Demogorgon

GregH's page

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I want Alpha Flight in the MCU.

What ever that takes, I'm willing to accept.

:)


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World's most interesting Pan wrote:
Granted I don't know what good Poutine is supposed to taste like, I just know the Twin cities versions are god awful.

A good poutine is made up of the following:

1) Squeaky cheese curds (preferably from Quebec). Any other cheese is not a poutine.

2) Good fries. Something that holds the gravy without getting too soggy.

3) A good beef gravy.

Shouldn't be left to sit too long after making. Curds melt and fries get soggy. Can turn a good poutine into a bad one.

YMMV, of course.


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Guess you haven't seen the Tooth Fairy.

I have.

'Cause I have kids.

Honest.


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Dum Dum Dugan was in the Hydra POW camp when Cap rescued him in First Avenger.


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Braised or fried?


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Orthos wrote:
If she wants them that badly she could always adopt.

You can't adopt grandchildren.

Grandparents-to-be who want grandchildren want to have all the fun of having kids with none of the responsibility.

Don't think this is bad, mind you, just the way it is. Looking forward to it myself when my kids are old enough.


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Given that in Ant Man Hank Pym is an old man, then its possible that Stark will talk about building on Pym's older designs or some-such-thing even if Michael Douglas doesn't actually show up in the movie.


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One of my friends talks about a childhood friend of his who named his monk Theo, who followed the god J'hip.

Theodore the J'hip monk.


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Rubber Ducky guy wrote:
bugleyman wrote:

Because Windows 7 ate 9.


I'm so, so very sorry.

Don't be :-)

Why are they going to 10?
Because 10 is higher than 9, making it more advanced.

I think they should have called it Windows 11 and had Nigel Tufnel introduce it.

"This one goes to 11..."


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
GregH wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:
The difference is that none of the mentioned cures for physical ailments change who you are.
If you have a mental illness, isn't changing "who you are" the whole point of the treatment?

You're trying to change one part. Unfortunately our limited knowledge in this area means you sometimes end up doing the equivalent of nuking the brain from orbit.

You're trying to put a new sail on the ship, but you wind up replacing the entire hull

Medicine isn't perfect. Sometimes whats possible is not what's desired. Sure, we would all like to only remove that part that is affected by illness and leave the rest untouched. But that doesn't usually work for treatments on other parts of the body, why should it be insisted upon when trying to fix something in the brain? In the end its up to the patient and the doctor to decide if the end result is better than what you started with.


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
The difference is that none of the mentioned cures for physical ailments change who you are.

If you have a mental illness, isn't changing "who you are" the whole point of the treatment?


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A brilliant kid, but an extreme outlier. Public and even most private schools were not set up to handle kids like this because they are so rare that its impossible to cater to them and to the "regular" kids. His parents seem to have found out how to satisfy his needs within the established system (let him self-teach, get him out of public school as soon as possible and into higher education).

Schools have a lot wrong with them, but having the infrastructure to handle kids like this for 12 years is not one of them.


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At the speed of 1s/s!


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thejeff wrote:
Sissyl wrote:

What would really save police lives is if they simply sent out drones with automatic weapons and gunned down all the protesters. Not one policeman would be remotely injured. See now why safety of police officers before taking any other consideration can be a very bad idea?

Policemen and soldiers (and others) have chosen to take jobs that can be quite risky. Nobody is forced to be one. It is, quite literally, part of the job. Certainly, give them what protective gear they NEED. It's ridiculous they would need armored cars, automatic rifles and sniper rifles to deal with a peaceful protest - if so, they are severely incompetent at their job.

It's ridiculous they'd need armored cars, automatic rifles and sniper rifles even to deal with looting.

When you assume that the public is the enemy, then it automatically becomes a war, and therefore you need war machines.

One of the best parts of the John Oliver monologue is the bit where they show the photo of the police officers pointing their automatic rifles at someone with their hands up and then they cut to the interview where you have someone (can't remember name or occupation) indicating that in a war, soldiers only point their weapon when they are in the process of firing them.

They have the toys but they have no clue how to use them properly.

That can only lead to a happy ending...


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This is appropriate here:

John Oliver on police militarization


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thejeff wrote:

He's not saying they do that. He's saying they shouldn't be allowed to buy alcohol or cigarettes if they get assistance, even if they do it with cash.

