What do Dwarves eat underground?


Pathfinder First Edition General Discussion

51 to 98 of 98 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>

Gilfalas wrote:
the David wrote:

I've seen beer being mentioned a couple of times, but that would be virtually impossible. It does raise the question: What did the dwarves drink before the quest for sky?

There's gotta be some rancid fermented liquid we can come up with, right? Maybe something like rotgut? Huh, how do the orcs make rotgut anyway?

Since where there is dwarves there is magic, underground farms are very possible. While these dwarves may not trade with the surface they may very well trade with other under ground species and have been able to aquire even surface foodstuffs or seeds that way.

But you can ferment nearly anything so they will have SOME sort of booze. Hell I once had mead made of fermented black tea.

Or there may be as many types of 'deep' grains, sheep, cows and pigs, etc. as surface versions.

Not to mention mushrooms and perhaps a species of fast growing fungus that can be used like Tofu to make nearly anything else.

Vodka, like most alcohol is made from grains but can be made from potatoes which are a type of tuber. There are tuber plants that dont need much in the way of sunlight. So litteraly Roots, moss/lichen, fungus, bugs, and traded foods.


Moles, worms, sightless fish, mushrooms, assorted other fungi and endive, lots and lots of endive...


OMG I completely forgot roots! So when we think of dwarf halls a lot of us think of Lord of the Rings and enormous stone vaults. I personally forgot the fact that a lot of those halls start as caves and a lot of caves are earthen with roots growing down into them.

You could have the dwarves subsisting on roots and tubers cultivated from the plants growing above. Carrots, onions, potatoes, maybe ginger or licorice (is that a root?), its just that the dwarves pull them down instead of digging them up.

As for protein there's tons of options mentioned throughout this thread. Everything from insects and crawfish to goats and pigs. I like goats personally because 1. goats do well in the mountains, 2. their milk can produce additional products.

Between magic, fantastic edibles, and the RL animals, plants and fungi native to such environments it looks like you've got plenty to go on.


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Player: What do dwarves even eat underground anyways?
Game Master: Dwarves are tough, and so eat tough stuff. Lichen. They eat lichen.
Player: Lycan?

I SO want to get a t-shirt with those words and a picture of a dwarf eating a werewolf on it now.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Lichenthrope


In my homebrew setting, I decided to largely throw out a lot of the actual laws of physics to answer questions like this. Plants which live above ground absorb light to grow. Plants which live below ground instead absorb darkness. This explains the caverns full of glowing 'fungus' which form the basis of the entire underground ecosystem. My dwarves have giant farms and decorative gardens full of the stuff, as well as patches of glowing moss scattered around their tunnels for illumination.

Silver Crusade

There really is no issue here. There are lots of ways to produce light magically (level 0 cleric spell, so it can go on forever). Light produces photons, and even if the photons are a different wavelength (680 and 720 nm) than those utilized by above ground plants, evolution would take care of that easily with selective breeding. There is plenty of water below ground and lots of soil for nutrients and minerals. Animals are down there breathing so you have the CO2 needed for the building block of biochemical molecules. This now allows any type of primary producer you want and then it just getting the various levels of primary consumers. The entire food web is just based on a single level zero spell.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Ironbloom mushrooms are a setting-canon example of dwarf food.

Quote:
These stunty fungi only grow in dark places thick with metal. The diets of Five Kings Mountains dwarves consist heavily of ironbloom mushrooms, mainly because the plants grow naturally in and around dwarven forges. Protein-rich ironbloom mushrooms bear a slight salty taste but otherwise contain no flavor of their own, making them excellent additions to many dwarven meals.

Grand Lodge

Hill Giant wrote:
Lichenthrope

Can some please stay this up using the monster creation rules?

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 16

kevin_video wrote:
Hill Giant wrote:
Lichenthrope
Can some please stay this up using the monster creation rules?

Make sure to add the flavor text of 'Favored culinary item of Dwarven gourmets.'

==Aelryinth


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Subway sandwiches.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'd have staples include eels and fish and crayfish that spawn in underground lakes along with bats and largish centipedes (which shouldn't be any 'grosser' than shrimp or lobster, which are basically just aquatic scavenger bugs).

