Lost Omens Mwangi Expanse: coming June 2021!

Monday, September 14, 2020

Hey, there! Luis, here! Eleanor and I have been hard at work getting the next book in the Lost Omens line ready to go, and we’re proud to announce it here for you today. Lost Omens Mwangi Expanse is coming June 2021! This 312-page book will be our deepest dive in all of Pathfinder’s history into the Mwangi Expanse!

The cover art for Lost Omens Mwangi Expanse featuring a woman proudly using magic as several beautiful birds fly around her Several onlookers dance, sing, and cheer.

Mwangi Expanse Cover, Art by Ekaterina Burmak

Watch the Lost Omens Announcement Panel here!


Mwangi Expanse will be exploring various subjects that make the region what it is today. You’ll get to learn about the events that shaped the history of the Expanse, like the rise and fall of the serpentfolk empire and Old-Mage Jatembe’s rediscovery of magic. Learn about the dozens of cultures and people of the Expanse—from Alijae elves to Zenj humans. You’ll also get to understand the role of faith in the Mwangi Expanse and learn about the different gods of the region, which include established deities like Grandmother Spider as well as newer deities like Adanye, the catfolk deity of imagination and protection.

Grandmother Spider, an elderly Mwangi woman with multiple arms, sits and weaves a scarf

Grandmother Spider, Art by Valeria Lutfullina

Beyond the peoples and beliefs of the Mwangi Expanse, we’ll get to show you the region itself, traveling along the waterways of the area and trekking into its misty rainforests. The book will also take you to the various important cities of the region, like Nantambu, home of the fabled Magaambya academy, and Mzali, the temple-city home of the evil god-child, Walkena. Finally, we’ll get to experience the dangers of the Mwangi Expanse by showcasing some of the region’s nastier monsters, including old classics like chaura-kas and new threats like corpse-eating karina.

An anadi, a spider-like humanoid, stands in a friendly pose, waving.

Anadi, Art by Alexander Nanitchkov

Of course, the book will also include new rules options to play characters from the Mwangi Expanse. These include cultural items like Song’o fighting sticks or the magic masks that Alijae elves use to chronicle their genealogy. It also includes the player rules for those new deities to worship that I mentioned. Most exciting of all, I feel, are the new ancestries featured in the book. This book features six new ancestries: anadi, conrasu, gnoll, golomas, grippli, and shisks! These six represent a good mix of classic ancestries and new ancestries that we know fans have been wanting to see.

We hope that everyone out there is as excited as we are to check out Lost Omens Mwangi Expanse. Look forward to learning all about it next summer!

Luis Loza
Developer

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Tags: Conventions Lost Omens Mwangi Expanse Pathfinder Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Pathfinder Second Edition
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Wayfinders Contributor

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Aotrscommander wrote:
Michelle A.J. wrote:
If you're in it for the setting lore, I would recommend checking out Lost Omens: Legends. It is primarily a character book, but when many of those characters are heads of state or have the power to move literal mountains, there tends to be a lot of intersection there.

Thanks, but that's the sort of thing I'm least interested in of all, both from a standard of setting reading entertainment or even from a gameplay perspective, I'm afraid. It's just not something that grabs or inspires my interest - unlike, say, an entire source-book dedicated to pick-any-one of the other planets in the system or the previously unlooked at continents would.

Legends isn't an encyclopedic rogues gallery. It's a lore fest that will blow your mind, with tons of behind-the-scenes revelations about the world of Golarian. When Know Direction discussed Lost Omens Legends, Perram talked about how it made the world of Golarian real to him. Ryan discussed how it finally put much of what he didn't understand before into context.

Please note: I am biased because I wrote one of the sections. But I've never read another Pathfinder book with more delight. If you love lore, you need Legends.

Oh and back to the Mwangi Expanse: this is such a cool place to adventure! I can't wait to find out more about the anadis, gripplis and many regions in this book. (Full disclosure: still a biased author. But I am super excited to see how this book turns out!)

Your fellow lore junkie,
Hmm

Dark Archive

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Aotrscommander wrote:
Michelle A.J. wrote:
If you're in it for the setting lore, I would recommend checking out Lost Omens: Legends. It is primarily a character book, but when many of those characters are heads of state or have the power to move literal mountains, there tends to be a lot of intersection there.

Thanks, but that's the sort of thing I'm least interested in of all, both from a standard of setting reading entertainment or even from a gameplay perspective, I'm afraid. It's just not something that grabs or inspires my interest - unlike, say, an entire source-book dedicated to pick-any-one of the other planets in the system or the previously unlooked at continents would.

I know I'm talking with the choir here, but seriously, its not what you think it is, it is REALLY intricate lore and intrigue and politics book.

Like, it really fleshes out things that needed fleshing out. Like do you know what is Sun Orchid Elixir's creator's dealio or why he is still alive despite psychopomps hating immortals? Do you know how involved Pactmaster of Katapesh is in politics all over inner sea? What do you think you know about Jatembe or Nex or Geb? Have you heard of mother of modern medicine?

Also from lore entertainment factor its best lore book paizo has published if you ask me :p


Will there be character options related to the serpent folk? Ancestry, heritage, dedication feats?

