"Monster" orphanages and sanctuaries (Golarion)


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Silver Crusade

^^^^ Post results!

DJEternalDarkness wrote:

Kobolds

Kobold clans will always have a story teller, and young kobolds have an instinctive desire to be told stories. If they are left alone, the kobold with the best imagination will be picked to be the story teller and the others will listen to whatever stories it makes up.

I think we're looking at the origins of the "cutebolds" here. :)


Set wrote:

[tangent, inspired from the above]
Trolls, especially those in Kaer Maga, probably store (indigestible!)stuff, like large coin or gemstones, inside themselves, knowing that they can get to it without much difficulty, but that no pickpocket or burgler will ever get their hands on their 'stash.'

Some might even use their 'augur' reputation (even one that is *not* an auger) to smuggle items from one end of the city to another, in a place no local authority can search.
[/tangent]

This has me kind of wanting to run a heist adventure set in Kaer Maga. When the players are putting together their Ocean's 11-style collection of experts, who's going to expect The Smuggler to be a troll?


@Tacticslion, re: Neothelids:
Spoiler:
Ha, I'll have to dig up the rough notes and finish it now. It kind of breaks from the usual format and doesn't actually provide much direct advice, but there are a few slight parallels with both Trinite and Matthew's awesome takes on it. Kind of like a reverse Apocalyptic Log.


Abraham spalding wrote:
For a thread this awesome it isn't necromancy -- it's TRUE RESURRECTION!

Er, obviously, I'm just applying the repeat spell metamagic feat... after the fact.

ANYWAY, carry on, people.

(I mean, we've come out with Advance Race Guide since the last post, I'm pretty sure we've got more nifty options to mine, here!)


Mikaze this is a great thread thank you..im constructing a world that i plan on using alot of humaniod races in new ways..you have givien me much food for thought


Wyverns are an issue for any humanoid to deal with in raising. The most obvious reason is biology -- wyverns can fly, aren't shaped like humanoids in the least, and in a sense have less need of the advantages civilization brings in the form of protection (both from the elements and other creatures) and comforts (having less likelihood to suffer from environmental conditions in the first place). Fortunately much doesn't have to be made of physical training for a wvyern. Their natural instincts serve them rather well in learning to fly, and use their other prodigious gives with ease. Much like a natural athlete they only require honing of these instincts and direction for their talents.

Focusing on just these two points however would lead to failure recognize perhaps the biggest difference of all; wyverns aren't humanoids they are dragons.

Some would suggest that because of this last fact the best way to raise wyverns to fit into civilization is to allow a dragon that is part of civilization to lead the task. Such suggestions prove the naivety of the suggester and their lack of understanding about dragon psychology. All dragons have a deep seated need to be viewed (and to view themselves) as superior to that which is around it or to at least have a means of leading into that direction. If a wyvern was to be raised by a true dragon this would never happen as the true dragon outclasses the wyvern on almost every point and in fact would have to point this out regularly. Now dragons while different in psychology processes from humans do tend to mix the source with the message; a wyvern would resent such treatment and find it intolerable and would therefore reject the message of living in society and finding a place in it. In much the same manner a rebellious teenager of a humanoid race would react we would see the wyvern react, however due to their natural abilities typically with much worse end results.

As such a humanoid is actually a better match for a wyvern at least on the psychological level. Indeed the easiest way to lead a wyvern to fit into civilization is to allow it to lead instead. Wyverns while not particularly intelligence do have a natural knack for seeing the strengths and weaknesses of other creatures and enough natural cunning to use this knowledge well tactically. While some what lacking in empathy they (like all dragons) genuinely like managing others efforts and if shown how diplomacy can give them the tools to do this better take to it with at least the same ease as most people.

While wyverns like leading they do tend to be somewhat lazy as well, this can lead to a laissez faire method of management that allows others to be directed but not micromanaged. Being in a position of leadership and respected for it gives the wyvern a natural predisposition to support civilization since it is feeding his psychological needs in a very pleasing manner.

