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Machine Soldier

Gauss's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Society Member. 7,858 posts (7,866 including aliases). No reviews. 1 list. No wishlists. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 1 alias.


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Yup, your int goes up you gain another known 1st level spell in your spellbook. Enjoy!


You want the spell Suppress Charms and Compulsions.


The rule regarding ending rage is wonky. By RAW, if you are unable to take actions (stunned, paralyzed, whatever) you cannot stop raging but that is clearly not the intent.

So, go with the intent here, which is that if your first thing to do on your turn is drop rage then you are not paying for another round of rage.


Is there an actual "Rules Question" here?

Perhaps this should be in a different forum such as the Pathfinder RPG General Discussion forum?

As per that forum's description: "This forum is for general comments about the Pathfinder RPG and discussing the system with other gamers."

This seems more in line with a discussion about the system as opposed to a Rules Question.


knight9910,

Just for clarity: they gain the modifiers listed in the table on CRB p212 which is different in places from the modifiers listed in Bestiary p296 Table 2-2 Size Changes.

Make sure you are using the correct table. :)


MeanMutton, Chess Pwn is correct.

A tiny creature (such as most Familiars) having Alter Self cast upon it would have +4 Strength and -2 Dexterity modifiers (as per the Table on CRB p212) before the Alter Self spell's ability score modifiers of +2 Strength or +2 Dexterity kick in.

CRB p212 wrote:
If a polymorph spell is cast on a creature that is smaller than Small or larger than Medium, first adjust its ability scores to one of these two sizes using the following table before applying the bonuses granted by the polymorph spell.


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Just a note, staggered creatures CAN coup de grace, but it takes two rounds to perform.

CRB p186 wrote:

Start/Complete Full-Round Action

The “start full-round action” standard action lets you start undertaking a full-round action, which you can complete in the following round by using another standard action. You can’t use this action to start or complete a full attack, charge, run, or withdraw.


hasteroth, if you cast shocking grasp you are holding the charge until you discharge it. Spell Combat does not change this.

A couple examples of how this works:
1) I cast shocking grasp and miss my touch attack. Next round I can try to touch again.

2) I am a Magus and cast shocking grasp, I miss with my 2 sword attacks. Next round my attack hits and discharges the spell. (Note: I won't have a second attack because I wasn't using spell combat.)

3) I cast Shocking Grasp before combat, I am holding the charge. A couple rounds later combat starts and my first hit (either touch attack or through my weapon if I am a Magus) discharges the shocking grasp into the target.


I would not add Life Surge to the regenerated temporary hp. I would add it to the maximum temp hp like it would for most other effects.

So the Skin of Klendar the Troll King would grant 5+enhancement temporary hp and regen 1/round as normal.


Undone wrote:
Gauss wrote:

Here is how I handle it: every step in resolving something is a point you can use an immediate (or readied) action but some immediate actions are only useful in certain steps.

Example (note: I might be missing a step, this is just a quick example):
Enemy is casting a spell. (first step)
You use spellcraft and identify the spell. (second step)
Enemy's spell is finished and he targets "X". (third step)
Spell effect is resolved. (fourth step)

Now, you could disrupt the spell in steps one and two but by step three it is too late.
In step three you can do something to mess with the targeting (teleport away, throw up a wall, whatever).
In step four you could do something to mitigate the effect but it is too late to avoid the spell being cast and targeted at that person.

With all that said, there are no rules covering when immediate actions can occur. It is all a judgement call. Some immediate actions are useful at certain points while others are not. Thus it is more common sense rulings than anything else.

Step three is still a time. Part of the ultimate phrase "ANY TIME" which means it's interrupt-able.

Saying once you chose a target is absurd because it's illogical and pointlessly silly.

Let's say A and B are players with E as enemies and X as empty square and we'll call it an archer for the sake of simplicity.

AXXXXEXXXXXB

Archer is looking at wizard B when he draws his arrows and EFS to save himself then the archer snaps 180 just before letting multiple arrows fly into A.

There are by the laws and rules of casting clear visual and auditory effects including effects to determine the direction of casting as wizards know to exact geometric coordinates. Spending a life of geometic fire cubing as a wizard would grant him intimate knowledge of knowing if the 3rd finger up or half up meant 3 squares or 4.

As you pointed out in 4 steps there are more steps before "The effect is resolved". At any point before "The effect is resolved" Is a valid...

Undone, you have completely failed to understand what I wrote.

How do I know that? Because you think that I said you cannot use EFS during "step three". You absolutely can.
What I wrote was you cannot disrupt the spell during step three. That is completely different. Why can't you disrupt it? Because it is cast already and the opportunity for disruption has passed.

