James Jacobs

James Jacobs's page

Creative Director. Organized Play Member. 60,099 posts (62,750 including aliases). No reviews. 2 lists. No wishlists. 1 Organized Play character. 9 aliases.


1 to 50 of 17,574 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Paizoxmi wrote:
Did nex ever use magical constructs to fight Geb's undead?

Yes.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
Knowing you're a fan of The Dark Crystal, did you watch the Age of Resistance prequel show? And if so, what did you think of it?

It's on my to-do list. Haven't started it yet, because from all I've heard, I'm gonna love it and binge it and that's 10 or so hours I need to plan ahead for...

Paizo Employee Creative Director

8 people marked this as a favorite.
NumenorKing wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Voss wrote:
Desna comes across as profoundly true neutral in this snippet. More concerned with opposites and duality existing than creating weal and avoiding woe.

Neutrality being obsessed with balance is more of a D&D thing.

Desna's more trying to say that "Ugly people can be nice, and beautiful people can be awful—don't judge a book by the cover, and you should try to approach any new thing with the assumption that you might be meeting your new best friend rather than assume that the thing you just met needs to be killed or put down or ostracized because it looks different."

But the story you wrote was about something that looked like it might be beautiful at fist glance, but was in fact a horrible evil? So, isn't this actually an example of the opposite case?

What if Ghlaunder didn't have nice looking wings, would Desna have found him worth killing?

Allowing an evil being to continue in the hopes of redeeming it and making it a friend makes sense to me, but it reads to me that Desna only didn't kill Ghlaunder because he looked kind of nice on the outside.

Not judging based on appearance is a good message, and your prose and use of language is really nice, I enjoy reading it, but from my perspective the story seemed to inadvertently give the opposite message.

One more broad question though: If Duality is a trait of the Good alignment in Pathfinder, what is the Neutral alignment actually about? What is the point of Good and Evil fighting each other if they both need each other to exist, or should good characters only try to keep the two in balance?

It's a complex parable/myth, and you can't simply take it as trying to teach one thing. It's also trying to teach optimism, and to look for the positive in all negatives, and to find ways for bad things to help as well, even if only as a teaching/learning moment. And if something gives the opposite meaning than what it intended... well... myths can be good at that too, unfortunately. FURTHER this one's also teaching us to learn from Desna's mistakes. It's not as interesting if gods are infallible.

Duality isn't a trait of any alignment. It's the theme of this particular story is all. Alignments are complicated things, and you can't just say "Alignment #1 is always about this topic and thus Alignment #2 can never be about that topic."

People of any alignment can fall in love, or get frustrated, or have revelations, or philosophize on the nature of their role in the universe. There's room for all sorts of views, and limiting one kind of philosophy to only one allowed alignment is unnecessarily restrictive.

And yes... what IS the point of fighting if good and evil need each other to exist? If they didn't fight, would there even be such a thing as good or evil? Would that be an improvement?

All of which is me saying I'm hoping these parables/myths/stories do two things—give folks some insights into some in-world mythological stories and tales that are fun to read, and get folks to think over and contemplate and consider philosophical elements of faith. They do that to people in Golarion, after all, and having them spark discussions in the real world is pretty rad!

Anyway. These AREN'T meant to be rules pieces with one obvious "correct" interpretation. They're meant to be closer to poetry; what you believe and what you take from them is up to you. That's kinda what I'm trying to say in the "About the Windsong Testaments" blurb at the end. What parts of these are true and what ones are false? That's for each of us to find out for ourselves.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Ruzza wrote:

This feels like such an incredibly rude question of me to ask of our Dino Director, but this is something that crosses my mind from time to time. I think one of the most entertaining parts of APs is watching your group sort of shape the narrative and make the story uniquely theirs; with GMs changing encounters, adding NPCs, and inventing set pieces.

With material that doesn't make it in to the final book, do you hear about these ideas making it into home games around the office? Or does "cutting room material" ever end up repurposed later?

(I would totally be planning to take the scamp scrap idea into my game if my players hadn't already disregarded Calmont almost entirely. They were so caught up in the rest of the story that his meddling was like a speed bump to my group.)

