OK I know I'm being stupid but... Some slang I don't understand


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Funky Badger wrote:
Kryzbyn wrote:
The difference being you know what a tank is. You know what dps is. You know what a mob is. These aren't made up terms from thin air like your examples.
They're still dreadful terms. But good pointers...

Why are they dreadful terms?

Dark Archive

I'm not fond of 'DPS' as regards to tabletop gaming, because 'DPR' is more accurate. And the DPR threads are intriguing, because they highlight some interesting rules permutations and synergies, and some places where classes assumed to be 'just fine' are either underperforming or overperforming. It's useful stuff that reveals some combinations I might want to watch out for as a GM, and some playstyle assumptions that I might want to discourage from players who might have a frustrating or disappointing play experience because they didn't realize how ineffective they were.

Other than that, I don't find that sort of slang any more 'offensive' than I did Thac0.

Gaming niche slang is gaming niche slang. It's all just part of the 'professional jargon' of our funky little sub-culture.

The sort of 'gaming slang' that does drive me up a wall is when the same word refers to a bunch of different things, and sometimes causes confusion (like the words 'level' or 'divine').

Also words being used completely wrong, such as making something sacred to an evil god being called 'desecrate' or an 'evil' sacred bonus being called a 'profane' bonus, and therefore, hilariously, being stackable with the sacred bonus, while sacred bonuses aren't sacred with each other. Improper use of language leading to thematic or mechanical game design fails is just silly.


A round is measured in seconds, so, yeah.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Pathfinder Accessories, Rulebook Subscriber
Kryzbyn wrote:

A round is measured in seconds, so, yeah.

But EVERYBODY forgets to divide by 6(or 10) when calculating DPS for TTRPGs!


5 for RuneQuest (at least the Mongoose version, not sure about other applications of Basic Roleplaying).
3.2 (or something like that) for Cyberpunk.
~3 for most World Of Darkness games.
Between 3 to 10 for Legend Of Five Rings (4th edition) or ~10 (3rd edition).
No division for GURPS.


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blackbloodtroll wrote:

DM answers: "What are you talking about? I need you to use terminology I can understand."

I decide to be defensive "Um, I can call it anything I like, English is totally a living language man. Stop nerdragehating me, just because I play Shmorgen."

...

Now, is the DM here really all that bad, or was I at fault?

So, why would you need to get defensive about it, rather than just explain what some of the terms mean? Why can the DM not make an effort to recognize those terms when the player says them?

Your example is a bit over the top, in my opinion, but I get your point. Still, how about:

Player: "I statted up a toon for ranged DPS."

GM: (hasn't heard of toon or DPS) "Uh, what?"

Player: "Sorry, more or less similar terminology from another game. Toon is what you generally call your character, DPS stands for Damage per Second. So, I've got a character who mostly uses ranged stuff for killing enemies fast."

GM: "Oh, okay. Sounds good. Just so you know, we usually use PC to refer to characters if you want to shorten it."

Later, when the player makes mention of toons or DPS, the GM can either ask again, if he's forgotten what they mean, or he'll remember and not be fazed by the term. The player, meanwhile, can use the term PC if he remembers, and if they say toon, they can be reminded that PC is more appropriate.

Notice how much smoother that scenario flows, rather than having the player flip out and leave the game?

I suppose any situation can become argumentative if someone's first response to an innocuous statement is "I can do whatever I want, you're just being a jerk." That's a pretty quick downward spiral.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

That's exactly my point.

The "learn my lingo, or go f*ck yourself" position is silly.

Sovereign Court

Kryzbyn wrote:
The difference being you know what a tank is. You know what dps is. You know what a mob is. These aren't made up terms from thin air like your examples.

I had to ask people on this very site to understand 'tank'. The usage I was given is one I find pretty counter-intuitive as well.

dps? I'm guessing that is linked to dpr, but I have no idea what the 's' stands for, and I've only heard of DPR from these boards; I wouldn't really call dpr normal PF slang in the way that AC is, it's message-board optimisation slang.

mob? no idea.

