Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Belkzen, Hold of the Orc Hordes (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Belkzen, Hold of the Orc Hordes (PFRPG)
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Blood and Brutality

Orcs are the scourge of civilization, the raiders who come in the night, slaughtering innocents for treasure and the simple joy of the kill. Their brutality extends even to their own kind, with tribes battling for supremacy and only the strongest individuals surviving to adulthood. Yet despite their fearsome image, orcs maintain a society of their own, having carved out the legendary Hold of Belkzen. Within this chaotic region, warlords vie for supremacy, adventurers plunder ruins long lost to orc barbarism, and those bold orcs who imagine a better life struggle for change.

Whether your players are treasure hunters stealing the riches of the past, soldiers seeking to end the orc threat once and for all, or orcs seeking to escape or rule their brethren, this book has everything you need to run a campaign in the war-torn Hold of Belkzen, including:

  • Detailed gazetteers of Belkzen’s settlements, from the surprisingly cosmopolitan capital of Urgir to the turbulent Blood Plains and the rare non-orc settlements such as Freedom Town and the hanging monastery of Sech Nevali.
  • Information on the terrifying orc gods, such as Dretha the Dark Mother and the Blood God, Nulgreth.
  • Overviews of the most prominent orc tribes, from the Empty Hand and the Broken Spine to the Ice Tooth and the Skull Eater.
  • Information on orc warfare, including their beast-powered war machines.
  • Tons of new adventure sites ripe for exploration, including the draconic Sleeper and the Flood Road, plus a detailed regional map ready to lead your player characters to riches—or a bloody death.
  • Nine new monsters, random encounter tables, and more!

Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Belkzen, Hold of the Orc Hordes is intended for use with the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can be easily adapted to any fantasy world.

Written by Tyler Beck, Jason Garrett, Alex Greenshields, and David Schwartz

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-710-9

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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More than just orcs

4/5

I used this book for two different campaigns and I think it deserves it a better rating.

Map & gazetteer:

Spoiler:
The book starts off with a map that's stained in blood which is a nice effect. A lot of places are marked there - it would be quite challenging to prepare all of them, so maybe use only a fraction of the map for your campaign. Neighbouring countries and places are missing, which is unfortunate.

The gazetteer is good enough to give an impression on Belkzen. Flood Truce is an interesting concept that adds more depth to orcs. History is summarized within 2 1/2 pages - for me the rise from Underdark and the reign of the Whispering Tyrant were the most interesting parts.

Five areas get a four-page write-up: Blood Plains, Conquered Lands, Smokespur, Urgir and Whisperfall. While some of the content is typical for orcs, human settlements, undead menaces and even a hanging monastry are mentioned. Urgir as an orc metropolis should make a great place to visit for adventurers.

Adventuring:

Spoiler:
Eight gods are described on half a page each - pretty helpful if you want to add more depth and flavor to enemy divine spellcasters. The orc tribe list has some surprises like female chieftains, worship to Sarenrae and wyvern tamers. Conflicts between tribes get some room here, which could contribute to the story.

Orc war machines, siege engines and mounts show a few creative ideas which might add to flavor when battling orcs. The 14 pages of adventure sites are a wealth of starting points for adventures, but you will have to make up most maps and stat blocks for yourself. Only the map of a small human settlement is detailed enough to be used directly, imo.

Bestiary:

Spoiler:
There are 8 creatures and a template, but I found only a few of them to be actually helpful - which is not so different from regular bestiary books, but still a limitation. Ankhrav is a more powerful ankheg - nice if you want to add a boss to an ankheg encounter. The Burning Child is an unique flavorful creature which probably works better as a story element than as a straightforward encounter. Dahzagan is pretty cool if you want to augment an orc horde with an orc-related outsider.

So, overall this book gives you a good introduction into the area, but limited material that can be used directly. Orcs naturally get a lot of attention here, still it's not "Orcs of Golarion, Campaign Setting edition" - which is a blessing, given the high quality of the nonorc material. The book walks a fine line between the classic orc horde and surprising new takes on the greenskins - and succeeds in doing so. There are some decent adventure hooks, which might be the most interesting part.