The main concern at this point is to avoid corruption. Unfortunately wvyerns are still dragons as such have a natural desire for wealth and dominance that can lead to bullying. Such behavior is best managed by strong ethical training in youth and competent peers that it must maintain close association with. Such peers help civilization keep the wyvern's respect as it proves that it too produces strength but doesn't directly challenge the wyvern's own position.


dot for awesome


Ross Byers wrote:
Kevin Andrew Murphy wrote:
Note: "Make him marry the captain's daughter" is a euphemism for a hanging, not a punitive marriage ceremony.
I'd always heard "Put 'em in a bed with the captain's daughter". Is that a similar euphemism, or a slightly more literal lyric? (In any case, being caught with the captain's daughter is a pretty short trip to being keel-hauled.)

I believe the next verse is "Have you seen the captain's daughter?" implying that being in bed with her would be punishment enough.


The medusa article was well thought out, as was the goblin. I was quite fond of the kobold article though. In any campaign I've run, I have never played the kobolds with quite the evil urge of goblins, orcs, and the like. They are a nuisance, and sometimes dangerous, but would thrive if not for the larger races.


DOT

Shadow Lodge

Tacticslion wrote:
Would it be possible, once inbreeding has stopped, to generate a new species of creature out of the ogres? And what would that look like?

If you had a second group for the ogres to breed with, one that was genetically compatible with ogres (can produce fertile offspring) but without the same genetic problems, it should be possible. Dog crosses are less likely to have genetic diseases than their purebred parent breeds.

It would probably be very difficult, though. First, I expect that anyone trying to systematically breed ogres in any way would have a tough time of it. Second, depending on the nature and number of genetic defects in the species the genetic task of reducing the incidence of those alleles might be very involved. Recessive traits can sometimes hide behind dominant alleles for generations. With a species that reproduces at anything like a human rate (and consumes more than human resources, and can't necessarily be ethically culled) you're going to have a hard time.

Still, selective breeding can achieve surprising things, especially aided by technological or magical genetic screening. Elven wizards would probably be best equipped to make the attempt. Maybe a group of transmuters and diviners (the latter to magically assess specific crosses).


@Weirdo: excellent post and points! I especially like the idea of diviners that had never occurred to me before.

I figured the transmuters would be a 'thing', and I figured on long-lived races (though I hadn't specifically thought of 'elves'... neat trick, that), so I'm figuring that would be something solid.

My personal supposition is that "Polymorph any Object can fix anything.", but it's kind of difficult to know what, precisely, needs fixing with something so messed up as ogres (without, you know, completely altering everything about it), so I really like the diviner concept.

Liberty's Edge

This thread is *GOLD*. :D

The Exchange

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1. A lot could be solved with the dolphin training solution:
There is no way to punish a dolphin - just doesn't work. The solution for unwanted behavior is to reward it and tie it to a specific cue.
Then, never give the cue. The behavior goes away.
2. PFS should be in the orphan business - raise them all to get relics(the Consortium too). Other organizations (and PFS) could raise them to be spys.


Moofire wrote:

Good stuff all in all. But in classic monsters revisited it says that kobolds can live for 120 to 130 years, and if you wanna get old school ADnD 1 kobolds can live for 900, well unless a lvl 1 fighter gets their hands on them.

Yeah, but they reach adulthood very quickly.

Moofire wrote:
I have an idea for the orphanage where the kobolds/goblins would grow up. Make sure that the staff is a mix of small, medium, and if possible lager people that treat the children and each other with respect. Hopefully that will curb some if the tendency that kobolds and goblins have to resent larger folk.

Aha, but keep in mind that the kobolds, as children, are still going to be the smallest creatures present and may still develop resentment. Even if you include some halfling or gnome children, kobolds are still generally smaller.

Just something to keep in mind.

Mikaze wrote:

Very nice thoughts on kobolds! Yeah, little guys have persecution complexes and confidence issues to spare...

I can't help but wonder about metallic dragons getting into the kobold adopting game.

