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Raegos

Ravingdork's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 16,228 posts (16,588 including aliases). 1 review. 2 lists. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 7 aliases.


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Pretty sure the first sentence of the Monster Feat section makes them PC legal: Most of the following feats apply specifically to monsters, although some player characters might qualify for them.


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My wizarding master instructed me in the arcane arts every night, as I slept.

*shudders*

I. Will. Never. Forget.

:p

(In all seriousness though, this does seem like a good way to teach an apprentice how to use magic, and to make certain they remember ALL of your lessons. Or better yet, how to create government spies who use an intersect.)


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Those monster feats are absolutely legal for anyone who qualifies for them, even PCs. There is no rule ANYWHERE saying that they are reserved for monsters. Furthermore, there is a lot of support material reinforcing the notion that they ARE available ranging from construct creation rules for PCs in Ultimate Magic, to such feats appearing in heroic non-monster NPC stat blocks.


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wakedown wrote:

Gate Guards (both): "He's a Pathfinder wearing them blasted sleeves! GET HIM!"

So you have a bunch of dirty guards running around and one clean one? One does not belong. lol.


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DM Under The Bridge wrote:
With 4 int you can still have ranks in engineering, and most certainly can "understand technical details".

Yep. It all depends on how the PLAYER wants to build and portray his character.

The GM has no right to bully people for decisions that he allowed. He has every right to rule against a decision during character creation due to incompatibility of setting or play style. In the latter instance, ideally he will work with the player in question to find something that works for all.


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John-Andre wrote:
A 4 Intelligence is barely above complete mental retardation.

It could be, but it doesn't have to be. Fun thing about roleplaying. It tends to be more versatile and freeing than restrictive.

John-Andre wrote:
The character is quite literally stupider than the village idiot.

Not according to Paizo.

John-Andre wrote:
He might understand the difference between right and wrong, but understanding technical details is completely beyond him.

I agree. He likely understands that keys open doors, but not necessarily how the locking mechanism actually works, just that it does.

John-Andre wrote:
In your example, the sorceror might have correctly used his natural gifts to turn invisible, and then to follow the team in to the jail cells, sure. He might also know that things he pick up are hidden, because he has observed this in the past.

This portion of your post logically contradicts the next quoted portion.

John-Andre wrote:
Yes, he might have seen the guard fiddle with the keys in order to close the cell gates. This does not mean he understands how a door works. To him, a lock might very well be completely magical in its working. The player might argue that he saw the guard unlock the door, so he knows how the key works... really? Did he see EXACTLY how it worked? Does he know you have to stick it in the lock, the correct orientation, does he know you have to turn the key? And more importantly, does he REMEMBER how it worked? Intelligence is also memory, and with a 4 Intelligence, this character cannot remember squat.

So he knows things can be hidden because he's observed it before, but observing a key being used is not enough? Is that not a contradiction in logic? A double-standard? Seems like an inconsistent bully of a DM to me.


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Bandw2 wrote:
Orfamay Quest wrote:
Bandw2 wrote:


people are aware that running off a cliff is going to do something bad to them. People aren't aware that using your int on 4 means you basically aren't playing and you just roll to know if your characters knows what is happening.

Well, if they're not aware, then they weren't paying attention when I audited their character sheet and explained that Int 4 was a crippling disability that would make their character probably not fun to play, and they might want to use a different stat array.

except here's the thing, he's not "not fun to play" because of the 4 int, but because of you, the GM making it not fun.

Exactly right.


The inner voice within your ear
TarkXT wrote:
Someone should mention that every cow fed to her is one less person she'll kill maim or torture.

Yes. Please do mention that.


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blackbloodtroll wrote:

Now I am reminded of the "Kanji Dice".

We had a player with a number of dice, but with all the numbers in, what he said, was Kanji.

None of the other players, or DM, could read them, but he insisted he use them, as they were his "lucky dice".

This eventually prompted a table houserule, that if everyone can't read the dice, they can't be used.

I wish I could institute such a rule, but my players would never go for it. They love their tiny, next to impossible to read dice.

I hate them with a passion (the dice, not my friends).