Disappointing

2/5

Read my full review on Of Dice and Pen.

Belkzen, Hold of the Orc Hordes should have been an opportunity to add more depth to orcs in Pathfinder, and to be fair, it makes a couple tokens attempts to do so. However, on the whole, it misses out on the opportunity, instead focusing mostly on describing locations and adventure sites, many of which happen to have orcs in them. It does little to give the orcs any real character beyond violent killers or to differentiate one orc tribe from another. By the end of the book, orcs remain pretty much as faceless as they’ve always been, just fodder waiting for for the PCs to kill them.


Good but not great!

3/5

THE GOOD:
All major locations are mentioned and get a description.
Half of the inside art is great.
4 solid settlement stat blocks.
8 orc gods get half a page each.
24 orc tribes get a short write-up inclusive their leaders and their level.
The 4 orc warmachines are all solid.
The adventure site section is absolutely awesome - this is were the book shines! All 15 sites are great!
Half of the monsters in the bestiary are good.

THE BAD:
The inside-cover map of Belkzen is not very beautiful.
The timeline spans 10.000 years and is only one page.
3 settlements don´t get a stat block.
The city maps are not detailed enough.
Only 4 of 8 orc gods get pictures.
Not enough orc war-machines and the art for the 2 large ones that are shown is not very awe-inspiring.
Half of the monsters in the bestiary are lame.

THE UGLY:
Half of the inside art is too dark.

Worth it for the adventure site section alone!


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Well, if you look at Belkzen, it's surrounded by vastly different countries. Lastwall, Realms of the Mammoth Lords, Varisia, Ustalav, and I believe I'm missing one or two. So it may not be just Lastwall vs. Belkzen, because as James Jacobs stated in his Ask thread, when a truly charismatic leader shows up and rallies the tribes, it could take a large alliance to put them back down. I could definitely see Dwarves getting in on it to retake their Citadel, or they'd miss a huge opportunity to showcase a classic story.

Heck, it could even be the Dwarves starting the whole thing and their success provoking the Orcs into banding together against a common enemy.

Also, kidnapped half-orcs as casters and strategists are some-what common ideas among Orcs, giving them some extra diversity. If they're making an Belkzen AP, they'd probably at least keep Orcs visible, probably mix up encounters with them and other beasties. It would also be a prime opportunity for more of the troop unit types from Reign of Winter at higher levels.


Pathfinder Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:

Orcs could have monstrous allies, could have an alliance with a casty race, could have dangerous waaugh machines, or beasts of burden, could have half-orcs, half-trolls and half-dragons.

Fighting the horde could work, especially if they has Dragon pals.

Perhaps the orcs are allied with the giants hinted at in the upcoming Giant Slayer's Handbook?


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Kairos Dawnfury wrote:

Well, if you look at Belkzen, it's surrounded by vastly different countries. Lastwall, Realms of the Mammoth Lords, Varisia, Ustalav, and I believe I'm missing one or two. So it may not be just Lastwall vs. Belkzen, because as James Jacobs stated in his Ask thread, when a truly charismatic leader shows up and rallies the tribes, it could take a large alliance to put them back down. I could definitely see Dwarves getting in on it to retake their Citadel, or they'd miss a huge opportunity to showcase a classic story.

Heck, it could even be the Dwarves starting the whole thing and their success provoking the Orcs into banding together against a common enemy.

Also, kidnapped half-orcs as casters and strategists are some-what common ideas among Orcs, giving them some extra diversity. If they're making an Belkzen AP, they'd probably at least keep Orcs visible, probably mix up encounters with them and other beasties. It would also be a prime opportunity for more of the troop unit types from Reign of Winter at higher levels.

I actually wonder if this isn't going to be the Dwarf AP that has been talked about. Maybe the dwarves are trying to reclaim the Sky citadel in Belkzen.