Sometimes it does, usually it doesn't. Keep in mind that a lot of stuff on the so-called "cutting room floor" goes there not for word count, but because it being cut from the adventure makes the adventure better and it should STAY down there. Stuff that's great content usually finds a way to see print. A great early example of this is the extended set of encounters on the "gambling ferry" in "Hook Mountain Massacre." Nick Logue overwrote that adventure by 150%, and cutting the ferry stuff was too bad 'cause it was fun... but doing so opened up a huge chunk of space. And then that content got repurposed a few months later for his adventure "Edge of Anarchy" in the start of Curse of the Crimson Throne.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Ed Reppert wrote:

Don't you just hate when that happens? :-)

That's actually a pretty cool item. I gather it doesn't need any particular skill training or the "trick magic item" feat.

It did occur to me that summoning a water mephit might be a good way to counter a fire mephit. IIRC, though, the timing is off - the PCs would not get to Voz's shop before the fire incident.

It's just a lower level version of an elemental gem with some different fun flavor. Doesn't need anything more than that to use. Just activate it and play with your new mephit!

Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Hymn of Entropic Electrons wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
This and the upcoming stories were a blast to write. I think folks will get a kick out of some upcoming ones in particular. It's about time to get some actual creation myths for the whole pantheon out there, in other words, rather than just a myopic view from, say, Asmodeus...

Yeeeeees. Multiple conflicting origin mythoi and history via biased sources is amazing for plot hooks and adventure seeds.

Just need a bespectacled illureshi protean giggling and presenting a bunch of them, and when asked which of the conflicting stories is correct, getting a singsong answer of 'All of them!' as if causality and continuity wasn't the slightest concern. :D

Sure. That said... I DO try hard to make sure that the continuity doesn't conflict as much as possible. Asmodeus IS a liar, but not as much as you might think, in other words.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

7 people marked this as a favorite.
Ed Reppert wrote:

Calmont found "a parchment" that had a mephit-summoning spell on it. Sounds like a scroll to me. Now, a mephit is a first level elemental. Summon Elemental is a second level spell of the arcane or primal tradition. A scroll of a second level spell is a third level item. So we have a third level scroll of the arcane or primal tradition.

Calmont is a third level rogue. He would need the Trick Magic Item feat and trained proficiency in either Arcana or Nature to use the scroll, if he were a PC. He's not though. Even so, he has neither of the skills, nor the feat, so how does he manage to use the scroll?

Once upon a time, the idea was that the PCs would be able to find a few more of these magic parchments at the bookstore, but we didn't have room for these things so they were cut for space.

It wasn't a magic scroll in the classsic sense of the words. It was a one-shot item that lets you summon a mephit, similar to how an elemental gem works except not nearly as powerful. As presented in the adventure, there's no need for the GM to know the specifics of the way the item worked since its use and activation happens off screen.

It would have been better, yes, to have the PCs be able to find a few more copies of this scroll in the bookstore, both because that gives the PCs a fun new magic item to earn by playing the adventure, but also gives the PCs another bit of backstory and lore to help them connect the dots between Calmont and the store and why he was fired and so on.

I was originally going to design the magic parchment for inclusion in Hellknight Hill's Adventure Toolbox, but when it became apparent that there was only going to be room for two items (both of which were more important, overall, to the adventure) without doing something drastic like significantly trimming the Age of Ashes summary on pages 76–77... I made the decision to cut the parchment from the adventure before I even designed it. In a time when the design team had to do extra design passes over all the new rules content because they were the only experts at the time on the rules, it also made sense to lighten their load by a few hundred words as well.

That's the bad news.

The good news is that if folks want to include one or two of these magic parchments in their game, found, I suggest, in Voz's research room (Hellknight Hill page 46), I felt like whipping them together on the spot for folks to use right here.