Dark Archive

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kaid wrote:
Also goblins life span and lack of history means they are probably a lot more malleable than what we would find normal with humans. Enough positive interactions could quickly shift local goblin population behavior.

"Wait, I thought they were all impulsive pyromaniacs with a creepy song fetish?"

"Well, yes, the last generation was. We gave them all a few flasks of alchemist's fire and let them loose in the trashyards. (One of them actually survived, although she's a bit pyrophobic now...) Their kids, on the other hand, we've raised a bit differently. They still have do the creepy song thing. I think that's gonna take a few more generations to breed out..."


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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Maps Subscriber

One of the recurring NPCs in my campaign is an elf anthropologist who has been studying a particular goblin family for generations.

Wayfinders

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CrystalSeas wrote:
One of the recurring NPCs in my campaign is an elf anthropologist who has been studying a particular goblin family for generations.

So, besides this thread convincing me to give in and get Legends at some point, this is really interesting to me. It's such a cool concept.

How does this anthropologist account for the influences brought about on the family by their own observations? Goblins are so culturally susceptible to change; how does the character ensure that their studies are relevant to more than this one family? Not trying to deconstruct or anything, just super curious.


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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Maps Subscriber
Nitro~Nina wrote:
How does this anthropologist account for the influences brought about on the family by their own observations? Goblins are so culturally susceptible to change; how does the character ensure that their studies are relevant to more than this one family? Not trying to deconstruct or anything, just super curious.

It's a case study but includes participant-observation at regular intervals.

Off-topic drift:
So she's mostly visiting them three times a year for one day to track genealogy and their intra-tribal relationships. And, to note what external influences have changed behavior, and what prior behaviors have been abandoned or modified.

Every three years (roughly 1 generation coming to adulthood), she spends two weeks living with the family. She's already 400 years old; she's seen many generations being born and dying.

She's not concerned with relevance outside the tribe, just with documentation of this tribe through its relationships with this family. And documentation of changes no matter what the impetus. She's not averse to taking a goblin home with her for a visit, or arranging apprenticeships or internships for goblins who want to explore the rest of Golarian.

Her interests are focused on the processes of goblin cultural change, not the documentation or preservation of a particular set of mores and rites.

Think less "isolated Amazonian tribe" and more "American Amish"


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Set wrote:
kaid wrote:
Also goblins life span and lack of history means they are probably a lot more malleable than what we would find normal with humans. Enough positive interactions could quickly shift local goblin population behavior.

"Wait, I thought they were all impulsive pyromaniacs with a creepy song fetish?"

"Well, yes, the last generation was. We gave them all a few flasks of alchemist's fire and let them loose in the trashyards. (One of them actually survived, although she's a bit pyrophobic now...) Their kids, on the other hand, we've raised a bit differently. They still have do the creepy song thing. I think that's gonna take a few more generations to breed out..."

This approach kind of disturbs me, since it strongly implies the best thing to do with the existing bad tribes of goblins is to kill off the adults/kidnap the kids and raise them properly in your cultural traditions. Which has pretty awful historical overtones.

Contributor

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I don't really think anything has been "retconned" about Goblins, at least as far as PF1 going to PF2. A lot of them still do love fire, rancid food, and would rather have a pet rat than pet dog. The iconic goblin is even a bombardier. But now that it's frowned upon to kill goblins on sight, more and more of them get to branch out and and explore. They get to meet people and have experiences that they couldn't before.

I think it's perfectly reasonable, and necessary if we're going to pull away from viewing intelligent races as "monster by default."


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CorvusMask wrote:
Like do you know what is Sun Orchid Elixir's creator's dealio or why he is still alive despite psychopomps hating immortals?

Tukalo quietly pops another spider leg into his mouth, and then walks away whistling.

Silver Crusade

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Those poor Anadi ;_;

Dark Archive

Nitro~Nina wrote:
How does this anthropologist account for the influences brought about on the family by their own observations? Goblins are so culturally susceptible to change; how does the character ensure that their studies are relevant to more than this one family? Not trying to deconstruct or anything, just super curious.

I picture some sort of hunting blind, perhaps disguised as a giant book, something that goblins would totally avoid looking too closely at, in which the elf anthropologist could hide.

But then, they're goblins. The elf could probably just paint himself green, put a watermelon on his head, and be mistaken for one of the family...

Dark Archive

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thejeff wrote:
This approach kind of disturbs me, since it strongly implies the best thing to do with the existing bad tribes of goblins is to kill off the adults/kidnap the kids and raise them properly in your cultural traditions. Which has pretty awful historical overtones.

Yeah, more than 'strongly implies,' that was exactly the point, 'cause it was snarky graveyard humor about a fantasy construction, not a life goal involving real people.


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The nature of "goblin bad ideas" historically leads to "a lot of dead goblins" (not necessarily the ones who had or boosted the bad ideas) and goblins are sapient beings so can process "well, that went badly..."

Honestly, the thing that really works for Goblins for me is that most Goblins in modern Golarion are victims- either of bad leadership from their elders or of some external entity using them as tools. Your standard level 1 goblin PC never had any input on this sort of thing for which "longshanks" will relentlessly judge them. Like everyone instinctively understands not to judge every 18 year old Wiscrani by the actions of the Thrunes, but the same standard is not extended to goblins.

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