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Hezzilreen the Cunning

BigDTBone's page

Pathfinder Modules Subscriber. 2,322 posts (2,339 including aliases). No reviews. 1 list. 2 wishlists. 4 aliases.


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I hope all of y'all like lookin at blue dragon nutz.


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Blakmane wrote:

... Did you just try to say bards were better or comparable to sorc/wiz in 3.5? Maybe i'm misunderstanding you. Using the wizard is a very poor example, because it is widely considered to be the most powerful class in the game. Anything that benefits wizards and other full casters is probably bad game inclusion, purely from a balance perspective.

As for casting a spell from a wand or scroll using intrinsic knowledge and experience: a spellcasting class can already do that without needing spellcraft OR UMD. UMD is specifically about 'tricking' an item into thinking you are an eligible target, or 'faking' magical talent in order to cast something you really shouldn't be able to. It's not meant for spellcasting classes at all, outside of the bard and perhaps sorc.

As for your 6 CHA fighter: yes, except INT is also a dump stat for fighters. I guess a lore warden might benefit from an INT based UMD -- although if you were desperate for that you could just spend the trait.

Sublime chord.


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One that looks like a 50's poodle skirt.

One that is kelly green crush velvet with emerald sequins in the shape a dollar sign and it has a voice box button that has JG Wentworth saying "It's your money!"

One that is like a blue and pink koosh ball except it is a dice bag too.

A bottle of maker's mark that I broke the top off of and filled with dice.

Taxidermy kangaroo on roller-skates with magnets hidden in its hands that make a d20 float in front of it and the rest of the dice go in the pouch.

Game-worn, unwashed, autographed, Ty Cobb athletic supporter sewn up into a bag and embroidered with "sniff for luck."

I lost each of those, are they the one you found?

Oh, wait... I wasn't at Paizocon... le sad...


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Take a look at the 3.5 sublime chord prestige class, that would be a good place to start.


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Papa-DRB wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:
Papa-DRB wrote:
Jessica Price wrote:
Orthos wrote:
We'll have to agree to disagree then, DMD. Nothing pisses me off and strikes me as completely wrong more than that "All art is political" tripe.
The idea that reinforcing the status quo isn't political -- that those who want to change it are acting from an agenda (and therefore, it's implied, biased, self-serving, and ideologically driven) while those who uphold it are not (and therefore objective, unselfish, and neutral) -- is generally one insisted upon by people who believe they benefit from the status quo not changing.
No, you certainly do not have to look for or experience political meaning in anything. That doesn't mean it isn't there, nor does it make others strange to find it.

If others find political meaning in it, fine with me. Just don't make me out to be a bad person according to Jessica, since I allegedly "am one who believe that they benefit from the status quo not changing".

-- david

Added bold tags to the relevant part of her quote.

Benefiting doesn't make you a bad person, but whats interesting about your example is that Avatar doesn't promote the status quo. The underlying political message is against argi-business which is very much in opposition to the status quo.

Jessica is talking about works that actually purport to offer no political view by design but do so by process. So, to me, as a straight white guy, I go to see Gravity in the theater and it's a visually interesting spectacle that offers no real political message beyond the fact the Russians need to do a better job at keeping their space stuffs maintained. But they lady I was with immediately noticed that Sandra Bullock needed the ghost of George Clooney to calm her down so she could get her bearings in the soyuz.

She was right, that is a stupid scene that perpetuates a gender stereotype of a white knight figure charging in to save the damsel in distress. But, whats worse, is that in the scene George Clooney isn't even real. So the director is telling us that Sandra Bullock invented the Ghost of George Clooney to save her because she wasn't emotionally strong enough to do it alone. That she needed a white knight to charge in to rescue her. It's crap. And I didn't notice it the first time. Because of exactly what Jessica is talking about. As a dude I have a vested interest in perpetuating that stereotype.

Does that make me a terrible person? I don't think so. It just makes me a dude in American society today. Anyway, just an example... basically, don't take it personally, just be aware that it happens.


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Papa-DRB wrote:
Jessica Price wrote:
Orthos wrote:
We'll have to agree to disagree then, DMD. Nothing pisses me off and strikes me as completely wrong more than that "All art is political" tripe.
The idea that reinforcing the status quo isn't political -- that those who want to change it are acting from an agenda (and therefore, it's implied, biased, self-serving, and ideologically driven) while those who uphold it are not (and therefore objective, unselfish, and neutral) -- is generally one insisted upon by people who believe they benefit from the status quo not changing.