Introducing dragons is arguably unhealthy, as it reinforces the kobolds' idea that they are born to serve dragons and are, therefore, 'better' than other humanoids. If dragons must be introduced, they should not be at all awe-inspiring. Pseudodragons and fairy dragons, in particular, have had great success, being smaller than even the kobold children.


Dot for interest!

The Exchange

So what happens if you apply the Aasimar template to the Ogre? (Though, that might require artificial insemination some where in the past..) Would that somehow fix the genetics?


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I'll give this a shot.

Lizardfolk
Recommended Deities: Gozreh, Erastil, Pharasma, Abadar, Asmodeus*

The greatest inherent danger in lizardfolk is not malice or anarchy, but their inborn xenophobia, as they will reflexively distinguish themselves from other races. This instinctive segregation must be quelled as thoroughly as possible if integration is to have any chance at success. 'Civilized' lizardfolk are more prone to relapse than almost any other monstrous race.

Unlike with many other monstrous races, it is not recommended to keep lizardfolk away from others of their kind. The differences must be addressed early on, or lizardfolk will be confused upon running into 'wild' kin and may revert.

Lizardfolk should be kept in forested areas with at least one nearby water source--preferably natural. It is extremely important to expose them frequently to non-lizardfolk--indeed, it is wisest to raise lizardfolk alongside other races. As such, they are often kept nearby Pathfinder lodges or merchant roads to ensure a steady supply of strangers.

Lizardfolk children will tend to congregate together and exclude their non-lizardfolk peers. This should be addressed by assigning them activities--preferably competitive--and sorting them into groups containing members of multiple races. Swimming in particular should be kept as non-competitive as possible, as it will reenforce lizardfolk advantages. It is by far preferable to introduce activities in which no race has a distinct edge, such as woodcarving, canoeing or hunting.

A common practice is to stage regular tournaments with other orphanages, whether or not those orphanages contain lizardfolk. This will compel all the children to collaborate towards a common goal.

Above all, it should be made clear to lizardfolk children that they are barely different from their peers. Some organizations have taken to keeping the lizardfolk in deserts, but most agree that depriving the children of one of their greatest talents will foster resentment--and will almost certainly drive the children to seek out their kin as soon as possible.

Of all the faiths, it is indisputable that Gozreh worshippers have had the most success with lizardfolk, appealing to them with his themes based around nature. However, this can sometimes lead the lizardfolk to apply their innate bigotry towards non-druids. Pharasma's spiritual side also appeals to the lizardfolk to a limited extent.

Erastil resonates surprisingly well with the lizardfolk, pushing ideals of inclusion regardless of species. Lizardfolk take well to hunting and enjoy being useful to their community. Abadar worshippers have taken to looking after lizardfolk of late, doing their best to teach respect for the law. Their success has been mixed--unfortunately, lizardfolk are not especially talented at mathematics and can feel patronized if forced to learn.

Asmodeus promotes cooperation with other species, which is healthy for lizardfolk, but should still be approached with extreme caution for obvious reasons. In general, his involvement is not recommended.


What about "good" races who are, nonetheless, complete handfuls? What would happen if one had a Storm Giant orphan to take care of?


Actually, a note on some of the good races could be interesting. Don't want any more Nualias, after all!


For kobolds I'd think the key would be to work at the societal level. Kobolds are by default LE, but I believe LN tribes exist. Bring these into fair trade relationships with other societies and they should prosper. Protect such civilized kobolds from envious barbarians (or better yet enable them to protect themselves) and they can become examples to be emulated.

Once you have a solidly LN kobold civilization you have a source for eg. good leaning Abadarian kobold missionaries to spread civilization and commerce to other kobold tribes.

Of all the monstrous races Kobolds appear to me to be the easiest to uplift on the large scale because they're lawful, intelligent, and have little interest in conquest. All the hardest parts of civilizational uplift are already done and all that remains is to demonstrate the advantage of long term mutually beneficial relationships over short term one sided exploitation.


