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Goblin Squad Member. 1,205 posts (1,443 including aliases). No reviews. 3 lists. No wishlists. 4 aliases.


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James Jacobs wrote:
Roswynn wrote:
Anyways! Another question about PF came to mind - you said you like Wayne Reynold's rendition of Ameiko, right? (I *love* Wayne!) - what's the story with her white strands of hair, does she bleach them or did they lose their color because of a wound, or stress, idk?
Her white strands of hair are a fashion statement. If not bleach, then an alchemical analog or maybe even a long-lasting prestidigitation effect. It's hardly a game breaking thing to allow prestidigitation to give you a flourish like that without having to re-cast it over and over and over.

On the subject of cosmetic magic, is there a variant of humanoid form allowing for customizable detail and lasting for more than 10 minutes?


This may seem like an odd question but I'm always looking to timeline things. What year (AR, of course) was Nualia born?


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James Jacobs wrote:
Honestly in full hindsight, knowing what I know now, I probably would have cut the encounter entirely and had the PCs talking with a solar or something instead, so that if they DO attack or whatever, there's stats to handle the fight and I wouldn't have had to build rules for something we don't normally do rules for in a "just in case" possibility.

Or, since you often mention that deities are beyond stats then have her stop them by pure divine fiat to demonstrate this; no new rules required. I like talking to deities, and don't want to lose that opportunity because of players out of r/rpghorrorstories.

Anyway, what I originally came back to this thread for: given your (and Pharasma's) views of the undead, how do you feel about this article (first entry, about the zombies)? Best (only, really) counterargument I've seen to anyone who just wants to use zombies as labor-saving devices rather than Evil™.


James Jacobs wrote:
3Doubloons wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
The scene you're referring to where Iomedae "wrecks your face" is an error in our writing, not in her personality. We mistakingly leaned into the idea that PCs would be antagonistic toward her, and should have focused instead on how she can help you. It's the one thing I wish I could go back in time and fix about the storyline of that adventure path, because it's flat out wrong in how it presents Iomedae. I've said this before on these boards, but our lack of a process by getting story errata out means that this clarification and admission of error gets lost soon after each time I point it out or admit to it.
Are you keeping (or have you kept, if that part of the development is already over) an eye on how Owlcat are handling that scene to try and update how this encounter plays out?
I've chatted with them about it, but their version of the game is not a point-by-point recreation of the tabletop experience. Neither was Kingmaker. The realities of how you play a single player computer game verses a group dynamic in a tabletop game are VERY different. I honestly think that a scene like this will play out much better in a computer game, since the creators have much more control over the situation and Iomedae only has to react to one human rather than a whole party of them.

That's good to know! : D

But...why did you lean into the idea that PCs'd be antagonistic towards her? Just because she's a paladin? Something else?


So, you might've seen that D&D's doing away with races being always evil. Obviously a good thing, but what do you think this would mean for fiends and such? No change, I suspect, but I want an expert assessment for better information to work with.


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
For my completely unrelated question: Socothbenoth's areas of concern are pride, perversion, and taboos. The last two are the very obvious sorts I want to be careful asking about, but thankfully I want to know about the first: pride. How does that manifest? I checked Book of the Damned, but it's unclear.
He's proud of his masculinity, his appearance, his power, and his history. Vanity and narcissism are significant ways his pride manifests. From a game design point, having both him and his sister Nocticula embody two of the seven deadly sins was important thematically.
Masculinity? What do you mean?
He's proud of being a man in a chaotic evil way is what I mean. Take that pride however you want in your games, where you have your player's consent. It's not a topic I'm gonna get into further though, other than to double down and then triple down on the fact that he's a bad guy and not someone to admire; he's someone to fight and defeat.

Sorry about upsetting you; just asked because I thought literal sex fiends were more genderfluid than that.

I am curious about your last sentence, though; who is admiring him? Is this a thing in the fandom?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
For my completely unrelated question: Socothbenoth's areas of concern are pride, perversion, and taboos. The last two are the very obvious sorts I want to be careful asking about, but thankfully I want to know about the first: pride. How does that manifest? I checked Book of the Damned, but it's unclear.
He's proud of his masculinity, his appearance, his power, and his history. Vanity and narcissism are significant ways his pride manifests. From a game design point, having both him and his sister Nocticula embody two of the seven deadly sins was important thematically.

Masculinity? What do you mean?