But, isn't that an infringement on their freedoms?


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Thomas Long 175 wrote:
None. 4 months of non stop, no saves, unlimited domination spells from a deity that could not be blocked by even other deities on the girl I was dating at the time.

"4 months"?!?!?!? You're exceedingly patient...


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Drejk wrote:
Dazylar wrote:
Dazylar wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Itchy wrote:
Fromper wrote:
Irnk, Dead-Eye's Prodigal wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Fromper wrote:
strayshift wrote:

"I'll go... uh... check on Mr Scruffy."

Sinister?

Yeah, that struck me as a bluff check, where nobody was paying enough attention to bother making a sense motive roll. Guaranteed he's stalking the vampire.
it struck me as "the best way I can help is by being out of the way"
Possibly. Just reread it & I noticed that he's kind of looking directly at Durkula as he's saying it. I suspect that Fromper & strayshift might be on to something...
Either we're totally right, or Belkar really is just worried about the vampire eating his cat. :P
Or it's both. Also, the nesting quotes are starting to look like either a pit or a pyramid, depending upon how my eyes look at it.
Both pit and pyramid are appropriate for OotS :P
That's a pretty weirdly proportioned pyramid...
I suppose it'll look right when it gets to about 35 'nests'.
That's what you get when you make pyramid out of sticks.

I think its starting to look more like a longhouse.


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Arnwolf wrote:
and their are still all the holes in the ozone layer, it's a natural phenomenon.

No it's not. The reduction of ozone into individual oxygen atoms by UV is, (O3 + UV -> O + O + O) but left to its own devices the individual oxygen atoms will recombine to reform ozone. That's how it protects us from UV light. It absorbs the UV but reforms afterward.

When you add chlorofluorocarbons (man-made!) into the mix, they are also broken up, but then the individual chlorine atoms grab ahold of an oxygen atom, and leave only 2 oxygen atoms to make O2 thus depleting O3. O2 doesn't absorb UV so we now have a hole in our UV protection where there didn't use to be.

The ozone hole is not natural. It's caused by us.


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Now that the season is over, I still can't believe that they used Brad Dourif for all of 2 minutes and it didn't lead to anything.


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CapeCodRPGer wrote:
wicked cool wrote:
wonder if Boba will be in it. Id take a cameo or even a name drop by another character. There were rumors that they would give him his own film/series. Will they take any expanded universe ideas?

Picture this:

End of episode 7: Pan down to Tatooine, over sand dunes, to the Sarlac pit. We hear a couple of blaster shots from inside the mouth of the Sarlac. Crawling out, all beaten and brusied is Boba Fett. Armor all faded and dented. Breathing heavy, he gets of the the mouth and stands up. Wanting to breathe real air again we see his shadow start to take off the helmet.
The camera pans up to show it was Jar Jar Binks in the armor.
Fade to black.
Roll credits.

"Heesa no good to meesa dead."


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Purple Dragon Knight wrote:
Yes confirmed: Brad Dourif was the fake clairvoyant.... I only hope he downloaded his consciousness and we'll see him again on a BIG ROBOT CHEST SCREEN ;)

I can't imagine they'd hire Brad Dourif and then use him in a throw-away role. They will use him again.

Also, "Department H"! If they manage to introduce Alpha Flight, I'll piss myself. (Yeah, I know, fat chance. Still, I can dream can't I?)


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The smitter wrote:
As a production Brewer at a microbrewery I am offended by this talk of America beer being sub par. I have drank beer from all over the world and would put American craft beer against in beer in the world. I well not sign this until I get a fall apology.

I' m sorry you are offended. However while you may be a craftsman you live under the shadow of Bud, and Pabst and other so-called "beers". You must clean your own house first, then we will discuss terms of the treaty at the first "Molson Summit".


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We will agree to the merger but we would need some assurances first:

1) The national passtime would be curling.
2) "American" beer would be outlawed.
3) "Eh?" needs to added as the last word to the pledge of allegiance.
4) Canadian football rules will be instituted by the NFL. (4 downs is for sissies!)

That is all.


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2 dogs - a 3 yr old Burnese mountain dog; and an 8-year old mix. We think there is some Burner in the mix, but at the vet one time another dog owner said he saw some Australian (?) wolf hound in him. (Although not sure if that's really a breed.)