Scamp Scrap; Item 4
Conjuration, Consumable, Magical
Price 18 gp
Usage held in 1 hand; Bulk
Activate (two-actions) command, Interact
Each scamp scrap contains a magical phrase linked to a specific type of mephit. You read a short magical phrase from this scrap of parchment, and then rip it in half. As you do so, the parchment vanishes in a puff of energy or material associated with the mephit—a scamp scrap that summons a water mephit would melt away into a puddle while one that conjures a fire mephit would burst into flames.
When you activate a scamp scrap, it casts a 2nd level summon elemental to summon forth a mephit that you control as you spend an action each round to Sustain the Activation.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
LotsOfLore wrote:

I am loving this adventure path! I have a question that might be trivial but it's bugging me a lot:

Why is the cinderclaw symbol on page 34 of Hellknight Hill BLUE??

Isn't Dahak a RED dragon? Or at least that's how it's been portrayed everywhere I can see...

If there's a good plot reason for the colour I would love to know, thanks!

The idea is that it's a symbol of the Cinderclaws, not the symbol of Dahak. The Cinderclaws WORSHIP Dahak, but they are not the same organization as Dahak's religion. Dahak's symbol isn't even a claw—its a burning dragon scale falling star.

The intention is that the Cinderclaws have as their symbol a claw that is smoking hot... that's all it's trying to be.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Andostre wrote:
Kingmaker has a slain unicorn that isn't decomposing because it's body is not touched by "necrophages." More than once I've seen players wonder what unicorns do with their dead if the bodies don't decompose. Cremation seems like the obvious answer, but I'd like to offer more interesting options. Any ideas?

Unicorns don't have hands, and as such they have a hard time digging graves or cremating their dead. Furthermore, cremation isn't a great option for someone who lives in the woods.

I think a more interesting option is that they let them lie where they die, and honor the cycle of life in that the unicorn's remains are now able to feed animals and eventually plants and continue the harmony of nature. It plays in with the fact that they don't have hands and aren't tool users, but also helps to cement them as creatures with an understanding of and respect for the wilderness.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Blissful Lightning wrote:

Hi James,

How does Pharasma and her agents view the use of the spell "hasten judgment" (Planar Adventures pages 40-41, and Archive of Nethys)?

She approves of it. If she didn't she wouldn't grant it to her clerics, and the text of the spell would have said so. It doesn't disrupt the flow of souls at all. It greases the cogs, if anything.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

4 people marked this as a favorite.

There are no tags by design. This specific ability possessed by this specific character does not provoke attacks of opportunity. That's one of the benefits she gets for being high level. It's MUCH easier to simply use (manipulate) or leave it off rather than write out multiple sentences describing something—it's a much more efficient way to get rules out there.

It's certainly POSSIBLE for us to forget a tag, in which case it's an error... but errors are not the norm (despite what some folks might claim). In this case, though, it's not an error.

She doesn't provoke attacks of opportunity when she uses Hammer the Chained. If she just drew her light hammer as a normal Interact action to grab a stored object, of course, she would. But when she uses Hammer the Chained, it uses its own rules.

You'll see this sort of thing happening a lot with NPCs. In order to make encounters with named NPCs more dynamic, interesting, and to a certain extent surprising or unexpected for veteran players, we'll be giving NPCs thematic powers that they've developed for their own use. I could see some of these abilities, if they gain traction and attention, some day being translated and reworked to be presented as player options, but that'd be for a separate book.

Usually.

We COULD have, for example, had a Rare "Hammer the Chained" class feat or something like that be a reward the PCs could earn int his adventure; after defeating Ilssrah, for example, we could have put in her journals as a treasure containing the formula for how to learn a version of Hammer the Chained, and then would have put a PC version of the ability in that volume's Adventure Toolbox.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

7 people marked this as a favorite.
Voss wrote:
Desna comes across as profoundly true neutral in this snippet. More concerned with opposites and duality existing than creating weal and avoiding woe.

Neutrality being obsessed with balance is more of a D&D thing.

Desna's more trying to say that "Ugly people can be nice, and beautiful people can be awful—don't judge a book by the cover, and you should try to approach any new thing with the assumption that you might be meeting your new best friend rather than assume that the thing you just met needs to be killed or put down or ostracized because it looks different."

Paizo Employee Creative Director

8 people marked this as a favorite.
waynemarkstubbs wrote:
I'm assuming that Ghlaunder is an entirely orginal creation and not in any way related to any other similarly-named, spider-associated deities of abominations and outcasts who happen to the intellectual property of other publishers?