I've been playing for about 18 years, if someone dropped those terms at my table the first would surprise me (and lead me to want to talk to that person about how PF might not have the same expected character roles as the video game they play); the second I would have to ask for a clarification; the third would completely throw me off (unless it is a term which is obvious in context).

Anyone want to explain dps and mob?


blackbloodtroll wrote:
The "learn my lingo, or go f*ck yourself" position is silly.

yeah man on this you and I totally agree


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blackbloodtroll wrote:

That's exactly my point.

The "learn my lingo, or go f*ck yourself" position is silly.

Certainly, I agree on that.

But it applies in both directions. If you can't stand when someone uses the term Toon, and require that they say PC instead, you are adopting that exact position, not them.

GeraintElberion wrote:
Anyone want to explain dps and mob?

DPS = Damage per Second (as opposed to Damage per Round, as used on these boards)

Mob = Enemy (singular, not plural, and according to Wikipedia, shortened from 'Mobile.')

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Thing is, not everyone at the table will be into the same hobbies.

If everyone is using different lingo, from different hobbies, then things can get quite confusing.

Simply asking everyone to leave their unaffiliated lingo out, for cohesion purposes, is not some sort of horrible act.

It's the sort of forcible insertion that bothers me.

Even when already familiar with established affiliated lingo, some choose to use unaffiliated lingo, almost in spite.

They don't care if you are not familiar, or that it bothers you, they just mock you, and complain that it is all the same in their eyes, and you are stupid to not see it the same way.

This indeed, bothers me.


If they're doing it out of spite, don't care if it bothers you, and are instead mocking you and calling you stupid about it, I think the problem is not the terminology they're using, but the person.

What you're describing is a very different situation, and seems to have little to do with lingo except as a tool for being a jerk. Quite a bit different than just using the term because its what the person is more familiar with.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

I suppose I have my view eschewed by bad experience.

To put it simply, asking someone to refrain from using certain lingo does not mean the person asking is a bad person.


blackbloodtroll wrote:

I suppose I have my view eschewed by bad experience.

To put it simply, asking someone to refrain from using certain lingo does not mean the person asking is a bad person.

This statement is true.

Refering to it as 'bad behavior' is kinda over the top, though.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

I suppose context is the factor in defining it as "bad behavior".


No, don't see how using those terms would ever be considered bad behavior. A waste of time at your table, maybe, but not bad behavior.

Sovereign Court

Kryzbyn wrote:
No, don't see how using those terms would ever be considered bad behavior. A waste of time at your table, maybe, but not bad behavior.

Rudeness = bad behaviour.

Deliberately excluding others = rude.

Two people at a table using slang others don't understand = (either deliberately or ignorantly) excluding others.

Even if it is born from ignorance, failing to consider the impact you will have on others around you is still rude. Especially if you are asked to refrain but continue.

---

Thanks for the translation. 'Mobs' is really counter-intuitive to me.


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GeraintElberion wrote:
Thanks for the translation. 'Mobs' is really counter-intuitive to me.

Because it is strictly computer game term referring to game code. There is absolutely no excuse to use it during table top game.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Drejk wrote:
GeraintElberion wrote:
Thanks for the translation. 'Mobs' is really counter-intuitive to me.
Because it is strictly computer game term referring to game code. There is absolutely no excuse to use it during table top game.

According to some, having that opinion makes you a horrible, stupid, ignorant neckbeard t&@#, who only comes out of your cave to pretentiously declare your hobbies superior to all others.

So watch out!


blackbloodtroll wrote:
Drejk wrote:
GeraintElberion wrote:
Thanks for the translation. 'Mobs' is really counter-intuitive to me.
Because it is strictly computer game term referring to game code. There is absolutely no excuse to use it during table top game.
According to some, having that opinion makes you a horrible, stupid, ignorant neckbeard t!~+, who only comes out of your cave to pretentiously declare your hobbies superior to all others.