I disagree. Kobolds may be one of the most challenging due to the fact that they are arguably the best at pretending to be reformed. They may play nice, but they'll harbor resentment that will eventually make itself apparent at the worst possible time. Unlike bugbears, goblins and orcs, kobolds are subtle (read: cowardly) and patient.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

Although Lizardfolk are neutral, correct? So I don't see why you couldn't have lizardfolk being raised by other lizardfolk.

There Xenophobia is a bit justified, given that they have mostly been pushed off into swamps, deserts, and other environments that the other races are less interested in. Raising up Lizardfolk with human-focused gods and trying to "civilize" them strikes me a bit too much as what happened to Aboriginal peoples in Australia and the new world.

Although that COULD make an interesting adventure hook right there...


As a kobold, I see the entire thread as horribly ethnocentric. Lizardfolk can be just as hostile as orcs if you live nearby, so I don't see any reason why it's not okay to assimilate them when you're going around telling goblins that Lamashtu is a wrongbadfun goddess. :P


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

The Medusa that ran the thieves' guild in one of my city campaigns wore a veil, disguising herself as a burn victim, a semi-transparent 'bonnet' hiding her 'hair while allowing them to peer through the vents in the fabric. After 18 months, the Paladin finally popped a detect evil and she didn't ping. Later, the player found out and a long, nasty debate began over alignments and changes.

My key argument was that in the entire time they dealt with her, she never did anything evil, a RP trait that was key to many issues.


While Detect Evil is a whole other issue (some have it not affect those who aren't currently doing evil stuff), I am of the opinion that it is nature, and not action, that matters for alignment. A politician who is perfectly willing to kill somebody at any time and just has no current need to should be marked as Evil, even though he hasn't done anything yet. But that's just my opinion.


Redot-bump because this thread needs it.


Vamptastic wrote:
What about "good" races who are, nonetheless, complete handfuls? What would happen if one had a Storm Giant orphan to take care of?

I`ll hit up on something this weekend.


Kobold Cleaver wrote:
I disagree. Kobolds may be one of the most challenging due to the fact that they are arguably the best at pretending to be reformed. They may play nice, but they'll harbor resentment that will eventually make itself apparent at the worst possible time. Unlike bugbears, goblins and orcs, kobolds are subtle (read: cowardly) and patient.

This, getting a kobold to *comply* is fairly easy, convincing him to actually change and trust is much more difficult.


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A bump for King Torg! ALL HAIL KING TORG!


Kobold Cleaver wrote:
A bump for King Torg! ALL HAIL KING TORG!

I've no idea what this means (the only Torg I know is from Sluggy Freelance, who is awesome, though not a king), but I'm really glad you did this, because I was going to. :)


Also, I know this isn't related, but I want to see dinosaur farms.


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Dryads as soon as I get a decent internet connection.

Liberty's Edge

I keep looking in on this thread...have yet to read it all...it's just chock-full of cool. I use my own gods...but I'll adapt the material. :)


Tacticslion wrote:
Kobold Cleaver wrote:
A bump for King Torg! ALL HAIL KING TORG!
I've no idea what this means (the only Torg I know is from Sluggy Freelance, who is awesome, though not a king), but I'm really glad you did this, because I was going to. :)

I've often wondered about the relation. King Torg is the king of the kobolds in "Kobolds Ate My Baby!".


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Ninja'd by Kobold Cleaver.

edit: Of course, Kobolds in KAMB more closely resemble Golarion's Goblins than Kobolds, but still.


Kobold Cleaver wrote:
Tacticslion wrote:
Kobold Cleaver wrote:
A bump for King Torg! ALL HAIL KING TORG!
I've no idea what this means (the only Torg I know is from Sluggy Freelance, who is awesome, though not a king), but I'm really glad you did this, because I was going to. :)
I've often wondered about the relation. King Torg is the king of the kobolds in "Kobolds Ate My Baby!".

Cool, thanks, guys! :)


Dotting!


Bump.