The primary 'vegetation' would be mushrooms, but, assuming a fantasy 'underdark' sort of deal, with a thriving ecosystem of it's own, and strange 'underdark radiations,' there logically should be some sort of life that thrives on those energies. Just as thermophilic life exists here on earth, adapted to use energy sources other than sunlight, there should be living creatures in the darklands that feed off of the radiation and energy given off by strange rock formations. That life could be a kind of fungus, a crawling vine or even tiny brine creatures in deep lightless waters that swarm around crumbling aboleth constructions, wearing away the stone over centuries to feast on the lingering magics in these aeon's old constructs. Whether manaphilic, thermophilic, feeding on energies coming across planar rifts to the plane of fire, or actually devouring 'hard' radiation from pitchblend ore deposits, there are plenty of 'energy sources' that could sustain an ecosystem (in lieu of a sun) in the fantasy underground.

(The existence of D&D critters like brown mold, which reproduces when exposed to heat, or disenchanters, which 'feed' off of magic, provides precedent for these sorts of things. If a disenchanter can do it, certainly some tiny aquatic life can share that feature, and feed off of magical locations or items that have sunk below the waves, or deep into the earth, creating the necessary first link in a vast underground ecosystem, all powered by those ancient aboleth ruins and their decaying magical wards.)

And then there's nutrients that come in from above ground, through water seepage, or the actions of bats or insects that forage / feed above ground and then deposit their nutrient-packed waste in the darklands.

For dwarves who also have holdings above ground, goat and sheep (descended from local mountain goat strains) would be the biggest meat staple, along with rarer chicken, beef and pork.

Stuff everybody tends to associate with dwarves, beer and cheese and beef, would be the stuff they eat like crazy when they are visiting lowland race communities, not because 'that's what dwarves eat,' but because those are the sorts of foods that dwarves can't get at home, having no fields to grow hops or barley, or raise herds of cattle.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Soylent Beard.

Dark Archive

RJGrady wrote:
Subway sandwiches.

I hate you so much, but I can't help but laugh.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm not really found of "weird underground dwarves" being the default type. In Krynn, they eat a lot of fungus. Duergar, sure, they'll be eating some blind fish and stuff. But to me, standard dwarves should have aboveground holdings, including fields and pastures, and their wealth should be sufficient to procure other foods. Do you seriously imagine dwarves letting other folk live on top of their claimed mountains, without charging a rent? I can't imagine they wouldn't make any use of the land they own.

Scarab Sages

I'd have to agree that the dwarven diet would feature a lot of mushrooms as they do not require much light to grow. In Golarion dwarven priests of Torag have access to a spell called Ironbloom Sprouts which basically is the dwarven version of the Goodberry spell (except they're rock hard brussel sprouts "for real men").


Set wrote:

{. . .}

(The existence of D&D critters like brown mold, which reproduces when exposed to heat, or disenchanters, which 'feed' off of magic, provides precedent for these sorts of things. If a disenchanter can do it, certainly some tiny aquatic life can share that feature, and feed off of magical locations or items that have sunk below the waves, or deep into the earth, creating the necessary first link in a vast underground ecosystem, all powered by those ancient aboleth ruins and their decaying magical wards.)

For that matter, microorganisms ought to be able to make use of magic, whether as an energy source or for performing actions that microorganisms not so equipped would not be able to perform (like get into and out of sealed containers -- if you want a mold that eats gunpowder to limit firearm use, this is a way to ensure that it gets into and out of where it needs to). Then other things could eat the microorganisms, and so on up the food chain.

Set wrote:
And then there's nutrients that come in from above ground, through water seepage, or the actions of bats or insects that forage / feed above ground and then deposit their nutrient-packed waste in the darklands. {. . .}

So the mushrooms are fed by bat poo . . . actually manure is a valid substrate for growing mushrooms, although by far not the only one (hard to tell from the rest of the article, but it doesn't even seem to be the most common one, despite a certain mushroom-farm-inspired idiom about lack of transparency that was popular in the 1980s).


2 people marked this as a favorite.

If you want some great ideas try reading this.

It's only one chapter so far but it's started off brilliantly.

Ultimately you can have a cuisine as variable and interesting as you like. Simply look at places in our non-fantasy world and figure out how to eat those things that never see the light. Then simply look at this list and cook it!!

Mold snail soup seasoned with salt with a side of 6 fat fried bat wings!

Dire bat surprise! The surprise is that it's stuffed with shredded cave fisher meat.

