White Estrid

Taja the Barbarian's page

1,577 posts. Alias of Darren Rodriguez.


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Shadow Lodge

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Access is limited by rarity, and you do not have access to 'non-common' weapons unless something specifically states that you do (an ancestry feat or a GM's house rule).

Uncommon wrote:

Source Core Rulebook pg. 637 4.0

Something of uncommon rarity requires special training or comes from a particular culture or part of the world. Some character choices give access to uncommon options, and the GM can choose to allow access for anyone. Less is known about uncommon creatures than common creatures. They typically can't be summoned. The DC of Recall Knowledge checks related to these creature is increased by 2.

In the case of the Elven Branched Spear, all fighters are technically proficient if they happen to find one (it's a Martial Weapon), but fighters without access can't just purchase them from the local shop: They'd most likely have to loot one from an opponent...

Shadow Lodge

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Milo v3 wrote:
I feel like these sort of mechanics only really work if there is something to encourage people to be doing a different thing in the different phases, but with starfinder most of the time people will just be using the same skill each time for each of those phases. So the primary result is just "you have a higher chance at failing the action".

Yes, needing to succeed on multiple rolls drastically reduces your chances of succeeding.

Your odds of getting 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 successes in a row for a given required roll on a d20 is:
16: 25.00% / 06.25% / 01.56% / 00.39%
11: 50.00% / 25.00% / 12.50% / 06.25%
06: 75.00% / 56.25% / 31.64% / 23.73%
02: 95.00% / 90.25% / 85.74% / 81.45%

Given there is no way this could work in game if PCs needed to succeed at all four checks (even a "don't roll a 1" checks have a nearly 20% chance of failure), I'm assuming there is more to this system (maybe you can keep retrying a step until you succeed, but that's going to stretch things out even longer).

Shadow Lodge

Cleric / Class Features / Deity / Anathema wrote:

Source Core Rulebook pg. 116 4.0

Acts fundamentally opposed to your deity's alignment or ideals are anathema to your faith. Learning or casting spells, committing acts, and using items that are anathema to your deity remove you from your deity's good graces.

Casting spells with the evil trait is almost always anathema to good deities, and casting good spells is likewise anathema to evil deities; similarly, casting chaotic spells is anathema to lawful deities, and casting lawful spells is anathema to chaotic deities. A neutral cleric who worships a neutral deity isn't limited this way, but their alignment might change over time if they frequently cast spells or use abilities with a certain alignment. Similarly, casting spells that are anathema to the tenets or goals of your faith could interfere with your connection to your deity. For example, casting a spell to create undead would be anathema to Pharasma, the goddess of death. For borderline cases, you and your GM determine which acts are anathema.

If you perform enough acts that are anathema to your deity, or if your alignment changes to one not allowed by your deity, you lose the magical abilities that come from your connection to your deity. The class features that you lose are determined by the GM, but they likely include your divine font and all divine spellcasting. These abilities can be regained only if you demonstrate your repentance by conducting an atone ritual.

Shadow Lodge

Goth Guru wrote:

A PC ratfolk may have a ring of invisibility.

I'm just saying how I would handle it as a GM. I would handle it in a way I understand. In a combat situation, everybody's grunting"unless they are a ghost" and you could recognise one of your teammate's grunts.

Okay, we seem to be on different pages here. My understanding of the basic most-recent question is:

I am invisible and prowling around with no one aware I am there.
An 'enemy' proceeds to accidentally walk through my square: Can I somehow let him pass through without revealing my presence (and if so, how?) or should the RAW apply?

Neither 'small size' nor 'allies' directly come into play here...

Shadow Lodge

Technically speaking, the existence of fertile Half-Elves and Half-Orcs indicates that Humans, Orcs, and Elves are all the same species:

Species wrote:

A biological species is a group of organisms that can reproduce with one another in nature and produce fertile offspring.

...
Half-Elf wrote:

Source Core Rulebook pg. 56 (4.0)

Either one of your parents was an elf, or one or both were half-elves. You have pointed ears and other telltale signs of elf heritage. You gain the elf trait, the half-elf trait, and low-light vision. In addition, you can select elf, half-elf, and human feats whenever you gain an ancestry feat.

Half-Orc wrote:

Source Core Rulebook pg. 56 (4.0)

One of your parents was an orc, or one or both were half-orcs. You have a green tinge to your skin and other indicators of orc heritage. You gain the orc trait, the half-orc trait, and low-light vision. In addition, you can select orc, half-orc, and human feats whenever you gain an ancestry feat.

Shadow Lodge

Goth Guru wrote:
6:A square can hold 2 small creatures. A gnome and a goblin could fight in a square.
This is pretty much a Ratfolk Trait:
Ratfolk Racial Traits wrote:

Source Inner Sea Races pg. 247, Advanced Race Guide pg. 150, Bestiary 3 pg. 231

...
Swarming: Ratfolk are used to living and fighting communally, and are adept at swarming foes for their own gain and their foes’ detriment. Up to two ratfolk can share the same square at the same time. If two ratfolk in the same square attack the same foe, they are considered to be flanking that foe as if they were in two opposite squares.
...

I'm not certain what this has to do with the original 'can I let this guy pass through my square without revealing myself' question...

Shadow Lodge

The 'Good' Stuff:
Stamina: Pretty much a universal opinion.
Personal Upgrade system: Might be my favorite 'stat boost item' system yet.
Skill Synergy Feat: Simple, but very nice...

The 'Not-So-Good' Stuff:
Starship combat: Yeah, this rarely works well in a RPG
Economy: The '10% resale value' makes you highly dependent on useful equipment dropping from your foes, and I'm not a fan of the 'replace your weapons/armor every 4 levels or so' model. Also, not an actual game issue, but the season 1 SFS boons that 'reward' you for not spending all your funds earlier (get a discount on future purchases, buy an item right now you can resell later for a good profit) annoyed me as well as I had always just emptied my wallet...
Skills: Perception is annoying as ever (it sucks when your technomancer is great at disabling traps but can't actually find them), and two characters with the same 'good stat' are probably going to have a lot of overlap on their skills. It's nice that there is a reason to have high-intelligence characters, though...
Operatives?: Didn't actually have one in our group, but they kinda seem 'too good' at skills when compared to other classes, to the point that they are almost 'must haves' for a decent group...

