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Jarl of the North Wind

Jason Rice's page

574 posts. No reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist.


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Mathius wrote:

Sailing ship

Ship cost: 10k
Carrying capacity: 150 tons
crew 20
Speed 50 miles/day
Cost/ton 15ton/k
Cost/day 40 GP
trip time 40 days
trip cost 1600 GP

Brachiosaurus: 9k GP
Heavy lift belt (saddle): 2k GP x2
Mule back chords: 1k
clear spindle: 4k
total: 16k
carrying capacity: 240 tons
crew 1 + spell casting
speed 2000/day
cost/ton 15ton/k
cost/day 10th level teleportation x2= 1000 GP + 10 GP animal handler

I'm going to say that they don't make pooper-scoopers that can accommodate what a brachiosaurus leaves behind. You think the fine is stiff for not picking up after your dog? Man, you don't want to be the guy with a pet brachiosaurus.


Canada is a Commonwealth Realm, so I'm guessing the United Kingdom might have something to say about this petition.


Shadowborn wrote:

*strategies

Every time you use an apostrophe to pluralize a word, Zon-Kuthon tortures a kitten.

The Chelish army would likely have clerics of Asmodeus and minor devils amongst the ranks. The devils would make effective shock troops, teleporting in behind enemy ranks to sow havoc. The clerics' abilities to channel negative energy would help break enemy lines, allowing for formations to break through more easily.

I kind of get a Third Reich vibe from Chelax. I see the cleric's operating as a pseudo-gestapo, while the hellknight's act as a pseudo-SS. Most of the military division's are probably geared toward quick & powerful strikes, rather than prolonged campaign's.

Four kittens were tortured to bring you this message.


Long term, I like leveling. It offers both the players AND the GM some variety, by presenting both with new combat options. It's not any more fun for the GM to run the same set of monsters over and over again, than it is for the players to fight them. After a while, the whole table is ready to mix things up a bit. Leveling is a good way to do that.


andreww wrote:

Jason you are in the PFS forum so none of those are really options. Earth Glide is a really powerful ability and there is little that most opponents can do to stop it. The main issue will be if you get spotted while sneaking about. Even though you might look like a small rock man enemies will still be alerted and it may well trigger things to begin preparing for an assault. I will pretty much always pick up Elemental Body I on a sorcerer, fly, swim, earth glide and stat boosts all in one spell are very hard to turn down.

Also this really is not abusing the rules, it is simply using those available to his class. Getting para elemental forms is however right out.

Oops, I missed that. For some reason, I thought this was a general advice forum. I've never played PCS, but I understand that the GMs have to run the adventure as written.

In that case, yeah, alerting the enemies and allowing them time to buff might be your best option.


Well, not sure what level, but it is using one of the charater's wild shape uses per day. So one option is to throw more combat at the party. They may start to wish they hadn't wasted the wild shape.

Other options include having the character encounter:

Underground reservoirs of water or underground rivers

Hot steam geysers

Magma

Rooms lined with a cheap metal (lead, tin, etc)

Something interesting.... Oops, it was explosive runes.

An enemy which would have been unaware of the party, but now has several round to buff.

An enemy druid (at a CR appropriate for the party)

Monsters that can chase the druid with burrow or earthglide.

Or... You can do the opposite. Have the rest of the party experience combat while the druid is off scouting. Let's face it, combat is fun, and part of the reason people play.

I wouldn't "punish" the player, but dungeons are dangerous, and there are several good reasons why it is generally not wise to split the party.


Bjørn Røyrvik wrote:
Jack Assery wrote:
Everything Orcus is WotC stuff, he's their mascot, like my missed mind flayers. I love the guy, the whole intrigues between him Graazt, Demogorgon and even gods are epic.** spoiler omitted **
** spoiler omitted **

Orcus is the Latin spelling of the Greek god Horkos. He is NOT WotC property, though the specific mechanics may be.

TSR used a lot of obscure Greek and Roman deities when they created their demons and devils. Another example is the devil Dispater, which is an alternate spelling of Dis Pater (in Latin, Dis = Hell, Pater = father).