I have to somewhat agree with Orthos. Why does every piece of art have to be political? Can't I just enjoy the tale / story / painting / statue / whatever without having to think of what the meaning is?

For instance, when the movie "Avatar" came out, my wife, myself, my adult (30+) son, and our 16 year old grandson went to see it. After the movie, my son started on a minor tirade about political meaning, etc.. I just said, good story. Bad guy becomes good guy and the good guys win in the end.

Do I have to look at everything thru the lens of politics or can I just enjoy the story?

-- david

ps. since WotR has been mentioned above, I am running that as a PbP here. Have read all six chapters. I enjoy the back stories of all the characters. It gives depth to them and it is a good story.
pps.Politics. A buddy of mine sent me this picture.

No, you certainly do not have to look for or experience political meaning in anything. That doesn't mean it isn't there, nor does it make others strange to find it.


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DrDeth wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:


Merchant of Venice is basically dripping with antisemitism.

This is actually highly debated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shylock
"Critics today still continue to argue over the play's stance on antisemitism."

Shylock himself says it best:
"Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, heal'd by the same means, warm'd and cool'd by the same winter and summer as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, revenge. The villainy you teach me, I will execute, and it shall go hard but I will better the instruction. |Act III, scene I}}

Yea, and then he goes on to completely implode from usury greed to the point that he loses his family, livelyhood, and freedom. Not to mention perpetuating castration myths/fears based on a caricature understanding of circumcision with his desire for "a pound of flesh." But sure, Merchant of Venice totally isn't antisemitic.


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I've played in games where young children were present, but only at places where the host also had children. I think that most folks without kids probably don't have their homes in a state conducive to regular child visitors (I certainly don't). Liquor cabinets and chemical cabinets are unlocked, expensive and fragile things are displayed on open shelves. I would be completely comfortable telling a prospective player that I am uncomfortable with having kids in my place on a regular basis for these reasons. It's an entirely different matter for friends/family to visit and everyone can keep an eye out (or take turns) but at the game we are knowingly and intentionally diverting our attention away from the young'uns and that's not fair to them or my place.

So, no, I don't think its rude to politely decline to invite a child or rescind an invitation to someone who insists on bringing a child. Now, depending on the maturity of the kid and the content of your game I think having a 10 year old playing at the table could be acceptable.


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Rynjin wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Readerbreeder wrote:
I know that most of us have no issue gaming with those of the female persuasion.
Speak for yourself. I skipped the stag parties of the Rutgers RPGA group back in the 70's to game with a group at Demarest Hall which was pretty much a 50/50 split genderwise. And this was back in 1981.

Nothing you said contradicted what he said.

Unless you're saying you DID have an issue with it?

I find it more impressive that Lazar managed to simultaneously exist in the 70's and 1981 at the same time. If you have ever wondered where the combative tension in lazar's posts comes from it is clearly brain damage suffered in a time travel accident. That level of cognitive disconnect mere syllables apart is very telling indeed.


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GreyWolfLord wrote:
Orthos wrote:
We'll have to agree to disagree then, DMD. Nothing pisses me off and strikes me as completely wrong more than that "All art is political" stuff.

I suppose it could be seen depending on whether you think pre-schoolers and kindergartners have an agenda with each picture they draw.

They put out art at a very tremendous rate. It seems they scribble on one piece of paper for five seconds, and then switch to the next piece of art.

I suppose you could say each scribble has an agenda...

But that is probably how we interpret what an agenda is.

There is a what we call an agenda, and then what we call a theme. Many books and pieces of art can have themes, which may be used by others, or even the creator, to eventually be pushed or used to support an agenda. However, the theme may not even be an intentional theme. An agenda is different then a theme.

To me, an agenda is where you have a way that things should be, and you push that as the main topic or point of what you draw or write. It could even be secondary...but it normally is intentional. (Though it could also be unintentional at times...however...when you get to younger people drawing...and when they get old enough...to write...I think they usually lack any specific agenda and are just doing it to entertain themselves...and also plaster your fridge with their artwork each day if you have kids).

Shakespeare is a poor example with his Merchant of Venice to use as an anti-Semitic theme (it is a theme, but FAR MORE as I point at as follows). He knew what he was doing and targeting, it is definitely an agenda in there. The anti-semetism may be unintentional as a main agenda (I see it as intentional though), but it is definately intended as an agenda in a very specific and pointed statement and portrayal of a race, and encouragement for others to utilize that viewpoint. However, with another item in the play there is a theme that is not necessarily an agenda, even unintentionally, but could still be seen as a minor...