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James Jacobs wrote:
JoelF847 wrote:
Would there be interest in publishing a product which was all about traveling on Golarion? More about trade routes, shipping lines, etc and including distances between major cities and towns both by land, by sea, and by air, which would be extremely useful when calculating how long it would take getting from point A to point B by different methods of travel? I know I'd buy that, and as a 1st edition player, it might be the first 2E product I'd purchase.
Whether or not there's an interest at the office for a book like that isn't as important is if it is for customers. Traditional wisdom is that books on that subject simply don't sell as well as books with PC options or adventure content.

I, for one, would love a book on the microeconomics of Golarion. : D

For my completely unrelated question: Socothbenoth's areas of concern are pride, perversion, and taboos. The last two are the very obvious sorts I want to be careful asking about, but thankfully I want to know about the first: pride. How does that manifest? I checked Book of the Damned, but it's unclear.


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It's been a while since I asked any Sorshen questions. Somebody has to do it. ; p

Nowadays, how is she as a tutor? What sorts of student would she be interested in? On a likely related note, how is she as a partner, both vocationally and romantic?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
What's the afterlife like for faithful and successful servants of evil deities?
A violent, dangerous, non-stop horror show of backstabbing and plotting and betrayal in which only the strongest or smartest or fastest or trickiest survive. AKA: They love it.

Interesting... : )

Any chance of seeing such characters in a future adventure?

AKA Devils, daemons, demons, and other evil fiends? That's what these servants become in the afterlife, after all, so... Yup! Lots of chances.

So you mean to say that successful worshippers of Evil's might get fast-tracked to fienddom, without an eternity or two of torture?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
What's the afterlife like for faithful and successful servants of evil deities?
A violent, dangerous, non-stop horror show of backstabbing and plotting and betrayal in which only the strongest or smartest or fastest or trickiest survive. AKA: They love it.

Interesting... : )

Any chance of seeing such characters in a future adventure?


What's the afterlife like for faithful and successful servants of evil deities?


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James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
All right, so far so good. So how do I make NPCs that fit in with the PC's personal story without them being a one-note harem? Especially in the context of interesting/fun/unusual PC/NPC relationships.
That's pretty much up to you. I'd suggest letting the player build up their character and then looking at the rules options they chose and looking at the personalty and history they decide on and then build NPCs to compliment or challenge those choices. How much of this becomes a one-note harem is 100% up to the GM and player. Do what's fun for the table... don't worry about it having to be something that's fun for everyone.

Good to know. : )

In building the NPCs, one thing I like to figure out is "why are they following the PC?" When they're equally powerful, what makes the PC special?

1) What makes the PC special is that they're controlled by someone else, not the GM. What makes them special is that they aren't played by someone who knows what the plot is.

2) And that said, an NPC accompanying a PC is always going to be at a disadvantage because the PC has one person focusing on them, whreas the NPC has to share that focus with everything else. A player will often be better at playing their one character and building the best option for that character over the course of a campaign than a GM who'll have to do the same for EVERY other NPC.

I mean in-setting. In a party of 1st level adventurers, all else being equal regardless of differing capabilities, why would the rest follow this one other person they just met?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
All right, so far so good. So how do I make NPCs that fit in with the PC's personal story without them being a one-note harem? Especially in the context of interesting/fun/unusual PC/NPC relationships.
That's pretty much up to you. I'd suggest letting the player build up their character and then looking at the rules options they chose and looking at the personalty and history they decide on and then build NPCs to compliment or challenge those choices. How much of this becomes a one-note harem is 100% up to the GM and player. Do what's fun for the table... don't worry about it having to be something that's fun for everyone.

Good to know. : )

In building the NPCs, one thing I like to figure out is "why are they following the PC?" When they're equally powerful, what makes the PC special?


James Jacobs wrote:

Multiple PCs for a player work as well, but in my experience, the game is more enjoyable as a player if you're playing one character. The GM is already playing ALL the other NPCs in the game, so adding a few more is no big deal.

And as the GM you get to make whatever sort of helper NPCs you want, so there's always 1st level NPCs as far as that's concerned. If the Adventure Path doesn't have NPCs that would make good choices, whip up some of your own design. If I were in this situation, I'd let the one player read through the Adventure Path Player's Guide, let them pick their background and all that, and then I'd build up 2 or 3 helper NPCs as first level adventurers to fit in other backgrounds that would allow me to tell a more compelling story as they interact with the campaign and the PC.