There is a runelord under Belkzen ?


Justin Franklin wrote:
I actually wonder if this isn't going to be the Dwarf AP that has been talked about. Maybe the dwarves are trying to reclaim the Sky citadel in Belkzen.

If it is, that means we'll have a better chance of having it 6 months earlier since it'll be a Rob AP :D

Edit: Runelords are Varisian, don't believe any moved further than that.


Kairos Dawnfury wrote:
Edit: Runelords are Varisian, don't believe any moved further than that.

Wasn't the area covered by Belkzen (or most of it) part of the Thassilonian empire (specifically the part of the domain of the Runelord of Gluttony, at least) in the past?

Just wondering...

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Card Game, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Seventh Seal wrote:
Kairos Dawnfury wrote:
Edit: Runelords are Varisian, don't believe any moved further than that.

Wasn't the area covered by Belkzen (or most of it) part of the Thassilonian empire (specifically the part of the domain of the Runelord of Gluttony, at least) in the past?

Just wondering...

Western Belkzen was Gastash, yes


And there's that black obelisk where it's believed the Runelord of Gluttony rests, where Tar-Baphon stayed for a bit of time, probably just sucking up powers and doing a ton of research. That is also in Belkzen.

Grand Lodge Contributor

Major_Blackhart wrote:
And there's that black obelisk where it's believed the Runelord of Gluttony rests, where Tar-Baphon stayed for a bit of time, probably just sucking up powers and doing a ton of research. That is also in Belkzen.

The Cenotaph.


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An Orc AP would be awesome. An Orc and Dwarf AP would be even better >.>


Someone please tell me that there will be at least Orcish weapons, melee, ranged, or siege (melee preferred) that utilize the Orc weapon quality, and maybe some distinctly Orc magic weapon qualities, like some sort of once per day death blow type of deal or a super charged Vicious, and some distinct Orc rage powers.

Dark Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Major_Blackhart wrote:
Someone please tell me that there will be at least Orcish weapons, melee, ranged, or siege (melee preferred) that utilize the Orc weapon quality, and maybe some distinctly Orc magic weapon qualities, like some sort of once per day death blow type of deal or a super charged Vicious, and some distinct Orc rage powers.

Ooh, Orcish / Gorumite rage powers...

Cold Iron Rage (Ex): When you damage a creature with a cold iron weapon while raging, slivers of cold iron embed themselves in the wound, forcing an arcane spellcaster to make a concentration check (DC 10 + damage dealt from all relevant blows + spell level) to cast any arcane spells for 1 round.


Major_Blackhart wrote:
Someone please tell me that there will be at least Orcish weapons, melee, ranged, or siege (melee preferred) that utilize the Orc weapon quality, and maybe some distinctly Orc magic weapon qualities, like some sort of once per day death blow type of deal or a super charged Vicious, and some distinct Orc rage powers.

My guess...and just a guess mind you...is you really won't see a lot of mechanics in this book like you want. I am basing that guess of how the other books like this are typically laid out.


I don't need a LOT of mechanics, I just need some. Some of these books do have them, some don't.


Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I don't think location-based books like this normally have mechanics beyond ones based on environments or bestiaries, from what I recall. In general, they tend to cover several occupied settlements, talk a bit about each, who's there, significant figures, a few plot hooks, cover several areas, same deal, possibly an encounter table or environmental dangers, have a bestiary, etc. The ones that have more mechanics tend to be more general, such as Inner Sea Combat, Inner Sea Magic, the various Books of the Damned and Chronicle of the Righteous, and so on and so forth. Personally, I wouldn't get your hopes up too much in regards to mechanics, based on the campaign setting materials we've gotten so far that are focused on a specific location.


Seventh Seal wrote:
Kairos Dawnfury wrote:
Edit: Runelords are Varisian, don't believe any moved further than that.