I see the thread got derailed... I'm partly to blame.

I'm ok with cdg. It is unwise to leave a potential threat behind you as you move forward in combat. It's quicker to cdg than search them to see if they have a potion of healing. Also, helpless doesn't always mean negative hit points. A sleep spell can render someone helpless.

If you are talking about real life: Even a dying person can pull a trigger on a crossbow...


Eirikrautha wrote:


Combat plate armor (as opposed to ceremonial) weighed somewhere between 35 and 55 pounds, with the weight distributed across the shoulders and body. Henry V of England was documented to leap into his horse's saddle from behind in full plate armor. The French knights at Agincourt drowned in the mud, not because they could not stand up in their armor, but because of the press of the many men behind them struggling to move forward.

Yes. The idea of knights being unable to get on their horse is just as exaggerated as the effectiveness of the longbow . Recent rain had softened the ground, and the French had a narrow avenue of attack, up hill (not only eliminating the advantage of numbers, but turning it into a disadvantage), so the ground along the attack route was torn up very badly by hundreds of people and horses, and turned into a thick mud that sucked at the legs of the French knights traveling uphill. It was slow, plodding movement, and if you slipped, you likely fell in the mud and suffocated or were trampled by your allies. The real reason for the English victory was the proper use of terrain and tactics by the English, NOT the longbow. The arrowheads on the English arrows were made of a softer, thinner metal than the French breastplates.

Anyway, what he said. Military armor was heavy, but not so heavy that a knight needed a crane to get mounted. Think about it... Where did they keep the cranes when they were hundreds of miles from home, invading enemy territory? Even if they had them (they didn't), what use is an army that can only get ready for war 1 or 2 knights at a time because they had to wait their turn to get mounted?


Yeah. When I ran this, my players actually had a harder time with the goblins than Tsuto. They killed Tsuto in 1 round.

The reason it was so easy for my group was the terrain. Tsuto is trapped. He had to go through the PCs to go anywhere, whereas the goblins could move around and use the terrain.

If you want a suggestion, I would move Tsuto to another location. One with more room. Let him run and regroup if things are not going well.


GM_Solspiral wrote:


@ Azouth yeah but when he made it Gundam style instead of gangam style I pictured giant robots doing it which was so much better.

Yeah. That's what I meant, giant robots. Lets go with that. Not a mistake at all. ;)


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Chris Shaeffer wrote:
Boogie Shoes

Before I saw this, I actually came up with a similar themed item...

Meme Shoes

Aura moderate enchantment; CL 15th
Slot feet; Price Your future embarrassment; Weight 1 lb.

DESCRIPTION
These black leather shoes are nondescript, and their details are easily forgotten.

Meme shoes have a continually changing set of abilities. All save DCs begin at 25, but are reduced by 1d6-1 points annually. When an ability becomes DC 0, it no longer functions, but a new random ability is created. Currently, meme shoes have the following abilities:

Harlem Shake: once per day, the wearer can begin dancing as a full round action. While dancing, when the wearer utilizes the command words “The Harlem Shake”, all creatures within a 30 ft. radius must immediately succeed on a will save (DC25) or begin dancing as if under the effects of irresistible dance. This is an enchantment (mind control) effect that lasts as long as the wearer continues dancing, or the affected creature is no longer within the area of effect.

Opa Gundam Style: once per day, the wearer may dance as a standard action in a quirky and slightly humorous fashion. While dancing, when the wearer utilizes the command words “Hey sexy lady”, all creatures within a 100ft radius must succeed on a DC20 will save, or become fascinated. This is an enchantment (mind control) effect that ends once the wearer stops dancing, or the affected creature is no longer within the area of effect.

YMCA: Once per day, the wearer may shout “Its fun to stay at the YMCA!” as a swift action. All creatures within a 30ft. radius must succeed on a D10 will save, or drop any held items and immediately spell out the letters Y, M, C, and A with their arms. This is an enchantment (mind control) effect that only functions at wedding receptions.

Macarena: This ability no longer functions.

Electric Slide: This ability no longer functions.