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Orfamay Quest wrote:
Ravingdork wrote:
Orfamay Quest wrote:


I just asked a number of people what it was (without context), and no one was able to correctly identify it
The problem with this line of reasoning, however, is that there really is no skill in Pathfinder that would govern "recognizing a modern key." So either the GM is forced to make something up to keep the game moving, or no one in the campaign world knows what keys are.
Aw,... the poor GM, having to make rulings and all that. My sympathy for the "problems" this causes is just as deep as appropriate.

Tone.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:
Ravingdork wrote:

Ability scores = natural aptitude/talent

Skill ranks = actual training/experience
Feats/miscellaneous bonuses = exceptional training/experience
Class skill bonus = synergy with your other abilities (based on class)

I can work with this.

But let's look at this in more detail. Consider this image.

I just asked a number of people what it was (without context), and no one was able to correctly identify it as

** spoiler omitted **

.... which in turn, suggests that knowledge of what that object is and how it is used is not the sort of thing you'll pick up from "natural aptitude/talent." (Suggestions about what it was included a hitch for a wagon, jewelry, or an antique marital aid.) You need actual experience with the object to identify it and know how to use it. This actual experience is what RD identified as "skill ranks," so there's some skill or set of skills that would allow you to know what it is.

The problem with this line of reasoning, however, is that there really is no skill in Pathfinder that would govern "recognizing a modern key." So either the GM is forced to make something up to keep the game moving, or no one in the campaign world knows what keys are.

I just prefer to assume that locals know what local keys look like and how they are used (but perhaps not an ancient key used by the Azlants thousands of years ago--as you so aptly demonstrated. That might require Knowledge: history, Knowledge: engineering, or Knowledge: geography [which covers people]).


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Ability scores = natural aptitude/talent
Skill ranks = actual training/experience
Feats/miscellaneous bonuses = exceptional training/experience
Class skill bonus = synergy with your other abilities (based on class)

Hoping this will help change the way people look at certain aspects of the game's rules as they continue the discussion.


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wraithstrike wrote:
Well actually he can't copy the spell into a new book without another book that has the spell or a scroll so if he loses the book it is just as good as him not knowing it.

I found some Core corner cases a few years back where the differentiation mattered.

(I don't remember what they were right now though.)

In any case, it's simple. First the wizard must decipher the spell script in question (see Arcane Magical Writings). After all, if you can't read or understand it, then you aren't going to get very far.

Then, if you have successfully deciphered the spell's script and understand it, then you can learn it (see Spells Copied from Another's Spellbook or a Scroll). If you've successfully learned the spell, you can then write it into your spellbook. (Or not. Note that there is no time limit on when that must be done. You may need to hold off to get scribing supplies first or whatever).

Once you've learned the spell (as above), I'm pretty certain it is on your list of spells known, but you won't be able to cast it until it is actually in your spellbook.

EDIT: I knew I brought this up before.


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Sorry, my "flavor description" is a bit misleading. All the spells would be scribed into his book prior to leaving on his journey.

His "studying and learning how to properly use them over time" would be him leveling up during his adventures over seas and finally being able to cast them.

The description is literally no different than the assuming that a wizard had been studying the spells he wanted to know prior to his *ping* getting them at level up.


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Just the same, I am not rewriting one of my favorite characters until someone can link me something more solid than "they said it didn't work that way."


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Nefreet wrote:

We actually have a good number of FAQ hits on this thread.

And it's certainly generating discussion.

I don't see the need for a new FAQ thread, especially when it just encourages people to comment here anyways.

Except this thread doesn't ask all the questions, at least not in one place.

The OP of this thread has 20 FAQ requests and asks:

"Can this magical item produce a swarm suit?"

That's it. It doesn't help us determine if it is transmutation or illusion, it doesn't tell us what mechanical benefits it offers if any, or anything else for that matter. If the answer comes back "yes" we won't even know what turning it into a swarm suit even does for you!

It's too narrow a question if you ask me. Even if it gets answered, it just leaves too many questions in its wake, hence the other thread.


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I was thinking more like "I want to be ready for my three-year journey across the ocean where I might level up several times, so I best make make good use of this six month period of downtime to learn and scribe a bunch of spells in advance."

Essentially, you are ensuring you have the spells you want the moment you level up because they were put into your spellbook previously.

It's not even metagaming, as the character would likely want to keep himself occupied during such a journey, and bringing extra study materials with which to learn new spells is a perfectly logical thing for a wizardly fellow to do.