All right, so far so good. So how do I make NPCs that fit in with the PC's personal story without them being a one-note harem? Especially in the context of interesting/fun/unusual PC/NPC relationships.


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James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
If I'm adapting an adventure path for a solo campaign, should I have the player make up other characters or have NPCs tag along?
That's up to you, but when I've run solo campaigns in the past I've always included a few NPC companions for the player character. Not only does this help keep the game's action economy going and help prevent incapacitation or unconsciousness from being unduly punishing, but it helps to give the game a sense of relationship building that's missing if you don't have a group of PCs constantly interacting. In fact, depending on the real world relationship you have with your player, this can let you get into some really interesting/fun/unusual PC/NPC relationships that would be a lot more awkward to roleplay out in a group! (Of course, player and GM consent remain, as always, the number one thing to keep in mind!)

So NPCs instead of multiple PCs for the solo player, correct? What if there aren't any 1st level NPCs?

And yes, I like really interesting/fun/unusual PC/NPC relationships~ : 3


If I'm adapting an adventure path for a solo campaign, should I have the player make up other characters of have NPCs tag along?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
How do adventuring wizards learn spells? There aren't many opportunities to visit a library while adventuring in the wilderness, plus magic had to start somewhere, so where do wizards learn spells from?
Whether or not there are many opportunities to visit a library depends 100% on the nature of the campaign the wizard is on. Not every wizard spends their time always in the wilderness, as even a casual glance at the adventure paths we've published prove. Beyond that, wizards learn magic by leveling up, by discovering scrolls and spellbooks, and by researching.

I'll elaborate. Whether the adventure path is urban intrigue or wilderness exploration a wizard will learn, on their own, just about any two spells they want per level. This is in addition to scrolls and spellbooks. These spells can be anything, regardless of what they themselves have cast or even witnessed.

So, in terms of in-setting flavor, how would a wizard research magic absent any references? And what is leveling up from a character and story perspective?

Without references? A wizard is limited to the spells they'd learn by leveling up or by those they research on their own. We don't yet have rules for spell research in 2nd edition, as far as I know, but in previous editions that plays out like an author writing a novel–except instead of a novel, a spell is what's being written.

From a character/story perspective, leveling up is "getting better at something you practice at doing."

(Oh dear, I forgot to continue my thread and got everyone worried.)

Lemme try to clarify some more. I'm not asking about researching spells according to as-yet implemented research mechanics. How would a wizard research the 2 spells/level they get based on only the magic they cast or witness?

(Also, I'm doing well under quarantine. Calmer, actually, since staying indoors, online, and solitary isn't so stigmatized at the moment.)


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
How do adventuring wizards learn spells? There aren't many opportunities to visit a library while adventuring in the wilderness, plus magic had to start somewhere, so where do wizards learn spells from?
Whether or not there are many opportunities to visit a library depends 100% on the nature of the campaign the wizard is on. Not every wizard spends their time always in the wilderness, as even a casual glance at the adventure paths we've published prove. Beyond that, wizards learn magic by leveling up, by discovering scrolls and spellbooks, and by researching.

I'll elaborate. Whether the adventure path is urban intrigue or wilderness exploration a wizard will learn, on their own, just about any two spells they want per level. This is in addition to scrolls and spellbooks. These spells can be anything, regardless of what they themselves have cast or even witnessed.

So, in terms of in-setting flavor, how would a wizard research magic absent any references? And what is leveling up from a character and story perspective?


How do adventuring wizards learn spells? There aren't many opportunities to visit a library while adventuring in the wilderness, plus magic had to start somewhere, so where do wizards learn spells from?


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James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
But...how would said introvert work as an adventurer?
I'm not seeing how that makes any difference.

I don't follow; could you explain? Yes, I know an introvert can be an adventurer, Raistlin pulled it off well enough, but I mean what specific things could an introverted Arshean do? Besides follow along with an adventure path's plot, I mean (p.487 of the 2E core notwithstanding). If not as an adventurer, what sort of behind-the-scenes are we talking about here?

I know I ought to keep it simple, but maybe this'll clarify things? Assuming you're familiar with the alignment grid of pop psychology, the MBTI. How would an INTx (i.e., coldly analytical) Arshean go about adventuring, particularly in a way that supports their faith (which comes across as very ESFx, or sociably sentimental)?