Braised violet fungus served with blackened dark mantle meatballs over fungus noodles!

And don't forget the centipede kebabs!

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Assuming little to no trade (such as before the Quest for Sky) While you can't make alcohol from mushrooms (not enough carbs) apparently some mushrooms will break down sugar into alcohol just like yeast does.

pubmed article

Lichens and mosses probably don't contain many carbs either though might be used as flavoring. There might be some fruit underground (using smell to attract insects) or maybe they drink fermented milk of animals.

Mushroom-fermented mole milk, anyone?


There is a flowering nettle plant that lives in near complete darkness in caves. There's also a long-established love of glowing molds, lichen and fungus in fantasy RPGs. This wouldn't even take spells.

1. the nettles (or other plants you want to make up; underground chicory, cattails, flax, etc) adapted to living underground before this area was completely sealed off, hundreds of thousands of years ago

2. The flowers attract insects; the poisonous nettles kill them

3. The soil fertilizes from dead matter; this also feeds glowing mold

4. the area collapses; no sunlight but the mold still thrives

5. the nettles adapt once more, growing from the light of the mold

So fast forward a few millennia, the dwarves have learned to cultivate gardens of mold, nettles and such. They have bred some version of the plant that is edible and use it as both their own forage and slop for underground herds such as the OP's "deep goats".

You could even have a few different varieties of subterranean plants, one of which is a grain like the above-mentioned flax. These, plus underground-adapted hops have been mashed and turned into beer because, in the absence of armies of folks casting Purify Food and Drink or constantly filtering water the dwarves get just as much hydration drinking thin beer as they do fresh water.

So you've got underground agriculture, horticulture and animal husbandry, all without having to rely SOLELY on magic. Add in all the other stuff above: edible mushrooms, insects, fishing in the underground waters, bats and vermin, etc. and you've got TONS of food sources for completely underground dwarves.

To the OP: why don't the dwarves have access to the surface? Do they have lots of access to magic? If so what kinds? Without sunlight for a long time, are they really just variant duergar?


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Also Tark I like where you're going with your stuff. Some other ideas:

Deep fried mushrooms on a bed of nettle leaves with roast mutton in a mustard sauce

Brine-boiled mutton served "corned" with boiled beets and cabbage; on the side is a stout-mustard sauce

A chilled plate of goat cheese, nettleberries and carrots

Peppered goat meat sliced thin and fried in goat butter and oil, then served with a smear of jellied shrieker and nettleberry preserves on flaxenbread and served with a sweet molasses-mead

(notes: molasses is tapped from tree roots growing down into the caves - it's fantasy, run with it; shrieker is the "jalepeno" of the fungus world; one bite and you're screaming! Muy Caliente!)

Boiled flax-and-nettle-leaf noodles, in a sour beer soup with carrots, onions, and crawfish, then seasoned with ground pepper and ginger; garnished with fresh, edible glowmold. Best eaten while still luminous, this dish is referred to as Torag's Beard Soup

Fresh blind flathead baked with sprigs of orange lichen that bear a slightly citrus flavor, then served with flax crackers and sweetened goat's butter

Mushroom pancakes (ground flax flour, diced honeydew mushroom caps) served with molasses and sweetened goat's butter; mutton sausages and cave lizard eggs on the side

Bitter lichens, nettle leaves, carrots, diced mushrooms, onions and pickled ginger tossed with an oil and nettleberry-vinegar reduction, and finally garnished with flax seeds. This is served as a pallet-cleanser in small portions with thin flax beer in a bowl

Boiled bats head soup garnished with radish, nettle leaves, carrots and onions with a hearty potato bread and flaxen stout


1 person marked this as a favorite.

You guys...expand your imaginations here.

Fungi? Fungi would require organic matter to decompose and where would that come from? No, mushrooms couldn't be the staple crop of the dwarves in the underdark.

Lichen and moss? Nah.

Even a few kilometers into the earth's crust, the temperatures become sweltering. At 7.5 miles down, the temperatures reach 356 degrees Fahrenheit.

So the underdark's ecosystem would be supported by some new types of organisms that use geothermal energy. Google hydrothermal vents for some inspiration.

Dwarves are snacking on non-aquatic tube worms.

Sovereign Court

1 person marked this as a favorite.
JJ Jordan wrote:

You guys...expand your imaginations here.