Moonwalk: This ability no longer functions.

The Hustle: This ability no longer functions.

The Twist: This ability no longer functions.

CONSTRUCTION
Requirements Craft Wondrous Item, Leadership, Perform (dance) 5 ranks, that is all Cost your kids will think you are a dork


noblejohn wrote:


Can I get some basic advice on how to ensure I am giving my guys a good battle? For example, shouldn't I always take a five foot step with my beasties to avoid a full round of attack from the PCs? Unless of course my creatures are to raged or dumb to think about that.

A 5 ft step will rarely avoid a full attack from an enemy. They can 5ft step too.

As far as speeding up combat...

I use some custom made cards (roughly 3x5) in combat. Each card is prepared in advance of the game with init mods, attacks, damage, saves, HP total, and special abilities.

After init is rolled, I organize the cards in order of init (each pc has a card too). If a creature takes dmg, I mark it on the card. Once they are dead, I remove it from the stack. If someone holds an action, I turn the card sideways, then place it in the stack in their new position when they finally take the action. I've made my own cards, but I've seen a 3rd party publisher sell a similar item as well.

Doing this, I rarely look at the book during combat, unless I need to see a skill mod, because all the non-combat info is removed from my vision, leaving only the essential info.

In addition, I give players about 60 seconds to make a decision on their action (10 times the length of time their characters have to make a decision). If they don't decide in that time, they automatically go full defense and I move on to the next creature. Note: they don't have to finish their action in this time, but they must at least start it. I figure, they have all that time when other people are acting to plan ahead, plus the 60 seconds in case the situation changes enough to cancell their plans.


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I'm OK with a low stat. In fact, when roleplaying, I actually prefer it. Its FUN to role play a low stat, IMO, especially Wisdom and/or Charisma.

Sheldon (Big Bang Theory), Dr. Perry Cox (Scrubs), and Dr. House (House) are great characters BECAUSE of their low stats.


You are talking hypotheticals, so there is no right answer. However, there are SOME answers:

The Day the Earth Stood Still

Spoiler:
1 robot

Star Trek: First Contact

Spoiler:
1 Borg Cube

Star Wars: The Phantom Menace

Spoiler:
1 Droid Control Ship + apx. 20-40 other battleships

V

Spoiler:
1 mothership for every major city (200???)

War of the Worlds

Spoiler:
impossible, regardless of numbers

My own thought process believes an alien-human air war would be unlikely. A handful of well placed EMPs would shut down the power grid for all of North America. Add a few more for naval and air bases, and America would be mostly defenseless to an alien air attack with only 15-20 EMPs.

Repeat for the other major military powers of Russia, China, India, U.K., France, and Germany. Then round out the nuclear club (Pakistan, North Korea, Israel) and about 150 EMPs worldwide would wipe out any major air resistance as well as a significant portion of the human ground resistance. Do it in January, when most of the above countries are experiencing freezing temps, and millions of non-military humans would also be eliminated. The aliens would effectively own the skies before the first flying saucer was launched from the mothership. Considering that EMPs are a technology we as humans possess, it is likely any aliens would as well (only better).

Or, they could all be like E.T.


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First, let me say I don't believe ANY class is absolutely necessary. However:

The "classic" setup is cleric (healer), fighter (tank), rogue (trapfinder), wizard (artillery).

In your group, the barbarian fills the traditional fighter role, the oracle fills the traditional cleric role, and the sorcerer fills the traditional wizard role. That leaves rogue...

I think a rogue/fighter would be just fine. That would round out all the traditional roles, particularly if you went rogue early.

However, more important than filling any role is playing a class you would enjoy, because enjoying the game is the most important part. If you WANT to play a fighter/rogue, do that. If not, do something else.


I think they should make a Dragonlance movie. I've heard there is an animated movie (I've not seen it), but I'd like to see a live action version.

