Storm Hag

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baggageboy wrote:
Spell cartridges is a pretty good option for this class combination.

Spell Cartridges is difficult to fit into a build due to the extra feat it costs. At higher levels the fact that it uses your swift action economy is a bit of a problem, and it takes steep competition from shadowshooting weapons that don't require any feats whatsoever.

Nosta1300 wrote:
So would myserious stranger 1 x Juggler Bard 4 be any good?

Very solid approach. The one caveat is that Mysterious Stranger has no way to fix misfires quickly. Ensure you know the Mending cantrip and learn the Jury Rig spell as options to quickly deal with the inevitable misfires. However, the ability to get Cha-to-damage synergizes very well with the bard and if you want to two-weapon fight with firearms this is one of the few ways that works well out of the box.

In terms of feats you need Point Blank Shot and Precise Shot. You're an obligate ranged attacker, you can't afford to be shut down by enemies closing into melee range. After that you'll want either Arcane Strike and Spell Cartridges or Rapid Reload and Rapid Shot. Long-term you'll want all of Deadly Aim, Rapid Shot, and Two Weapon Fighting to complete the build.


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Entymal wrote:

I love playing blaster mages, and I disagree with the common sentiment that they're sub-optimal. But I often play solo when I play a wizard and I don't have anyone there to kill my controlled mobs for me. I have to do it myself. This may skew my perspective.

So how would you go about building a solo wizard that isn't a blaster? What tactics would you use?

Blasters are indeed quite good for solo play, since a level-appropriate encounter for a single character is well within nova range for a well-built blaster build. Having some means of dealing hit point damage is important for solo-wizards, as it's a good catch-all for when other tactics aren't effective.

As a solo wizard, I'd be inclined to hedge my bet with some at-will weapon attacks so I'm not completely dependent on spellcasting. I feel the best option is going into Eldritch Knight and taking the Elven Battle Focus feat chain and the Knowledge is Power arcane discovery to get Int-to-damage, Int-to-CMB, and Int-to-CMD. With a finessable weapon like an elven branched spear or elven curve blade you avoid being overly MAD and get by with just Dex and Int (also you can use a bow as a backup weapon pretty easily if desired).


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1) Inconsistent, but potentially powerful. The Consume Life ability doesn't work if you (or an ally) knock an enemy straight from above 0 to dead in a single hit, doesn't work if they're a construct, swarm, or undead, and doesn't work if you're in a social situation that doesn't strictly involve combat, and doesn't work when you need to capture enemies alive or (since you're non-evil) it would be immoral to execute them. That's a long list of caveats. However, when it does work you can have virtually limitless arcane reservoir which is very cool. Note that Necromantic Focus doesn't prevent you from replacing necromancy spells using Quick Study, so it's not as limiting as it first appears.

2) Put the 18 in intelligence, preferably with a racial bonus to back it up, the 15's in Dexterity and Constitution, and the others don't really matter. Putting the 8 in strength will mean bad carrying capacity, putting it in wisdom will mean bad will saves, and putting it in charisma will mean bad social skills.


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TheBobJones wrote:
I love gish builds and would love to find a way to build an EK with heavy armor full spellcasting and decent in battle.

Sadly the best option to cast in armor as an EK is to just slap Still Spell on everything, and that's not a very good approach. If you're playing mythic then arcane armor training is viable (if feat intensive) but in non-mythic it eats into your swift action economy and that's a deal-breaker.

Esoteric Knight is interesting but ludicrously feat-starved since you really want to spend 6 feats on Favored Prestige Class and Prestigious Spellcaster x5.


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The Eldritch Knight has access to better spellcasting and has a bit more freedom with weapon selection than the Magus. It is a little tough to build since the prestige class itself is barren so you have to make good feat and spell selections to get value out of it. You can also get a lot of variation through which classes you use to qualify. This means two Eldritch Knight builds can be radically different.

For instance, if you want to build a gun-using Eldritch Knight you'll get a completely different balance if you go with a Trench Fighter 3 / Spellslinger 5 than if you go with a Mysterious Stranger 1 / Sorcerer 6. Without knowing more about the direction you want to go with your Eldritch Knight it can be difficult to provide specific build advice.