Fungi? Fungi would require organic matter to decompose and where would that come from? No, mushrooms couldn't be the staple crop of the dwarves in the underdark.

So - since you are what you eat - is that why dwarves are all such fun guys?


Taking a more non-magical approach, Dwarves could use hydroponics to grow the crops they want underground, and breed those crops to have a day/night cycle shorter than 24 hours and need very little or no soil, like gift-shop desert plants you hang on a wall. There's also the strategic advantage of farming in a secure vault that plays into the Dwarven notion of building something to last many generations. It would also explain why they don't have many surface farms--they adapted their preferred crops to thrive underground. Just throw in creative uses of light spells/enchantments.

Unpacking the idea a little, you could have Dwarven halls where the surfaces are covered in plants and are more comparable to a Druid's wet dream than a turn of the century factory.

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 16

The underdark in PF goes down many, many miles.

I'm guessing some of that geothermal heat powers the prison of Rovagug, eh?

==Aelryinth


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Charon's Little Helper wrote:
JJ Jordan wrote:

You guys...expand your imaginations here.

Fungi? Fungi would require organic matter to decompose and where would that come from? No, mushrooms couldn't be the staple crop of the dwarves in the underdark.

So - since you are what you eat - is that why dwarves are all such fun guys?

*pinches thumb and forefinger close together*

You were this close to making me burst out in a guffaw at my work place. Thanks.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Elves. Explains the true source of the centuries long antipathy.


The OP said nothing about the Underdark. He also didn't mention the dwarves being "miles underground." I'm putting my version of these dwarves 20' below the surface and going down from there.

They merely need to have "no access to the surface" per the OP. Fine; the dwarves refuse to breach the surface because reasons. That still doesn't mean they can't

1. live really close to the surface
2. utilize resources such as roots growing down through the roof or walls of their caves
3. have fantasy-type things like glowmold and such


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Plump helmets, cave wheat, sweet pods, and quarry bushes.


Korlos wrote:
Plump helmets, cave wheat, sweet pods, and quarry bushes.

Kittens.


Mark Hoover wrote:

The OP said nothing about the Underdark. He also didn't mention the dwarves being "miles underground." I'm putting my version of these dwarves 20' below the surface and going down from there.

They merely need to have "no access to the surface" per the OP. Fine; the dwarves refuse to breach the surface because reasons. That still doesn't mean they can't

1. live really close to the surface
2. utilize resources such as roots growing down through the roof or walls of their caves
3. have fantasy-type things like glowmold and such

Your dwarven menus are George RR Martin-esque quality awesome. I'm hungry reading it.

That said, if you can assume the OPs dwarves are 20' below ground, I can assume they are miles below ground. Both of us can be wrong or right. It's all up to the OPs version of dwarves.

Charon's Little Helper wrote:
JJ Jordan wrote:

You guys...expand your imaginations here.

Fungi? Fungi would require organic matter to decompose and where would that come from? No, mushrooms couldn't be the staple crop of the dwarves in the underdark.

So - since you are what you eat - is that why dwarves are all such fun guys?

I...just...ahhhhh!


Haggis.

Liberty's Edge

I tend to imagine that D&D being a fantasy world full of magic and wonder does have an ecosystem underground that can support life and according to how many races live below a large amount of it.

Just a casual look at a typical bestiary gives us a large selection of creatures who prefer to dwell underground. Creatures hunt kill ect.. and leave lots of matter for mushrooms to thrive on. You can make the underground food chain as magic or mundane as you like. Going mundane just means you may have to toss in "alien" (to us earthlings) naturally occurring lifeforms that make the ecosystem possible.

Mushrooms of all shape, size and kind. Herbivores (Fungivores ?) that can go for very long times without eating. Maybe some lifeforms that have symbiosis or parasites that are part of an alien ecosystem that works unlike anything surface races understand. Like some kind of large slow moving silicon based worm thing that eats everything in its path but only digests rock and poops out mineral rich, fertilized loamy soil witch in turn becomes home to the spores of a mushroom that lives in its stomach who got there because a "rock worm" ate them in its slow mindless devouring of things and pooping out of grade a soil that had been laced with their spores by another "rock worm".

Underground realms are an awesome opportunity to get alien and weird when designing especially the ecosystem. Just take a look at a bestiary and then fill in the blanks with what ever fantasy fun you can think up I say.