EDIT: Elaborating on the 'Economy' issue a bit, getting heavy armor or Solarian weapon 'drops' was really annoying in our party because no one could use them and they would vendor for pocket change...

Shadow Lodge

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Being an 'outsider' is actually a question of what you are, not where you are from:

Outsider wrote:

Source Pathfinder RPG Bestiary pg. 309

An outsider is at least partially composed of the essence (but not necessarily the material) of some plane other than the Material Plane. Some creatures start out as some other type and become outsiders when they attain a higher (or lower) state of spiritual existence. An outsider has the following features.
...

Shadow Lodge

XXSUPERHEROXX wrote:
I am sorry but changing the rules from 1st edition to 2nd edition should not change the history of the Golarion if it did then playing the game is a huge waste of time.

It's a game: By definition, it's a waste of time...

Shadow Lodge

Do you mean like the Gremlin Companion Hack that grants you a Glitch Gremlin?

Shadow Lodge

AwesomenessDog wrote:
Yes, but my question is in the fact that (at least if you know) you can simply choose the damage type as suits the DR. That combined with I guess select oozes winds up making the supposedly better (according to the custom weapon rules) "and" option actually worse than the or.

Yes, 'or' is generally better than 'and' for weapon damage types (unless you are using a virtual table top and really don't want to include copies of your weapon for each damage type).

Shadow Lodge

Azothath wrote:

generally solutions fall into categories;

1) RAW bumper cars: strict RAW which then allows searching for an invisible creature's square by using movement. Squares that are mysteriously impassible invite the conclusion that they have invisible foes in them.

2) Invis GM Fiat: The invisible creature is allowed to be considered "friendly" with specific creatures for that creature's turn. This trades AoOs for not being detected without an actual search. The invisible creature must still make checks to move through other creature's squares and is not allowed to stop in another creature's square.

3) Invis check: Invisible creature makes Stealth/Acrobatics check to avoid detection which must be higher than the traveler's 10+Perception check or perception bonus. Somewhat an analog to using Stealth or Acrobatics.

4) Percp check: Converse of 3 where traveling creature makes a skill check vs a base invisible stealth DC. Requesting a check alerts the creature to an unusual condition.

5) Squeezing: a check rationalizes two creatures in a square but who takes the penalties?...

6) others

Regarding #2, it seems to me that the general ability to pass through a friendly creature's square assumes some basic level of coordination to avoid tripping over each other (I see you are trying to come through the west side of my square, so I'll stick to the east side for the moment it takes you to pass through). If the person passing through isn't aware the square is occupied by a 'hostile but willing to let you pass' creature, there is no guarantee they won't lurch into the east side of the square by accident (or because they were planning on turning or going diagonal at this point).

At minimum, there should probably be an acrobatics check to let the other character pass thru (so, 'no' to option #2 and 'maybe' to option #3 I guess).

Offhand, I think another solution is probably: Invisible creature has to ready an action to move out of the way if anyone enters his/her square. If they don't, RAW if someone else enters that square (you need to plan ahead a bit and learn to keep your distance if you want to be sneaky and safe).

Shadow Lodge

marcryser wrote:

"or" means it does only one damage type at a time. You have to choose how to use it. A dagger is slashing or piercing.

"and" means it does both types at the same time. You don't have to select. A morningstar does bludgeoning and piercing together.

This is generally only a thing when dealing with DR of certain creatures.

Damage types are often significant against Oozes as well.

Shadow Lodge

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Threeshades wrote:
I know a +1 is a lot more significant with the critical success/failure rules, but it the math in PF2 really so tight that you hamstring yourself if your attack ability modifier starts 1 point below the ability increase soft cap instead of at?
My general understanding is:
  • Starting with an 18 attack stat is great!
  • Starting with a 16 attack stat is perfectly fine (there's literally no mechanical difference versus a starting 18 for half the game)
  • Starting with a 14 or less attack stat is likely to be an issue...

Shadow Lodge

Arise, slumbering thread...

Well, it's been nearly a year, but we hit level 16 last week (we took a good portion of 2022 off as two of our players refused to let their newborn child learn to fend for itself) and I'll finally get True Arcane Bloodrage next level, so I've started looking at this again.

My GM has declined my request to have my equipment resize instead of merging if I shift into Girallon (high or otherwise) form, and to be fair we haven't actually found the AP threatening enough that we really need the additional damage output.

I have come up with a possible work-around for my sword by getting a couple of enchantments on it:

Source Ultimate Equipment pg. 137

Aura moderate conjuration CL 9th
Slot weapon quality; Price +1 bonus; Weight

Description
A called weapon can be teleported to the wielder’s hand as a swift action that does not provoke attacks of opportunity, even if the weapon is in the possession of another creature. This ability has a maximum range of 100 feet, and effects that block teleportation prevent the return of a called weapon. A called weapon must be in a creature’s possession for at least 24 hours for this ability to function.

Construction
Requirements Craft Magic Arms and Armor, teleport; Price

Source Giant Hunter's Handbook pg. 33

Aura faint transmutation CL 5th
Slot none; Price +4,000 gp; Weight

Description
A resizing weapon instantly shrinks or grows to suit the size of any creature that picks it up unless it is currently wielded by another creature. It reverts to its original size 1 round after it leaves its wielder’s possession.

Construction
Requirements Craft Magic Arms and Armor, resize item; Price 2,000 gp

Basically, the idea is to drop the sword, start my bloodrage and shift into Girallon form, then summon the sword back as a swift action at which point it changes to large size for maximum carnage...

One thing that is kinda pushing me away from Beast Shape is that I picked up Infuse Self this level and Beast Shape IV will end that nice long buff: Assuming I am infused with a +2 Str bonus, this effectively reduces the Strength buffs of Beast Shape and Form of the Dragon by 2 and makes Transformation a little more attractive

  • Transformation: Str 32 (Infused), Dex 20, Con 18, +4 Natural Armor, +5 Fort save, +1 BAB, Medium Size, keep +3 Mithril Breastplate (Net +6 AC, +3 attack, 2d6+20 base wpn dmg).
  • Large Magical Beast: Str 34, Dex 14, Con 20, +6 Natural Armor, Large size, lose +3 Mithril Breastplate (Net -5 AC [before Mage Armor], +2 attack, 3d6+22 base wpn dmg).