Silver Crusade

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Eh, it's been long enough. :)

Drow
Recommended Deities: Desna, Shelyn, Sarenrae, Calistria, Black Butterfly, Ashava, Calistria
Recommended Environment: Rural/Isolated

The "dark elves" are at once a familiar and alien people. Surrounded by no shortage of mystery and misinformation, it is easy to view drow as demons made manifest in flesh. This is not only erroneous, but it belies the real danger and tragedy of that seemingly cursed race. The fact of the matter is that they are ultimately elves. Elves trapped in a horrific culture and touched by dark forces, but elves nonetheless. Ultimately, simple removal from the dysfunctional society found in the Darklands before indoctrination will greatly improve an individual's chances of finding a better life. This, unfortunately, is merely the easy part.

Far more difficult is providing security and preparing drow youths for life on the surface world.

Providing a safe home for young drow casts a great emphasis on the need to guard against more dangers from without more than within when caring for members of "outcast" races. It is strongly suggested that such operations be as secretive as possible. For this reason, it is highly advisable that any sanctuary for drow be kept as far from urban centers and major trade routes as possible. It is likewise suggested that these havens not be established near any surface connections to the Darklands. After the raiding of two santuaries and the disappearance of all those living there, drow and caretaker alike, it has been concluded that mainstream drow society will eagerly hunt down any deviation from their norm, likely out of a sense of racial or cultural purity.

To combat this, seclusion and fortification are of utmost importance.

Forests are ideal, the deeper and darker the better provided they can be made sufficiently safe. Establishing a small network of operatives to supply these homes and to guard their perimeter(to keep people out rather than in) is a must, therefore the matter of seclusion must make some concessions to the necessary proximity of settlements that can sustain a sanctuary. On the matter of guards, alliances with local fey are ideal.

Fey allies play well into the matter of actually raising drow children. Basically, such youths would be raised as any other elves. However, the seemingly greater rebellious streak and the need for powerful authority figures must be taken into account. Providing great variance in teaching and secure landscape will help curb wanderlust to a point, but the need for secrecy and the skills needed to survive and avoid trouble must be instilled early. They must be prepared for the difficulties and dangers they may face in many surface cultures even as they are taught how to live within them. But they can also be taught to integrate into fey cultures as well, depending on their location. This in turn may provide a safer and more fulfilling life than what they may find elsewhere. Sadly, this may say some things about their best chance for a better life in the modern world: They are best raised into lives that can keep them safe, content, and separate from the world at large. The faiths of Desna and the allied cults of Ashava and the "Black Butterfly" can readily provide such a life, one lived moving through moonlight and shadow rather than exposed to the light of day. This may frustrate those hoping for a full and healthy integration into surface society, but in some regions this will be the best that can realistically happen.

It bears noting that the cult of the Black Butterfly has had great success in integrating both young and, rarely, adult drow into their loosely organized faith. That many of these individuals have been attributed a sort of reverence as sacred and are possibly being given an inflated sense of self-importance is a matter of concern for some, though Desnan theologians assure that this fringe faith does not have a reputation for fostering arrogance and that the cult of Desna's Shadow has had a long history of reforming drow and preparing them for life on the surface so well that they simply have not been noticed throughout history.

NOTE:

Spoiler:
Investigations into the suspected infiltration of supportive organizations have revealed a disturbing truth: The greatest threat to our work is not the drow, but their surface kin. The elven organization known as the Lantern Bearers has proven not only to be responsible for suppressing information about the drow for centuries, but also for the raiding of sanctuaries housing drow youths.

Whether these innocents and their caretakers are alive or not is currently unknown. Interrogations have revealed that they are most likely alive, but they would certainly have been relocated to Kyonin, beyond our reach. This, combined with what now seems to be a series of disappearances of scholars and investigators who came too close to the truth of the drow, complicates matters substantially. The Lantern Bearers and, by extention, Kyonin are at best untrustworthy parties where are work is involved. While certainly not all elves are complicit in this conspiracy, greater care must be taken in our choice of contacts going forward.

As it seems the greater threat to these children comes from their surface cousins rather than their parent culture, who it now seems cares little to pursue them, it is recommended that the youngest children kept in lands near Kyonin be relocated amongst willing dwarven allies. This is one case where chilly relations between the two peoples can prove beneficial at least.