I invented Ghlaunder a few decades ago for a short story I wrote back in college in the early 90s. Ghaunadaur was out by that point and I suspect that name helped inspire me to name Ghlaunder in a subconscious way, but this is the first time anyone's pointed out the "Gh" similarity at the start of the name.

In any event... Both of the names are themselves inspired somewhat by Lovecraft's naming conventions for Lovecraftian type deities. The two deities are similar in a few ways, but more dissimilar in more ways than they are the same. Ghaunadaur is a drow god of oozes and slimes and slithery blobs and outcasts mostly worshiped in the Underdark of D&D. Ghlaunder is a Lovecraftian space mosquito who's worshiped by humans aboveground and is associated with parasites and stagnation and is mostly the type of guy you'd see worshiped in backwoods horror themed rural towns. Not really that similar overall in my head.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
MrDerr wrote:
What is the fate of Glimmerhold now that it's within the borders of Oprak? Do hobgoblins stay clear of it like they do Kraggodan?

Haven't thought about that at all. No idea.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Cole Deschain wrote:
Are you doing all of these Windsong parables we're getting, or has it been shared out in the name of sanity?

I've written five of them so far. They'll be spread out over the next few months is my understanding. I'd love to write more of them, but we'll see how things play out I guess.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

22 people marked this as a favorite.
Spamotron wrote:

I assume the picture is how Golarion artists interpret the battle.

Because my understanding is that Desna didn't adopt a humanoid form until she encountered and came to love humanoid mortals. Who didn't exist back then.

Desna's clashed against Ghlaunder more than once. But also, she's a deity, and that allows her to reach out to alter our minds' ability to perceive her depictions even if those depictions were created before there were mortal minds to perceive in the first place.

Also if we illustrated her in her previous form no one would recognize her so that's not an option either.

EDIT: For the record, I've always envisioned Desna's pre-humanoid form to be more like a glowing light space moth. Think Mothra, but made out of stars and prismatic sprays and sparkles.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

28 people marked this as a favorite.

This and the upcoming stories were a blast to write. I think folks will get a kick out of some upcoming ones in particular. It's about time to get some actual creation myths for the whole pantheon out there, in other words, rather than just a myopic view from, say, Asmodeus...

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Bellona wrote:

What is the canon pronunciation of "Rivethun"?

RIV-uh-thoon

Rhymes with GIVE-uh-tune.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Trigger Loaded wrote:

Followup question that depended on the answer to this one. My purpose is not to try and make two trolls out of one, but some curiosity that came to mind regarding Troll brains.

So, behead a Troll, and destroy the head. Troll grows a new head. Does he have his old memories, or is he an amnesiac? I'm wondering where a Troll's memories are stored.

(Though, on reflection, given that souls are usually shown having memories of their life as well, that could explain a workaround instead of having to explain the necessity of a brain.)

He's the same troll, and keep the memories. Their memories are stored everywhere.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Mogloth wrote:

Hey James.

Yet another Sandpoint question for my upcoming Sandpoint campaign.

In order to make it feel like a living world I would like to incorporate events in the background from other APs. Mainly, I will at some point have a certain NPC go off to begin her journey. And I plan on having the start of Shattered Star happen in the background away from the PCs. Now, I would like to have the culmination of SS affect Sandpoint. My question is this - what would be a good amount of time passage for SS? 2 months? 6 months? A year? I don't have the books so I can't read to get a feel. I'm curious so I have a good idea when to have events happen.

Thanks

The timing of those events is really left to each game group to determine. Some people are okay with player characters going from 1st level to 20th level in 6 months. Others hate that and prefer years or even decades to pass. Shattered Star can play out in either case.

Now, when we decided to incorporate all of these storylines into the recent history at the launch of 2nd edition, we generally went with each Adventure Path starting at about the same time and in same order as their publications, but the endings are ambiguous–ohter than that they have to end either before the next in-world event takes place there, or that they have to end before 4719 AR.

In the case of Shattered Star, that means these events need to end before Return of the Runelords begins. Probably a year or so before so that the region has that long, at least, to catch its breath.