In the "WHY" category... Battleship. I know its not a book, but that movie left me with so many unanswered whys:

Why THAT game? Why aliens? Why cast an actor with an Irish accent to play an American admiral? Why didn't the movie studio have their security remove whoever pitched this disaster to them? Just WHY???


benedict wrote:

If you've been rolling the item idea around in your head long enough and done a little research to identify conflicts, you have a strong idea of how best to describe it, relative to the rules and what specific rules you feel need to be addressed in the description. It's entirely possible that a modestly complex item could put you at nearly 500 words. So you go back and do some rewriting.

<other stuff>

This closely represents my process for the original item I was going to submit. I worked and reworked it over and over again, but despite chopping off as much as I could, I was still over 300 words. In the end, I gave up and wrote items B, C, and D... and item C is the one I submitted.

Azouth wrote:


So what is Industry Standard pay for this? Just wondering.

Also, on the subject of pay, I've sat in on 2 writers seminars at Gencon, and based on the information there, I would say the standard pay seems to be 1 cent/word for inexperienced writers, to 3 cents/word for the average writer, to 5 cents/word for the "A list" writers.

It was also mentioned that the pay has remained the same for decades, while inflation has continued to rise, meaning that modern writers are actually getting an effectively smaller paycheck than their predecessors. Fortunately, most RPG writers are not doing it (only) for the money.

I've heard more than once: "The best way to make a small fortune in the RPG industry, is to start with a large fortune."


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Bjorn Turoque (the "j" is pronounced like a "y")
Malice in Chains (an all-kyton band)
Elvis Priestly
The Saxon 5
Muskets N' Roses
The Brave Matthews Band
Led Zelda (ok, wrong game)
Link Floyd (still wrong game)
.

Plus, these also work without changing them...
.
Nirvana, Queen, Rob Zombie, Iron Maiden


Yes, just a corner provides cover. Though the GM is free to adjust just how much of an AC bonus the defender gets. In your above example, I would grant +4.


TriOmegaZero wrote:


Texts are for when you don't need a response right away.

I thought that was what email is for. (or voicemail)

Also,

1) email is free,
2) doesn't have a character limit,
3) and doesn't require a smartphone to do quickly (try using an old phone to text, you'll see what I mean).

Just sayin.


Terquem wrote:

Oh I think there's truth in that, right there

#IfIamincabableofmakingmypointclearwiththewordsIamusingwhyshouldIbesopompou sastobelievethatbydrawingattentiontomyinabilitytoexpressacompletethoughtbya ssigningameaniglesssymboltoaphrasethatIcleverlybelieveisassumationbutisinre altiyjustapedanticwasteoftime

That might be the first time it didn't annoy me.

#lol


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Not really game related, but...

I hate texting. I would much rather call someone and speak directly to them.

Also, the term "hashtag" annoys me.


I agree with Klingon.


Stabbald wrote:

I get that some games enjoy critical fumbles, but if an GM applied a critical fumble on my character on a crit confirm roll I would be really annoyed. Use it on normal skill, save, attack rolls if you must, but not on a roll that only happens if a character does well.

Part of the problem is that it's possible to roll a 1 after a 20, but not a 20 after a 1.

Well, it could be. One if my groups (the one I play with the most) uses the crit and fumble decks. We confirm fumbles just like we confirm crits, meaning that you roll again. If you still miss, its a fumble. If you hit in the confirmation, then its not a fumble. Thus, its easier for bad things to happen vs tough opponents, but rarely happens against weak ones.

EDIT: Deathquaker, that same group does that, though we don't call it "exploding". It's a rare event when someone confirms a crit with another crit, but when it happens, it is exciting for the whole table.


Malachi Silverclaw wrote:


Then buy them a donut.

Mmmmmm. Donuts.

Seriously folks. There is nothing wrong with a homebrew rule if it enhances everyone's fun. Besides, this will only happen once every 400 attacks, on average. What's the harm?

Or, you could use the optional donut rule. Your call.


Mapleswitch wrote:

Something fun? Something different would be that it confirms the critical, but the weapon gets stuck in the critters body and requires a standard action (provoking attacks of opportunity) to pull it out.

This would have been my suggestion.

