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encounter the "when closing this location" effect? Or just the character that actually closed the location? Thanks.


Besides the abilities listed on certain character cards(like Lem) what are the benefits of staying together? I saw something in the manual that said characters can attempt "take turns" when encountering a card that has a "then" requirement. Like complete a combat check then a divine check. So the player who draws the card does the combat check and then the same character or another character at the same location can do the divine check. Is this the case? Also if a character defeats a henchman at a location can any other character at that location attempt to close the location or only the player who defeated the henchmen? I'd appreciate anyone giving some insight on the benefits of keeping together. Thanks.


Hawkmoon269 wrote:

Yeah, this one can be tough. The typical stratedgy seems to be to both go to one location (usually the Fog Bank) and churn through it. Your goal is to empty it of cards, but don't close it, so you are hoping your won't find him there. If you do, evade him if you can and go to the other location and try to empty it. Once you have one location empty (but not closed), go to the other location. Your goal now is to encounter Whalebone Pilk and hope that, when undefeated, he goes to the other location.

Anything that can help you examine a location deck will be really helpful in this scenario. Dodo, Dolphin, Boatswain, Lookout. They can all help you confirm if you've force Whalebone Pilk over the empty location deck. Because, once he is there, you need to empty and close the location you now know doesn't contain him. Then, head back to where Whalebone Pilk is the only card and finish it off.

Perhaps others have more advice for you. Good luck on your adventure!

Thanks, I saw this strategy somewhere else I just couldn't remember the details. If anyone else has some advice I'd appreciate it.


Can anyone give some basic strategies to defeating this scourge? My friend and I got our butt's handed to us as Jirelle and Lirianne trying to beat this scenario. It really stinks because up until this one we hadn't lost a single game. Came close a few times but managed to pull the win through sheer luck. But this guy may be too much for us.


To answer the original question my group would banish the potion. Because that's pretty much how all potions work and since your character basically "drank" it it doesn't make sense that you would keep it even if the villain was defeated. Our group has, luckily, been together for over 30 years and we tend to let logic play out over technicalities. This doesn't always end up in our favor but in the end it's what we all agree on.


My friend and I just did this one yesterday and like you we are very new to the game. On the plus side we've both been playing tabletop games since the mid-80's so we've been able to draw on that experience. The toughest thing for us was that in order to close Lonely Island you need to banish an ally and at this point you're character deck most likely has allies you'd hate to lose and there's only a few available in the scenario (maybe only 2 I think). In the end we ended up with both Villains in the same location. In the rule book under "Encountering a Villain" there's a line about what happens if you defeat a villain and there's more than on villain in the deck. You basically banish everything except the second villain and the location is "temporarily" closed instead of "permanently" closed. This way the defeated villain is removed from the game but the remaining villain is still there and you can defeat them.

Keep in mind that the rules state that you use whatever villain(s)is listed on the scenario and then work your way down the list of henchmen so you have enough to fill out each location. So in a 2 player game you'll have the 2 villains and then Owlbear Hartshorn and Aretta Bansion shuffled into the 4 locations. We've been playing with Jirelle and Lirianne and since Lirianne has an ability that let's her assist someone at a different location we almost never end up together. For most scenarios we usually each pick a different starting location and stay there until we permanently close it and then move on. In this scenario your primary goal should be trying to close Lonely Island as soon as possible and then track down the villains. In our case we ended up temporarily closing Lonely Island down 2 times and lost 3 decent allies before beating both villains who ended up at the Pinnacle Atoll. The toughest part about this scenario, besides losing allies to Lonely Island, is having to recharge your hand before encountering an enemy with the "pirate" trait" as well as not losing the evasion check for each of the villains. Luckily the evasion check happens before you recharge your hand so if you have a blessing in your hand you can use it on the evasion check and then draw up a new hand.

I'm not sure if I helped any but I hope it did. Good luck.


Hawkmoon269 wrote:

Yes. It is any Combat check that has the Dexterity trait. In this case, you get the Dexterity trait by using your Dexterity skill. So, Jirelle, using the Cutlass and her Finesse power would be making a Combat Dexterity check. You'd roll 1d10 + 2 + 1d6 + 2d10.

Good luck on your adventure!

Thanks. I've been constantly worried that I'm doing something wrong in the Pathfinder card games because so far my buddy and I have played through both the base set missions and the first card set, Wormwood Mutiny, and we haven't lost a single game. We've gotten pretty lucky with card draws and came really close to losing a game yesterday when I flipped the last card on the blessing deck at the start of my turn; but as luck would have it the Villain was the the card I drew on my exploration phase and I was able to beat it. Right now I'm going through the FAQ I downloaded and I'm highlighting parts of it that I think we've either screwed up on or we have the potential to screw up on. But it's nice to have these message boards to come too with specific questions like this. Again thanks.


I'm pretty new to Pathfinder and my friend and I have a question regarding the Blessing of Erastil in Skull & Shakles. The second ability of the card states:

Discard this card to add 2 dice to any combat Dexterity check.

So the question is: what exactly is a "Combat Dexterity Check"? If I'm playing as Jirelle and I use a cutlass, which allows her to use Melee: Dexterity +2 since it adds the "finesse" trait to the check. Does this count as a ""Combat Dexterity Check"? If I play this blessing do I get 3 combat dice (in this case 3d10 +2) in addition to the 1d6 for the cutlass? I'm asking because I'm still learning what all the terms mean and there's no index in the manual. Thanks.