- Ayilah al-Zafayna, Emberscribe of the Dawnflower

ADDENDUM:

Spoiler:
Recent events have at once complicated and simplified matters. The lid has been blown off of elvenkind's dirty little secret in the past few years. While much of it still amounts to rumor to many and cold hard facts are hard to come by, the drow are no longer a legend.

With so many eyes looking Kyonin's way and the Lantern Bearers having a harder time operating in the dark, our work is a bit safer. To a point.

Everyone knows about drow now. Or at least they will. Where before our kids could pass themselves off a fetchling-kin or some other exotic, now folks are going to know. So integration is going to be harder now. Most of our kids won't have to be relocated. They were hidden well enough already, and those that knew of them will still know them as the children they've known for years before thinking of them as monsters from old fairy tales. But that doesn't mean there won't be those looking for those "monsters".

The Lantern Bearers are officially finished as far as their attempts to keep things quiet. But that doesn't mean they won't be attempting to spread misinformation and continuing to collect our children. Our advantage is that public opinion has turned against them. As long as we can carry the fight into the light, we'll have the advantage.

One more thing. I know past assurances that the Darklands drow were a minimal threat to our work have been accurate for the past few years, but with recent events, we may be looking at an end to that. News is getting around fast up in daylight. I can't imagine it won't be spreading down below before too long. I don't know if they actually give a damn about these kids or not, but we can't afford to make assumptions. Be prepared. Keep to the shadows like you've been doing. But be ready to step out at a moment's notice. The butterfly cult can say what it wants, but our children can't stay in the shadows forever. They deserve as much a chance to see the sun as any other.

- Dannen Yaerman, Eagle Knight ret.


That...was a really good read. I love the almost noir aspect of the whole thing. Thank you.

Silver Crusade

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y ty!

I was a bit worried about breaking format, but the recent AP events have been on the brain. Had to work in those two Empyreals for folks that miss Eilistraee too. :)


I'm surprised to say that this may be my favorite entry yet.

Silver Crusade

:D

Speaking of Empyreals though, does anyone have any ideas on minotaurs and Chadali? Half-celestial minotaurs are listed among her servants, and her holy symbol is featured over a labyrinth-like pattern...

Hmm...


This is a really cool thread! Nice to see the ideas about the practicalities of socializing some of the "monstrous" races, since there's much more to making it stick than just some diplomacy checks and/or atonement spells.


Next up: GHOULS!
Just kidding. Probably. XD

Silver Crusade

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Got some ideas to play around with for those, but it wouldn't fit here(like Hunger/Decay rules). I really want to do Forlarren next. One of my all-time favorite "redemption-bait" races. ;)


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I might be able to give the Minotaur a shot.

Silver Crusade

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Forlarren
Recommended Deities: Sarenrae, Shelyn, Irori, Korada, Vildeis
Recommended Environment: Rural/Isolated

The forlarren are an unusual case. Far more often than not, most forlarren one might encounter will be orphaned children. One could go so far as to suggest they are essentially a race of orphans. Cursed with an internally warring nature, each forlarren wrestles with violent mood swings from fiendish spite and rage to remorse and regret borne from their fey parent.

It is often said that forlarren typically slay their own mothers at a young age. A closer look at forlarren and nymphs reveals this to be highly improbable at best, as a forlarren's abilities are meager in comparison to their mothers. This raises the question of just what has happened to these missing parents. While many do die in childbirth and others might abandon their children, there is still the mystery of what happens to those that have allegedly been murdered by their own children. Rumors abound of malevolent third parties, possibly hags, evil fey, or even their fiendish fathers, seeking to ensure the misery and destructive downward spiral of folarren by taking away their one source of love. Perhaps even worse are tales of nymphs dying to protect their children from fey courts seeking to purge them. What is known is that those rare forlarren who have achieved some measure of inner peace typically have been raised successfully in seclusion by their mothers.