Shadow Lodge

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One of the largest factors isn't mentioned in your criteria: What is the rest of your party doing?

Many years ago, I had an Affliction (Damage over Time) Warlock in World of Warcraft and the damage I dealt in a dungeon run was highly erratic: Some times I'd top the charts, while other times I was 'would they even notice if I went AFK' and this puzzled me for a little bit before I realized the underlying issue:

  • DoT specs have a 'build-up' time where they establish all their debuffs and get all their damage effects running.
  • With a random group of players, I'd have plenty of time to get everything set-up and would often top the charts.
  • When running with my actual friends/guildmates (who were both good at the game and well geared), nothing lived long enough for my damage to really get going...
Coming back to PF1, the largest factor limiting my Bloodrager's Full Attacks is the party Swashbuckler and Alchemist (both of whom typically beat me to initiative and do a lot of damage) weakening my foes to the point that a full attack isn't actually needed.

Likewise, when we played through Wrath of the Righteous, the party paladin rarely got a chance to shine in the first half because his initiative was so far behind the rest of the party (Ninja, Gunslinger, and Oracle using Charisma for init) that most foes would be dead before he went

So, I guess what I am trying to say is: The better your party is, the fewer 'full attacks' you're likely to make...

Shadow Lodge

Minigiant wrote:

Do these two Cleric Archetypes stack

Now usually I find these questions pretty cut and dry, but in this instance I have doubts.

Scroll Scholar

Diligent Student wrote:

At 1st level, a scroll scholar chooses one Knowledge skill. This becomes a class skill if it is not already one. The scroll scholar adds half her class level to all Knowledge checks of this type (minimum 1).

At 5th level and every five levels thereafter, a scroll scholar chooses 1 additional Knowledge skill to receive this bonus.

This ability replaces one of the 1st-level granted powers from her domains—the character gets to choose which of her two 1st-level granted powers it replaces.

Effects the powers, whereas the Evangelist Single-Minded effects the Domain. I am not sure if there is enough of a distinction for them to be counted as separate things

The actual class feature being altered is "Domains" in both cases, so these archetypes shouldn't mix.

Shadow Lodge

Mark Hoover 330 wrote:

Looking through CR 11 monsters on the SRD (that's right Derklord, I'm still using the SRD! *runs for cover*) I see 82 monsters that are Paizo specific, not 3pp creations. 22 of these have either Resist Fire 10, Resist Fire 20 or Immune: Fire. This means roughly 1 in 4 monsters the PCs face would need another energy type from a blaster caster to deal with them.

Yes, that IS a lot of monsters to build contingencies for, but that still leaves 3 out of every 4 monsters vulnerable. In fights when your Fire spells aren't as effective you could

1. Still deal SOME Fire damage unless the monster is immune
2. Use admixture or some other similar ability/feat/metamagic item
3. Buff your allies or debuff the foe(s) in some way

I haven't run a comparison to other energy types but others before me on these threads have mentioned that Fire is the most resisted energy type. This glance at CR11 monsters though gives us an idea that being fire based doesn't INVALIDATE your entire PC beyond this point, it merely puts a wrinkle in your attack plans.

Taking a quick look at the CR11 creatures, I see:
  • 12 types of dragons, each of which is likely to be immune to something,
  • 8 types of elementals, each of which is going to be immune to something,
  • at least 4 'classic evil outsiders', each of which is going to be immune or resistant to a lot of stuff*, and
  • both the 'Cyro-' and 'Pyro-' Hydra variations, which swap immunity/vulnerablity types between them.

*From personal experience, getting Chain Lightning as an Oracle Mystery spell is kinda annoying when you are playing Wrath of the Righteous: Only used it once, against a bunch of giants who turned out to be resistant anyway...

In short, Fire does tend to be the most resisted energy type, but the other types typically aren't that far behind.

Shadow Lodge

Minigiant wrote:

I reread Magical Lineage, and I could have sworn that you could update the spell it affects every couple of levels, but I am not seeing any mention of that. Was I imagining it? or is that rule written somewhere else?

D20 wrote:
Benefit: Pick one spell when you choose this trait. When you apply metamagic feats to this spell that add at least 1 level to the spell, treat its actual level as 1 lower for determining the spell’s final adjusted level.

While feats typically allow you to change the specific spell it is applied to, I don't think any traits have this flexibility: They just aren't supposed to be 'that good'...

Source Ultimate Campaign pg. 57, Second Darkness Player's Guide pg. 13, Advanced Player's Guide pg. 1

Category Basic (Magic)

One of your parents was a gifted spellcaster who not only used metamagic often, but also developed many magical items and perhaps even a new spell or two—and you have inherited a fragment of this greatness. Pick one spell when you choose this trait. When you apply metamagic feats to this spell that add at least 1 level to the spell, treat its actual level as 1 lower for determining the spell’s final adjusted level.

versus:

Source Ultimate Magic pg. 156

Select one spell. You cast that spell with greater than normal power.

Prerequisites: Int 13, Spell Focus.

Benefit: Select one spell of a school for which you have taken the Spell Focus feat. Treat your caster level as being two higher for all level-variable effects of the spell.

Every time you gain an even level in the spellcasting class you chose your spell from, you can choose a new spell to replace the spell selected with this feat, and that spell becomes your specialized spell.

Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Its effects do not stack. Each time you take the feat, it applies to a different spell.

Shadow Lodge

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Source PRPG Core Rulebook pg. 172

Dwarves and half-orcs have darkvision, but the other races presented in Chapter 2 need light to see by. See Table 7–10 for the radius that a light source illuminates and how long it lasts. The increased entry indicates an area outside the lit radius in which the light level is increased by one step (from darkness to dim light, for example).

In an area of bright light, all characters can see clearly. Some creatures, such as those with light sensitivity and light blindness, take penalties while in areas of bright light. A creature can’t use Stealth in an area of bright light unless it is invisible or has cover. Areas of bright light include outside in direct sunshine and inside the area of a daylight spell.

Normal light functions just like bright light, but characters with light sensitivity and light blindness do not take penalties. Areas of normal light include underneath a forest canopy during the day, within 20 feet of a torch, and inside the area of a light spell.