I hadn't even considered it for item creation.

Every spellcaster has a spells known list, not just spontaneous ones. If I am not mistaken, then (technically speaking) if a wizard EVER scribes a spell into his spellbook, it is from that point forward considered a known spell, even if he loses the spellbook later on. (He won't be able to cast the spell without his spellbook however, so differentiating between the two is most often a moot point, however.)


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Darche Schneider wrote:

what this feat needs is an automated calculator.

There's already a few out there. At least three are linked earlier in the thread.


The inner voice within your ear

(That's why we investigate and vet him first--as we should for all council candidates anyways.)


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Tels wrote:
He's taking -2 to hit because the Greatsword isn't sized appropriately to him, but he can still wield it 1-handed.

I see how you came to that understanding, and was expecting you or another to do so (I'm quite familiar with those rules myself). The exception to the general rule provided by oversized limb, however, is that he can wield larger weapons, not that he can hold a two-handed weapon in one hand.

Though it is entirely possible you are correct, I think it's something of a (small) leap.


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Is the effect produced by the Sleeves of Many Garments an illusion effect? Or a transmutation effect? Is it capable of granting a mechanical benefit such as protecting a person from swarms as a swarm suit, or from the cold as a cold weather outfit; or is it only meant to disguise (and if so, what mechanical advantages does that grant)?

This thread is primarily for clean, organized FAQing of the question. Please go to this thread for related discussion.


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The rules are quite clear that you cannot cast spells of an inappropriate spell level. However, they aren't so clear about having said spells on your "spells known" list. Is it possible to add a spell to your spellbook or familiar as a "spell known" even though you are unable to cast it?

For FAQ and discussion.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:

Nor if you played a character with a 4 Int stat as having average or better intelligence.

Has anyone in this thread claimed to be doing that though? Has anyone even seen it during play?

I'm not so certain it's as common a problem as you claim.

Seems to me one side is claiming they don't want to be told they don't know how a key works--and rightfully so. The other side is claiming that they don't want characters with low intelligence being played as super geniuses--and rightfully so.

There's a middle ground in there somewhere, guys. All you need to do is to stop talking past each other and find it.


The inner voice within your ear

It occurred to me that we might be going about this the wrong way.

What do you think would happen if we invited that bard to attend a council meeting, so as to better observe how we do things? Or possibly even join the council of rulers itself?

If he proves to be an honest man, and really does hold the peoples' best interests at heart, he may prove to be a valuable ally when it comes to gaining the trust of the rest of the population.


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Mechanically, yes, that's exactly what would happen--and I wasn't saying it should work any other way.

Throwing the swords via telekinesis is clearly an instantaneous action. Someone could literally walk up and pick up one of your swords in between your turns, or easily destroy them with an attack (since they are unattended).

However, if they aren't doing that, I see no reason not to have some fun with a bit of flavorful description.


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As far as I can tell, that ability doesn't let you wield a two-handed weapon in one hand. It let's you wield a weapon one size larger.

He could wield a large longsword with that template, but not a medium greatsword.


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TheOddGoblin wrote:
Does the ring allow you to still take normal actions(ie: casting spells or fighting in combat) and still have the ability to telekinetically wield the swords? I'm unsure of how the action economy works on such a character but I have an idea in mind for a "warrior priest" barbarian type of character, spirit wielding his blades despite being half-crippled.

Yes and no.

The telekinesis spell requires the caster to maintain concentration for any use of the spell besides "violent thrust." Since maintaining concentration is a standard action each round, you could not cast other spells or make attacks during the same round in most cases.

However, there is no limit to how often you can use the ring's abilities, so you could hurl ALL the great swords at your foe in round 1, cast a defensive spell or make a different kind of attack in round 2, then hurl the swords at him again in rounds 3-5.

Though you are essentially dropping and hurling the swords repeatedly, I like to describe them as never having stopped moving (such as having a bunch of large, spinning blades floating in the air)--just for fun.

Also, if you craft the ring yourself, you can make it into an intelligent item so that it capable of taking actions in its own right (including activating itself). Suddenly, your swords really are always on the move WHILE you are doing other things. :D


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TheOddGoblin wrote:
Question regarding the telekinetic greatsword throwing. Since they do damage as the weapon, is it base damage or do magical enhancements apply to damage done through this technique? For example, a character toting around a greatsword of each elemental damage, and launches them all at once at someone, does each +(elemental damage) effect apply to that attack?

