The Jester

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In my opinion, any GM who actually shows happiness at a player kill should be barred from running games for a while. That is just plain bad sportsmanship, not to mention rude.

Mechanics that detract from the fun should be looked at. While I understand that some deaths in games are unavoidable, player killing shouldn't be easy or enjoyable. A good many people invest enough of themselves in there characters that it spoils the game for them if they die. I haven't seen many player deaths in PFS, but perhaps the penalties need to be adjusted. Also, depending on the people at the table, it can be really bad to have to wait out a game after your character dies. In a perfect world, there is a lot of camaraderie to share even after the death, but it isn't a perfect world. However, I have yet to see a game that has a role for dead players, so I don't have an answer for that.

It would be nice in loot in PFS was more original and interesting. Also, instead of the page of generic crap,maybe the players should each just be given the choice of one or two adventure related items for free. It is how I generally write adventures - each person has the chance of getting something nice, balanced and unique to that adventure.

I personally think if anything, PFS needs to be made a bit easier than regular Pathfinder, just because it is supposed to be the draw to get folks to play.


Thanks to everybody for the feedback. I had considered making net as one of the weapons. However, it is pretty weak for combat, and I wanted to balance out the weapons on the standard elves. The siangham matches up pretty well with the rapier, which is a standard elven weapon. The guisarme does a bit more damage than the longsword, but I could honestly see a stealthy wild elf using it to trip up a charging creature. It is the names that bother me the most, but I felt it would be easier to just leave the standard names than explain that a "kchar-staff" was the same as a guisarme. Spears could have made the cut, but felt a bit "blah". I took the proficiency with both bows straight from the standard rules for elves in Pathfinder. Limiting it to one or the other would mean I would need to find a replacement to keep the balance I wanted.

I was looking at giving these guys immunity to any plant-based substance. Since I don't feel all poisons are potions and all potions aren't poison, I was trying to make my description cover both. I also felt that limiting their spell immunity to plant-based ones was limiting, but I couldn't figure out a way around it without sacrificing the flavor of the race. Suggestions on how to broaden this without overly diluting it?

The save vs. plants is from knowledge. Easier to escape from an assassin vine, that kind of thing. I suppose better wording would be a +2 bonus vs. plant attacks?

Thanks again..

Eric


I have created a world where elves have been at war over the use of nature. During that time, the race has split in two, with the High Elves being the standard race, while Wild Elves have become nature's champions. I would appreciate feedback on my thoughts on this racial variant, as expressed below.

The wild elves have lost some of their magical aptitude. Instead, they have become much wilder, oftentimes almost feral. Their skin is hues of brown and green, with darker hair and eyes. While much of their shelter and clothing is "grown", they do so with little style, so everything is somewhat primitive. They tend to be distrusting of their High Elf neighbors, fearing that they will once more overwhelm the forest with their gardens and parks, pushing out the wilderness. They have become friendly with the dwarves of the Weathered Wall, as they have also come to revere nature, though they do so underground. While wary of humans, they have found that they can form alliances with those who seek to rein in the expansionist tendencies the race possesses. As they live in an area which is geographically isolated, they tend to be somewhat distrustful of most other races.

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Wild Elf Racial Traits +2 Dexterity, +2 Wisdom, –2 Intelligence: Wild elves are dexterous and able to move easily, while their connection with nature has given them greater wisdom; they have come to rely more on wisdom and cunning, and lost reliance on intelligence in the process.

Medium: Wild elves are Medium creatures and have no bonuses or penalties due to their size. Normal Speed: Elves have a base speed of 30 feet.

Low-Light Vision: Wild elves can see twice as far as humans in conditions of dim light.

Wild Elven Immunities: Wild elves are immune to plant based poison and potion effects and get a +2 racial saving throw bonus against plant attacks and spell-like effects, including druid spells such as Entangle.

Wild Elven Nature: Elves receive a +2 racial bonus on caster level checks made on Knowledge (Nature) and Survival checks. In addition, wild elves receive a +2 racial bonus on Handle Animal skill checks when dealing with forest animals. Keen Senses: Wild elves receive a +2 racial bonus on Perception skill checks.

Weapon Familiarity: Elves are proficient with longbows (including composite longbows), guisarme, siangham, and shortbows (including composite shortbows), and treat any weapon with the word “elven” in its name as a martial weapon.

Languages: Elves begin play speaking Common and Sylvan. Elves with high Intelligence scores can choose from the following: Celestial, Draconic, Gnoll, Gnome, Goblin, Orc, and Elven.


Thanks, I appreciate your comment. It helps, because sometimes I get stuck. I wasn't wild the constitution penalty, but was not sure I could change to much without losing the elven flavor. You are right... I am changing out the Con penalty for Int... It will be reflected above.

Eric

Set wrote:

For an elf who has bonded with the natural world, I would ditch the Con penalty and replace it with an Int penalty. It doesn't really fit the 'feel' of a race that lives outdoors and spends a lot of time in the wild to be a sickly race that keels over at the slightest hint of infection, or change in temperature.

For the more ethereal and otherworldly high elves, who may retain a connection to fey realms and such, a Con penalty is acceptable, as it represents that these elves have *not* adjusted to the mortal world, and are deliberately holding themselves apart from it, resulting in their lighter-than-expected frames being overly susceptible to earthly conditions of climate, contagion, etc.