In an area of dim light, a character can see somewhat. Creatures within this area have concealment (20% miss chance in combat) from those without darkvision or the ability to see in darkness. A creature within an area of dim light can make a Stealth check to conceal itself. Areas of dim light include outside at night with a moon in the sky, bright starlight, and the area between 20 and 40 feet from a torch.

In areas of darkness, creatures without darkvision are effectively blinded. In addition to the obvious effects, a blinded creature has a 50% miss chance in combat (all opponents have total concealment), loses any Dexterity bonus to AC, takes a –2 penalty to AC, and takes a –4 penalty on Perception checks that rely on sight and most Strength- and Dexterity-based skill checks. Areas of darkness include an unlit dungeon chamber, most caverns, and outside on a cloudy, moonless night.

Characters with low-light vision (elves, gnomes, and half-elves) can see objects twice as far away as the given radius. Double the effective radius of bright light, normal light, and dim light for such characters.

It's 40' Normal plus 40' Dim for a character with Low-Light vision.

Shadow Lodge

Squiggit wrote:
Taja the Barbarian wrote:
Presumably, Paizo wanted to future-proof the class and minimize the chances that weapons added in the future might cause issues (or just give future martial weapon designs a little more 'breathing room' by not having to worry about rogues easily 'abusing' them).
Weird to have that concern only for rogues.

A sneak attacking rouge with a short sword or rapier typically gets better 'weapon damage' than a greatsword for any other martial (2d6 vs. 1d12), so this class is an obvious 'potential problem' if better (and rogue-appropriate) martial weapons are ever introduced.

Please note this also keeps Exotic weapons effectively 'out of reach' even if you spend an ancestry feat to get access and reduce the proficiency to martial, which means they don't have to be quite as nervous about possibly adding an exotic finesse and/or agile large-die weapon in the future.

Shadow Lodge

Presumably, Paizo wanted to future-proof the class and minimize the chances that weapons added in the future might cause issues (or just give future martial weapon designs a little more 'breathing room' by not having to worry about rogues easily 'abusing' them).

Shadow Lodge

Name Violation wrote:
Taja the Barbarian wrote:
The key thing to remember about Bloodragers is how few spells they actually can cast in a day: Runestones of Power help a bit, but it's still pretty easy to run out of slots once you start using them (I mostly favor long-duration buffs like Resist Energy and Rags To Riches on my Urban Bloodrager, but our latest adventures have been the 'run around all day doing various missions' where even extended versions of those spells have been running a bit short).
Rags to riches isn't a bloodrager spell (or AoN doesn't say it is)

Urban Bloodragers get to poach a handful of Bard/Magus spells.

Shadow Lodge

The key thing to remember about Bloodragers is how few spells they actually can cast in a day: Runestones of Power help a bit, but it's still pretty easy to run out of slots once you start using them (I mostly favor long-duration buffs like Resist Energy and Rags To Riches on my Urban Bloodrager, but our latest adventures have been the 'run around all day doing various missions' where even extended versions of those spells have been running a bit short).

Shadow Lodge

Ravingdork wrote:
Is there a way to make it work well? Not a naked high AC monk capable of dodging, or a Mountain Stance monk whose skin is like iron, but rather a monk relying on heavy armor such as plate.

Why?

I mean, 'a monk in full plate' sounds more like a punchline than a character build to me, so I'm curious if this is an actual character idea or just an attempt to combine the two most incompatible options you can find because you are bored (not that there is anything wrong with that)...

Shadow Lodge

Yeah, I was looking into the Giant Squid as a potential Beast Shape form last week, and I concluded that all/both your tentacles are used in a single secondary attack.

On a side note, squids apparently only have two tentacles and eight shorter arms, so the limb descriptions might be backwards in PF1 (or maybe I am just reading too much into the 'two arm attacks' bit)...

Shadow Lodge

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Gortle wrote:
graystone wrote:
Gortle wrote:
But the way organic to the Rogue class is via Mastermind.
While I 1000% agree Mastermind is a fun class to play, it needs a BIG asterisk by it as it's dependent on Recall checks and they are notoriously open to table variance. Getting hit with Unique modifiers [+10] and/or Additional Knowledge modifiers [+5 to +10 per extra check] can suck the fun and usefulness out of the build.
True but if the GM just decides to nerf a build, then what can you do. But I for one am not going to let a few uncooperative GM's out there spoil a build that is clearly supposed to work. At least this Rogue will be rolling twice for his first recall knowledge check in the rounds

There's a bit of a difference between 'nerfing a build' and 'applying the actual rules.' A Mastermind pretty much has to assume all the recall check rules apply unless otherwise specified (either by specific ability text or GM's discretion), just like a Thief has to with Stealth checks. I'm not aware of any elaboration on how this racket's mechanic is intended to work, so the printed rules are all we really have to work with.

The other thing to keep in mind about Masterminds is that keeping your racket mechanic maxed out will consume all your Legendary skill options:

  • Arcana: creatures of arcane significance.
  • Crafting: Alchemical creatures and constructs.
  • Nature: creatures of natural origin.
  • Occultism: creatures of occult significance.
  • Religion: creatures of religious significance.
  • Society: humanoids
Assuming you max out these six skills, that probably leaves you with one skill at Expert and everything else at Trained: It's certainly do-able, but you basically have to sacrifice being 'great' at any skill actions other than recalling knowledge (and maybe crafting), which may or may not be your cup of tea...

Shadow Lodge

Flagged for transfer to the PFS Forums...

Shadow Lodge

Three things:

1) Why does this matter? The specifics of Spell Preparation/Readying is largely irrelevant in actual play, even to the point of not being detailed at all beyond the CRB classes.

2) It's pretty clear the Psychic's spellcasting is basically a slight variation on the Sorcerer's, so if it really matters, you should probably go with the 'Sorcerer and Bards' Spell Readying rules.

3) If you really need an 'Official' rule, be prepared to be disappointed: For all intents and purposes, there is no longer any official support for 1st Edition Pathfinder. Even if you do manage to get a response from one of the class creators, that still won't be an official Paizo ruling.

Shadow Lodge

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Azothath wrote:

...

I'm also surprised that "round down to nearest integer" was never defined or given a symbol (there are several ways: ⎣X⎦, ⤓(X), [X]). Simple notation like X^2 was never used.
Descriptive language easily quadruples the word count and introduces confusion that could have been easily avoided with notation. Players would have learned something useful if they hadn't picked it up from 8-11th grade in school.