For me, Shattered Star feels like a medium-length campaign. In my head-canon, since there's no timer counting down, but also since there's no long-term downtime events playing out, I'd like to think that the time it takes for the campaign's events to play out is 1 to 2 years. That being about how long my campaigns tend to play out in-world. (I personally have NO problem with the idea that a 1st level character can become a 20th level one in a matter of months or just 1 or 2 years... PCs are, in my mind, the most special and unusual and mold-breaking characters in the entire game world, after all, so if ANYONE is going to do a meteoric rise to power in the game... it's the PCs.)

Paizo Employee Creative Director

6 people marked this as a favorite.
Draknirv wrote:
All of the interplanar cities have a significant population of aasimars, tieflings, or what have you. Such as the City of Brass or Galisemni or even Dis. While outsiders don't need to eat, drink, or drop loads, these native outsiders definitively DO. How do these cities handle this problem? Handing everyone a magic food fork seems cumbersome and theres nothing written about these places having any kind of farming infrastructure. So how do they feed these significant populations of plane-bred peoples? Do they mass import food? If so, from where?

Same way other cities do. By having eateries, restaurants, food shipments, markets, and support from outlying regions. These cities are magical locations, remember. They don't need farms right next door. There might be portals to distant farmlands inside of some inns for resupplies, for example. Don't let real-world supply and demand limitations from physics and reality crimp your imagination when it comes to how magic cities work! :)

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Aenigma wrote:
Who are the barbarians-gone-native on the eastern plateau that were mentioned in this blog post? Are they Kellids? Or are they Shoanti?

Shoanti. I suspect that blog post is older than the word "Kellid" in fact.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Souls At War wrote:
Has the stance about Goblins learning to read, but not write, changed much since then?

Nope. Most goblins remain afraid of words and don't write. Players who make goblins get to decide if their characters can read or write, but that hardly makes a dent in the world average for goblins, since there's only like four or six or whatever PCs in the game at any one time. (Unless you're playing PFS, in which case there's a weird sort of shared experience that goes on, but if you can accept the mental disconnect that your PC isn't the only one who went on any one specific adventure in that game, then you should be okay with the idea that just because there might be a lot of PC goblins in PFS who can write and read that that doesn't impact the world canon At All, any more than does the idea that thousands of players play the same adventure side by side...)

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Ed Reppert wrote:

Back in 2007 or thereabouts, James Sutter told us, of Seoni, "she's mostly Varisian—as might be apparent from her otherworldly grace, there's something not quite human in her ancestry".

Has she ever figured out what that is?

It's her sorcerer bloodline Sutter was talking about. It's covered somewhat in the comics I believe. I don't know for sure. In my head-canon, it's a lingering influence on her magical DNA from Thassilon though.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Trigger Loaded wrote:

I asked this once before (Over a year ago) but overcomplicated the question with a lot of details which got me an answer to a different question. My fault, so now I'll try again, more simply.

Can a troll live without a head? Specifically if you cut the head off and burn it, will the body keep living and grow a new head?

As long as you don't stop its regeneration, the troll can recover unless it was slain by an effect that bypasses hit points, I suppose.

It can't multiply though. You can't get 2 trolls by cutting one in half. As a general rule, the larger portion is where the regeneration continues. So if you cut off a troll head, the head is dead but the body regrows it unless you deactivate the body's regeneration.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
quibblemuch wrote:
To your knowledge, has anyone combined the Lovecraftian mythos with cyberpunk? (It could be in any form: RPG, fiction, animation...)

Yes. Steve Jackson Games did a Cthulhupunk book a while back for example.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Aenigma wrote:
In First Edition we had GameMastery Guide and Advanced Player's Guide. But in Second Edition, only Pathfinder Gamemastery Guide is on the schedule and there is no such a thing like Second Edition Advanced Player's Guide. Will Paizo not publish Second Edition Advanced Player's Guide?

Way ahead of you. (We announced it at last Gen Con.)

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ed Reppert wrote:
I'm beginning to run out of room for all this Pathfinder/Starfinder stuff. What should I do about that?

Do what I did when I had the same thing happen to my office at work. Add a shelf.

If there's physically no more room and you still want to keep purchasing content, either store or sell the older books you don't want/need anymore, or consider switching over to electronic format with PDFS?