Theme/agenda are pretty mutable when talking about literary works. If you don't agree with the merchant of Venice example then how about another; Mark Twain wrote Huckleberry Finn with the express purpose to challenge the deep seeded institutions of white supremacy in the United States, yet his narrative (even if not his narrator) is racist at every turn. His story perpetuates the ideas of a dim-witted black man who can't hold a candle up to the intelligence of a white child who actively refuses education. Twain is driving home this paradigm in a novel that he sets out to try and say virtually the exact opposite.


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LazarX wrote:
Orthos wrote:


So having someone throw the idea at me that everything I do and love has a political bent behind it makes me angry. I'd like to have just one thing at least in this wretched world untainted by politics.

The folks who work in the favor of special interests have the greatest incentive in fostering this attitude among those not among the empowered clique. It discourages those that might block their self-serving agendas and helps leave the field uncontested. These are the same people who move heaven and earth to spread voter supression by making it as inconvenient and expensive to participate in the public sphere.

Politics is not a vice, it is not an ugly profession. When the honorable and the virtuous abandon the art of politics, they leave it in the service of those who would abuse and corrupt it.

Politics should not be an epithet. It's the only alternative to rule by naked force.

Your's is a different use of politics, perhaps a more common one. What I am talking about with the word politics are "comments reflective of the body politic."


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Steve Geddes wrote:

I'll confess ignorance on this topic, but I believe Orthos is drawing a distinction between "having an agenda" and "having a political effect" (presumably one based on intent).

It seems to me that there are two ways to reinforce the status quo - obliviously and intentionally (or perhaps unknowingly and in a considered fashion) Although they may be indistinguishable with respect to outcomes, that doesnt make them identical. I guess you could make the same distinction with respect to "challenging" stories - though it's probably harder to buck the cultural trend without being aware that you're doing it.

Rather than use a modern example it may be easier to demonstrate the point with well known examples from the past.

Merchant of Venice is basically dripping with antisemitism. We notice it immediately today because as a society we are aware of it in the language and find it to be unacceptable. Shakespeare did not pen the story with the idea that he was writing a "political" piece about the place of Jews in society. His English, white, Christian contemporaries didn't notice it either. They saw Shylock as a "regular" depiction of a "typical" Jewish person. But there is no doubt that, despite the fact that no authorial intent existed, Shakespeare's depiction of Shylock perpetuated an outmoded and stereotypical view of Judaism with just as much force as an intentional political movement might have. Indeed, most likely more.

This is what is meant by all art has politics in it. The author includes politics whether they wish to or not, and sometimes includes politics they didn't intend to.


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Orthos wrote:
We'll have to agree to disagree then, DMD. Nothing pisses me off and strikes me as completely wrong more than that "All art is political" stuff.

It all depends on what you are sensitive (detection, not reaction) to and how that relates to normative (ie. majority) society. Normative privilege is to see no political motive force in a work which leaves the status quo unchallenged.

People who are sensitive to non-normative topics in society will be aware of tangentially touched subjects, omissions, and slights that others may not notice.

edit: edited my quote of Orthos to reflect their edit.


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Chief Cook and Bottlewasher wrote:
Bjørn Røyrvik wrote:

Quite fond of Glenfiddich and Jura (the ones I've tasted, at least - haven't tried them all).

I take it neat, preferably at room temperature. You get so much more taste than if you cool it down.

I'm really in the 'adding water/ice is sacrilege' camp, but I try to be polite. Perhaps if I wasn't drinking a good single malt, but then I'd probably pass anyway

Adding water and adding ice are entirely different matters.

Adding ice will cool the liquid and the aromatics don't move as freely, so you don't experience them as readily. Adding water, or "breaking", the scotch is widely recommended as a method for opening up flavors. The slight dilution lets the tannins move more easily on your pallet and makes each profile note more accessible.

The master distiller at glenlivet drinks his single malts 1:1 water:scotch.

Lately, I've been enjoying some blends from compass box. Hedonism (pear, caramel, smoke) and Flaming Heart (vanilla, peat). Both highly recommended (by me!)


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That thread got locked for a very specific reason given by the moderator in the lock message. It may have been tangentially related to what you are talking about here but I would leave well enough alone. Basically, the moderation staff has politely asked you to not discuss that topic here, at all. You should accept it and move on.


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Vic Wertz wrote:
Sebastian Hirsch wrote:

I supported the recent legendary gamess mythic kickstarter, and the plan seems to be to send out the pdfs to us, then gather the feedback to fix every typo and only then send it to the printer.

I appreciate, that this might cause some trouble with retail, but would this be an option you would be willing to experiment with?