Why would I bother with doing that? I would have to waste time that I could spend actually playing to state the obvious?


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Kryzbyn wrote:
No, don't see how using those terms would ever be considered bad behavior. A waste of time at your table, maybe, but not bad behavior.

I agree. They're just words people. Get over yourselves.


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GeraintElberion wrote:
Kryzbyn wrote:
No, don't see how using those terms would ever be considered bad behavior. A waste of time at your table, maybe, but not bad behavior.

Rudeness = bad behaviour.

Deliberately excluding others = rude.

Two people at a table using slang others don't understand = (either deliberately or ignorantly) excluding others.

Even if it is born from ignorance, failing to consider the impact you will have on others around you is still rude. Especially if you are asked to refrain but continue.

---

Thanks for the translation. 'Mobs' is really counter-intuitive to me.

Using those terms and refusing to define them would be rude and exclusive.

Merely using them is not.

For Pete's sake, did someone hold you guys down as kids and make you listen to pig Latin before you understood it or something?
This reaction is over the top.

AND Meatrace agrees. With me. That is EPIC.


blackbloodtroll wrote:
Drejk wrote:
GeraintElberion wrote:
Thanks for the translation. 'Mobs' is really counter-intuitive to me.
Because it is strictly computer game term referring to game code. There is absolutely no excuse to use it during table top game.

According to some, having that opinion makes you a horrible, stupid, ignorant neckbeard t&~#, who only comes out of your cave to pretentiously declare your hobbies superior to all others.

So watch out!

Now this statement right here is the problem. You are adopting the "use my lingo or get the f@#$ out" mentality. Aside from your ridiculous example earlier you have only given examples of terms which you know but dislike when people use at your table. Here's an over the top example forr you:

Player: "Dang, my toon died, guess I'll roll a new one."

GM:"YOUR WHAT?!?!?!!??"

Player: "My toon? You know, the character I'm playing."

GM:"I KNOW WHAT A TOON IS!!!! THAT TERM IS UNACCEPTABLE AT MY TABLE!!! YOU EITHER USE PC OR CHARACTER OR YOU CAN GET THE F#$% OUT OF MY GAME!!!!"

You can dislike how I speak, you can ask politely for me to stop using it if it is hampering the game, but nothing gives you the right to tell me how to speak especially if you understand what I am saying and are only asking me to speak differently because you are annoyed. The statement of "there is absolutely no excuse to use it during a table top game" really equates to "I am going to try and force you to speak the way I like solely because I feel I am the most important person here and you should think so too!". Also, BBT's hilariously vindictive comment only shows that he sees one side to this argument and that is that nobody has the right to speak in a way that is contrary to his views on what is right and wrong.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

If you haven't noticed, my comments are poking fun at reaction of some of those who don't like being asked to not use unassociated lingo.

The over the top response is not appropriate for either side.

That's is exactly what I am trying to convey.

The statements were phrased to give an idea how it feels from the other side.

I do.

For example, I game with a guy who, like me, has been playing Pokemon since R/B/G, and each do tournament play. People in the hobby use a lot of lingo, that others outside of it would not understand, at least not right away. Neither of us use such lingo when at the table, discussing an entirely different game. We respect the fact it others do not understand, and the two hobbies are different things.
I admit, after discussing our shared hobby, some of the lingo would slip into the session, if it occurred right after, and I would apologize, and discontinue it's use, after realizing it.

I would not, however, throw up my arms in protest, start calling names, and make scene.

This is what I am against.
Whether it be the "Holy F@ck! I talk how I want, you hating sonufab+++@!" or the "Silence your whore WoW sh!t, or get the f@ck out!", the problem is a lack of mutual respect.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
blackbloodtroll wrote:
If you haven't noticed, my comments are poking fun at reaction of some of those who don't like being asked to not use unassociated lingo.