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There is the Empathic Diplomat and Persuasive Insight traits that allow you to apply your Wisdom ability score to Diplomacy in the place of Charisma, and Clever Wordplay which allows you to select one Charisma-based skill and use your Intelligence modifier for that instead. Since a good Wisdom score is useful for pretty much any class (who doesn't appreciate a solid Will save?) and another trait can be used to get class skill bonus, this really allows you to use any class or archetype you want. Heck, even the Fighter is a pretty solid choice for a skill monkey these days. With Lore Warden and Versatile Training (advanced weapon training) you can bring it up to effectively 6 + Int skill points.


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Reaping Strike deals energy damage, which is never multiplied on a crit.


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Leitner wrote:
CR is more an art than a science.

CR tends to be very easy to judge at low levels, where you can simply compare a monster's stats to guideline tables. At high levels abilities start to matter a lot more than raw numbers, so it becomes increasingly subjective. A Neolithid Cleric 16 is so far outside of the boundaries the CR guidelines were meant for that it's basically just a technical way to assign an XP value and cannot truly measure the danger level (which, to be clear, is extreme in this case).


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Sammage wrote:

I have roughly 4k xp now at lvl 3

...
I am a human fighter Str: 16, Dex: 16, Con: 14, Int: 13, Wis: 10, Cha: 9. (can't change these)
...
I chose Falchion as my weapon before I realized how slow leveling was going to go. (could change this if I wanted...even changing to a sword and board I think...though I don't have access to a shield right now)

- Feats are Dodge, Power Attack, Point Blank Shot, Weapon Focus (Falchion), Cleave. (can change these up)

I would agree with dropping Point Blank Shot. If you're actually close enough to an enemy to benefit from it, you should be drawing your falchion instead. You should still keep a bow, but it's your secondary weapon with melee being your primary. Don't bother investing feats in it. You could drop the melee weapon instead and focus on ranged if you prefer, but I get the sense you lean more melee.

Cleave and Dodge are poor feat choices. Cleave is just an underwhelming feat that gets worse as you level up, and there is a better option than dodge. Magus Black mentions the Iron Will feat first for a reason; your will save is your Achilles heel as a fighter, not your AC, so if you're going to take a feat to bolster your defenses make it Iron Will. Your high dexterity makes Combat Reflexes a very attractive pick.

The falchion is a fine weapon and there's no reason to change that if you're happy with it. If you want to be more defensive, the answer is to go with longer reach. A shield will protect you from damage, but does nothing to help your allies. A reach weapon will give you a larger threat range and make it more difficult for enemies to engage your allies in melee. Alternately you can just convince one of the mages into casting Enlarge Person on you, which will give you natural reach. If they're being resistant to the idea, just remind them that it'll make their meat shield bigger.

While you won't be able to get access to it until 5th level (which will be a ways off given your slow XP track) you should seriously consider taking Advanced Weapon Training for Warrior Spirit. If you're in a low magic setting then lack of magical weapons will be by far your biggest problem, and Warrior SPirit allows you to make your weapon magical by sheer force of will twice per day. It's an incredible power in any circumstance, but even better in low-magic settings.


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It appears to allow your mind-affecting spells to ignore all aspects of the undead creature type, so that would work for affecting them with mind-affecting abilities. However, it's written just vaguely enough that a restrictive GM might shoot it down.


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The Leshy Warden and Treesinger archetypes allow you to have a leshy or plant familiar respectively.


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Cevah wrote:

Good for 3/pay uses on a spell of 1st to 3rd level, such as Heroism.

/cevah

Threnodic Spell does not work on heroism. It gets around undead immunity to mind-affecting spells, but does not bypass the restriction that undead cannot benefit from morale bonuses, so threnodic heroism still doesn't affect undead.


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Yqatuba wrote:
blahpers wrote:
Wait, are we talking gender or biological sex? Changing gender is a bit more complicated.
Biological. If a spell can change a human into a dragon or elemental, just changing their gender should be easy.

You're conflating "gender" and "sex". They're two different things that are commonly mistaken as synonyms. It's generally understood that the Girdle of Opposite Gender just swaps your sex and nothing else gender-related (which is a nuanced subject, so I'll just link a Wikipedia article rather than going into detail of gender here). blahpers was pointing out that if it actually swapped gender it would be drastically more complicated.