I think they defined 'rounding' pretty clearly:

Source PRPG Core Rulebook pg. 11

The Pathfinder RPG uses a number of terms, abbreviations, and definitions in presenting the rules of the game. The following are among the most common.
...
Rounding: Occasionally the rules ask you to round a result or value. Unless otherwise stated, always round down. For example, if you are asked to take half of 7, the result would be 3.
...

The more 'arcane symbols' you add to the rules, the harder it is for people to pick it up easily, so descriptive language is a much better option in general.

Shadow Lodge

Phoebus Alexandros wrote:

Mage Armor makes sense within the contrived context of Paizo's attempts at game balance*.

There are two sets of light armor that give you a +4 armor bonus. A full caster that wishes to wear light armor incurs a one-in-five chance of spell failure--unless they invest in feats. Mage Armor effectively gives a full caster the ability to wear light armor while ignoring that very real danger. That's what informs the cost of Bracers of Armor, not the pursuit of classes who can't normally cast Mage Armor to get a measly +4 armor bonus (which can't stack with stuff most of them would be better off trying to get past the first few levels).

* I swear, I'm not trying to be insulting to the people who brought us the game. It just is what it is.

To be fair, the major factors haven't really changed in the last 20+ years: Mithril Armor, the Mage Armor spell, and wand mechanics haven't changed much (if at all) since DnD3 launched back in 1999. Paizo tweaked some AC numbers, but not really significantly...

Even before DnD3, there was an 'AC 6*' armor spell in the earlier editions that is pretty similar to PF Mage Armor (and an illusionary 'AC 3*' 'Phantom Armor' spell at some point), but a lot of the surrounding mechanics radically changed with DnD3 so a direct comparison isn't very helpful.

So, Mage Armor is presumably something that Paizo declined to 'fix' because they didn't consider it 'broken' (or at least not broken enough to worry about)...

*Armor Class used to go down from 10 as it got better, so AC 6 is the equivalent of 'modern' AC 14 and AC 3 is the equivalent of 'modern' AC 17.

Shadow Lodge

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Just remember that using Trick Magic Item is a single action in addition to the actions required to normally use the scroll/wand, so you are limited to 1 and 2 action spells (which is most of them, but it does leave you unable to 'cast' some spells this way).

This also means you typically need to start the round with the scroll/wand already in hand (one action to trick, then two actions to use the item).

Finally, you do have to actually succeed at the appropriate skill check as well, which might not be easy for a Barbarian (your mileage may vary, of course): Enlarge will probably require a DC 18 or 20 Arcana(Int) or Nature(Wis) check.

Shadow Lodge

Atalius wrote:
could I slap some Hand wraps of Mighty Blows on my Antlers? Or affix a talisman to my Antlers like a potency crystal?

As noted by other posters, the Handwraps worn on your hands enhance ALL the unarmed attacks you happen to have (tusks, bites, antlers, tail slaps, etc.), not just fists/claws.

Talismans are added to the handwraps rather than your actual unarmed attack(s), but they otherwise work normally.

InvestedMagicalTransmutation 

Source Core Rulebook pg. 611 (3.0)
Usage worn gloves

As you invest these embroidered strips of cloth, you must meditate and slowly wrap them around your hands. These handwraps have weapon runes etched into them to give your unarmed attacks the benefits of those runes, making your unarmed attacks work like magic weapons. For example, +1 striking handwraps of mighty blows would give you a +1 item bonus to attack rolls with your unarmed attacks and increase the damage of your unarmed attacks from one weapon die to two (normally 2d4 instead of 1d4, but if your fists have a different weapon damage die or you have other unarmed attacks, use two of that die size instead).

You can upgrade, add, and transfer runes to and from the handwraps just as you would for a weapon, and you can attach talismans to the handwraps. Treat the handwraps as melee weapons of the brawling group with light Bulk for these purposes. Property runes apply only when they would be applicable to the unarmed attack you’re using. For example, a property that must be applied to a slashing weapon wouldn’t function when you attacked with a fist, but you would gain its benefits if you attacked with a claw or some other slashing unarmed attack.

The minor downside is that the handwraps count against your Invested item cap while normal magical weapons do not.

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I don't know these actual rules, but it seems like you are over-estimating the effectiveness of boats: They can get the job done, but no where near as effectively as bridges can, so I'd expect some penalty for a lack of land connection...

Influence 0 for unconnected islands sounds a bit rough, but there probably should be a hefty penalty and I'm guessing they just went with '0' as the ruleset is presumably not intended to support island empire building...

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Our party just finished this ritual to enter the frozen city...or to be more accurate, our Alchemist just finished this ritual while the rest of the party watched. He pulled out every buff he could and succeeded by the skin of his teeth (he succeeded in 6 of the 9 checks, but two of those checks just hit the DC due to poor rolls).

If Perception were added to the usable skills, my +36 Perception (with Heroism) Bloodrager (with a spiritualist dip) would have probably auto-succeeded at the relevant checks, but there was no way she could participate with the base skills (Int 10, Wis 08, Perception +36, Diplomacy +33, Sense Motive +32, no other non-physical skill in double-digits).

Likewise, the Swashbuckler and presumably the Ranger (new party member, uncertain of actual build) were not going to be able to help, while our Cleric and the Librarian from the previous adventure (another new party member) had at least some of the relevant skills but weren't as good at them as the Alchemist (I think they were 12 and 14 intelligence respectively).

I understand there were a couple of items that could have helped, but we didn't find any of these (we randomly went straight to the collector and borrowed her pendant in exchange for the vases she wanted) and I don't recall any indication that these items were in the area so we had no reason to seek them out (It's just one of those meta-gaming things).

While it is fine for an adventure to have 'here is a chance for character type X to shine' moments in it, this becomes really problematic when the story comes to an abrupt halt if the checks fail. This makes the second module in a row with a significant research sequence followed by a ritual casting that you really need to succeed at, and I presume there is another research sequence coming up soon (since we are here to determine how exactly history was changed). It does seem like there should have been a 'at least one high-intelligence character is strongly recommended, preferably with magical skills' disclaimer at the start of the campaign since it is reasonably easy to not have one these days*. Perhaps giving one of the Campaign traits a strong research/ritual bonus would have helped as well (Intrigued by Thassilon has the flavor, but doesn't really help mechanically while Scion of Legend has a useful mechanical boost for a ritual but doesn't naturally synch with the relevant ritual skills).