It is unclear. I've always thought not.

Even if you could, it gets ridiculously expensive fast and is easily beaten by even low energy resistances.


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I didn't see anything about it in the official FAQ. Could you link to some of the developer commentary, please?


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Also, where is your center exactly? You'r supposed to measure from a grid intersection with emanations and other area effects, so...how does that work?


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chaoseffect wrote:
He's referencing a common question with the Eldritch Heritage feat chain: Can you take a wildblooded bloodline with it? The RAW answer is no because Wildblooded is an archetype for sorcerer that modifies some base bloodlines. He was using that as an example for why base Fiendish Heritage would still work with Pit-touched; Pit-touched is just Infernal with an archetype.

Just because it is an archetype doesn't necessarily mean it isn't also a bloodline, and thus legal for selection by Eldritch Heritage.

Has there been any official statement regarding your interpretation?


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Yes, the blessed book, a must have for all wizards at higher levels. You can make two of them for 12,500gp, which is enough to fit all of the Core Rulebook's wizard spells and then some.

Give it to a magus of 7th-level or higher, and he can automatically learn ALL magus spells given enough time.


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FLite wrote:
Ravingdork wrote:
FLite, just because an object can be targeted by magic doesn't make it magical.

No, but activating a channel focus *does* make it magical.

Quote:
An activated channel focus radiates faint conjuration (positive energy) or necromancy magic (negative energy). An unactivated focus is completely nonmagical—it is a channel for the magical positive or negative energy, but has no magic of its own.

Unactivated = non magical

activated = weakly magical

I suspect it's the channeled energy you're picking up, not the item itself (which would be pretty odd if that's what the designers intended, as you normally can't detect channeled energy).


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Creating mythic monsters is great!

As it turns out, mythic monsters can poach abilities from other monsters, specifically anything from the Universal Monster Rules section of the Bestiaries (in addition to any standard mythic monster abilities or mythic path abilities of heroes).

Additional Mythic Abilities: The monster gains a number of mythic abilities equal to its MR + 1. Such abilities can be drawn from the mythic path abilities for mythic heroes or the mythic abilities listed with the monsters in this section, or it can be a new ability you create by taking inspiration from those abilities. These abilities should be thematically appropriate for the creature.

Some new monster abilities are especially powerful; at the GM's discretion, they can count as two abilities toward this total. For example, the mythic fire giant's fire vortex ability could count as two mythic abilities.

In place of a mythic ability, the monster may gain a universal monster ability, such as rend or pounce, either from an existing Bestiary or from this section.

So...yeah...the creative possibilities are endless! A true monster mash up!

A troll with fire and acid immunity, as well as split would be nigh unstoppable! A water elemental that can move through beach sands thanks to earth glide or burrow? Or a multi-headed hydra with the split ability that turns into two (or more) single-headed hydras when struck with a slashing weapon?

What sorts of amazing, challenging, or fun ideas can you brainstorm?


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That sounds like a weaker druid knockoff then. If they beef up the saves and base attack bonus, there may not be much of a mechanical reason to play a ranger over a shaman.


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FLite, just because an object can be targeted by magic doesn't make it magical.


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Wasum, she has Fleet twice because she wanted to be able to move about quickly. For that particular character, the animal companion was more of an after thought then anything, so not a lot of focus was put on it. (I was more focusing on getting a powerful melee character out of her--ultimately, she is just a precursor to Nudel.)

As for her casting ability, she gets some hefty boosts thanks to being a member of a Spellcasting Guild (see Inner Sea Magic) in high standing. Her position in the guild grants her the Esoteric Training ability, which is what boosts her casting abilities.


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Having varied monsters of the same type shouldn't be any more difficult than having different monsters.

I've been known to mix and match. Things like hobgoblin bullies who forced their goblin slaves into attacking the PCs. Or a pirate crew with a captain (fighter), first mate (sorcerer), and deckhands (rangers)--as well as an enslaved marsh giant. Or a wizard with a pair of "pet" manticores.


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Wasum wrote:

Is it possible that you do not like animal companions?:D

I couldnt find even one

nevermind, found Sootscale!