Thus it follows that caretakers are usually advised that relative seclusion is the best approach for bringing up forlarren. While a folarren may need to grow accustomed to dealing with others, interactions are best kept in controlled conditions, especially as they grow into adulthood. Even most rural communities may be too bustling and likely to introduce unwanted complications, especially given the negative reactions such children might recieve and the negative feedback loop it can cause.

Caretakers must be prepared to deal with inevitably violent mood swings and take measures to protect both themselves and the folarren from herself. Self-loathing is the most common poison for their kind, and it must be combatted through helping them build up their self-worth. They must be able to define their own image, lest the world do it for them.

To this end, and somewhat at odds with what most assume of fey, some forms of monastic asceticism work well for forlarren. Mastery of their own emotions and a means to weather their inner turmoil are among the greatest gifts one can give a forlarren. It is highly difficult for most to start down such a path, but those that commit to it tend to embrace such lifestyles in ways that may surprise most fey researchers, achieving a discipline over their dual-nature while moving a step closer to the demeanor of their mothers. Still others might combine this approach with a life further removed from the complications of civilization, embracing the simple ranger's life. Forlarren take to such a lifestyle naturally already, and those who have developed self-control can make for formidable members of any rural community that welcomes them. Being able to pass off their appearance as some sort of satyr or preferably faun-kin can be of great help as well.

When possible, it is highly advisable that tieflings caretakers have a hand in raising such children. In many ways, tieflings and forlarren are parallels of each other across the humanoid and fey divide. Few others can relate so easily to what these forlarren will be experiencing, and that extra measure of empathy and understanding can make all the difference in the world. Ideally, one should seek the aid of sympathetic fey who might better understand the natural aspects and needs of these children. However, care must still be taken to ensure that this does not become a destabilizing element in the forlarren's life. It goes wtihout saying that the aid of First World-born fey should not be sought out, as the ensoulled fey of the Material Plane are far less capricious and far more understanding of mortality and consequence.

One thing, beyond the requisite empathy, that is absolutely required of those entrusted with the care of forlarren is patience. Forlarren tend to be far less intelligent than humans. While this average is caused by the high rates of mortality at a young age coupled with their tendency to be wild children, forlarren generally can be expected to possess substandard intelligence. This can easily exacerbate their frustration and as such they must have caretakers who can offer patience and understanding, because they will have little of either for themselves.

"One thing I don't think enough people appreciate is that every forlarren is a victim. Every forlarren is a child that has been dealt the cruelest of origins and are cast into a world that all too often hates them for it, and so they remain victims. Of the world, fate, and themselves.

The best thing we can do for them is to teach them how to stop being victims. It can be difficult. The best things in life tend to be." - Xioau Ni, Koradan monk

Spoiler:
"You really buy those tales of forlarren killing their own mothers? Pff! Look, I've known nymphs, and I'm telling you right now that isn't happening. A nymph could have a full-grown forlarren over her knee for giving her sass, and most forlarren aren't going to be bright enough to pull off anything in their favor. Something else is going on there, and someone needs to find out.

One of two things I know one thing for sure: Every time someone strikes down a forlarren, they're killing the wrong person. Damned if I know who the right one is, but the other thing I know for certain is that I hate them for what they've done to these children." - Sheila Longstrider

Forlarren have been my favorite fey ever since Tome of Horrors. :)


Mikaze, I love the forlarren as well!

In Reign of WInter, i used their dual nature a lot for the encounter with Mierul, and adopted Sarenrae as her patron:

http://paizo.com/threads/rzs2ph8x&page=6?The-Snows-of-Summer#264

I like the song idea, would like to use it in my campaign. I made Mierul a little different, adding more background to her and the song fits in perfectly.

My version of Mierul plays off the dual nature of the race. In her background, she is from Varisia. Being raised by her mother, she finally came under the apprenticeship of a Dervish Dancer dedicated to Sarenrae (the Dervish Dancer, with Sarenrae being about redemption, saw it as a trial of faith to redeem this wayward forlarren).