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RAWmonger wrote:

EDIT: although, are the spell manifestations a *source* of light? Are they the light itself? If I wave a torch around while invisible, is the fire of the torch invisible, or just the wood/metal/fuel? Is fire the source of the light? Or is it light? Is the chemical reaction taking place the “source” or is it the fire that’s the source

What have you guys done to me

Welcome to the rabbit hole. I assure you everything you just considered and then some has been thoroughly discussed in previous threads. There's a reason there is no community consensus on this matter.


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This is an openly debated subject with no official answer, and it has potentially far-reaching implications. If an invisibility spell on the caster does make spell manifestation invisible, then any form of total concealment would as well, and that opens up a huge number of options for concealing spellcasting actions, most notably a successful stealth check (full disclosure, this is how I rule it at my table). If it doesn't, then the exact space of the invisible spellcaster is revealed when they start casting the spell, which invalidates many conventional combat tactics with invisibility. Paizo never officially took a stance on the matter, and there's never really been a consensus from the community on the topic.

RAWmonger gives a good ruling on how to handle identifying a spell based solely on its verbal components if you want to run it that way, but it doesn't solve the visibility issue.


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Given the plethora of half-breeds implicit in the Pathfinder rules, I tend to think that "life finds a way" is a good rule of thumb to go with. Exactly how is best left unmentioned.


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P=NP? wrote:

The wish spell reads "inherent bonuses to a particular score do not stack" {core p.370}. Does

this apply also to the Manuals and Tomes [core p.522, 531} that grant inherent bonuses?

They don't stack, sadly. If you read a +2 manual, then reading a +1 manual does nothing for you. If you read the +1 manual then the +2 manual then the bonus from the +2 manual replaces the previous one. Same deal with wishes.

It's a rather silly rule that means most players will never waste cash on any inherent bonuses lower than +4, since when you get around to upgrading your inherent bonus you just completely lose all your previous investment.


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I've been working on and off on a Age of Ashes Conversion Guide which, of course, converts all PF2 monsters to an equivalent PF1 statblock. I've finished converting book 1 and have already converted all the monsters for book (although nothing else as of yet; working on the NPC's currently, then I'll get around to specific conversion notes for events and areas in the adventure).

I'm doubtful that anything like this would be a viable commercial endeavor, and it's much more realistic as just something that fans can do and post conversions. The conversion process itself isn't too hard if you have the system mastery to know how to do it, but it is time consuming if you want to do a good job of it).


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blahpers wrote:
Heh. One person's "might as well just play a fighter" is another's "CHALLENGE ACCEPTED". : D

To be fair, getting a teleportation-based build to work on a Fighter isn't easy. You have Teleportation Mastery and Flickering Step, but that's not a whole lot of uses per day given the heavy feat investment required.


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Firebug wrote:
Would there be any options available through Shadow Enchantment?

Very dubious; the Shadow Enchantment spell is still duplicating the effect of the spell in question. If that spell is a Mind-Affecting Effect, then it should still be even if the effect was created by Shadow Enchantment. It doesn't explicitly state that it inherits the keyword so there is some wiggle room to rules lawyer it, but if this came up at my own table I'd shoot that down and say it's still mind-affecting. It would be easier to get around this with the Threnodic Spell metamagic.

The go-to buff option on the Enchantment spell list is Heroism, which gives a morale bonus. Undead explicitly cannot benefit from morale bonuses (completely independent of their immunity from mind-affecting spells) so even if you got past their immunity they still won't actually benefit. Same deal for the Bless spell. The only way I'm aware of to get around this problem is with the Undead Sorcerer bloodline arcana, which straight up causes them to be treated as if they were of the humanoid creature type instead of the undead creature type, bypassing both the immunity to mind-affecting and the inability to benefit from morale bonuses at the same time. Undead Sorcerer is normally a pretty terrible bloodline, but buffing allied undead is one of its legitimate niches.


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Wonderstell wrote:
I figured "tome eater" was a joke about consuming knowledge. But nope. Literally eats books.

My first introduction to that archetype was in an AP. Three glorious words: Otyugh Tome Eater.


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Magda Luckbender wrote:
How is Vital Strike, already a mediocre feat, even useful to any sort of Wizard? Seems like a poor idea from the start. High BaB requirement feats are supposed to be inaccessible to Wizards ...