*I previously played (most of) Wrath of the Righteous where my Spirit Guide Oracle's 14 Int was easily the best in the party (the others being 10, 9, and 7), though at least I had the option to use my ridiculous Cha instead of Int for skill checks if I needed to with a Lore spirit.

In my limited PF2 play, this really hasn't gotten a lot better: We played Age of Ashes prior to this campaign and the ritual in the final volume was also pretty bad: Only our Cleric could actually help (the rest of the party being Barbarian, Fighter, and Rogue), and we ended up failing both** ritual casts because the GM rolled in the single digits for the primary caster which denied the party some decent buffs.

**Our first foray resulted in the only death of a PC in the campaign due to a 'fail both save and your soul is stolen' mechanic and some truly horrible rolling, so we had to retreat, resurrect, and redo the ritual for an additional foray. We also had issues with the skill checks in Volume 5, but we managed to succeed in the end. To be fair we started as a 6 person group but lost our Ranger and Sorcerer players about halfway through the AP, which left us with an annoying lack of Cha skills (we never had a strong Intelligence character in this party either, so Int skills were always a bit of a weak point).

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Firearms are generally only good for Gunslingers: They are generally treated as Exotic weapons, are slow to reload, their damage tends to be unimpressive, and they tend to misfire when you roll badly. Also, availability is pretty left to the GM's discretion.

Other than that, they work fine with Magus mechanics, as they are Ranged weapons.

EDIT: Golarian is a 'Emerging Guns' setting, so don't expect to find revolvers or other advanced firearms.

Emerging Guns wrote:
Firearms become more common. They are mass-produced by small guilds, lone gunsmiths, dwarven clans, or maybe even a nation or two—the secret is slipping out, and the occasional rare adventurer uses guns. The baseline gunslinger rules and the prices for ammunition given in this chapter are for this type of campaign. Early firearms are available, but are relatively rare. Adventurers who want to use guns must take the Gunsmithing feat just to make them feasible weapons. Advanced firearms may exist, but only as rare and wondrous items—the stuff of high-level treasure troves.

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thorin001 wrote:
Taja the Barbarian wrote:
thorin001 wrote:
Krik.longleaf wrote:
Was it ever changed from the play test that Hybrid class characters mukti-classed with one of that hybrid's parent classes does not get to stack duplicate abilities? In particular, I'm referring to the Rogue and Slayer sneak attack progression.

The sneak attack class feature from the classes does not stack. That is you do not add up the levels and then apply them to one of the two classes to see how many dice you get.

But the damage does stack. You have 2 sets of additional dice that both are added to the damage. So if you have R dice from rogue and S dice from slayer you do normal damage +(R+S), assuming the attack qualifies for sneak attack.

Except that's not how 'non-stacking' bonuses works:

Source PRPG Core Rulebook pg. 11

...
Stacking: Stacking refers to the act of adding together bonuses or penalties that apply to one particular check or statistic. Generally speaking, most bonuses of the same type do not stack. Instead, only the highest bonus applies. Most penalties do stack, meaning that their values are added together. Penalties and bonuses generally stack with one another, meaning that the penalties might negate or exceed part or all of the bonuses, and vice versa.
...
Unless you have a version of Sneak Attack that specifically states that it stacks, you ONLY apply the greater 'bonus' to your damage roll.
But they are untyped bonuses from different sources, so they stack.
Except RAW they DON'T STACK:

Most heroes progress along a single path—choosing to become a fearsome fighter, pious cleric, or mighty wizard—but some are drawn to many roads. For them, it can be hard to find a balance between abilities offered by disparate classes. Hybrid classes solve this dilemma by blending features from two classes, adding rules to make them work seamlessly together.

Parent Classes: Each of the following classes draws upon two classes to form the basis of its theme. While a character can multiclass with these parent classes, doing so usually results in redundant abilities. Such abilities don't stack unless specified. If a class feature allows the character to make a one-time choice (such as a bloodline), that choice must match similar choices made by the parent classes and vice-versa (such as selecting the same bloodline).

You don't get to apply both Sneak Attack dice pools to the same damage roll and claim you aren't stacking the class features that don't stack...

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thorin001 wrote:
Krik.longleaf wrote:
Was it ever changed from the play test that Hybrid class characters mukti-classed with one of that hybrid's parent classes does not get to stack duplicate abilities? In particular, I'm referring to the Rogue and Slayer sneak attack progression.

The sneak attack class feature from the classes does not stack. That is you do not add up the levels and then apply them to one of the two classes to see how many dice you get.

But the damage does stack. You have 2 sets of additional dice that both are added to the damage. So if you have R dice from rogue and S dice from slayer you do normal damage +(R+S), assuming the attack qualifies for sneak attack.

Except that's not how 'non-stacking' bonuses works:

Source PRPG Core Rulebook pg. 11

...
Stacking: Stacking refers to the act of adding together bonuses or penalties that apply to one particular check or statistic. Generally speaking, most bonuses of the same type do not stack. Instead, only the highest bonus applies. Most penalties do stack, meaning that their values are added together. Penalties and bonuses generally stack with one another, meaning that the penalties might negate or exceed part or all of the bonuses, and vice versa.
...

Unless you have a version of Sneak Attack that specifically states that it stacks, you ONLY apply the greater 'bonus' to your damage roll.

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JiCi wrote:

The Kineticist could have been better...

...
- Kinetic Blade and Whip should have been nerfed, because they eclipsed melee manufactured weapons completely. I swear, there's NO reason to use a sword when your Earth-based club can outclass it.

Isn't 'you don't need to carry a mundane weapon' is the entire point of those talents? What would be the point of them existing if using a mundane weapon is just better?

That being said, wielding a manufactured weapon does allow you to actually threaten your target after the end of your turn and might be very useful against foes with annoying DRs/Resistances for your chosen elements, so there actually are reasons to keep such a weapon handy...

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Malik Gyan Daumantas wrote:

It states "While fighting within an area of magical darkness, you gain a +2 bonus on damage rolls with unarmed strikes, or a +4 bonus against opponents that are shaken, frightened, or panicked. You also gain a +2 morale bonus on Acrobatics and Intimidate checks."