Both are pretty much carpets, and the Burner especially will let you do darn near anything around him and not even flinch.


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Aranna wrote:
Skye as Ms Marvel? That would be an odd play. I doubt that is what they intend. Remember Coulson got the same body fluids and he isn't a now a superhero.

Except Coulson was normal before he was "killed". We don't know what Skye is or what made her so special in the first place. I think they are different starting points.

Greg


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Another thought on the galactic community & the Drake equation: do we need to add a term for what percentage of intelligent industrialized civilizations develop virtual reality and then completely withdraw into virtual worlds never bothering to spend any more time on what's "out there"?

Greg


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MagusJanus wrote:

So, what if science is wrong? What if relativity and quantum mechanics are operating under different sets of physics entirely? And what if gravity is operating under a third, one we don't know much about yet? What if there's more? What if Unified Field Theory is just science tilting at windmills and the majority of the universe as we see it exists in the cracks where these different fields of physics interact?

Scary thought, isn't it?

First off, science isn't a "thing" it's a process. More accurately it's the scientific method. "Science" as you define it, is everything we have ever learned using that process.

Now yes, it is true that current scientific study is based on the assumption that the laws of physics, as we understand them, apply to all of the observable universe. But two things: 1) we've seen nothing so far to counter that and 2) you gotta start somewhere.

If someone actually provides evidence (not just conjecture) that the laws of physics are not universal but rather location-specific, I'm sure most scientists will not find it scary at all, but rather a challenge. A rather daunting one, but a challenge nonetheless.

Greg


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chillblame wrote:
1 slowship.

No one disagrees that this is possible. But as a means of developing a "galactic community" it's basically a no-go.

chillblame wrote:
2 albucurrie derive (probably mis spelling that). Warp space to provide fast travel. Ship never actually reaches lightspeed but warping of space gives that effect. Has problems like a masive discharge of radiation on arrival, but that may be amiliated. (For example don't arrive directly in target system, but outside and let the inverse square law be your friend. Then do ordinary travel in system.).

Also the negative energy requirement is a bit of a hurdle. If (and that's a big "if") White's experiments support his warp drive hypothesis then we'll talk. Until then it's just another idea...

chillblame wrote:
To say it can't be done lacks...ambition

One person's "lack of ambition" is another person's "living with the laws of physics".

Greg


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DragGon7601 wrote:

I remember watching a science show on this subject, wish I had a better memory and could remember the full details. Im sure they said that since the speed at which you travel effects the passage of time; while it may take (8?) years to get to Alpha Centauri as far as the people of earth are concerned, the people on the ship would measure the time in months...

So star travel could be possible with only one generation of humans... at less for the ones on the ship.

Absolutely. Time dilates as you approach the speed of light. But even then stars are very far apart. But even more than that, you need the political will on Earth (or whatever home planet) to fund a project that no one supporting it will ever see the results of. That would be an impossible sell in any country here now, and unless we become far more "enlightened" as a species I don't think it ever will. (And I'm not holding my breath on that one.)

Greg


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"There are two possibilities. Either we are alone in the universe or we are not. Each is equally terrifying." Arthur C. Clarke.


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MagusJanus wrote:

I will note that traveling faster than the speed of light is actually possible under general relativity.

I only took general and special relativity in undergrad, but my understanding is that the speed of light is a barrier. One cannot cross from sub-light to supra-light speeds. In fact, IIRC the rise of mass as one accelerates to c has been shown in particle accelerators. (Mass goes as 1/ sqrt (1-v^2/c^2)). You may not have infinite mass while going faster than c but you will get there trying to accelerate from less than c.

So unless you start out at supra-light speeds, you are stuck at sub-light speeds.

Greg


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Feegle wrote:
Sean K Reynolds wrote:
So a six-pack of American beer becomes 32 metric beers.
Someone knows his Bob and Doug Mackenzie. :)

Take off, eh?


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IceniQueen wrote:

Here This is what I am referring to, compare

OR Yet another example

Or Front on

THIS is how it should be, not the way Lily is holding it in the photo

Try having any type of a physics degree and then watching 99% of science fiction.

Sometimes you just got to let stuff go...


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Sebastian wrote:
Ack!!!! Hama!!! That's a book spoiler. :-(

Sorry you had to take one for the team, Sebastian. But thanks for the head's up. Almost clicked on it.