I'm not familiar with it beyond only the bare essentials, but I don't think a coldly analytical Arshean would make too much sense to me. That said, often what draws people to play a certain type of character is that they're the exact opposite of the expectation.

I guess an Arshean like that would be like a hedonistic android, perhaps? Someone who understands the theory of passion but doesn't understand it? Dunno. I'm pretty sure I can't answer the question the way you want me to answer it though. Part of the issue is, I guess, that I really don't know that much about Arshea. I didn't invent the character and I've never written about them. I'm not sure who did, initially... I suspect it was Wes though since he did the lion's share of the work on setting up Empyreal Lords.

So I don't really have a lot of hidden insights into Arshea. In fact, I suspect you know more about Arshea than I do.

I've got a better grip on Ashava and Sarenrae and a few others that I've specifically worked on, but I don't know how to answer you question about an introverted Arshean without potentially saying something that would disappoint you. Sorry!

No, that's actually an informative answer. And flattering, too. ^_^

(As proof by example, the old Gods & Magic explained the reason for their favored weapon being the flail: it symbolizes striking back at slavers with their own scourges.)

And yes, Arshea was Wes's creation; the idea came about at a con when a gamer expressed desire for someone relatable. The same article mentions the empyreal lords were created to make good deities diverse and engaging, which bears mentioning since that philosophy strongly influenced my sharp critique of their stats in 1E Bestiary 4, which I’m bringing up since it influenced Mark Seifter before they joined Paizo. You might remember them as the fellow who started up Arshea to my satisfaction. : )

Since my posts are supposed to ultimately questions…is it okay if I brag a bit?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
But...how would said introvert work as an adventurer?
I'm not seeing how that makes any difference.

I don't follow; could you explain? Yes, I know an introvert can be an adventurer, Raistlin pulled it off well enough, but I mean what specific things could an introverted Arshean do? Besides follow along with an adventure path's plot, I mean (p.487 of the 2E core notwithstanding). If not as an adventurer, what sort of behind-the-scenes are we talking about here?

I know I ought to keep it simple, but maybe this'll clarify things? Assuming you're familiar with the alignment grid of pop psychology, the MBTI. How would an INTx (i.e., coldly analytical) Arshean go about adventuring, particularly in a way that supports their faith (which comes across as very ESFx, or sociably sentimental)?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
Appropriate inappropriate wordplay aside, the impression I get from the Arshean faith is that it's very Touched by an Angel; i.e., helping with personal problems and generally being sentimental. So how would a hardcore introvert, like a dark vigilante or mysterious wizard, work as one?

They wouldn't be part of a group of worshipers. And that's not an Arshea thing. That's an organization thing. A hardcore introvert wouldn't be part of any organization, I think, where they'd need to be out there in the public pushing an agenda, be it a religion or a political movement or a mercantile company or the like. An introvert can still certainly worship Arshea, but would not be likely to be part of the organized clergy; a cleric of Arshea who was an introvert would either be a behind-the-scenes member of their church or a lone worshiper who tends a small personal shrine or something like that.

Nothing in Arshea's edicts or anathemas require a devout follower to be part of a big group or to work with large numbers of people. You can still help individual people and be an introvert. Speaking as an introvert, I do this all the time so it's perfectly plausible. ;-)

Good to know. : )

But...how would said introvert work as an adventurer?


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James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
Appropriate inappropriate wordplay aside, the impression I get from the Arshean faith is that it's very Touched by an Angel; i.e., helping with personal problems and generally being sentimental. So how would a hardcore introvert, like a dark vigilante or mysterious wizard, work as one?

They wouldn't be part of a group of worshipers. And that's not an Ashava thing. That's a organization thing. A hardcore introvert wouldn't be part of any organization, I think, where they'd need to be out there in the public pushing an agenda, be it a religion or a political movement or a mercantile company or the like. An introvert can still certainly worship Ashava, but would not be likely to be part of the organized clergy; a cleric of Ashava who was an introvert would either be a behind-the-scenes member of their church or a lone worshiper who tends a small personal shrine or something like that.

Nothing in Ashava's edicts or anathemas require a devout follower to be part of a big group or to work with large numbers of people. You can still help individual people and be an introvert. Speaking as an introvert, I do this all the time so it's perfectly plausible. ;-)

And...would this apply to Arshea as well? (See Rysky's post below.)