If it were a bow, I would give an equivalent penalty (confirmed critic, but you need to spend a standard action to re-string). For a bludgeoning weapon, I'd confirm the crit, but say it got wet with blood or sweat or whatever, causing the character to drop it.


Do whatever you like. If you want strength 18 halflings, go for it. It's your game, and no one is going to confiscate your books for having badwrongfun.


Kittenological wrote:
naw, the only downside of playing as a dwarf is roleplaying tha accent.

Yeah. Most people play dwarves with a Scottish accent, but since they come from Norse mythology, they should probably have a Norwegian accent. Yet, the Scottish tradition is so prevalent, anything else just sounds wrong.

To the op, I may be biased (check out my avatar pic.), but I disagree. You can't compare any of the core races to the aasimar, because the
aasimar simply ARE better. I read somewhere (possibly the bestiary, I don't have it with me) that taking the aasimar race is equivalent to roughly 1/2 a level. If I were your DM, I would give you some negative (possibly deny you a starting feat) to ballance out your racial choice.


I died 8 years ago. My current state can go on indefinitely... But maybe you wouldn't call it living. >:)


5 people marked this as a favorite.

You should make a Grippli bard.

Why?

Kermit. Nuff said.


I don't think its possible without a major redesign of the rules. To ballance out the issues others mentioned, you would have to make CASTING a skill as well, like knowledge. For example, Casting Arcane (Divination) or Casting Divine (Conjuration). But once you get to that point, you are basically talking about a classless system, or at best, a semi-classless system like M.E.R.P./Rolemaster/H.A.R.P. You are better off just picking a system that does most of what you want.


You could just give everyone (adults anyway) a free level in an NPC class, and call that adolescence. It's the trade everyone was taught by their parents or guardians while growing up. No one teaches their kid to be an adventurer.

With this method, your average NPC would end up with 2 HD, and the PCs might think its cool to take a rank in aristocrat (comes with some minor title or official govt appointment), or warrior or adept (for the combat advantages). Some might even select expert for the skill bonuses.

Of course, more HP to start still doesn't solve your problem at higher levels.


A siege would have to be like an imprisonment, not a traditional siege. As you said, they don't need food or water, so time is on their side.

Look at the Battle of Alesia, when Julius Caesar defeated Vercingetorix, for an example of what I mean. The Gauls were inside a walled city, and outnumbered the Romans. So Caesar ordered a wall... built around the wall. He encircled the entire city with another wall, defended by the Romans, effectively turning the city into a prison. Of course, the Gauls were forced to action by virtue of their larger army needing more food, but besieging and undead army could be just a safe(er) way to deal with the threat than attacking their castle.


7 people marked this as a favorite.

I like them for the jokes, which can be udderly amusing. No bull!

But I would steer clear of calling a minotaur cowvalier "Sir Loin". They might look pasture human faults, but most minotaurs will get mad (cow) if they field like you are insulting them. They will have a beef with you till the day you die. It is farm more safe to moove away and hoof these jokes in a place where you can't be herd by the minotaur. As humans, most minotaus can taurus limb from limb. You better bellieve it! I'd steak my reputation on it. But hay, who am I to offer advice? I tend to cattle, er, prattle on.

...Ok, that last one was a stretch. I think I've milked about every pun I could out of this.


As someone pointed out... Don't think of hit points as the amount of damage you can take. Think of it more as your endurance. How long you can continue to duck and weave to avoid the real hits... Which are anything that takes you negative HP or causes bleed or some other condition.

However, if you truely don't like the HP concept (ill admit to prefering systems with health levels myself), feel free to change it. Just keep in mind that spells beyond 1st level will become MUCH more effective if you limit HP. To the point of game unballancing. So you will need to limit the damage output (and healing factor) as well. Maybe even standardize damage for all spells of the same level (single Target spells should do more damage than multi-target spells).

Then of course, if you do that, then resistances to energy types become more powerful if spells deal less damage, and DR becomes overpowered... You might end up rewriting a significant portion of the game, as each change has a butterfly effect on everything else.