Wasn't the area covered by Belkzen (or most of it) part of the Thassilonian empire (specifically the part of the domain of the Runelord of Gluttony, at least) in the past?

Just wondering...

Ooo, this is one of those times I enjoy being wrong! Necromancer stirring up the Orcs...

Dark Archive

Kairos Dawnfury wrote:
Ooo, this is one of those times I enjoy being wrong! Necromancer stirring up the Orcs...

Between occupying the ruins of Gastash, and having more recently served as the footsoldiers to Tar-Baphon, I think it should be safe to assume that the orcs of the Hold of Belkzen are up to their clavicles in necromancy.

Add in some lingering ties to the land of the necromantically-potent Black Blood, from whence they came oh-so-long ago, and it should be all necromancer-palooza in that nation.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Set wrote:

Add in some lingering ties to the land of the necromantically-potent Black Blood, from whence they came oh-so-long ago...

Is that canon? Or something you made up? I always figured orcs evolved/originated in Sekamina.

Dark Archive

Generic Villain wrote:
Set wrote:


Add in some lingering ties to the land of the necromantically-potent Black Blood, from whence they came oh-so-long ago...
Is that canon? Or something you made up? I always figured orcs evolved/originated in Sekamina.

P. 47 of Into the Darklands has a sentence that could be read to either state that the orcs, or the megafauna used by the orcs in Belkzen (or both?) come from Deep Tolguth, in Orv.

I haven't noticed another possible Darklands origin place for the orcs (although the Quest for Sky writeup for the dwarves makes it sound like the dwarves started out below the orcs, and drove them upwards before them).


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Set wrote:

P. 47 of Into the Darklands has a sentence that could be read to either state that the orcs, or the megafauna used by the orcs in Belkzen (or both?) come from Deep Tolguth, in Orv.

Ah okay, I thought you meant the Land of Black Blood instead of Orv in general. Deep Tolguth I could see - LoBB not so much.


DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:


** spoiler omitted **

Sounds more like prattchet than Tolkien


Just saw this. Congrats, Mikaze.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Troodos wrote:
DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:


** spoiler omitted **
Sounds more like prattchet than Tolkien

That's a feature, not a bug :-)

Dark Archive

Oh my, oh my! I've been wishing for a Belkzen module and AP for a long time! This is amazing! =)

And Mikaze is one of the authors? Congratulations, M! :)


Curse you, Paizo for giving Mikaze a lucrative foothold into the industry and taking his happy shiny face away from the boards while he's hard at work on it :(

Dark Archive

Random (conversational) necromantic thoughts;

Tels wrote:

in an AP where Orcs are the primary antagonists, you're going to be fighting a lot of Orcs who are, naturally, going to be PC classed. This means is going to, usually, be locked into a certain role with very little in the way of options they can use in combat.

I mean, the Orc has a penalty to Wisdom, Intelligence and Charisma, so if you used the standard stat array for NPCs of 15, 14, 13, 12, 10, 8, then their highest starting casting stat would be 13. Even if they put their worst stat, an 8, into Strength, they'd end up with a 12 strength, nearly as high as their casting stat.

Some sort of 'elite' orcs who have no penalty to Wisdom might make them a bit more usable for something other than melee fodder (and be good for orc clerics, druids, rangers, etc.). They'd just be a version of orc like the 'dread corby' or wikiwak bugbears or color-scaled kobolds, not anything that the orc NPC would have to buy with a feat or racial ability trade-off.

Perhaps a racial 'old blooded' trait that gives them a +2 Cha for the purposes of a particular Sorcerer Bloodline (similar to the Tiefling Fiendish Sorcery racial thingie?) could also open up Sorcerer (and Bloodrager) a bit more (Orc, Undead (cause of ties to Gastash, Black Blood and / or Tar-Baphon), etc. Bloodlines seem most appropriate, although Aberrant, Abyssal, Deep Earth and Shadow are also good choices, as well as a theoretical Jotun Bloodline based on giantish relations). That 'Orcish Sorcery' trait could replace weapon familiarity or ferocity.