Appropriate inappropriate wordplay aside, the impression I get from the Arshean faith is that it's very Touched by an Angel; i.e., helping with personal problems and generally being sentimental. So how would a hardcore introvert, like a dark vigilante or mysterious wizard, work as one?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
One thing I've noticed about Pathfinder is that apart from the destitute, everyone seems to have really nice outfits. I'm talking stuff better than the best cosplay. How do they get made? And if the answer is "magic" then what are the fine details?

They get made by magic and by traditional methods, but it's a world without industrialization and mass-production programs, so as a result, things like clothing tend to be things that are made with more passion and love by their creators and, since they aren't mass produced, are customized and often built to last a lot longer.

It's also a case of "This is a fantasy setting and part of what makes it fun to escape to is that things are better there than they are for us in the real world."

But where do people get their reading and gaming material? I doubt even immortals will want to wait for the Netfinder era.


One thing I've noticed about Pathfinder is that apart from the destitute, everyone seems to have really nice outfits. I'm talking stuff better than the best cosplay. How do they get made? And if the answer is "magic" then what are the fine details?


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James Jacobs wrote:
james014Aura wrote:
What's your favorite PF deity, of each alignment?
LG Iomedae

You like Iomedae?


James Jacobs wrote:

Now that you've specified bribery, no, that wouldn't work. She's already rich in money, and it's very unlikely that a PC will be able to offer her enough riches to buy her loyalty. And once you get so powerful that you could do something like offer her a private demiplane, her paranoia and jealousy would have long since kicked in and she would be even more prone to attacking you to take your stuff rather than trust that you will remain subservient to her.

And as for redemption, that's a VERY strong repeated theme I get from folks who are always asking about it, so this is another example of me trying to address a vaguely worded question with multiple possible responses.

She's after a lifestyle of control and adoration. She wants to be in charge of as much as possible, and wants the people she is in charge of to be simpering and submissive and devoted to keeping her comfortable and powerful. The facial disfigurement is a sort of faerie tale element where her vanity doesn't abide the idea of other people possibly being more attractive than her. If they're enemies, she'll kill them. If they're allies, she just wants them uglier, and having them endure the facial scarring is also an element of her power over them.

All right, that's informative. I hope it's no trouble if I refine my questioning even further; I really like to know the details of things, even if I reveal that my way of thinking is different from how I "ought" to think of something.

Assuming a wizard with a demiplane, and extravagant luxury, got to Ileosa before she found the damned teeth, what then?

As for what she wants, that seems eerily close to what I'd like. Of course, I have other interests, no grim fairy tale jealousy, hopefully no narcissistic personality disorder (thus my mention of brain surgery), an actual conscience, and failing that working knowledge of where bad people go when they die. Anyway, while I'm all for redemption what is redeemable about Ileosia?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:

Been a while...

Suppose I wanted Ileosa for the same reason Eodred did. (Can't think of any better reason besides therapeutic brain surgery.) What would coax her away from her royal life to come with me?

(Gee, I wonder why James looks at my questions funny...?)

I'd probably say that what would require it would be to play the entire Crimson Throne adventure path out, and during it continue to do things to pay respect to Ileosa as a person but to focus on the idea that the Crown of Fangs empowered her negative personality traits. And then at the end, don't kill her, get control of the Crown of Fangs, destroy the Crown of Fangs, and then offer her a chance to redeem herself[...]

The whole "mind control" route where you coax her away from her royal life through dominate or charm would work too, if you and your GM were willing to go that route[...]

Mind control? I was talking about bribery, and in particular before she puts on that damn crown. Suppose a wizard with a demiplane had more and finer stuff; I'm guessing that'd cause the princess to leave for another castle, but how much more would I need? What does she want out of life besides facial disfigurement? What sort of lifestyle is she after?

As for redemption, how would that be possible? I haven't seen a single, likable personality trait. She doesn't even have a sympathetic backstory like practically every other villain.


Been a while...

Suppose I wanted Ileosa for the same reason Eodred did. (Can't think of any better reason besides therapeutic brain surgery.) What would coax her away from her royal life to come with me?

(Gee, I wonder why James looks at my questions funny...?)


Let's say I'm looking for dopplegangers without magic. What tells would I be looking for?


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Besides the dragon's pure evil, what stood out to me was how Uguro thought Cirra caring about his town and people was odd. That he also know what nobles are like is also telling.