Instead of rewriting a core mechanic like HP, I suggest looking for the D20 Game of Thrones RPG (not the current one in print, the out of print one), which did pretty much what you are describing. Characters got 1-3 HP when they leveled, based on their class. Of course, magic is far less common in Westros, so you don't have to worry about a TPK from a single fireball.


Yes alcohol is a poison. So are drugs. In fact many drugs (even legal ones) are modified forms of natural poisons. Other times, the line between poison and food (or drug) is really just a matter of how much was ingested, and there is no difference.

Alcohol and drugs should count as poisons for all game mechanics. They are toxins that modify the body chemistry.


You said it yourself. The bad guys don't know the party's low on fuel. If they went in with guns-a-blazin, then at least SOME of the badguys will think that this is a tough group. I'd let them get away with it once. Maybe the bad guys try to gather reinforcements before attacking, or only the people that think the party is low on power attacks... Which will ammount to a probing attack if any of them escape.


I would have consistent damage between energy types. Right now it is fire with the most damage (and also the most common energy resistance), and then everything else. Damage is damage. There is no reason fire should be better at it.


I don't think that they necessarily need to be the most powerful if they are the most numerous. There is roughly 500 years of history involving European colonialism, that shows you can still be the most powerful while being vastly outnumbered. Go back even further and the Mongols, Romans, and Macedonians also showed power and numerical superiority were two different things.

You can still have humans, elves, or even orcs be the most powerful race, even if half elves are more populous. The empire fell for a reason...


I would actually say monk. I know A LOT of people would disagree on these boards, but in a low magic setting, getting magic armor and weapons would be a problem. However, its much less of a problem for a class that doesn't need armor or weapons. Monk.


Peet wrote:

I am currently playing in a "nostalgia" game of old Basic D&D (the 1981 Tom Moldvay edition). We are doing "Keep on the Borderlands."

What is my character class? Halfling.

Stats are generated by rolling 3d6, in order. After you choose a class you can lower certain stats by 2 (to a minimum of 9) to add 1 to your "prime requisite." My halfling has a DEX of 16 and all his other stats are 8's, 9's, or 10's. Yet in the selection of our party he is pretty decent.

That is an iconic adventure. Real old school stuff, back in the day when Arneson and Gygax got along, if I'm not mistaken. I've always wanted to play that, its been talked about enough. I started with this edition of DnD ("basic" was not its official name, just something it acquired when "advanced" came out), but I never got to play Keep on the Borderlands.

To the OP, you really want to see a difference in editions, pick up "basic".

EDIT: Nope, Borderlands was published in '79, Arneson left TSR in '76 and didn't work with them again till '86. So, Borderlands came out at the height of the feud.


Understood.


Benchak the Nightstalker wrote:


Komoda, I should specify, I was talking about the GM adjusting the grid in setting up the encounter.

I understood you. As was I. During design, the orientation of the grid as it is laid on top of the map should have no impact on how weapons work... But obviously once mobile features are added (like the PCs and monsters), the grid should be fixed.

So back to the diagonal charge, if the grid were oriented along the path of movement, the defender would get that AOO, so there is no reason that the same movement should bypass the AOO just because of an abstraction that doesn't actually exist in the character's world.

EDIT: Komoda, that may be (I don't have the book with me) but I think it jives with RAI and common sense.


Gilfalas wrote:
Komoda wrote:
Um, Gilfalas the 5' step rule is fine. But the way the grid works RAW, you can charge a spear wielder from a 45 degree angle who is braced with a spear, from 100' away and he can never attack you as he does not threaten the squares that you enter.

Well sometimes crap happens in combat. If your enemy can setup a perfect charge along only the diagnonal angle from 100' feet away then perhaps he deserves to get it.

And I keep mentioning the 5 foot step because it seemed to specifically be the bone of contention with the OP's corner approach case and explicitly stated in his question.

And as for the 5 foot wide angled hall issues, I would hazard that a reach weapon in that situation in the real world would also be pretty screwed so it seems RIGHT to me that it does not work in game that way.

Not all weapons are perfect for all things. Hence why humanity has made so many of them in so many varied designs.