It's almost certainly a polymorph build that uses a natural attack that has a huge number of damage dice to begin with. Normally these kinds of builds are done with the Druid, but there's no reason you couldn't do it as a Wizard, provided you go into EK to actually meet the feat prerequisites.


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Feats with high BAB prerequisites are supposed to be inaccessible to Wizards. The only way to qualify would be to actually increase your BAB, for instance by entering the Eldritch Knight prestige class.


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I trust my players to do their own bookkeeping, and have been fortunate to have never been in a situation where I've felt it necessary to audit them. I have enough prep-work to do during and between sessions without tracking their wealth and expenses.

It'll take a load off your mind to let your players handle this bookkeeping, so I would recommend discussing such a change with them.


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It's a 3.5 feat that never got converted to Pathfinder, sadly. Magical Knack is the closest we have.

Tangentially related, we have the Prestigious Spellcaster feat. It only works on prestige classes with "dead" spellcasting levels, and is only gives back one level, but it gives you spells known and spell slots and not just caster level.


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I was more referring that if you wanted to take Magical Knack as well, you would need to take the feat twice (once for Curator, once for Knack). Of course, the metamagic point is a legitimate one as well.

If you were to rebuild this from 1st level you could take Curator in the place of your two free traits at character creation, then take Additional Traits a single time to take both Magical Knack and Magical Lineage. Definitely a lot smoother if building from the ground up.


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JiaYou wrote:
Can't the Additional Traits feat be taken after level 1?

You can, but he'd need to take the feat twice to do what baggageboy describes, which is a pretty heavy feat tax and not really realistic if he can't retrain.


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Fumarole wrote:
Are your players racist, or do you suspect them to be so? If not then I don't really see how this is a problem. If so then you might want to find new players anyway.

If you wait until you've already made your players uncomfortable with the content or presentation of your campaign, then you waited too long. It's not that Captain Morgan is intentionally including racist caricatures in his game (because it seems very clear to me from what he's said that he would never do that, and his players doubtlessly know him better than I do), but rather that the presentation of the charau-ka veers close enough to an existing caricature that real-world racists use. Even though it's not the intended interpretation, that connection could make the experience very uncomfortable for one or more players, which is the kind of intrusion we don't want to seep into our escapism.


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Most of the plot issue caused by these modifications should be fairly straightforward to maneuver around. There is one that could prove a problem, though:

Tyrant's Grasp Spoiler:

the Whispering Tyrant is sealed away in Gallowspire and cannot leave its confines until the halfway mark of that AP.

Beyond that, let me just give you a general piece of GM'ing advice that will serve you well: players are unpredictable and will seldom do what you expect them to do. Especially with all the abilities at the disposal of high-level adventurers, there's every possibility they may investigate or confront your mysterious stranger at a much earlier junction than you'd prefer. Part of GM'ing is adapting when things don't go to plan, and with a mega-campaign spanning 5 AP's you'll definitely need to rethink your plans along the way. Remember that each AP will have your players add their own mark to the world; this is material for you to use.


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If you're fully-investing in stealth (to the extent of dropping feats into dampen presence) you should be able to succeed stealth checks very consistently, to the point of often succeeding on a natural 1. For instance, a 10th level Halfling Rogue with max ranks in stealth, 24 dex, and shadow armor would have +29 stealth for a minimum result of 30. If the enemies you're scouting are just taking 10 on passive perception, this is auto-succeed against most CR 10 monsters even if you're breathing down their neck. Especially if you're cautious enough to keep some distance, a stealth specialist can be reasonably safe from discovery.

I do agree that most of the time you won't have the entire party being stealth-capable, but it does happen and is the case in my current War for the Crown game. No one even even collaborated on that one, everyone just came to the table with max ranks and class skill in stealth.


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Wonderstell wrote:


...so there's prestige class archetypes now. Interesting.

It's basically a Divine caster version of the Arcane Archer and a Psychic caster version of the Arcane Trickster. This doesn't really fit within the scope of the guide, as it's actually swapping your base class completely rather than just a couple class features.


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Claxon covered the big issues.

It's worth noting that at these levels that the Shadow Enhancement for armor is really affordable at these levels. +5 competence bonus to stealth for 3750 gp and effectively being a slotless augmentation of your armor is a really sweet deal. Improved and Greater are also incredible, but those get very pricey very fast.