Grand Lodge

In Dragonlance, dwarven fungi liquor was the strongest spirit drink in the world.
I suppose clerical magic can provide for some.
Too much lichens and rothe is the reason many dwarfs love halfling cuisine!

Also there are always other dwarfs to eat...

Dark Archive

Rothe still rub me the wrong way, after the Menzoberranzan boxed set had the tens of thousands of Drow of the city live off of the meat of a 'herd' of Rothe that lived on an island *25 feet across.*

Not even my suspension of disbelief could go that far without turning into Galloping Gertie. :)


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The dwarves have a spell component pouch, which contains infinite food.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Thanks everyone for all the ideas, this has been great!

I especially like the concept of fish from underground streams, as it seems highly plausible, as well as plant life that flourishes in darkness.

Some posters asked for a little more detail about the scenario: the PCs are a party that visited a stand-alone dwarven outpost (Varisia/Crystalheart), and while they were there, a dragon caved in the mountain, and set up a lair on the top. The PCs now have to visit each of the warring dwarven clans under the mountain, find the axe of the dwarven lords that their last king carried, reunite them and take back the only exit to the sky.

In this scenario, the dwarves could have used stockpiled food from the surface, but I can't see any dwarven city making itself solely dependent on food from the surface, otherwise they'd be easily sieged. It's something that could have easily been hand-waved with magic or similar, but a little plausible detail goes a long way towards selling a story.

Thanks again for all the suggestions!


Deep pan? ;)

Seriously neeps and tatties would likely be a staple... Surely earthworms would also be on the menu in some shape or wriggling form?

Slimy yet satisfying!


A most excellent thread if I have ever seen one!


Some have noted how mushrooms have no carbs to make alcohol out of. This is true. It is also true that surface dwarfs are an aberration and deep dwelling duegar are in fact their natural state. The difference being? Surface dwarfs have access to alcohol and duegar do not. In other words, duegar are, horror of horrors, sober dwarfs.

How about life that feeds off of natural nuclear fission reactors underground?


Drow

Liberty's Edge

My Take..... They Use Magical Lights to Grow Above ground crops.

Seriously though..I doubt there is a Subterranean Culture which does not trade with "above Cultures" or Steal from Them....

Sczarni

Also, Golarion is just one part of the multiplanar cosmology. The dwarves may not have access to the surface, but they probably have access to the First World or the Shadow Plane, and thus can hunt or gather anything they can bring through a portal. Naturally-occurring subterranean portals are probably a thing, and support dwarven populations in much the way river mouths full of fish support coastal settlements.

Also, if magic exists, then "magical energy" is probably a natural phenomenon, like magnetism or the strong nuclear force, and there are probably organisms that can feed off of it. Arcanosynthesis instead of photosynthesis?

It also helps that Golarion is a world with active interventionist deities. I doubt Torag is going to let his most faithful worshipers starve to death. It also handily explains where they get beer-- their priests turn water into it.

Dark Archive

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Silent Saturn wrote:
Also, if magic exists, then "magical energy" is probably a natural phenomenon, like magnetism or the strong nuclear force, and there are probably organisms that can feed off of it. Arcanosynthesis instead of photosynthesis?

Mentioned above, and definitely a possibility. The Underdark of Greyhawk / the Realms had 'mysterious underdark radiation' that helped empower those decaying Drow magic armor/weapons/cloaks/boots, and presumably could be tapped into by some sort of smaller life-form, such as a form of fungus, or specialized insects / crustaceans in the underdark seas, which would serve as the bottom of the local food-chain, turning that 'underdark radiation' into tasty protein.

In Golarion, actual radiation (such as from a fallen spaceship...), in addition to unnatural / supernatural radiations (such as from feverstone or lazurite or just Rovagug's prison) could be metabolized by *something,* and form the basis of such a food chain. (Golarion even has a sort of precedent, with Purple Worms being attracted to energy sources within the earth and eating them up, and possibly being changed in the process.)

And there's always the possibility of chemosynthesis, such as deep sea tube worms and whatnot, or even some sort of thermosynthesis, such as brown mold, mysteriously able to turn heat into great quantities of organic life. A less hazardous version of brown mold could thrive near underground lava flows, and serve as the bottom of a local food chain of cave crickets and bats and whatever, which are in turn harvested / farmed by local duergar or derro or svirfnibbleflibbertigibbets.