Does that +4 bonus apply to all weapons or just unarmed strikes? its worded kinda weird so i would like some clarification.

Seems like it's either:

a) '+4 bonus on damage rolls with unarmed strikes against opponents that are shaken, frightened, or panicked.' - or -
b) '+4 bonus (to unspecified rolls) against opponents that are shaken, frightened, or panicked.'

I'd guess it is supposed to be option A...

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Channel Energy: If I have this ability from more than one class, do they stack? wrote:
No—unless an ability specifically says it stacks with similar abilities (such as an assassin's sneak attack), or adds in some way based on the character's total class levels (such as improved uncanny dodge), the abilities don't stack and you have to use them separately. Therefore, cleric channeling doesn't stack with paladin channeling, necromancer channeling, oracle of life channeling, and so on.
Common Terms wrote:

Source PRPG Core Rulebook pg. 11

...
Stacking: Stacking refers to the act of adding together bonuses or penalties that apply to one particular check or statistic. Generally speaking, most bonuses of the same type do not stack. Instead, only the highest bonus applies. Most penalties do stack, meaning that their values are added together. Penalties and bonuses generally stack with one another, meaning that the penalties might negate or exceed part or all of the bonuses, and vice versa.
...

Rolling two separate Sneak Attack pools and combining them in your damage pool seems to violate the 'only the highest bonus applies' rule/guideline of (non-)stacking bonuses (Note that the Assassin version of Sneak Attack specifically states 'If an assassin gets a sneak attack bonus from another source, the bonuses on damage stack.' so sneak attack damage seems to be a bonus that can stack or not stack depending on its specific text).

Beyond that, you also start getting into the 'same source' argument (un-typed bonuses from the same source don't generally stack, and 'Sneak Attack' is 'Sneak Attack'?): You could argue that each die of sneak attack damage is a specific 'trick' and taking non-stacking versions from multiple classes just teaches you the exact same trick multiple times.

Also, while most versions of Sneak Attack state that they stack, I suspect those are mostly the ones granted by Prestige Classes, which by definition need to work in conjunction with at least one other class. Of course, the counter-argument here is that non-prestige classes are generally written without any reference to multi-classing and that might be why Sneak Attack stacking isn't generally mentioned...

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Most heroes progress along a single path—choosing to become a fearsome fighter, pious cleric, or mighty wizard—but some are drawn to many roads. For them, it can be hard to find a balance between abilities offered by disparate classes. Hybrid classes solve this dilemma by blending features from two classes, adding rules to make them work seamlessly together.

Parent Classes: Each of the following classes draws upon two classes to form the basis of its theme. While a character can multiclass with these parent classes, doing so usually results in redundant abilities. Such abilities don't stack unless specified. If a class feature allows the character to make a one-time choice (such as a bloodline), that choice must match similar choices made by the parent classes and vice-versa (such as selecting the same bloodline).

Neither Rogue, Rogue(Unchained), nor Slayer class specifically state that their sneak attack feature stacks with any other source of sneak attack, so RAW you would just use the better SA pool.

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The real question is: Does it really matter? The actual floor plan is largely irrelevant unless one or more occupants are actively plotting against others...

That being said: Yes, hallways would count against total area if not specifically stated otherwise (I believe the D&D3.0 Stronghold Guide had a 'pay by room, but no cost for hallways' rule but also included a 'no 100ft wide hallways filled with furniture allowed' caveat).

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Dragonchess Player wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:
Arutema wrote:

It's more situational, but many spells are in Starfinder compared to PF 1E.

That said, the ability it grants to move and full attack is a major boost to any melee builds in the party.

The situation for haste is "do you have melee in the party"
I would say it's more of a "do you have anyone in the party that could benefit from an extra move action or movement distance." This could be melee full attacks + move, ranged full attacks (including special attacks such as firing in automatic mode or using the Fusillade feat) + move, solarian using Blazing Orbit to set up "walls" of fire and then Black Hole to pull enemies through multiple "walls," etc. It's still situational, but it applies to more situations than just melee.

The real question is: Is it worth having one of your party casters sacrifice one of their limited 'spell known' slots on learning it, and a 3rd level spell slot + standard action to actual cast?

Obviously, your mileage will vary based on party composition and individual battle characteristics, but this spell didn't make it onto my personal 'Technomancer spells to consider' list: Our campaign ended at 4th level (it was only a 'summer break' from our Return of the Runelords campaign) so I haven't had a chance to actually put my list to the test, but I personally couldn't see taking Haste as a spell known for a very long time (maybe in the mid-teens?) with all the other options for that slot.

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To be fair, GM-ing is a bit like riding a bicycle:

  • When you watch someone else doing it, it seems really easy.
  • When you first try to do it yourself, it seems outright impossible.
  • When you get some practice, it can become second-nature.
I guess I'm trying to say that learning to ride a bike is a lot more difficult when someone has removed the brakes and strapped a rocket booster to the frame...

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Cerezoss V'Drane wrote:

...

I agree with you, but our GM is... let's say stubborn. If you'll allow me to vent a little, he's using his newness to GM as an excuse to be annoyed when we have parts that we literally steamroll over, and blames players for being too insanely strong. As a matter of fact, the Bard was deemed the most powerful, only due to the amount of static bonusses it supplied to the two martials, and I have been threatened with character death ever since he joined the party at level 2. I'm actually looking for help on these forums because I don't like to be petty and make a character specifically to make his life a living hell, since I'd rather just leave the campaign at that point. The guy also has a penchant of acting as if all of his GM'ing shortcoming are the result of something someone else did. He's not very good at admitting his own shortcomings. Anyway, these are all issues irrelevent to the topic, and I'm sorry for putting those into the mix. I just needed a place to write this down. /vent
...

You might want to bail now: My GM told tales of running WotR and being slightly annoyed that his 'bad guys' only got to act twice in entirety of the last two modules, and this was with a non-maximized party (described as 'solid but not min-maxed')...

Mythic takes high level rocket-tag and just makes it worse: Supercharged PCs will slaughter foes before they even get a chance to react, and your GM will need to come to terms with this. Honestly, it kinda seems like any mythic campaign is the last thing your GM should be running, and WotR is a particularly bad option once the PCs start to stack the obvious anti-demon stuff (cold iron holy weapons, Paladin Smites, Holy Smite spells, etc.).