Always remember to apply bonuses and penalties! Enemies making opposed perception checks take a -1 penalty for every 10 feet of distance between you. If you're sneaking past at a 30 ft distance, that's a free -3 to their perception. Bad lighting and conditions can also help you.

The big problem with stealth is party dynamics. Unless the entire party is built for stealth, some people will be left out of stealthy shenanigans and that can cause friction. If your party is open to stealthy tactics, however, it's a great option that can frequently be part of your overall solutions.


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No, it doesn't grant you a fly speed, it just increases it if you already have it. If you were to gain a flight speed (even a temporary one, for instance by being targeted with a Fly spell) then your bonus to fly speed would apply on that.


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Mage of the Wyrmkin wrote:
I find that being able to win on round one on encounters that will challenge the party is far more important and powerful than having extra spells for cleanup. Generally in most scenarios there are only 1-2 encounters that are a true challenge to the party. You just do not need that many spells to win the game.

A 15th level Exploiter only has two 8th level spell slots. A specialist with his third slot could support preps like Mind Blank and Discern Location while still having a slot left over for combat. Something has to give for an Exploiter since he doesn't get that bonus spell slot; in this way you feel the reduced spell slots even before the very first combat encounter of the day. This isn't a versatility drop because you still have lower-level slots as an alternative, it just means you will be at reduced power in some respects because you didn't have enough high-level slots to cover all your needs. So yes, even if it's just 1-2 encounters per day you're still feeling the Exploiter's reduced slots.

Beyond that, by-the-books encounters aren't particularly challenging, especially at high levels. AP's in particular are built to a conservative baseline, and GM's raise the difficulty to match their own table's needs. A strong archetype should be able to handle a "stress test" of more difficult encounters, encounters with better tactics, and more frequent encounters. The Exploiter's lack of spell slots puts it under much more pressure than a standard specialist Wizard in this regard. Again, it's still not a power drop since Exploits do make up for it, but I wouldn't rate it any higher than neutral in that respect.


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Mage of the Wyrmkin wrote:
Good job on the ratings. I would personally rate the Exploiter Wizard as +1 Power +2 Versatility. Potent Magic is either +2 DC or +2 CL that is a massive boost in power to a good deal of spells. IMO Potent Magic is THE reason to be an Exploiter Wizard.

Staying power is also a type of power, and the loss of the specialist spell slots is a huge reduction in that regard. Exploits do give it some powerful options, but this is tempered by the loss of daily resources, so I stand behind the neutral power rating.


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I find it impressive that this thread has been necro'd 5 times.

I've always interpreted Stealth Synergy as "you all take the highest roll and add all your own modifiers to Stealth to your own result."

The feat is definitely poorly worded and it's a shame it never got a FAQ to formally clarify it, but this is a sane and simple ruling that I suspect is what was intended.


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Yes; while using Weapon Versatility in that manner it counts as a piercing weapon, and thus qualifies for Hamatula strike. I'm not sure how exactly you'd impale someone with a hammer, but it works.


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Derek Dalton wrote:

I have been looking up feats for a retrained character and found a metamagic feat that makes all damaging spells non lethal at zero level adjustment. You could if you have a feat available do that for your offensive spells.

...
There is also a racial traits that allows you to make nonlethalweapon attacks without any penalty.

The Merciful Spell metamagic option is a decent one for Sorcerers, but Summoners simply don't have any good damage-dealing spells to use it with.

Racial abilities also won't help you with non-lethal weapon attacks, since your eidolon can't benefit from your racial abilities. If you're only using bludgeoning natural attacks, then the Bludgeoner feat could work for you. Otherwise, best thing you can do is get an Amulet of Might Fists enhanced with the Merciful weapon enhancement, but that costs 16000 gp so it's a bit too pricey at the lower levels.


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Bartram wrote:
Book 6 might be challenging. The first dungeon boss fight consists solely of creatures with Immunity to Magic. Not sure how this group would handle that, but for the most part they should be ok.

Some encounters will be more difficult or less difficult based on party composition; that's normal. They're supposed to be 17th level by this point, and quite frankly if they have nothing to deal with magic immunity at such a high level then they're doing something wrong. Sorcerers have like 50 spells known by this point; if literally nothing on your list is useful, that's a problem with your spell selection.