I just played my first Pathfinder Card Game session ever and my friend and I played through the first 3 scenarios of the S&S base set. I picked up S&S over the other 2 sets because it had pirates. We already play a lot of different fantasy themed board and and card games and while WotR and RotR look cool I wanted a change of pace from the standard fantasy trappings. So that's my advice in a nutshell: get "Skulls & Shackles" because pirates.


skizzerz wrote:

Page 11 of the WotR rulebook pdf, 2nd paragraph of the "Attempting a Check" heading: "Each boon card has a section called Check to Acquire. This section indicates the skills that can be used in checks to acquire the boon and the difficulty of the checks. If you succeed in acquiring the card, put it into your hand. If you fail, banish it. You can never automatically succeed at a combat check."

Note this only applies to combat checks, you can still automatically succeed at non-combat checks (even against villains).

.

Again I'd like to thank you for pointing this out. It's pretty late here so maybe that might have something to do with my blindness. It'd be really nice if that was highlighted in a "New Rules" box. What a great community. I'm really glad I picked this game up. My friend and I really had a blast and are looking forward to getting deeper into it.


skizzerz wrote:
JeffKaos wrote:
JeffKaos wrote:

Thanks so much guys, that really cleared up A LOT for us; especially the difference between a "Check" and "Difficulty". It seems like we may have fudged a little bit but since we only got through the first 3 scenarios of the base set I don't think it will be that big of a deal in the long run. While I bought the Wrath of the Righteous base set we started with S&S since we're big into pirates and they're fairly underutilized in tabletop gaming these days.

One more quick question: there's 3 different kinds of "Feat Rewards"? Card Feat, Skill Feat and Power Feat? And when we're rewarded one, such as after all 5 of the Base Scenarios "Each character gains a skill feat". I assume we can only check a box in the skill area of a the characters card, which are all basically adding +1 to one of the skills for the first reward. Is this correct?

Again thanks a lot for clearing this up; much appreciated.

*edit*

One more thing; are you sure that rule about "You can never automatically succeed at a Combat check" is on page 11 of the WotR rule book? Because I don't see it anywhere on that page.

It is on p11 of the pdf download (pdf edition 1.0), which has some errata not present in the printed rulebook. I'm not sure why it isn't listed in the FAQ.

The three types of feat awards correspond to the three sections on the character card. Skill feats are for the top set of boxes labeled "Skills". Power feats for "Powers" and card feats for the card listing on the reverse side of the character card.

Thanks but I just downloaded the PDF version of the WotR rule book about 15 minutes ago and I still don't see that rule anywhere in the book. While I don't think it's liable to come up very often I'd like to have it referenced somewhere and I'm just not seeing it.


JeffKaos wrote:

Thanks so much guys, that really cleared up A LOT for us; especially the difference between a "Check" and "Difficulty". It seems like we may have fudged a little bit but since we only got through the first 3 scenarios of the base set I don't think it will be that big of a deal in the long run. While I bought the Wrath of the Righteous base set we started with S&S since we're big into pirates and they're fairly underutilized in tabletop gaming these days.

One more quick question: there's 3 different kinds of "Feat Rewards"? Card Feat, Skill Feat and Power Feat? And when we're rewarded one, such as after all 5 of the Base Scenarios "Each character gains a skill feat". I assume we can only check a box in the skill area of a the characters card, which are all basically adding +1 to one of the skills for the first reward. Is this correct?

Again thanks a lot for clearing this up; much appreciated.

*edit*

One more thing; are you sure that rule about "You can never automatically succeed at a Combat check" is on page 11 of the WotR rule book? Because I don't see it anywhere on that page.


Thanks so much guys, that really cleared up A LOT for us; especially the difference between a "Check" and "Difficulty". It seems like we may have fudged a little bit but since we only got through the first 3 scenarios of the base set I don't think it will be that big of a deal in the long run. While I bought the Wrath of the Righteous base set we started with S&S since we're big into pirates and they're fairly underutilized in tabletop gaming these days.

One more quick question: there's 3 different kinds of "Feat Rewards"? Card Feat, Skill Feat and Power Feat? And when we're rewarded one, such as after all 5 of the Base Scenarios "Each character gains a skill feat". I assume we can only check a box in the skill area of a the characters card, which are all basically adding +1 to one of the skills for the first reward. Is this correct?

Again thanks a lot for clearing this up; much appreciated.


My friend and I just started playing Skull and Shackles and had a couple of questions that we couldn't figure out with the rule book. The first one involves "summoning" henchmen. Some locations like, Shark Island, require you to summon a henchman from the box which has me wondering: if you defeat a summoned henchman AND the henchmen allows you to close the location can you make the attempt? Or can you only attempt to close a location by drawing the henchman from the location deck and summoned henchmen don't count for the purposes of closing a location. We assumed that defeating any henchman that allowed you to close a location, even a summoned henchman, gave you a chance to close the location but it seemed a little easy to close locations early when it came to summoned Buccaneers since every player summons one when they're encountered and they're fairly easy to defeat. Or does defeating the summoned Buccaneer only let you attempt to close the location where the buccaneer came from? Can a location only be closed by a character at that location?

Another question I had is regarding traits and checks. So for example the "Shackles Pirate" card says:

"If the check to defeat has Swashbuckling trait, add 1d4 to it".

Does this mean that if I use a rapier card for my combat check, which has the swashbuckling trait, then the combat check will be 8 + 1d4?Or do I get to add the 1d4 to MY roll? This is confusing because the manual doesn't explain how traits affect rolls very clearly and has confusing wording.

Finally the villain Nefti Unwesha requires a Charisma or Diplomacy check of 13 to defeat. My friend had a Potion of Glibness, which let's players succeed at a Diplomacy check if he banished the card. It seemed like a pretty cheesy way to defeat a villain. Was that cool? Or did we miss something in the rules?

We might have more questions as we continue playing but these were the first issues we ran into. Thanks.