If you are looking for characters with animal companions, check out some of the following:

Feathered Tornado
Foerth
Magora Coldheart
Meglin Dee
Naya Foreteller
Sanat Norstag
Sootscale


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Athaleon wrote:
K177Y C47 wrote:
So.... what were people saying about blasters being weak???

Today's Blaster Wizard just wasn't possible without all the traits and feats that came out in later books, so for a long time, they really were weak.

Even now, though Blasters aren't weak, they're still inefficient. Save-Or-Lose specialists only have to push their DC's to be effective, while Blasters have to push damage and ability to defeat SR, on top of their DC's. All this takes a high-level character to put together, while a 5th-level Wizard with two traits can toss out a Dazing Stone Call in a 3rd-level slot. A Heavens Oracle can hit enemies with effective Color Sprays for most of their PFS career for free, and again with two traits, add Persistent Spell for free.

Which is actually a good thing. Throw most of your resources into blasting well, and a few of your resources into save or die effects, and guess what? You're now getting the best of both worlds!

Big bad boss? Save or die. Army of minions? BURN THEM.

Terrorize away you little spellcasting monstrosity. :D


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That's the one, Chemlak! (How is it that you are always so helpful? Is that like your super hero power or something?)


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A poster worked it all out using the rules not too long ago and found that farmers actually did fairly well for themselves, and it wasn't so much that it didn't make sense.

Maybe someone could dig up the thread? (I'm a bit too busy to do it myself at the moment.)


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I heard it said that 12 ranks guarantees 100% success rate with any spell of 9th-level and lower.


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Does Calculating Mind let you ignore numbers? If not, why does it say "as long as the number of dice does not exceed the number of ranks you possess in Knowledge (engineering)"?

Squirrel_Dude wrote:

From the land of Giantitp.com.

AnonymousPepper wrote:

So my good friend Al wrote up a little program to have a look at this... and after setting it to do 1000 rolls for every combination of skill ranks and spell levels, it turns out that 12 ranks in Knowledge (Engineering), no Calculating Mind necessary, the chance of coming out with a valid solution is 100% for every effective spell level.

All credit to GitP user alcarithemad for this one.

Of course, the primes can be extrapolated further for higher spell levels, in the case of getting higher-level spell slots. Not sure what the required ranks would be for those.

Link to Post

It seems imperfect. I tried a level 2 spell with 3 ranks and it worked. I tried it with Calculating Mind and it failed.

Seeing as Calculating Mind still lets you use d6s, it should have succeeded as well.


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Thornborn wrote:
If a good fight lasts five rounds, and your damage doubles, the opposition suddenly 'will have been' breeding doubly-tough monsters, which you'll meet very soon... I acknowledge this is not the case in PFS.

Assuming you are doing it because of a new combination the player came up with rather than typical level/CR advancement, I've always viewed this as rather bad GMing. If you are having a problem with a player character's new toy or trick, you should talk to the player and resolve the root of the problem, not compound it by killing everyone else with strong monsters.

Also, I find it best to just leave it be if it doesn't appear to be diminishing the fun of anyone else. I've found that oftentimes, the apparent problem lies with the GM alone. (Even so, a GM should strive to have fun too.) Whenever one of my players comes up with a powerful character, concept, combo, or whatever, I revel in their joy and keep the story moving forward as already prescribed by my notes or the module in question. The only time I step in is when it is causing problems for others (such as stealing away too much of the limelight or whatnot).


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TrollingJoker wrote:
The reason I started it is because I wanted a clear rule definition of int and wis.

Ask and you shall receive:

Intelligence (Int)

Intelligence determines how well your character learns and reasons. This ability is important for wizards because it affects their spellcasting ability in many ways. Creatures of animal-level instinct have Intelligence scores of 1 or 2. Any creature capable of understanding speech has a score of at least 3. A character with an Intelligence score of 0 is comatose. Some creatures do not possess an Intelligence score. Their modifier is +0 for any Intelligence-based skills or checks.

You apply your character's Intelligence modifier to:

- The number of bonus languages your character knows at the start of the game. These are in addition to any starting racial languages and Common. If you have a penalty, you can still read and speak your racial languages unless your Intelligence is lower than 3.
- The number of skill points gained each level, though your character always gets at least 1 skill point per level.
- Appraise, Craft, Knowledge, Linguistics, and Spellcraft checks.