And I'm pretty sure that accent was an "American" one. ; )


Is the ice trade established in Avistan, or is that an untapped market for an enterprising PC?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Beroli wrote:
Do you have an opinion on the Expedition to Castle Ravenloft hardcover? (No demiplane, no universal trapping though Strahd's likely to have an opinion on whether the PCs specifically get to leave while he's still undead, no fear/horror/madness checks unless the DM chooses to site it on the Ravenloft demiplane, and even there the DM needs to come up with them unaided by the text.)

I never read it, in large part because the "Delve format" that D&D was using for adventures at that time made it unpleasant to read adventures. And to write them too, to be honest, having written Expedition to the Ruins of Greyhawk in that style.

So apart from disliking the delve format so much that I never read the adventure... no opinion.

Delve format?
The format WotC used for their adventures near the end of third edition.

Yes, I got that. I mean could you elaborate on what the features of the "delve format" was, and how it's different from how Paizo writes adventures?


James Jacobs wrote:
Beroli wrote:
Do you have an opinion on the Expedition to Castle Ravenloft hardcover? (No demiplane, no universal trapping though Strahd's likely to have an opinion on whether the PCs specifically get to leave while he's still undead, no fear/horror/madness checks unless the DM chooses to site it on the Ravenloft demiplane, and even there the DM needs to come up with them unaided by the text.)

I never read it, in large part because the "Delve format" that D&D was using for adventures at that time made it unpleasant to read adventures. And to write them too, to be honest, having written Expedition to the Ruins of Greyhawk in that style.

So apart from disliking the delve format so much that I never read the adventure... no opinion.

Delve format?


Given that it's centered in the mountainous middle of nowhere, how would the economy of New Thassilon work?


James Jacobs wrote:
Lord Fyre wrote:
In your opinion, what is the biggest single benefit to switching to Pathfinder Second Edition?
You'll be able to continue playing the same types of games you enjoyed in 1st edition but with a ruleset that is much more empowering to GMs in that it gives them greater ownership over how they run their game without being undermined by player expectation/entitlement.

...What?

I mean, please elaborate. I thought the new rules was to make it easier to run for both players and GM, as well as deal with the balance issues and other wobbly bits 3.75 had.


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Where in Golarion are dudebros?


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What sort of partner is Amiri into?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
Oh, and what suggestions do you have for reskinning for Qadira flavor?
Read products we've produced about them, read stories and myths and legends from the real world that cover the same themes, and then use that steeped knowledge and inspiration to turn that lens on stories from other cultures.

So what I've already been doing; good to know.

So...what about the other question I asked in that comment? About pulling material from adventure paths. Yes, I gotta ask for peace of mind's sake.


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
How much did you work on the latest Qadira book, and who can I ask about locations in the region?

I developed the book, so you can ask me... but it's been years since I had my head in that space, so don't expect deep revelations on every question.

John Compton wrote a few pages and is pretty deeply involved in the region's lore. Jessica, who wrote almost all of the book, isn't at Paizo anymore, alas.

Alas indeed, but that's well beyond the scope of this post.

I was asking because I'm looking into developing Naamat (Qadira, JotE; p.50) and thus nearby Butraf, as adventuring hubs. Do you remember any ideas you three had for those locations.

Beyond the scope of this post and beyond what I'm interested in talking about in public.

I don't remember anything additional about those locations, and I'm pretty sure that what was intended for them is in the book. As a general rule, we writers don't try to come up with more than 100% of the ideas; it's a waste of time and energy and inspiration and morale to overwrite for things, after all.

Plus, that gives the GM more room to fill in the gaps with their own ideas, or to bring in plots from other books that they enjoy from areas they aren't going to directly use in their game. For example, if you love a bunch of ideas from the Andoran book but have no interest in running an Andoran-based game, use the storylines there as you can, reskinned for Qadira flavor.

Ooo... Even adventure paths?

Oh, and what suggestions do you have for reskinning for Qadira flavor?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
How much did you work on the latest Qadira book, and who can I ask about locations in the region?

I developed the book, so you can ask me... but it's been years since I had my head in that space, so don't expect deep revelations on every question.

John Compton wrote a few pages and is pretty deeply involved in the region's lore. Jessica, who wrote almost all of the book, isn't at Paizo anymore, alas.

Alas indeed, but that's well beyond the scope of this post.

