This allows you to wield a weapon 1 size category larger as if it were your own size, (this applies to ranged weapons)
    • use a two-handed weapon in one hand, (this only applies to 'Two-handed weapons', not 'ranged weapons' that require two hands to use)
    • or a one-handed as a light weapons. (this only applies to 'One-handed weapons', not 'ranged weapons' that only require one hand to use)

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    Mesmerist wrote:
    Spells: A mesmerist casts psychic spells drawn from the mesmerist spell list.

    While there is a specific Psychic class, this term is also used to describe an entire type of magic.

    Psychic spells do not use the same components as Arcane or Divine spells:

    • Verbal components are replaced with Thought components.
    • Somatic components (gestures) are replaced with Emotion components.
    • Material components are still required, but Psychic casters use a slightly different version.

    So, Mesmerists do not have to make gestures (or even speak), but may still need to manipulate material components...

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    Java Man wrote:
    According to the archetype stacking faq adding a single class skill is altering the "class skills" feature.

    This.

    If the two archetypes touch the same class feature in any way, you can't combine them. In your example, the class feature is 'class skills' so the two archetypes are incompatible.

    Note that class skills added from Sorcerer Bloodlines or Oracle Mysteries are usually considered a separate class feature, so an archetype touching Oracle Class Skills does not necessary clash with an archetype touching the Oracle Class Skills from the Mystery: You'll need to read these archetypes carefully.

    For example, the following two Oracle archetype features do not clash (thought the archetypes themselves clash on another feature):

    Spirit Guide wrote:
    Class Skills: A spirit guide gains all Knowledge skills as class skills. This replaces the bonus class skills gained from the oracle’s mystery.
    Shigenjo wrote:
    Class Skills: A shigenjo adds Survival to her list of class skills in place of Diplomacy.

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    Remember, the bonus only applies 'against monsters of the giant subtype' so your mileage will vary: If you are playing an update of the old 'Against the Giants' campaign, you'll be happy as a proverbial clam with this trait, but in most games it will rarely come into play.

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    Per a site I just found http://tametick.com/dnd/#Dwarves, Dwarves originally took half damage from 'clumsy monsters like ogres, giants, and the like' in the 1974 rules.

    By 1978's AD&D Player's Handbook, it was changed to a -4 penalty to attack rolls against Dwarves and Gnomes (which was not a player race option prior to this volume).

    So basically, this idea has literally been around since the dawn of the game...

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    Every Barbarian should be a Totem Warrior: It literally costs you nothing and in return you get...Nothing!

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