Greg


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MARILLION!

(And Rush, and Yes, and King Crimson, and a little Dream Theatre, and Flower Kings, and Transatlantic, and SAGA...)

Greg


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Baldur's Gate to be released on the iPad.

And there was much rejoicing!

Greg


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Character: Kip - Monk 7 / Fist of Zuoken 1
Adventure: Tomb of Horrors side-trek after the Hall of Harsh Reflections
Cause of Death: Tumbled head-first through the green devil's open maw.

I had decided a while ago that since most of my players are relatively new to D&D (all started within the last 12 years), I wanted them to do a side-trek through Tomb of Horrors to set up the reveal near the end when Tenser (aka Manzorian) reveals to them the location of a sphere of annihilation. Little did I know that it would end up being so memorable. They made the spot roll early on to read the inscription on the mosaic floor, and it said, in part, to "avoid the green" or something similar.

When they thought the shrouded archway led only to a trap, they decided to try the green devil. When the monk decided that "avoid the green" meant to not touch the green devil's face but rather to tumble head first into the blackness, well, it was all pretty much decided. I had him roll his tumble against the DC to tumble through an opponents square (25) and he beat it handily. So, one monk through into oblivion.

The wizard decided to follow, but not being a tumbler, he decided to take it slowly. First his leg. "Your leg goes numb" (cause it ain't there anymore). Next his arm. "Your arm goes numb also". Then he backs up only to fall backward realizing he has no arm or leg anymore.

At that point I asked the monk to hand me his character sheet. They went back to Greyhawk (via a teleport provided by the clerics of Pelor - their sponsors for this little side jaunt) and got the wizard's limbs regenerated.

After meeting up with the monk's replacement (a dwarven defender) they have decided to head back.

I think this worked out better than I expected. When they are sent to retrieve the sphere at the end of the adventure, I suspect it will be a very memorable moment.


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GentleGiant wrote:
bugleyman wrote:
GregH wrote:
For that to work that 1% has to be really, really, really horrible.
You ever driven in California? ;-)
Especially when it rains, even just a little bit... *shudders*

I've driven in LA (my brother lives in Burbank) and it's impossible to know anyone's driving ability when the maximum speed one can attain on the 405 is about 10mph.

Greg


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Jeremiziah wrote:
Hama, do you appreciate the fact that on one hand, I've got you saying that GM's should be trusted implicity (or really that you should be trusted implicitly, and you're a GM), while on the other hand this thread contains several explicit examples of GM's who say "Heck yeah, I use a screen, it allows me to fudge rolls!"?

And I, quite frankly, don't see the disconnect here. But then I don't think the DM is playing against the PCs, I believe he plays with the players. If you think the DM is out to get you, that his sole motivation is to kill your PCs, then you shouldn't trust him. In fact you should just get up and leave the table. There are 101 ways to kill a PC without resorting to fudged dice rolls. Make traps with enormous DCs/damage. Send monsters after them that are +6CR above the average party level. I could go on.

Dice rolls are a tool to play the game. Players use them to adjudicate random situations. DMs use them to help tell a story.

Greg


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Sebastian wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
For me, personally, as a player: that kind of game is no fun at all. If I know that I'll "just barely" win every single fight, every time, due to fudging, then I see no point in wasting my time playing them out.
I generally don't like playing with a GM who fudges either.

To paraphrase Steve Jobs "If your players know you're fudging, you're doing it wrong."

Greg


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
I look into a bowl of hard candies, of many different flavors. I like cherry, but failing to find one (Cause A) I reach for an orange one, but change my mind and grab a lemon one instead. I like orange and lemon both. I made a free choice, that could easily have gone the other way, but it's not random. It's determined by my choice.

(Bold is my emphasis.)

The question then becomes, what made you change your mind? Was it purely whimsy? Did you just change your mind for no other reason than you did? Or did you decide you "wanted" a lemon instead of orange? If so, what makes a person want to eat something? Chemical changes in the mouth/tastebuds? Changes in your gastro-intestinal tract (telling you that you need more of the citric acid found in lemons than in oranges - if there is a difference)?

Is it possible that "freewill" as we describe it may be no more than the conscious reaction to unconscious physical needs?

Just throwing an idea out there for discussion.

Greg