Please try to read what I wrote rather than taking a single line out of context.


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Here is how I handle it: every step in resolving something is a point you can use an immediate (or readied) action but some immediate actions are only useful in certain steps.

Example (note: I might be missing a step, this is just a quick example):
Enemy is casting a spell. (first step)
You use spellcraft and identify the spell. (second step)
Enemy's spell is finished and he targets "X". (third step)
Spell effect is resolved. (fourth step)

Now, you could disrupt the spell in steps one and two but by step three it is too late.
In step three you can do something to mess with the targeting (teleport away, throw up a wall, whatever).
In step four you could do something to mitigate the effect but it is too late to avoid the spell being cast and targeted at that person.

With all that said, there are no rules covering when immediate actions can occur. It is all a judgement call. Some immediate actions are useful at certain points while others are not. Thus it is more common sense rulings than anything else.


Ultimately your options (without multiclassing) are:

Elemental Spell metamagic feat (or rod).
The Rod can be made to work while using spell combat by means such as the glove of storing, a tail (or extra arm) that can hold an object, etc.

You can reduce the cost of metamagic by one by taking the Magical Lineage or (maybe both?) Wayang Spellhunter traits.

There may be other ways to reduce the cost of metamagic.


You cannot combine polymorph and size changing effects.

CRB p212 polymorph wrote:
You can only be affected by one polymorph spell at a time. If a new polymorph spell is cast on you (or you activate a polymorph effect, such as wild shape), you can decide whether or not to allow it to affect you, taking the place of the old spell. In addition, other spells that change your size have no effect on you while you are under the effects of a polymorph spell.

Additionally, enlarge person does not stack with size altering effects.

CRB p278 Enlarge Person wrote:
Multiple magical effects that increase size do not stack.

So, the following does not work:

Enlarge Person + Polymorph (violates both rules)
Enlarge Person + Kinetic Form (violates the enlarge person rule)
Polymorph + Kinetic Form (violates the polymorph rule)


Blymurkla wrote:
Brf wrote:

Why is it impossible to kill someone with unarmed attacks?

You can choose an unarmed strike to do lethal damage.

I'm slightly bored, a bit tiered and not paying enough attention. I should probably stop answering threads for the evening. Of course it is possible.

My point still stands though. And the fact that you can chose to deal lethal or non-lethal damage with your attacks actually adds to that. Imagine if that was true for real life. The number of involuntary manslaughter incidents would be pretty low, I believe, and the US police would have a much better reputation.

Not really, non-lethal damage in PF can still kill. Roll a crit on a level 1 NPC with 4 hp and an 8 con and you might very well kill him.


In 3.5 the rule is that, in general, creatures are as tall as their space.

3.5 DMG p29 wrote:
As a general rule, consider creatures to be as tall as their space, meaning that a creature can reach up a distance equal to its space plus its reach.


Brf, as stated, the Devs have already stated which is the correct interpretation. It is closest space on the line you select...not 'most direct line'.

The 'most direct line' interpretation leads to broken rules (such as making the Ride-by Attack feat unusable).

DeadJesterKelsier, dragonhunterq posted the relevant link. At the time of posting Sean K Reynolds was a rules Dev.


Both the Blue and Orange lines are legal.

There are two interpretations here.

First interpretation: Draw a line from the center of your square to the center of the target...move along that line. (This is your blue lines.)

Second interpretation: Draw a straight line in any direction that ends in a square where you can attack the target but does not move through a square that you can attack the target. (This is your both your blue and orange lines.)

The Devs have previously stated that the second interpretation is the correct one because the first interpretation leads to rules inconsistencies such as Ride-by attack not working.

Put another way...closest spot is closest spot along the (straight) line you choose. It is not 'the most direct line'.

The purpose of the rule is to prevent charges that attack the enemy after you have passed him (perhaps to get a flank attack or whatnot).


GM Rednal, it is easier than that. :)

You can select the images in a PDF by using the select tool. Copy then paste into Windows Paint and save.


Third Mind, it is pretty easy to pull images out of a PDF and drop them into Roll20. Sizing them is also pretty easy and should only take a minute or two. If you ever want me to show you how let me know.


Short version, RA is not designed for PCs to survive. It is an exercise in 'how far can you go between deaths'.

Rather than trying to change that, I suggest going in with a mindset of 'you will die, make it good'.

Out of curiosity, why is Roll20 too much upkeep? I find it to be rather easy to use and, if you aren't using some of the more advanced features, it is pretty low-prep. (I am talking about things like Dynamic Lighting and NPC/Monster character sheets, etc.)