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No, you are not flat-footed. You are only flat-footed if you have not yet acted in combat, and acting on the surprise round means you've already acted in this combat encounter and are not flat-footed.


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Probably the easiest way is just to rebuild her and pick the options that fit closest to the 5E options she took. Pathfinder 1E does not have any standard method of generating ability scores so there's no "one size fits all" way to convert it. In addition, we have a different list of skills so choosing where to allocate the skills will be a judgement call on your part to best fit her character.

Beyond that, the only remaining selections are feats, equipment, and domains. A Cleric in Pathfinder receives her choice of two domains from her deity. Looking up Talos on the forgotten realms wiki, it seems Talos in D&D 3.5 (the closest edition to Pathfinder rules-wise) offered the chaos, destruction, evil, fire, storms, and wrath domains. We don't have any wrath domain in Pathfinder, and storms is a subdomain of weather, so that gives you the choice of the follow domains: chaos, destruction, evil, fire, weather (storms). Pick any two.

Beyond that, if you have any specific questions we can try to answer them for you.


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avr wrote:
Honestly, I'd count extra spells as treasure for the PCs rather than part of the NPCs wealth by level. They won't likely have a chance to cast the extras. If they're interacting with the PCs over the long term it may matter - barely - but not enough to be worth the bookkeeping.

The primary purpose of NPC wealth by level is to control the amount of loot the party receives and keep it to a reasonable level. While it does have a secondary role in keeping things relatively balanced and consistent, optimization decisions in the building of the NPC have a much bigger impact on the overall power level of the NPC. In the case of a Wizard, spell selection and tactics is overwhelmingly the most important consideration in the difficulty the NPC will present as an adversary.

It's true that most NPC Wizards will never live long enough to change their spell prep, and thus extra spells in their spellbook is just look for the PC, and that's perfectly fine.

Cevah wrote:

Telling me that it is up to me when I am asking for your advice doesn't help. :-/

It really is just a subjective decision based on the NPC in question, "whatever feels right". There's a huge range of numbers I could spitball that would work, and without knowing the specific NPC it's hard to say if it's the right answer.

If you just want to be given complete spellbooks without having to make those subjective calls yourself, I did create a script to do that. If you don't want it to try to fit to a page limit, just set the limit really high (setting it to 2000 pages will ensure it always views the spellbook as "mostly empty"; it only starts to consider page space once it's filled at least half the available pages). You can always swap out spells you don't like for specific ones you may want.

I would not recommend rolling by hand, but here's the algorithm I used to determine the number of spells at each spell level:

Spoiler:

* Pick a number between 1 and 4. This is your weight number. Bigger weights means your spellbook will be more top-heavy. If the spellbook only contains 1st level spells, choose a number between 4 and 6 instead.
* Roll a number of dice equal to your chosen weight (ie, 2d6 for weight 2). This is how many spells you have at your highest spell level, to a minimum of 2. If the rolled number of spells exceeds the remaining pages in the spellbook, reduce it so it fits.
* If you weight is less than 5 and less than half the spellbook pages are used, there is a 50% chance the weight increases for the next spell level down. If more than half of the spellbook pages are used, then there is instead a 50% chance the weight decrease (unless the weight is 4 or 5, in which case the odds are 75% / 100% respectively). If weight ever drops to 0, stop the spellbook generation and don't add more spells.

The spellbook styles slightly change this algorithm. Slim style changes it to d4's, the starting weight is 1-2, and the maximum weight is reduced to 3. Thick style changes it to d8's, and the starting weight is 3-4.


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Cevah wrote:

I know they can get more with their WBL budget, but how many more should they get?

/cevah

That's entirely your discretion as the one building the NPC. It's really no different than selecting feats or magical items; it's just a decision you make as part of the creation of the NPC.


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Cevah wrote:
However, as they advanced, surely they gain additional spells via purchases and treasure (such as a found scroll). So how many spells should a long term NPC have in their spellbook? Which spells I can figure out. But how many choices should they get?

A spell scribed into a spellbook is really no different than any other possession. It has a defined value in GP, and just counts against their budget. You can add as many additional spells as you like, then count their value against the NPC's wealth.