Thanks for liking it. It wasn't too hard to do, mostly finding the right replacements to give them the right feel.

I actually read over all of the standard weapons several times trying to find substitute weapons that did similar damage but would be easy to make in the wilderness. I also wanted them to be easy to use and carry. I have to admit, though, that once I realized the siangham fit my criteria, I thought it was too unusual not to use. No monks in my world, so it is not a weapon that you would see too often.

Eric

Dave Young 992 wrote:

Looks good to me. Very druid-y, ranger-y, and slightly different from the standard elf.

The weapons seemed a little strange, but thinking about it, they're easy to make, and being isolated, the wild elves could have easily developed their own preferred fighiting style. Plant poison immunity is a good swap for sleep inmunity, etc.

I'd play it like that!


I have created a world where elves have been at war over the use of nature. During that time, the race has split in two, with the High Elves being the standard race, while Wild Elves have become nature's champions. I would appreciate feedback on my thoughts on this racial variant, as expressed below.

The wild elves have lost some of their magical aptitude. Instead, they have become much wilder, oftentimes almost feral. Their skin is hues of brown and green, with darker hair and eyes. While much of their shelter and clothing is "grown", they do so with little style, so everything is somewhat primitive. They tend to be distrusting of their High Elf neighbors, fearing that they will once more overwhelm the forest with their gardens and parks, pushing out the wilderness. They have become friendly with the dwarves of the Weathered Wall, as they have also come to revere nature, though they do so underground. While wary of humans, they have found that they can form alliances with those who seek to rein in the expansionist tendencies the race possesses. As they live in an area which is geographically isolated, they tend to be somewhat distrustful of most other races.

sssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss sssssssssssssssss

Wild Elf Racial Traits +2 Dexterity, +2 Wisdom, –2 Constitution: Wild elves are dexterous and able to move easily, while their connection with nature has given them greater wisdom; they are, however, still frail.

Medium: Wild elves are Medium creatures and have no bonuses or penalties due to their size. Normal Speed: Elves have a base speed of 30 feet.

Low-Light Vision: Wild elves can see twice as far as humans in conditions of dim light.

Wild Elven Immunities: Wild elves are immune to plant based poison and potion effects and get a +2 racial saving throw bonus against plant attacks and spell-like effects, including druid spells such as Entangle.

Wild Elven Nature: Elves receive a +2 racial bonus on caster level checks made on Knowledge (Nature) and Survival checks. In addition, wild elves receive a +2 racial bonus on Handle Animal skill checks when dealing with forest animals. Keen Senses: Wild elves receive a +2 racial bonus on Perception skill checks.

Weapon Familiarity: Elves are proficient with longbows (including composite longbows), guisarme, siangham, and shortbows (including composite shortbows), and treat any weapon with the word “elven” in its name as a martial weapon.

Languages: Elves begin play speaking Common and Sylvan. Elves with high Intelligence scores can choose from the following: Celestial, Draconic, Gnoll, Gnome, Goblin, Orc, and Elven.


I am running a Pathfinder game in a homebrew world. However, I have lost several players in the last six months due to romance, school, etc. Now I am down to two, and am therefore looking at "rebooting". If you would like to play, please contact me via e-mail at krowpa@gmail.com -- I will do my best to make it a fun time! Looking for two to four players -- level of experience not important...

Eric
krowpa@gmail.com


I find this to be a very amusing class. I don't think I would let a PC have it, but should make a very cool NPC in my campaign. I think something to do with following the party around, hot for the female Dwarven cleric.


All I can say is, I tried 4E with my regular gaming group. They hated it. My old gaming group wants to get back together and have me DM, but they have voted it be a Pathfinder based game. I found out my neighbors down the street want to play D&D, which is cool, but they only want to play 3.5. Heck, I had a guy on the bus try to get me into his group (I was reading a Dungeon Crawl Classic), and they had tried 4th Ed, but hated it, so it would have to be a 3.5 or Pathfinder game. I know quite a few people who have bought one or more of the 4th Ed books, but they are never going to use them. I can't even get my family to play it in "Beer and Pretzels" mode. Is anybody really playing this game, and if so, where? (Not at my local game shop, either...)


I am not planning on moving over. I have tons of 3.x books, most of which I haven't used yet. I still haven't got everything in the current version down. 4.0 reminds me of an MMORPG. Every class gets "special abilities" each level, every character is going to be "useful" every round, and now the term "quests" seems to be replacing "adventures", along with the idea of giving out a printed "Quest Card" (presumably to go in the "Quest Log.") So far, it doesn't appeal to me. (Of course, ask me again a year from now, once it has been out, and I may have changed my mind.)


I love the idea of the owl bear companion. My players are getting their characters together to start this adventure path, and I have requested that there be at least one druid or ranger, so that this critter can tag along behind. I like the random event chart, and will probably print it out to use more than a few times. I see it as every creature is different, and an owl bear raised by a halfling druid may overcome it's nature to be a bit more affable.

In the past, I have saddled PC's with a young grimlock, a baby goblin, an "Elmo" (I don't remember now where I got it, but it came from the Elemental Plane of Play... Very chaotic creature) and an Essential Robot of Gnomish Origin (E.R.G.O.) that I culled out of a dragon magazine. Besides the owlbear, I can't wait to figure out what other creatures I can attach to the party this time.