A wizard gains bonus spells based on his Intelligence score. The minimum Intelligence score needed to cast a wizard spell is 10 + the spell's level.

Wisdom (Wis)

Wisdom describes a character's willpower, common sense, awareness, and intuition. Wisdom is the most important ability for clerics and druids, and it is also important for paladins and rangers. If you want your character to have acute senses, put a high score in Wisdom. Every creature has a Wisdom score. A character with a Wisdom score of 0 is incapable of rational thought and is unconscious.

You apply your character's Wisdom modifier to:

- Will saving throws (for negating the effects of charm person and other spells).
- Heal, Perception, Profession, Sense Motive, and Survival checks.

Clerics, druids, and rangers get bonus spells based on their Wisdom scores. The minimum Wisdom score needed to cast a cleric, druid, or ranger spell is 10 + the spell's level.

And that's about all there is insofar as gaming definitions go.


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As has been stated, the Echo abuse doesn't work. The authors of Echo Spell were quick to errata the feat's text once they realized that Spell Perfection allowed people to have infinite castings of one of their spells. I very much doubt they would allow it to grant infinite castings of nearly all of their spells.

Te'Shen wrote:
Ascalaphus wrote:
. . . Given the increased casting time, I'd say this is a good feat for out of combat spells (which is when the slightly longer player time is also less of an issue). Therefore I recommend taking Extend as one of the free metamagics. For clerics, I'd say Maximize is also good, for getting the most out of healing spells. Style points for wrapping your party into geometrically pleasing bandages.
See... that was my first thought. Extend + Heighten. Everything lasts longer and is harder to dispel/ignores minor/major globes once you run into them... perfect for a transmuter/abjurer, but I thought the idea just wasn't splashy enough.

Though RAW likely doesn't back it up, I think RAI is that Heighten Spell wouldn't work with this feat. You could do something similar when Spell Perfection came out, and the developers were quick to squash that as well (and that was just ONE of your spells rather than nearly ALL of them).


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Orfamay Quest wrote:
A GM is completely within his rights to demand of any character who dumped a stat that that character make a roll for an otherwise "routine" task that any normal person could make without trying. Trying to remember where you parked your car? Trying to open a jar of pickles? Trying to carry a plate of food without dropping it? All of these are simple checks that should be trivial but that are not trivial with bad stats.

Respectfully, I disagree. There are no rules anywhere saying you need to make checks for any of those things, regardless of what your stats may be. A GM asking for such checks is simply making up new rules out of thin air, quite possibly because they subconsciously want to punish the player for doing something different and unique, or consciously because it makes them feel more powerful and in control of the situation.

Auren "Rin" Cloudstrider has the right of it: "Some of those checks are redundant and serve no purpose but to slow down table time by punishing a PC for taking a dump stat you don't approve of."

Blackbloodtroll seems to have a good grasp of the situation as well: "This is really not about rules. No rules cover this. This is about fellow players being serious dicks. What you need, is some good advice on how to handle this."

Zagnabbit and I disagree on a few of the finer points, but not the following: "Spell this stuff out ahead of time. In the open, with everyone's input. Disconnecting stats and RP is fine, if everyone is onboard. So is playing without stats entirely (it's also way easier to do the math for basically everything, especially the GM side of things)."

zagnabbit wrote:
Knowing the name of the local Ruler is a DC 10 Knowledge:Local check. Knowledge is a Trained Only skill. So for a character to even make that check by RAW they gotta have a rank.

Not quite correct I'm afraid. You can still make the check untrained, provided the DC is not higher than 10.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Many dresses are also "layers of clothing." That doesn't mean it's not clothing.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Thanks for the help everyone. I suspect that I will get my helms now. (Which are WAY powerful as written by the way.)

Alleran wrote:
rknop wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Whether or not any one group allows it in their game is not a choice I can make, though.
What if we got you a team of commandos and a black helicopter?

They already ha-ohgodtheyrerightbehi-

Paizo don't have a crack team of commandos and military-spec attack helicopters to deploy across international borders in violation of treaties and law in order to execute kill-orders. That would be silly.

Oh what silly ideas people have! Paizo uses slayers, not commandos. ;D

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