"Unassociated lingo".

Yep, that one is going straight onto the list of favorite oxymorons.

Language is inherently associative. Someone learns the term 'toon' for the character they are playing in one environment and then naturally associates that same term with the character they are playing in another environment. Most linguists believe this is how language BEGAN (via onomatopoeia), and it is certainly one of the primary drivers of linguistic evolution. Anyone arguing that the origin of a term limits its applicability (i.e. that 'lingo' can be 'unassociated') would need to throw out most of the dictionary.

The term 'mob' arose in the MMO culture to describe things which the RPG culture had long been calling NPCs or monsters. As an MMO culture evolved, some people brought in each term from past experience. Likewise, 'toon' originated in the MMOs, but has now spread back to the similar concept in RPGs. If you 'do not like it' then you are at odds with language itself... or, in most cases, displaying a sort of tribalism which assumes that your own sub-culture is the 'correct' one (which applies whether insisting for or against certain terminology).

Ultimately, the only answer is to speak the terminology you are comfortable with while understanding the terminology you are not and wait to see how the clash of sub-sub-sub-cultures plays out.


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LOL
Ok you win with the 'shut your whore mouth' comment. I laughed :)

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

You all just be hatin' us Shmorgen players!

Shadow Lodge

Sorry I got everyone all upset. I was just asking what somethings meant so I'd understand what people were saying. There are still alot of slang and acronyms used in these forum that I dont know.


I think nearly nobody understands perfectly well all the acronyms here, honestly. Better ask what they mean.
And now I show (one more time) my problems with English. Not exactly what this theme is talking about, but still similar enough: What exactly means "strawman"? For context is obviously some kind of insult, but would like to understand the exact meaning.


Alaryth wrote:

I think nearly nobody understands perfectly well all the acronyms here, honestly. Better ask what they mean.

And now I show (one more time) my problems with English. Not exactly what this theme is talking about, but still similar enough: What exactly means "strawman"? For context is obviously some kind of insult, but would like to understand the exact meaning.

I'd link it for you, but I'm on my Xbox and no copy/paste. Google Straw man argument to read more, but in a nutshell, it means misrepresenting someones argument in a debate, to counter their point without actually countering it.

The way I see it being used most often on the forums is that someone will discuss X ability, and someone else will say it's too good/bad because of Y build which is specifically designed to either be good/bad for it.

For example, suppose there is a feat that gives bonus critical hit damage against targets for each size category larger than they are. So someone says that's a broken feat because a Two-Weapon Fighting, double Keen Kukri wielding Halfling with potions of Reduce Person could potentially one-round giants.

In the example above, someone posted the most opitmal build for using the feat, and therefore, the feat is too powerful.


Alaryth wrote:

I think nearly nobody understands perfectly well all the acronyms here, honestly. Better ask what they mean.

And now I show (one more time) my problems with English. Not exactly what this theme is talking about, but still similar enough: What exactly means "strawman"? For context is obviously some kind of insult, but would like to understand the exact meaning.

A strawman is a type of argument style where you build up a flawed example of the other person's stance so that you can highlight the flaws. So instead of debating on the actual merit of the opponent's argument, you are now debating something similar to, but not, their argument. Accusing someone of using a straw man is basicly saying they are debating dishonestly.


Thank you Caineach and Tels. For context I supposed was something like that, but the exact thing is really interesting... and appropriate for too many themes, unluckily.


Some slang in frequent use in this thread I don't grok:
WTF is "neckbeard," and from whence the etymology?


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Kirth Gersen wrote:

Some slang in frequent use in this thread I don't grok:

WTF is "neckbeard," and from whence the etymology?

No idea the etymology, but its basicly a derogatory term for slovenly, unwashed, usually overweight geeks. It's basicly for people like Comic Book Guy from the Simpsons. Urban Dictionary is pretty accurate on that one.