I was asking because I'm looking into developing Naamat (Qadira, JotE; p.50) and thus nearby Butraf, as adventuring hubs. Do you remember any ideas you three had for those locations.


How much did you work on the latest Qadira book, and who can I ask about locations in the region?


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James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Rysky wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

I'm not sure which GoT prediction I mentioned you're talking about. I had a LOT of them. A few came true, a few did not.

Overall I was quite pleased with the last season. My only two regrets is that it's over, and that toxic/entitled fan reactions on the internet have further damaged my faith in humanity.

What do you think about Scientific American's take, then?
Don't know. Haven't read it and won't. I'm really not interested at this point in immersing myself in the morass of toxic fan over-reactions, especially this close to PaizoCon when I need to cultivate my positivity and focus on the positive elements of fandom.

As alluded to here, the story used to be one where the characters existed in a world beyond their personal dramas. Contrast that to shows where everything, including morality, is protagonist centered with no thought for external consequences.

But...that's not what I'm here for.

deep breath

I put this off to give you PaizoCon space, then because I wanted to address this as tactfully as possible. I decided to be simple and direct, and hope for the best. How does being highly critical of something make me toxic and entitled?


James Jacobs wrote:
Rysky wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

I'm not sure which GoT prediction I mentioned you're talking about. I had a LOT of them. A few came true, a few did not.

Overall I was quite pleased with the last season. My only two regrets is that it's over, and that toxic/entitled fan reactions on the internet have further damaged my faith in humanity.

What do you think about Scientific American's take, then?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:

Well it's a good thing this is an idea for a solo game since I wouldn't want to be any of those adjectives. (You don't think I am, do you?)

What is your experience, or at least perspective, on solo games (i.e., 1 GM & 1 PC)?

I don't know you—internet forums are a tough way to get to know anyone. I suspect you're not really a plant monster though.

Solo games can be great fun, and these are a GREAT time to come up with a complex character idea that requires a lot of GM interaction and attention.

Thank you! ^_^

So...play or GM any yourself? What were they about?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
And I'm not trying to be aggravating; like you said, the game has preset expectations, but I tend to think...unexpectedly. That's what my therapist says, anyway.

It's goofy in that a player often does this, I believe, to be a proud nail and to try to garner more attention. Players who do this want to be the focus of attention, and are at direct odds with the fact that an RPG is a team-event, not a solo event. No one PC is the "MAIN" character. All of the PCs should be equally important, and when a player makes choices that force the GM to spend more time dealing with those choices (such as is the case when someone picks a character concept fundamentally opposed to the status-quo or expectation of the setting or the story of the campaign), then that player is robbing time from the other players.

So maybe "goofy" isn't the right word for this. Words like "arrogant" or "obstinate" or "disrespectful" or "annoying" might be better.

Well it's a good thing this is an idea for a solo game since I wouldn't want to be any of those adjectives. (You don't think I am, do you?)

What is your experience, or at least perspective, on solo games (i.e., 1 GM & 1 PC)?


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
Let's say a character is a shapeshifter, but an ooze and therefore not naturally humanoid. Does that mean it'd have no item slots, and thus be unable to use certain wearable items?
A character who is a shapeshifting ooze is so far out of bounds from what the game expects that your GM needs to make up new rules for that situation. I wouldn't allow a shapeshifting ooze PC in my game since that's kinda too goofy for my tastes; I prefer less outlandish groups.

Are you sure "goofy" is the right term? How are goblin (or gnome) characters not-goofy?

(Useful answer otherwise, though, so thanks for that. : ) )

Goofy on the player side, not the player character side.

Okay, that partially clarifies things, but how is it goofy on the player's side?

And I'm not trying to be aggravating; like you said, the game has preset expectations, but I tend to think...unexpectedly. That's what my therapist says, anyway.


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
Let's say a character is a shapeshifter, but an ooze and therefore not naturally humanoid. Does that mean it'd have no item slots, and thus be unable to use certain wearable items?
A character who is a shapeshifting ooze is so far out of bounds from what the game expects that your GM needs to make up new rules for that situation. I wouldn't allow a shapeshifting ooze PC in my game since that's kinda too goofy for my tastes; I prefer less outlandish groups.

Are you sure "goofy" is the right term? How are goblin (or gnome) characters not-goofy?

(Useful answer otherwise, though, so thanks for that. : ) )

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