Crowdsourcing development and editing come with their own problems. Yes, you will probably catch and fix more mistakes, but the in-house effort spent to find each issue will be significantly higher. Let me give you a small-scale example:

Whenever we prepare to reprint a book, we have somebody—usually Jason—scan the FAQ queue and go through the main discussion threads for that product looking for things that need to be fixed. This is a process that might take a few days. Then, he and his team work on solving those problems if they haven't already been solved. During this process, they will also be investigating problem reports that are actually false positives; for example, somebody might have complained that a number in a stat block is wrong, but when we redo the math, we often find that we were right in the first place. This might take another few days. At the end of it, we have a list of changes that then go through editing, layout, and proofing, meaning more people spending more days. And the end result of that work gets summed up in an errata doc that's usually less than a page or two. In short, many man-hours of effort that result in maybe a dozen little changes.

Now image that we do that as an open call. Our days would turn into weeks, and maybe our errata doc would grow from a dozen items to two dozen, with each of the additional items very likely being far less noticeable than the previous dozen. It's the law of diminishing returns.

And crowdsourcing still won't catch everything. We're in our 6th printing of the Core Rulebook now, and in each printing, we've made corrections in response to our community identifying...

The change may be physically small, but the impact would be large. Also, I don't see how 3 weeks of subscriber's editing notes would be exponentially larger than 2 years of notes generated by the entire community. Likely it would be the other way round. But many/most of the 'initiated reader' editing mistakes would get caught that cause an FAQ backlog before the product even has its street date. As well as most of the copy/paste, spelling, and omission issues.


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12 million arrows.


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Take away ki powers, give him bard casting.


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Wiggz wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:

Yea, seems that it would stack.

I've found that the optimistic gambler trait and quicken SLA feat are adequate to accomplish the same result, but if you have access to mythic then that would seem to be the superior choice.

Unfortunately Optimistic Gambler is a Campaign-specific trait from a 3.5 AP and there are some strong arguments against Quicken SLA being legal due to Touch of Rage not being a spell.

Having said that, the trait Community Minded should work pretty well as a non-Mythic option since you always count as your own ally...

Um, yea... So touch of rage is marked as (sp) which means that 100% without a doubt, no question it is a spell-like ability. And therefore 100% no question, without a doubt does work with the "quicken spell-like ability" feat.

Optimistic gambler is a campaign trait, so what? If you are really really concerned about it then pick it up with the extra traits feat instead. Or find a GM who is able to rewrite fluff when it doesn't matter, or play second darkness.


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Yea, seems that it would stack.

I've found that the optimistic gambler trait and quicken SLA feat are adequate to accomplish the same result, but if you have access to mythic then that would seem to be the superior choice.


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thejeff wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:
In a similar note, I suspect the use of the policeman's image in conjunction with the caption is a violation of the license agreement with Getty. Stock images aren't supposed to depict the face-seen subjects in a negative light. I feel that drug fiend cop who turns a blind-eye to the under-age sex ring his dealer is running is a pretty negative light.
I know nothing about stock image law or contracts, but I suspect if that was an issue, Cracked would have been toast years ago.

Perhaps they get away with it as a comedy site. I can only speak from my own experience as lately I have had reason to purchase large quantities of stock photos and images for my business and that was a restriction of every license option I saw. Wasn't an issue for us because we're using them as image options for business cards and I've not seen anyone submit a card order for "Charlie's crack consortium. We've got 5-0 on the payroll."

If those cards ever do come through, I might just print them anyway. :D


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In a similar note, I suspect the use of the policeman's image in conjunction with the caption is a violation of the license agreement with Getty. Stock images aren't supposed to depict the face-seen subjects in a negative light. I feel that drug fiend cop who turns a blind-eye to the under-age sex ring his dealer is running is a pretty negative light.


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Zhangar wrote:

Cracked.com has run articles like this before, and will run them again; there's usually one up every week.

Robert Evans (who's a Cracked.com employee) is the actual/primary writer. He'll interview someone with a strange, complicated, dangerous, and/or horrible profession (prior articles include a bomb disposal specialist, a surgeon, and an ex-drug dealer) and then works with the subject to convert the interview into an article following Cracked.com's normal format.

You can blame Mr. Evans or another member of the Cracked.com editorial staff for the pictures & captions.

This article is a bleaker one than usual, but based on Robert Evans's past work I'll assume it's legitimate.

It very well could be this was part of the issue. The article was arranged as a narrative using the first-person interview answers. I actually found it difficult to determine if the article author was the person in the story (ie cooperatively written) or, otherwise, where the "edges" of account and comment were.