We're not going to be stopping the publication of content anytime soon, so at some point you'll need to do self-evaluation as to whether you want to stop collecting, put stuff in storage, or whatever. I can't make that choice for you and have no secret solution.

More shelves is what I do.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Aenigma wrote:
When can we see the updated version of Second Edition Core Rulebook? Or an errata document for it, maybe?

Do you mean the second printing? Or do you just mean errata?

We haven't announced either yet, but we ARE moving forward with errata and hope to get that out more frequently than we did for first edition.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
Are long, metal tubes especially attractive to demons? Are there more demons in tubes than in the general population?

No. Weird question, by the way. Not sure where it's coming from.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Trigger Loaded wrote:
How do extraplanar beings 'sleep' if they don't need to? Do they actually fall unconscious, or is it more just laying down and resting their eyes/meditating? If they do sleep, can they control how long they sleep for, or do they follow human norms for sleep?

If they don't need to they don't at all. If they do, they sleep normally, like whatever might be the closest norm. Left mostly to the GM.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Trigger Loaded wrote:

You mentioned that Outsiders (And I know the term is obsolete for the new edition, but I'm assuming the general concept of powerful extraplanar beings who aren't as tied to biological needs still applies.) don't need to eat and sleep, but can do so if they wish. Two questions (Across two posts, of course.)

If an extraplanar being eats food, what happens to the food they eat? Do they still digest it? Or is it just absorbed into their mass? Is there any waste generated?

In most cases, it digests normally. Some outsiders have specific different things going on, like nabasus or barghests who have specific rules for eating.

Whether or not poop happens is left to the GM.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
NECR0G1ANT wrote:
James Jacobsaid wrote:
as [Nocticula’s] influence grows she'll get more and more into conflict with Abadar, who'd view exiles as traitors and would not be too happy knowing that those traitors have found somewhere safe and welcoming to go.
Is Abadar hostile towards those who have been banished from their homeland?

No. He (more to the point, his church) is hostile toward those who have been exiled from cities, because in most cases they're exiled for crimes committed in or against said city.

Nocticula's worshipers accept those folks in with open arms, which causes the friction.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

RumoWolpertinger wrote:
Why do you think are tentacles so prevalent in the aesthetics of many horror-like beings on Golarion (Great Old Ones, many qlippoth etc.)? Is there something inherently horrific about tentacles?

It's the influence of Lovecraft to a large extent. And yes, I feel that there is something inherently horrific about them. Tentacles are a limb no human has, and thus, being inhuman, they have an element of the "other" that is intrinsically creepy. They evoke the slithering of serpents as well, another common fear among people.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Aenigma wrote:
Does that mean, maybe several years later, Paizo can(though not necessarily will) hire Wesley Schneider to write a Bastardhall megadungeon book?

No.

It means that if we decide that it's time to do a Bastardhall product, Wes will be the first person I'd hope we'd approach to hire to write it, or at the very least let him know and give him the first refusal.

Age of Ashes spoiler...

Spoiler:
This is what I did when I decided the time was right to finally put Mengkare on center stage as the primary behind-the-scenes antagonist for an Adventure Path. Mengkare and Hermea were the creation of James Sutter, who no longer works at Paizo. I spoke with him early on about it, and while he wasn't able to write an adventure for the AP, he WAS able to write a few of the companion articles and gave me his blessing to proceed without him.

Respecting the work of others is important to me, even if that work is no longer legally owned by them because they wrote for hire or wrote while employed by a company like Paizo.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Tender Tendrils wrote:

I am a bit in love with the Anadi in the age of ashes books - they have a very unique and interesting design that is unique to the setting - are there plans or even just the inclination to eventually make them into a playable ancestry?

(I absolutely love when ancestries that are unique paizo creations are added).

Absolutely. In fact, the original intent for them was to introduce them as a playable ancestry in "Hellknight Hill," but that was back when we were assuming the ancestry rules for players would have a footprint akin to what they are for Starfinder—AKA, about 1/4 a page, or 1/2 a page at most.