Mierul has a split personality and the Dervish Dancer archetype, as well as the Dervish Dance Feat. When her fey nature takes over, she is actually a NG worshipper of Sarenrae; during her fiendish moments, she is her typical NE alignment, still looking for redemption. Her ranks in Perform (Dance) and Perform (Sing) swap depending on which personality is manifesting, as does her spell set. She is the classic tragic character; during one of her more hateful moments she accepted the ice sliver and now regrets it, feeling it has doomed her and perhaps has shattered all hopes of redemption.

I think the song idea is a perfect match for her!

Check out the post about the song above my post also, it is a great idea for the encounter, =)

Thanks for your work, I love it!


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dryads upcoming.


Kobold Cleaver wrote:

I'll give this a shot.

Lizardfolk
Recommended Deities: Gozreh, Erastil, Pharasma, Abadar, Asmodeus*

The greatest inherent danger in lizardfolk is not malice or anarchy, but their inborn xenophobia, as they will reflexively distinguish themselves from other races. This instinctive segregation must be quelled as thoroughly as possible if integration is to have any chance at success. 'Civilized' lizardfolk are more prone to relapse than almost any other monstrous race.

I know that this comment was made...ages ago...but I still feel a need to comment on this after finding this thread raised from the dead: I don't particularly think lizardfolk need 'upraising'.

Comparing their bestiary entry with the history of many of the other races here, they are in a much more stable position. They are not sufferers of the tainted darklands, like orcs, drow, or neothlids, nor somewhat 'cursed' races like medusa or harpies forced to linger on the outskirts of humanoid society. And upon further inspection, they are not some degenerated society like the goblins, trolls, or ogres (ok, I just don't know the right word for this grouping; better than 'leftovers').

Judging from their bestiary entry, they have their own society based on scattered villages, and they are simply uninterested in complex infrastructure or advanced metallurgy that are mistakenly taken as the signs of 'civilization'. Most of the 'xenophobia problems' in fact stem from resistance against the imperialistic and colonial nature of humans, and they simply find themselves out-bred by humans (heck, lizardfolk probably have a similar view of humans as humans have of goblins in that regard).

When I try to think of Paizo trying to be 'socially conscious', I always look this bestiary entry because it reflects a postcolonial perspective on how Europeans treated the native populations of...well...anywhere but Europe. Trying to 'civilize' the lizardfolk carries undertones that are too similar to the French policy of forced assimilation on their African colonies (especially since this thread tends to favor taking children away from their original culture, which, by the way, may well be the reason why the lizardkids try to be distrustful and congregate together). So in this case, the change of perspective probably should be on the part of the humans so they can make better attempts at fair negotiations and peace treaties with the lizardfolk.

Really, reread that whole reform entry for lizardfolk, but replace it with the word "Africans" and it suddenly gets really uncomfortable. Not blaming you or anything, it is a good approach to the perceived problem, and the allegory does seem rather subtly encoded into the lizardfolk from what little I have seen. The first step towards overcoming a problem is examining whether your preconceived notions of it might be wrong. Admittedly, I may be a bit overly aware of the issues since I have taken several courses related to this subject. A lot of people might not be aware of these global issues. But that is in and of itself a problem, no?

MMCJawa wrote:

Although Lizardfolk are neutral, correct? So I don't see why you couldn't have lizardfolk being raised by other lizardfolk.

There Xenophobia is a bit justified, given that they have mostly been pushed off into swamps, deserts, and other environments that the other races are less interested in. Raising up Lizardfolk with human-focused gods and trying to "civilize" them strikes me a bit too much as what happened to Aboriginal peoples in Australia and the new world.

Although that COULD make an interesting adventure hook right there...

EDIT: Ah, ninja'd by about 8 months. Still, I like my post, so I will leave the core of it in tact.

Also, as another note: Mikaze, I simply love the entry on drow. I have gained a somewhat bizarre taste of dark, hinted truths delivered through an objective, clinical like tone. I guess I have just read too much of the SCP archives for my own good. It made me love addendums (which might be the greatest horror that site provides: making proper office work interesting)

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