These are just patches for the issue, of the orc being designed mostly as a menace and not something more versatile and useful for any other type of encounter, but should serve to allow them to function without throwing a bunch of non-orcs into the spellcasting / leader roles.


Set wrote:

Random (conversational) necromantic thoughts;

Tels wrote:

in an AP where Orcs are the primary antagonists, you're going to be fighting a lot of Orcs who are, naturally, going to be PC classed. This means is going to, usually, be locked into a certain role with very little in the way of options they can use in combat.

I mean, the Orc has a penalty to Wisdom, Intelligence and Charisma, so if you used the standard stat array for NPCs of 15, 14, 13, 12, 10, 8, then their highest starting casting stat would be 13. Even if they put their worst stat, an 8, into Strength, they'd end up with a 12 strength, nearly as high as their casting stat.

Some sort of 'elite' orcs who have no penalty to Wisdom might make them a bit more usable for something other than melee fodder (and be good for orc clerics, druids, rangers, etc.). They'd just be a version of orc like the 'dread corby' or wikiwak bugbears or color-scaled kobolds, not anything that the orc NPC would have to buy with a feat or racial ability trade-off.

Perhaps a racial 'old blooded' trait that gives them a +2 Cha for the purposes of a particular Sorcerer Bloodline (similar to the Tiefling Fiendish Sorcery racial thingie?) could also open up Sorcerer (and Bloodrager) a bit more (Orc, Undead (cause of ties to Gastash, Black Blood and / or Tar-Baphon), etc. Bloodlines seem most appropriate, although Aberrant, Abyssal, Deep Earth and Shadow are also good choices, as well as a theoretical Jotun Bloodline based on giantish relations). That 'Orcish Sorcery' trait could replace weapon familiarity.

These are just patches for the issue, of the orc being designed mostly as a menace and not something more versatile and useful for any other type of encounter, but should serve to allow them to function without throwing a bunch of non-orcs into the spellcasting / leader roles.

I imagine some sort of alternate racial features, like with the Aasimar or Tiefling, might be best. Possibly swapping the racial stats to something different.

For example, giving a -2 penalty to strength, dex, and con, in exchange for a +4 to charisma would pair nicely with an Orc bloodline Orc Sorcerer.


No way. These are Orcs, and they're made to fight and win.
We don't need none of these pansy Aasimar and Tiefling alternate racial traits!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

I kind of like the idea of something like the black orcs from Tome of Horrors, a sort of badass more disciplined subrace of orc, analogous to the Uruk Hai of Tolkien. I kind of wish Paizo would create something like that...after all there are something like 6 types of goblinoid statted up, but orcs only get one.


MMCJawa wrote:
I kind of like the idea of something like the black orcs from Tome of Horrors, a sort of badass more disciplined subrace of orc, analogous to the Uruk Hai of Tolkien. I kind of wish Paizo would create something like that...after all there are something like 6 types of goblinoid statted up, but orcs only get one.

The Orcs probably killed all of the others is why.

[Edit] Tweaked quote from one of my favorite animes.
Master: Orcs, when used incorrectly, can kill your opponents!
Student: Then why do we use them?
Master: Because Orcs, when used correctly, can kill your opponents!

Dark Archive

MMCJawa wrote:
I kind of like the idea of something like the black orcs from Tome of Horrors, a sort of badass more disciplined subrace of orc, analogous to the Uruk Hai of Tolkien. I kind of wish Paizo would create something like that... after all there are something like 6 types of goblinoid statted up, but orcs only get one.

Most of the Tome of Horrors Orcs, IIRC, were just kind of generally awesome. (Net +8 to attributes, DR 1/-, etc. for the Black Orcs, best of the best. Yikes!)