Alas, the footprint for a playable ancestry expanded to about 6 pages, so we had to abandon that idea for Hellknight Hill. Instead, we decided to just introduce them as new monsters in a way that set them up in their first encounter not as foes but as allies, to see how folks reacted to them. The reaction has been, as I'd anticipated, VERY positive, so I'm hoping that some day in the future we'll be able to present them as a full PC option.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ed Reppert wrote:

Did Ancient Thassilon have any Diviners? Or Azlant?

I ask because it appears that Divination wasn't one of the seven schools of Thassilonian magic.

Thassilon didn't. It wasn't part of their tradition. There probably were in Azlant though.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Paizoxmi wrote:

Is it true that most spawn of Rovagug resembles insects like there creator.The tarrasque seems to be only non insect great spawn.

The spawn all look different; not all are insects.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Paizoxmi wrote:
If the tarrasque was teleported to Axis what would happen?

It'd do a lot of damage before something teleported it to somewhere else.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Berselius wrote:
Gorbacz wrote:
Given that Wes Schneider, who came up with Bastardhall, is now working for WotC and can't freelance for Paizo, I'd say the hopes for that are close to zero.

I'm sorry Mr. Schneider left Paizo Pubishing and I do wish to honor and respect his legacy but even though Bastardhall is his brainchild I believe it probably still is the property of Paizo Publishing and I think someone else could possibly give it the justice it deserves one day.

James Jacobs wrote:
This is pretty unlikely. We've got a LOT of megadungeons we'd love to do, and Bastardhall is only one of them. And since it was Wes Schneider's focus... out of respect for him having left the company, I'd rather focus our megadungeon attentions elsewhere.
While I understand that I am hoping that one day Paizo Publishing will indeed give us a Bastardhall megadungeon. Until then, like the Strigoi who slumber in tombs beneath Ustalav, I shall wait patiently. ;) :D

Bastardhall is still owned by Paizo, but we've got a lot of other things to do to. I'd rather let Bastardhall go than take it somewhere Wes didn't intend, and instead focus our efforts on locations current employees and writers are excited to explore instead.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

5 people marked this as a favorite.
baron arem heshvaun wrote:

James, looking good on the chat!

Blood Mistress Jakalyn is going after Tar-Baphon????

What?

Please elaborate where you can.

I had dinner with Erik Mona and and the lovely Lou Agresta last week, I would have pressed Erik on this!

Stay tuned! More is on the way! Think of that quip as a teaser for an upcoming book, if you will. (Cause that's what it is.)

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Chief Cook and Bottlewasher wrote:


So you expect to be able to(re-)stat Baba Yaga or a similar being without needing new 'mythic' rules?

Cool!

It's possible, but whether or not we will... haven't decided yet. Don't wanna stat anyone of that power up until we decide what to do, if anything, to support that level of play.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
The-Magic-Sword wrote:

As a follow up clarification, you suggest we wouldn't need new mythic rules to do it-

do you think if such entities were statted currently (given that Treerazer is 24, and the encounter guidelines only go four levels up) that PCs would be able to deal with them using the resources core to the game (level 20, +3 magic items?)

or

did you just mean it'll be easier to design than in the past for a pf2 math reason and tack a couple of extra levels on to bring CL 25+ into range when the time comes?

The second. It's going to be easier to expand the game, I think, beyond 20th level. We have no plans to do that at this time, but I don't think we'll need to do what we did with Mythic, which was to build a half-again entirely new game.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Thomas Seitz wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Paizoxmi wrote:
Are zombies of outsiders possible?
Yes. Although in 2nd edition the term "outsider" is obsolete.
So if Outsider is 'obsolete" then what do you call denizens that aren't from the Material Plane? Or have extra-planar heritage?

We call them by their names, or their group names. Fiend, celestial, elemental, whatever. If we want to group them all together, I suppose we'd just call them "otherplanar creatures."

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
The-Magic-Sword wrote:

I'm working on my conversion of my homebrew setting, which takes a more shinto approach to gods, with countless gods that are present in the setting (contrasted with the all powerful PF and DND standard)and that use stat blocks of common monsters, maybe with a template. I'm working with the power level of the strongest beings in the setting, and what I'd like to know is:

Is the Empyreal Lord/Demon Lord/ etc 'demigod' (seemingly CL 25+) tier referred to in the books (what Treerazor is trying to become) something that you think may be'in play' as far as players fighting them, eventually?