I think the trap many people get into via Roll20 is that they want to use all the advanced features and then decide that Roll20 is too much work to prep the game when it is really the advanced features that are too much work.

I put all of RA's maps into Roll20 in a couple of hours. As for the NPC/monster prep..there is minimal prep there. I can either grab the images from the PDFs or I can grab them by searching through Roll20. Slap a health bar and nametag on it and call it good.


If your GM is really just annoyed about the Color Spray combo that is broken (for his campaign) then perhaps he should talk to the player about it rather than making up house rules to negate it.

If the GM and Player are both reasonable people they may be able to come up with a compromise.


You need far more than those two feats.

Archery feats: Point Blank Shot*, Precise Shot, Rapid Shot, Weapon Focus, Manyshot, Deadly Aim*, Clustered Shot, Improved Precise Shot, and Point Blank Master.
*indicates feat removed via the house rule you are using.

If you want to go for attacks of opportunity you can go with Combat Reflexes and the Snap Shot tree.

Then the non-archery feats you can take are:
Iron Will (your will save is bad), Toughness (hp is always good), Mobility (Dodge), and Shadow Strike (for your sneak attacks).


Player: I am going to cast a spell that gives me extra uses per day.
GM: Ok! You will get them when you next rest and wake up like normal.
Player: But, my spell won't last that long!
GM: Huh, well I guess it won't work then will it?

This is actually an old issue. It cropped up back in 3.X. Pathfinder fixed it with the changes they made to temporary ability scores but then they went back on that (via the FAQ).

But, back in 3.X it didn't work unless the increase lasted long enough to be useful.


Anonymous Warrior, the point here is not that you don't get the slots. It is that you cannot use them until you rest and regain your spell slots/uses per day.

Temporary ability score increases don't typically last long enough to do that.


Even if we went by the FAQ temporary ability score increases do not last long enough for you to rest and regain your uses/spells per day.

So any increase in uses/spells per day that you may gain doesn't help because you haven't rested.


Feegle, you do not 'begin casting Enlarge Person on a specific ally'. You begin casting it. The target is not chosen until the spell is cast.

You quoted the relevant rule "You do not have to select your target until you finish casting the spell."


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There are already a couple examples of this.

You can use hero points to get an extra action, spells or feats can give a BBEG hero points.

Alternately, a creature can be built with extra actions per turn. An example of such a creature is the Maharaja Rakshasa (Bestiary 3 p226).


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For me GMing is a means to an end. The end is to have fun with my friends.


Feats:
Level 1: feat for being level 1, can be any feat you qualify for
Level 1: bonus feat for being human, can be any feat you qualify for
Level 1: bonus feat for being a level 1 Monk, can only be taken from the Monk bonus feat list (Catch Off-Guard, Combat Reflexes, Deflect Arrows, Dodge, Improved Grapple, Scorpion Style, and Throw Anything).
Level 1: Improved Unarmed Strike for being a level 1 Monk
Level 1: Stunning Fist for being a level 1 Monk
Level 2: bonus feat for being a level 2 Monk, can only be taken from the Monk bonus feat list (Catch Off-Guard, Combat Reflexes, Deflect Arrows, Dodge, Improved Grapple, Scorpion Style, and Throw Anything)
Level 3: feat for being level 3, can be any feat you qualify for

That is a grand total of 7 feats with 2 of them decided for you and 5 you need to decide which feats you want.


Rednal, that is a misconception based on the following quote:

Rappan Athuk p7 wrote:
Rappan Athuk is a difficult dungeon. Even the upper dungeon levels should not be attempted by a party of less than six characters of 4th level. Only truly veteran players should attempt this dungeon with lower level characters. Parties delving deeper than the 1st or 2nd levels of the dungeon should be of 5th level or higher. Entering the dungeon through “The Well” (which leads to level 3A) is dangerous, best avoided by parties of less than 7th level.

Breaking it down:

6 characters and "upper dungeon levels" should be level 4+.

But, that still does not include all the outdoors or some of the very close to the surface dungeon levels which are less than level 4.

There are several dungeon levels which are less than Difficulty Level 4 (two are DL 1 and two are DL 3).

Summary: there is no hard and fast statement as to what level you should be doing Rappan Athuk at other than the Difficulty Level statement of each level. There are several areas that are quite suitable for level 1 groups in the main RA book (without additional content).


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This is right up there with everyone playing chaotic neutral (evil) characters and the calling it 'roleplay' when they act like jerks.