If the average PC race has a net +2 to attributes, an Orc 'elite' group with a net +0 (+4 Str, -2 Int, -2 Cha, Orcish Sorcery *or* +2 Str, +2 Con, -2 Int, -2 Cha, Orcish Sorcery) would still be an upgrade from the current net -2, and help make them not kind of suck as much at *all* spellcasting classes, and still not be 'as good' as the net +2 an elf, dwarf, human, half-elf, half-orc or Halfling has.


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Axial wrote:
The age of Men is over. The time of the Orc has come!

WAAAAAGH!!!!!!


Blackvial wrote:
WAAAAAGH!!!!!!

Pathfinder's Orcs are so awesome, their WAAAGH gets extra A's.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32

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This sums up my feelings on a Belkzen book.


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I love Orcs.
I can't wait for this book to come out.
Day 1 purchase.


I figure I should post here once a month until it gets closer to release, just to keep people talking and wondering about this book.

I'm so friggin pumped for it too, you have no idea.

WAAAAAGH!!!!!


I could so easily do something similar to Shadow of Mordor using this book. Have an army of unique and different Orcs that the players have to contend with.

I might just be coming off a post Shadow of Mordor high though.

Dark Archive

Interesting, a couple months ago I finished a campaign that was primarily located in Belkzen. Should be a good read to see what I could have done better, and what I got right.

Grask Uldeath better get an article, he's one interesting Orc.


Spells for orc shamans, please.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Tabletop Prophet wrote:

Interesting, a couple months ago I finished a campaign that was primarily located in Belkzen. Should be a good read to see what I could have done better, and what I got right.

Grask Uldeath better get an article, he's one interesting Orc.

Oh, there should be quite a bit about Grask.


What about the second most powerful warlord, Hundux half Mann? A lot of questions remain about his actual power, influence, and parentage thanks to towns of golarion.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Major_Blackhart wrote:
What about the second most powerful warlord, Hundux half Mann? A lot of questions remain about his actual power, influence, and parentage thanks to towns of golarion.

Hundux Half-Man, the lord of Wyvernsting? You'll learn about him as well.

Remember that the Hold of Belkzen is a pretty large place, and I was only able to go into so much detail about each of the places. The format of this book (as far as I know) is very similar to the Campaign Setting books on Numeria, the Worldwound, and Osirion that preceded it, so you can expect a similar level of detail about any particular place or person (i.e. a lot more than has been published up to now, but not nearly as much detail as you get in an AP article about a location or in a book like "Towns of the Inner Sea").


Ok, been about a month, cause it's December, so I'm keeping my promise of posting here once a month to keep interest up.

Anyway, I'm still pumped for this, and the Monster Codex helped keep my interest up, though I still wish that book had a new archetype for Orcs. Still, it was awesome.

At any rate WAAAAAAAGH!!!

Grand Lodge

I hope we get military statistics (for ultimate campaign rules). Like in MERP RPG old sourcebooks.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Roger Corbera wrote:
I hope we get military statistics (for ultimate campaign rules). Like in MERP RPG old sourcebooks.

Paizo tends to leave these kinds of statistics to individual GMs, so that they may tailor them to suit their own campaigns. The only time you'll see army rosters is when they appear as part of an adventure.

Grand Lodge

Curmudgeonly wrote:
An Orc AP would be awesome. An Orc and Dwarf AP would be even better >.>

I agree!


I don't think Paizo would do a full Orc AP because of the level of evil acts it would probably involve, tho I would buy it in a heartbeat.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber
Major_Blackhart wrote:
I don't think Paizo would do a full Orc AP because of the level of evil acts it would probably involve, tho I would buy it in a heartbeat.

Well we got the Worldwound AP, which is focused on demons. Which are way worse than orcs.


No no no, I mean Orcs as PC's type of AP.
Maybe they'd do an adventure of median level, similar to the We Be Goblins series.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Actually, if Paizo would let Richard Pett do with Orcs, what he managed to pull off with Goblins in We be Goblins I would squee.

SQUEE I SAY!!!!

I guess I will just have to see what they pull off with Daughters of Fury...

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