...and yet, here is where I would disagree with you. As Benchak pointed out, the whole grid system is just to aid players and GMs when playing. It doesn't really matter how that grid is placed. You could take a picture of a room, lay a grid over it, and the weapons you use would work just the same as if you picked the grid back up and rotated it 45 degrees before placing it back down over that same room. In that angled hallway, or an angled charge, I would argue (or rule if I was the GM) that the mover DOES provoke an attack, because they are not utilizing the 5 ft step to cancel the provoke. So, when I answered the OP above, I was being specific to the 5ft step, not all movement.


Gilfalas wrote:

The fact is a 5 foot step is a special free action that never causes an attack of opportunity. It also cannot be combined in the same round with any action spent for any other standard movement (flying, ground movement, burrowing and so forth).

I agree with this. I think you are looking at this from the wrong perspective. The perspective should be that of the Target, not the attacker, or even the perspective of the ground or other bystanders. The Target moves, PROVOKING an attack of opportunity. The Target PROVOKES this attack, whether or not someone is in a position to take advantage of it. It is his action, just like many other things that a character can do, that causes the attack of opportunity. The 5 ft step movement (and, not to confuse the issue, but also the withdraw) let you bypass the provoke that you normally make when moving. In your scenario, the Target moved 5 ft FROM HIS/HER PERSPECTIVE, and therefore did not provoke the attack.


Prestige Classes give other benefits, so gaining the original class's cool features in addition to the PrC is too much. It might be easier to think of it an an alternate list of "cool tricks". You get those instead, because you chose to advance in that class instead. When the PrC indicates an increase, you get spells known/spell levels/caster levels only.


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Somebody went through the trouble of creating a battlemap for this. They are awesome and much appreciated.

When I ran this, I cut out each room so that the players had a kind of "fog of war". As they progressed, I placed the next "puzzle piece" on the table. I recommend a large supply of paperclips or tape for this approach. Also, from experience, write the room number on the back of each piece.


Treesmasha Toothpickmaker wrote:

Poisons are not evil, not even to a paladin. However, a paladin would consider their use dishonorable (ie, against their code to use).

Btw, medicine = poison, just in a different dose.

All that being said, a GM can make his own rules for his own world.

What he said.

MANY poisons are used to developed medicines, especially anesthesia.

Poison is a tool. It can be used in hunting, much as a bow, crossbow, or gun. Some Amazonian tribes use tree frog poison in their blow darts. So, like a bow, crossbow, or gun, it all comes down to how it is used. Yet, of all these, only poison has the possibility to benefit the "victim" (as a medicine), so by that standard, it would be LESS evil than a bow, crossbow, or gun.

Contrast these items with a sword, which basically has only 1 purpose...

Poison is also a weapon, certainly. But depending on the type of poison, it can be seen a more humane way to kill someone. That's why some states in the US use lethal injection when carrying out the death penalty. Socrates was sentenced to death by poison, and carried out the sentence himself.

That said, modern armies are prohibited from using poison munitions by the Geneiva Convention... Even though many, including the USA, keep stockpiles of them.

Since you are looking for advice, I'll give mine. I would rule poison as a "grey area", much like necromancy. Not exactly evil, but certainly frowned upon. Many historical cultures viewed killing by poison as cowardly, because it could deny your opponent the chance to retaliate. Interestingly, denying your opponent a chance to retaliate could be seen as good tactics in military campaigns. I guess that's national honor vs. personal honor.

I'll close by saying that there are many types of poison, and some of them are painless. So it depends on the type of poison, and how it is used.


I agree, class doesn't matter.

Believe it or not, I actually DID have a merchant character. I sold wine, but I neither harvested the grapes, nor fermented the wine. I simply purchased it from a well known and respected monastery (in a dangerous part of the wilderness) and transported it to the nearby cities to sell to innkeepers. I was a sorcerer (high charisma class), with some ranks in Profession (Teamster) to drive the wagons, and Diplomacy (to negotiate price).

Many merchants don't actually make/grow what they are selling. Many merchants in a medieval setting just buy-transport-sell their products. Look to the Silk Road, Hanseatic League, or the British East India company for real world examples.

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