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Scott Wilhelm wrote:
MrCharisma wrote:
I'm curious how they handled grappling in Starfinder/PF2, but I agree that this is probably a topic for another thread.

I'm not emotionally ready to learn a new gaming system, but I am curious, too.

In PF2, it's a use of the Athletics skill. 1 action, make an Athletics skill check against the opponent's Fortitude DC (this is their Fortitude save + 10), on a success they gain the grabbed condition for 1 round, on a critical success they gain the restrained condition. On a critical fail they can choose to either grab you or knock you prone. Grabbed condition prevents them from moving and makes them flat-footed, and gives a 20% chance for most kinds of actions to fail. Restrained is basically tied up.


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First of all, punctuation is your friend. It's much easier for people to understand you if you write in complete sentences.

Secondly, I don't see any problems here. If you feel your character prefers non-lethal methods of defeating her enemies and you play her that way, that's not a bad thing. The line between idealism and naivety can be subjective and can be interesting to explore, and unless this is causing antagonism with the other players then this is perfectly fine.

Bringing more to a character's personality is simply a matter of having more time at the table, both to expand upon your skills as a roleplayer and to play your character. Try not to think about how you would react to a situation, and instead try to put yourself in the character's shoes. The best way to explore a character is through actual gameplay, and especially early in the campaign there's nothing with feeling a character needs more fleshing out. It will happen in the natural course of the game.


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Thomas Seitz wrote:
2. I've not actually chosen a race for this build, but I was considering human yes, and the FCB for it wasn't quite the consideration but it might be for this.

It's worth noting that the Human subtype is sufficient to meet the prerequisites in this case. That means that half-elves and half-orcs qualify, and there are alternative racial traits for many outsider races (like Ifrit or Aasimar) that give them the human subtype and qualify for this FCB.


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Slim Jim wrote:
The TSS has +2 AC, because DPR-obsessed Mr. Vanilla is using a worse shield even though his class entitles him to use the best one, the tower shield, an item that must be good for SOME reason as it is doled out exceptionally parsimoniously by the design-team.

While most vanilla fighters don't use tower shields (or any shields, for that matter) that's not what we're discussing here. We're discussing options for builds that use Tower Shields, and the position that both Wonderstell and I take is that vanilla Fighter does that better than the Tower Shield Specialist archetype.

The rarity of Tower Shield proficiency is peculiar, since most classes wouldn't care to use it anyways for the same reason that they don't care for the heavy shield: they need their off-hand to be free to manipulate objects.

Slim Jim wrote:
Not getting hit is the primary virtue of the fighter class, not weapon play.

Strongly disagree. Strong defenses are a useful quality for a player character to have and AC is definitely an advantage the Fighter class has over the likes of a Barbarian, but defenses on their own do not constitute a party role. The primary role of the Fighter class is the elimination of threats in combat, and this is typically achieved through DPR. Where defense is useful, it's in being able to consistently deliver on that DPR.

Slim Jim wrote:
Versus a human who puts his racial bonus in strength, and the dwarf picking up Glory of Old and Steel Soul (because those are total gimmes for dwarf fighters), the dwarf is relatively +6 to two of his saves (+5 on the other) versus 95% of the SoS checks the game will throw at him. So no, they don't need it "as much as any other".

Setting aside that not all saving throws are against spells or spell-like abilities, we're talking about a defensively-oriented build here. The closer you can bring yourself to 95% success rate the better! For instance, a 15th level NPC Wizard (a CR 14 threat) will typically hit for somewhere between DC 24 to DC 27. What do you have? +5 base saves from fighter, maybe +5 from wisdom, +5 from a cloak, +1 from glory of old, +4 from steel soul, for a total of +20? That's somewhere between 70%-85% success rate. Adding on Armed Bravery to bring that up to 90-95% success rate on will saves would be amazingly good.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

It's not an action, it's just something your Phantom can do as part of its movement while in ectoplasmic form. Any form of movement can make use of this ability. You cannot end your turn inside the wall, and must complete your movement before the end of your turn to exit the wall. The ability doesn't state what happens in situations where you cannot complete your movement in a way that satisfies this requirement, and a GM would need to determine what happens in that case.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Zel'Nathul wrote:
"Just go wizard, its so much better than sorcerer in every way."

Anyone saying something like that would've been crass, off-top, and factually wrong.

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