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Driftbourne wrote:
There's no errata for the spell in Starfinder. Of the three versions of the spell Pathfinder 1E is way more powerful than Starfinder or Pathfinder 2E.

Yet PF1 Haste is still much weaker than the 'Get an extra move action per round, which you can combine with your normal move action to get an extra standard action' D&D3.0 version of Haste...

It's been a steady downward slope for a lot of troublesome D&D3.0 spells...

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Deriven Firelion wrote:
I've mostly seen rogues use them. The player is not a great optimizer, so he takes it for the d8 damage. I think a dex rogue would do better with a rapier or shortsword.

This: The Elven Curve Blade and the Spiked Chain are the only d8 finesse martial weapon options for Thief Rogues, which makes them much easier to use than any of the Advanced options (Rogues are only proficient in a handful of Martial Weapons, so treating an advanced weapon as Martial leaves them stuck at 'trained' proficiency level at best without an archetype of some sort).

The big drawback (beyond the ancestry feat requirement) is the 2 bulk, which is a lot for a typically low-strength build...

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Aerotime wrote:
What are the differences of “awareness“ between smoke and fog?

By default, fog blocks all vision beyond 5 feet (basically providing Total Concealment), while Smoke merely provides concealment (note that specific 'smoke' or 'fog' effects might have different rules, but these are the general rules for these effects).

Chapter 11: Game Mastering / Environment / Environmental Rules / Smoke Effects wrote:

Source Starfinder Core Rulebook pg. 400

A character who inhales heavy smoke must attempt a Fortitude save each round she’s within the smoke (DC = 15 + 1 per previous check) or spend that round choking and coughing. A character who chokes for 2 consecutive rounds takes 1d6 nonlethal damage. Smoke obscures vision, providing concealment (20% miss chance).
Chapter 11: Game Mastering / Environment / Weather / Fog wrote:

Source Starfinder Core Rulebook pg. 398

Whether in the form of a low-lying cloud or a mist rising from the ground, fog obscures all sight beyond 5 feet, including darkvision. Creatures 5 feet away have concealment (20% miss chance).

Source Starfinder Core Rulebook pg. 253

Originating from sources such as dense smoke and battlefield position, concealment obscures precise senses and imposes a miss chance on attacks. When you have concealment, it’s harder for enemies to see you clearly. This might be due to your position on the battlefield, or it might be due to another effect that makes it more difficult for enemies to perceive and hit you with an attack.

To determine whether you have concealment from a creature’s ranged attack, choose a corner of the enemy’s square. If any line from this corner to any corner of your square passes through a square that provides concealment or the border of such a square, you have concealment. Also use these rules when a creature makes a melee attack against a target that isn’t adjacent to it.

When a creature is making a melee attack against an adjacent target, the target has concealment if its space is entirely within an effect that grants concealment.

Additionally, some effects provide concealment against all attacks, regardless of whether any intervening concealment exists.
Concealment Miss Chance
Concealment gives the target of a successful attack a chance that the attacker actually missed. This is called a miss chance. Normally, the miss chance for concealment is 20%. Make the attack normally; if the attacking creature would hit, the target must roll a 20 or lower on a d% roll (see page 513) to avoid being struck. Multiple concealment conditions do not stack.
Varying Degrees Of Concealment
Certain situations can provide more or less of a miss chance than typical concealment. In this case, it is up to the GM to determine a character’s degree of concealment.
Total Concealment
If a creature has line of effect to you but not line of sight (see page 271), you have total concealment. An enemy can’t attack you when you have total concealment, though it can attack into a square it thinks you occupy. A successful attack into a square occupied by an enemy with total concealment has a 50% miss chance (instead of 20%).
Ignoring Concealment
Concealment might be ineffective. Dim light or darkness doesn’t provide concealment against creatures with darkvision. Creatures with low-light vision can see in dim light as if it were normal light.

Concealment (total or otherwise) does not guarantee a lack of awareness, but it does generally allow you to make a Stealth check to Hide (with a huge bonus from Total Concealment).

Source Starfinder Core Rulebook pg. 147

You can use Stealth to hide if you have either cover or concealment (or a special ability that allows you to hide in plain sight), or if you have successfully created a diversion with the Bluff skill. You can attempt a Stealth check to hide either as a move action (if you are planning to stay immobile) or as part of a move action. If you move at a rate of half your speed or less, you take no penalty to your Stealth check. If you attempt to hide while moving more than half your speed or after creating a diversion with Bluff, you take a –10 penalty to your Stealth check; these penalties are cumulative if you do both. The check is opposed by the Perception checks of creatures in the area that might detect you. A creature that fails the opposed skill check treats you as if you had total concealment as long as you continue to have actual cover or concealment. A creature that succeeds at the opposed skill check either sees you or pinpoints you (see page 260) in situations when you have total concealment. If you lose actual cover or concealment during your turn, you can attempt to stay hidden, but only if you end your turn within cover or concealment.
Invisibility and Hiding
Source Starfinder Core Rulebook pg. 148
If you are invisible or benefit from total concealment, you gain a +40 bonus to your Stealth check as long as you remain immobile. You are considered immobile if it is your turn and you have not yet moved or if you have not moved since the start of your last turn. If you are invisible but not immobile, you instead gain a +20 bonus to your Stealth check. Typically, a creature cannot attack you if you are invisible or have total concealment unless the creature pinpoints you with a successful Perception check. (Invisible creatures can still be heard, smelled, and felt, and might do something to make themselves known to those who succeed at Perception checks; see Invisible on page 264 in Chapter 8.) Even then, the attacking creature has a 50% miss chance against the pinpointed creature.
Attacking from Hiding
Source Starfinder Core Rulebook pg. 148
If you are successfully hiding from a creature, that creature is considered flat-footed for the purpose of your first attack from hiding. If you remain invisible after your first attack, that creature is considered flat-footed against your attacks until it succeeds at a Perception check to locate you or until you become visible.

It should be noted that there are a lot of creatures in Starfinder with non-visual senses that would not be hindered by either smoke or fog

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In the prior edition, casting an [Evil] spell was an evil act, and repeatedly committing evil acts should cause your alignment to shift towards evil, but the exact mechanics were largely left up to the GMs.

I'm not familiar with any such rule in PF2, but it's not exactly something I've gone looking for...

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