'Mysterious Underdark Radiation' in Golarion, being the taint/energy leaking from Rovagug's prison is particularly funky, since it's pretty darn dark stuff. "Yes, we've all grown up eating food from a food chain that metabolizes pure hate into fungus, bugs, etc. Perhaps now you understand why so few of the races living in the dark lands are particularly *nice.*" (And why Torag sent the dwarven people a vision telling them to get the hell out of there!)


zen.cat wrote:

So, I'm running a campaign which takes place mostly underground, and the PCs are spending a lot of time with Dwarves who have never traded with the surface.

So what do Dwarves eat without access to the surface? Clearly they survived on Golarion for some time without access. An obvious one is mushroom dishes, and the occasional game meat like displacer beast, but for any large settlement, there would likely have to be some kind of semi-farmed animal.

My current fix is the invention of the 'deep goat', a variant underground goat with a black hide and darkvision. My argument to the players is that deep goats are clearly only omitted from the bestiaries due to space restrictions.

I could use some other suggestions as to what other foods underground races might eat, otherwise I'll have to go with displacer chickens, dark pigs, etc.

i really like the goat idea

Might throw in some insects, mushroom, albino fish, and moss.

Green moss tea, is kind of good, if you make sure to wash out the dirt.

As for drink, goat milk, teas, and molds can all be fermented in one shape or from, to make for some good drink.


While not exactly related to WHAT they would eat, I would think that underground-dwelling dwarves would also pay a good price for Pallid Crystals ("You can eat spoiled food and drink spoiled liquid as if it were fresh and wholesome, tasting as good as it did before it spoiled. Any person with the Profession (cook) skill can use the crystal to season a meal with the flavor of salt, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, or pepper (or the equivalent spices for the undead palate — fear’s breath, nightfog, bloodroot, thileu bark, or hatefinger).") and magic items that can duplicate (or the services of those who can cast) Prestidigitation ("It can color, clean, or soil items in a 1-foot cube each round. It can chill, warm, or flavor 1 pound of nonliving material." Examples of items that can duplicate it: any variant of Cloak of the Hedge Wizard, Apprentice's Cheating Gloves). You could probably be the richest person in Dwarf-burg if you were a spellcasting cook with Craft Wondrous Item.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Movile Cave in real life is a cave system that was sealed off for millions of years and yet had a thriving ecosystem.

The ecosystem didn't have a photosynthetic basis but a chemosynthetic one. Bacteria reproduced and thrived on certain abundant chemicals and various molds fed on the bacteria and herbivores fed on the mold and carnivores fed the herbivores.

Also like 80% reduced oxygen content.

Movile Cave actually has well over 100 unique species of invertebrates as well like spiders who still build webs despite the lack of flying insects in order to catch springtails mid jump.

Anyways my point is you don't need light, natural or magical, in order to have a stable ecosystem. LIFE FINDS A WAY


Of completely subterranean races like Drow, all the above suggests best fit, but in my experience, most Dwarven communities are not that far from the surface, almost always maintaining communities and farms operated by surface dwelling dwarves and with non-dwarven communities on friendly terms with dwarves that grow crops and keep livestock, then cart them or carry them below. I would think at least half of all the food consumed by dwarves is grown on the surface and carried down to them. If paid in precious metals and gemstones, I'd think such a venture would be very lucrative for dwarven friendly surface communities.

As far as farming beneath the surface goes, I'd think dwarves would fill entire caverns with cultured fungi and mushrooms, and other entire caverns made into "grazing" area for some underground livestock whether that is rothe cattle, underground lizards or some other underground dwelling and edible lifeform. In some cases, smaller livestock beasts could be kept like rabbit cages on a farm. Caged animals are cared and fed until ready for slaughter. Undoubtably fish and crustaceans from underground rivers, lakes and seas would probably also be a major foodsource for subterranean socieites, dwarves included.

While its certainly true that real world cavern systems are ecologically sound places where life exists, though is still largely devoid of life, so a fantasy underground system would have to unrealistically contain more life to make underground living practical - but that should be perfectly acceptable in a fantasy underground setting.

51 to 98 of 98 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder First Edition / General Discussion / What do Dwarves eat underground? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.