There is a basic premise at the gaming table. For whatever reason a party is going to be assembled comprising of the player's PCs.

If a PLAYER is unable to make a character concept that will fit into that then he should be playing a solo adventure (ie, not with a gaming group).

It sounds like you have a whole group of players that do not understand that the game is co-operative. The GM and the group as a whole needs to resolve this.


Well, as of last night my (level 10) group had another 2 deaths bringing them to a total of 27 deaths with three TPKs accounting for 16 of those deaths.

Page 1 of the obituaries is now full.


Why should the strength penalty apply? The rules are pretty clear here.


Bacondale wrote:
Gauss wrote:
CRB p136 Weapon Finesse wrote:
Benefit: With a light weapon, elven curve blade, rapier, whip, or spiked chain made for a creature of your size category, you may use your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier on attack rolls. If you carry a shield, its armor check penalty applies to your attack rolls.

IF it said 'bonus' instead of 'modifier' then yes, the Strength penalty would still apply to attack rolls.

In short, no, you do not apply your strength penalty to attack rolls using Weapon Finesse.

You still apply your strength modifier to damage.

The Unchained Rogue's 3rd level finesse training would use the DEX modifier and ignore any strength penalties for one weapon, correct?

Close, but not entirely accurate. The Unchained Rogue's Finesse Training uses the Dexterity modifier in place of the Strength modifier to damage (not just the Strength penalty) for one weapon.


CRB p136 Weapon Finesse wrote:
Benefit: With a light weapon, elven curve blade, rapier, whip, or spiked chain made for a creature of your size category, you may use your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier on attack rolls. If you carry a shield, its armor check penalty applies to your attack rolls.

IF it said 'bonus' instead of 'modifier' then yes, the Strength penalty would still apply to attack rolls.

In short, no, you do not apply your strength penalty to attack rolls using Weapon Finesse.

You still apply your strength modifier to damage.


Keep Watch doesn't work well because if you are attacked at night the spell is gone or must be cast again (losing a slot for the next day).


Buy wand, hand wand to spellcaster, have spellcaster cast it upon you. Alternately, buy wand, then UMD.


The first level spell Bed of Iron solves this problem.


CRB p91 wrote:
Accelerated Climbing: You try to climb more quickly than normal. By accepting a –5 penalty, you can move half your speed (instead of one-quarter your speed).
CRB p91 wrote:
Action: Climbing is part of movement, so it’s generally part of a move action (and may be combined with other types of movement in a move action). Each move action that includes any climbing requires a separate Climb check. Catching yourself or another falling character doesn’t take an action.

So, if you have a move speed of 30' your normal climb distance is 1/4 (7.5feet) per move action. By taking a -5penalty this increases to 1/2 distance (15feet) per move action.

However, a climb speed changes that.

CRB p91 wrote:
A creature with a climb speed has a +8 racial bonus on all Climb checks. The creature must make a Climb check to climb any wall or slope with a DC higher than 0, but it can always choose to take 10, even if rushed or threatened while climbing. If a creature with a climb speed chooses an accelerated climb (see above), it moves at double its climb speed (or at its land speed, whichever is slower) and makes a single Climb check at a –5 penalty. Such a creature retains its Dexterity bonus to Armor Class (if any) while climbing, and opponents get no special bonus to their attacks against it. It cannot, however, use the run action while climbing.

So if you have a climb speed of 15' and a move speed of 30' you have the following options (per move action).

A) normal climb: 15' per move action
B) Accelerated climb: 30' (double climb speed) per move action or 30' (it's land speed) whichever is slower.

So, in your example, if you use two move actions you can climb 60' in one round when using an accelerated climb.


Rule: Pathfinder doesn't generally deal with equipment space, only weight. There are no rules regarding how you carry a bag of holding.

Since there are no rules covering carrying a bag of holding (beyond weight) any discussion regarding how tables handle it is a non-rule discussion.


You can only select abilities that have a special ability equivalent bonus that is equal to or less than your Arcane Pool's enhancement bonus limit.

At level 5 you have a +2 bonus limit. You can only select abilities that are +1 or +2.

At level 9 that limit increases to +3 (Speed is now available).

At level 13 that limit increases to +4 (Dancing is now available).

At level 17 that limit increases to +5 (Vorpal is now available).

So, no you cannot select Dancing or Vorpal at level 5.


I agree with Jiggy, it is intended to be 'enhancement bonus is equivalent to this DR'.

Not 'special ability enhancement bonus equivalent is equivalent to this DR'.


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Aelryinth, a bag of holding in a bag of holding does not cause an explosion. It causes one to be non-functional.