Yes, that's the whole point of the demigod "tier"—to include creatures who push the boundary of what a mortal PC group can handle. At least, in Golarion. Feel free to adjust as needed for your homebrew, but keep in mind that the lower level you make your divinities, the less "permanent" they'll be since they'll be killed sooner. With the math being more supportive and workable at higher level than in 1st edition, this is even MORE likely to happen than in 1st edition because we won't need to do a stunt like Mythic Rules to justify the stat blocks.

Even in Golarion you could, technically, have a level –1 quasideity. It's just that a level –1 quasideity probably won't be around long enough to establish a cult before it gets stepped on or killed by a pig or eaten by a cat.

And it's Treerazer, with an "e" at the end. He destroys trees. He doesn't shave them. :P

Paizo Employee Creative Director

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Staffan Johansson wrote:
The box looks bigger than the old ones. Is that just the mock-up, or is it actually bigger?

It is indeed bigger. Turns out that's what happens if you do a Bestiary with about 100 more monsters...

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
SOLDIER-1st wrote:

In PF1, Outsiders breathe, but do not need to eat or sleep (although they can do so if they wish).

Since Outsider is not a trait in PF2, does that mean that denizens of the Outer Sphere need to eat and sleep now?

Depends on the denizen. It's safe to assume if a creature didn't need to eat and sleep in 1st edition, that doesn't change in 2nd edition, though; those elements will only really ever impact story flavor and stuff like that, and never the rules of combat really. As such, if/when we do a product for 2nd edition that focuses on providing a lot of flavor/lore information on these creatures and not focusing on the rules for fighting and stuff, we'll say so there. But it's gonna just repeat what we said in 1st edition, so there's not a super huge push for us at this point to do a book like that... we want to do some new stuff too, after all, rather than just reprint 1st edition content over and over!

Paizo Employee Creative Director

5 people marked this as a favorite.
CorvusMask wrote:
So if Axis' law enforcement would ever somehow catch Norgorber(since isn't his realm basically Axis' black market?), do they even have jail for gods?

They do have maximum security facilities capable of imprisoning demigods, but they're one-guest-only locations that would have to be custom created.

They do not have jails capable of keeping a full on deity like Norgorber imprisoned. Remember how much work it took to imprison Rovagug? It's POSSIBLE, but it'd be a storyline so foundational and fundamental to the setting that it would be a core part of the world's mythology, and after over a decade of talking about the world's mythology and never once mentioning something like this... I feel it's safe to say they don't exist.

Norgorber wouldn't be caught by Axis's cops anyway. He's too awesome.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

11 people marked this as a favorite.

We aren't trying to limit Golarion to a single era in real-world history. We have things from the ancient world, medieval world, modern world, and the theoretical future all mixed together in the same setting. That's part of what makes it a fantasy setting and not a historical setting. The British Empire also didn't have people capable of casting wish or the potential to hire dwarven smiths or the possibility of an alliance with giants or dragons or the like, after all, so assuming that one era in Earth's history limits what we can and will do for an era in Golarion's history isn't going to be accurate.

In fact, answering "does it look cool?" is as important, and in some cases MORE important, to us than "will this feel historically inaccurate?"

A ship with cannons like you see in the Absalom picture would not cause everyone in the city to drop everything and marvel at the wonder. If ANYWHERE in the setting is going to have regular visits by ships outfitted like this, it'd be Absalom, after all. By showing a ship like that sailing into the harbor, we're trying to show that the city is a Big Deal.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

6 people marked this as a favorite.
Rysky wrote:
Also they're more distinct than Angels are from Archons and Azatas, if you put a bunch of those three next to each other people likely wouldn't be able to tell which is which.

In 1st edition perhaps. In 2nd edition...

Azatas are carefree fey-looking glowing creatures, often with pointed ears; they're swashbucklers and partiers.

Angels are often androgynous, often have halos, and have wings and generally wear light or no armor; they're messengers and guides.

Archons are heavily armored; they're soldiers and defenders.

1 to 50 of 17,574 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>