Its also a term used for people with ratty, untrimmed beards, or the beards themselves, or for double chins of overweight people, especially if they are poorly groomed.

It is used a lot with grognard.


Thanks!

Shadow Lodge

Ok what is "munchkin" supposed to mean? I've seen it the forums lately but not sure context its being used?

Are there alot of players playing gnomes and halflings and such?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Jacob Saltband wrote:

Ok what is "munchkin" supposed to mean? I've seen it the forums lately but not sure context its being used?

Are there alot of players playing gnomes and halflings and such?

The typical meaning of munchkin these days is along the same lines as power gamer, or min-maxing.

Originally however it meant playing to your GMs tastes to curry favour. "If your GM likes munchkins (from Wizard of Oz,) then play a munchkin."

Shadow Lodge

Ok so what is a MAD charcter?


A MAD class is one that is Multi Ability Dependent, that is to say, the class requires several ability scores to be decently high to function well. Monks are an extreme example, requiring decent scores in Str/Dex/Con/Wis. Melee builds of all kinds seem to tend toward MAD-ness.

The opposite of MAD is SAD, Single Ability Dependent. Any of the pure casters are SAD, since all they need is a high casting stat (and possibly some Dex for ranged touch attacks).

Shadow Lodge

Bearded Ben wrote:

A MAD class is one that is Multi Ability Dependent, that is to say, the class requires several ability scores to be decently high to function well. Monks are an extreme example, requiring decent scores in Str/Dex/Con/Wis. Melee builds of all kinds seem to tend toward MAD-ness.

The opposite of MAD is SAD, Single Ability Dependent. Any of the pure casters are SAD, since all they need is a high casting stat (and possibly some Dex for ranged touch attacks).

Thank you.


I think the main problem is that there is a sort of derogatory view taken about WoW, specifically how it is a "worse" game than PF, so the dislike of WoW lingo has less to do with people actually caring about using jargon or not, and more to do with the jargon coming from an undesirable source.


Ganryu wrote:
Marc Radle wrote:
Must not go off on rant about people using dumb internet slang ... Must not go off on rant about people using dumb internet slang ... Must not go off on rant about people using dumb internet slang ...
MNGOORAPUDIS

I just found the name of the Rovagug worshipping BBEG for my next campaign.


Neckbeard is the term for a Linux Administrator as well. Typically a Grey or Black Hat, at that.

Shadow Lodge

Why do people use this 'YMMV' when this 'YEMV' is closer to what they were trying to say?

YEMV=Your Experiance May Very

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Because Your Mileage May Vary is a familiar phrase from the small print of car adds and has already become a meme. YEMV hasn't.

Shadow Lodge

Paul Watson wrote:
Because Your Mileage May Vary is a familiar phrase from the small print of car adds and has already become a meme. YEMV hasn't.

And a meme is what?


A meme is something that gets shared around the internet on a regular basis.

Most memes are funny in nature, for instance, Rage Comics, or lolcats. Demotivational posters also come to mind. Memes aren't just pictures, though many of them are, for instance, things like 'Arrow to the Knee jokes' would be a meme. Other memes can be simple phrases that are slightly changed; "Brace Yourself _____ Is Coming" "One Does Not Simply ____"

Hope that helps.


Tels wrote:

A meme is something that gets shared around the internet on a regular basis.

Most memes are funny in nature, for instance, Rage Comics, or lolcats. Demotivational posters also come to mind. Memes aren't just pictures, though many of them are, for instance, things like 'Arrow to the Knee jokes' would be a meme. Other memes can be simple phrases that are slightly changed; "Brace Yourself _____ Is Coming" "One Does Not Simply ____"

Hope that helps.

No. Meme.

Liberty's Edge

Indeed. The phrase 'Your milage may vary' is an idiom, not a meme.

Shadow Lodge RPG Superstar 2010 Top 8

Krensky wrote:
Indeed. The phrase 'Your milage may vary' is an idiom, not a meme.

It's both, isn't it?

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