Only when you mix a Bag of Holding with a Portable Hole are there dangerous consequences.

CRB p501 wrote:

Extradimensional Spaces

A number of spells and magic items utilize extradimensional spaces, such as rope trick, a bag of holding, a handy haversack, and a portable hole. These spells and magic items create a tiny pocket space that does not exist in any dimension. Such items do not function, however, inside another extradimensional space. If placed inside such a space, they cease to function until removed from the extradimensional space. For example, if a bag of holding is brought into a rope trick, the contents of the bag of holding become inaccessible until the bag of holding is taken outside the rope trick. The only exception to this is when a bag of holding and a portable hole interact, forming a rift to the Astral Plane, as noted in their descriptions.


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Yes, I know that is what we are discussing. That is what I am referencing too.

Bringing in a new/replacement character with an experience/level/wealth penalty is the same thing as such penalties for death.


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Reasons why most penalties for death are bad:

1) The "loss of level" penalty
At best, you now suck compared to your fellow party members.
At worst, enjoy standing in the back and twiddling your thumbs while you are unable to have a meaningful impact on the encounter.

2) The "loss of wealth" penalty
At best, you now suck compared to your fellow party members.
At worst, enjoy standing in the back and twiddling your thumbs while you are unable to have a meaningful impact on the encounter.

3) The "sit out and wait" a few sessions penalty
Why even show up? Why not go play another game? Isn't the purpose of this game to have fun with your friends? Seems pretty contradictory to that purpose.

3.X lessened many of the penalties for horrible things that happened to PCs and Pathfinder has (rightly) continued that trend by removing or further lessening many of the penalties that still existed.
Most of those penalties were a detriment to fun and resulted in a PC that was at best, a tag-along dead-weight character and at worst, a so unfun to play that you might as well suicide and make a new character.


Aroden's Spellbane, the ultimate anti-antimagic field spell. 100% guaranteed to work IF you can cast it (or get and cast a scroll of it) AND you can keep within the area of the antimagic field (which is dangerous).


Just a Mort,

These are the two relevant rules that were present in 3.5's Search skill that are not present in Pathfinder's Perception skill:

3.5 Players Handbook p81, Search Skill wrote:
Check: You generally must be within 10 feet of the object or surface to be searched. The table below gives DCs for typical tasks involving the Search skill.
Pathfinder Core Rulebook p102, Perception Skill wrote:

Check: Perception has a number of uses, the most common of which is an opposed check versus an opponent’s Stealth check to notice the opponent and avoid being surprised. If you are successful, you notice the opponent and can react accordingly. If you fail, your opponent can take a variety of actions, including sneaking past you and attacking you.

Perception is also used to notice fine details in the environment. The DC to notice such details varies depending upon distance, the environment, and how noticeable the detail is. The following table gives a number of guidelines.

The 10' distance limit is not present in Pathfinder.

3.5 Players Handbook p81, Search Skill wrote:
Action: It takes a full round action to search a 5-foot-by-5-foot area or a volume of goods 5 feet on a side.
Pathfinder Core Rulebook p102, Perception Skill wrote:
Action: Most Perception checks are reactive, made in response to observable stimulus. Intentionally searching for stimulus is a move action.

Instead of a Full-round action now it is a move action and there is no 5'5 area limit.

The result of this is that finding traps is a lot easier and takes less time (both in game and out of game). Back in 3.5 searching was tedious and was often hand-waived.


There appears to be a couple of misconceptions regarding searching for traps.

1) Taking 10 to search for traps takes 1 move action. It does not take ANY extra time.

2) Searching for traps is not per square.
It is one check and that result is compared to the DC for any traps within line of sight, taking into account the DC modifier of +1 per 10 feet.

The rule that made it per square was removed in the port from 3.5 to Pathfinder when Search, Spot, and Listen were merged into Perception. Additionally the action required was reduced from full-round to move action.


Holy Deja Vu Batman! Didn't this exact topic come up less than 2 months ago?


Personally, I think it doesn't go against the intent of the Decoy Ring.
The intent is to confuse the enemy so as to prevent them from knowing your true direction.

Whether you are doing it because you are threatened or not doesn't seem really relevant to "I am creating illusory doubles who move in different directions".

Earlier you compared it to the Ring of Invisibility citing that it would be a cheap version of the ring. I disagree with that.

Ring of Invisibility lasts for 3 minutes, not 3 rounds. It doesn't come with 4 illusory doubles telling the enemy 'someone is here!'.

It has one basic use, to confuse the enemy of your true location while moving around. Frankly, it is rather expensive for just that one use.

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