Hearing this it is pretty clear that the author took too much liberty in arrangement and too few editing passes when stitching this together. Which is a shame because it does that young lady and this topic a huge disservice.


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Sissyl wrote:

No. "Oh, I am not saying nobody is held against their will and forced into sex. It's just that the story, after reading it, struck the wrong chord with me." and "Again, I did not question the phenomenon, just the story in the 'investigative article'" are pretty clear, I think.

I am saying the story reads like a heavily designed argument to act against the phenomenon, thought up by a think tank, not something that really happened. If someone wants to pull my heartstrings, they should be decent enough to show me something real. This reeks of "how can we maximize the public reaction with her next situation?".

If someone used cracked.com for this, and get people to buy the veracity of the story, further arguments will come down the line, just in time for something the originators want. We'll see.

I agree that the story was written in such a way that I didn't have much faith in the narrator by the end. The pictures and captions certainly didn't help. I got the feeling that the author wasn't taking theirself seriously, maybe that is a coping mechanism. I don't know, but it was certainly off.


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A Tale of Two Covers


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bugleyman wrote:
MMCJawa wrote:
Alex Smith 908 wrote:
Yeah I was trying to point out how bigoted Wiggz post was. Sorry if that wasn't clear.
Yeah Sadly I have read messages on the internets that were not satire that say similar things to what you stated...
In your defense...Poe's law

The verbatim re-use of the quoted text was a fairly big give-away...


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Wraith, I think you missed the <satire> </satire> in that post.


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thejeff wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Vod Canockers wrote:
yellowdingo wrote:
Denmark mcdonalds pays 20 dollars an hour
And that worker is paying is paying over 35% taxes after $7500.

Which as a little basic math will show, leaves the Dane with less than the American getting $7.25.

?!!?!?!

(20x40x50)=40,000-7500=32500x.65=21125+7500=28625

(7.25x40x52)=15,080

Plus the Dane will have far more access to a wider range of social services

I'm sorry. Did I need a snark tag?

And the social services is definitely true as well. Though a minimum wage worker in the US gets some subsidies and other services as well. Often including food stamps.
They also get a large helping of scorn, derision and condescension with them.

Ah, well... Yes I needed your snark tag :D


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thejeff wrote:
Vod Canockers wrote:
yellowdingo wrote:
Denmark mcdonalds pays 20 dollars an hour
And that worker is paying is paying over 35% taxes after $7500.

Which as a little basic math will show, leaves the Dane with less than the American getting $7.25.

?!!?!?!

(20x40x50)=40,000-7500=32500x.65=21125+7500=28625

(7.25x40x52)=15,080

Plus the Dane will have far more access to a wider range of social services


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Hmm, I wonder what might be involved with setting up a "hostage insurance" company in the Cayman's. Offer it to anyone, but market it to US nationals traveling abroad. Insurance would pay $1,000,000 ransom if you were kidnapped. All happens overseas, no US accounts, no accounts with friends or family names on it. Just a phone call and 36 hours to verify. Ransom paid.

I bet there is a bunch of cash to be made there.


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Vic Wertz wrote:
Thehigher cause wrote:
Nicos wrote:
Personally I can't honestly recommend buying the physical copy, not until a second printing with all the Erratas.
I agree 100%
Ironically, every person who takes that stance actually delays the publication of the second printing... and if enough people were to do that, there would *be* no second printing.

I'm prepared to accept the possibility that there are some books I just won't own because the first run doesn't sell out. It isn't a dig, it is just a fact. I brought home my shiny new copy of UM and decided that night I wouldn't buy another first run hardcover from Paizo. I buy PDF's because they are cheap, so even if they never get updated a didn't waste too much on them, and if the book gets updated then so does the PDF.

That means my bookshelf has less product on it than it might otherwise, and I'm ok with that.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:


I think you're both wrong. You should treat other people like you want to be treated by them.
So in your world, a masochist should go around randomly assaulting people?

Didn't you just make a comment about muddying waters? Maybe you should check your astounding hypocracy and try again.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:

Again, you cannot possibly know that without having a relationship. For stranger/stranger encounters it is simply not possible.

Yeah, it's funny how you never speak to strangers.

That's just it, you speak to strangers ALL THE TIME, but you cannot possibly know "how they want to be treated" on a cultural level. If you greet every person that looks Hispanic the way you expect Hispanics like to be treated then (1) you're a racist, (2) going to get funny looks from a bunch of people, (3) going to get punched in the face by at least one dude from Tehran or Seoul.

What you can do is treat everyone with respect, and if you are asked to make a cultural consideration then you should comply. If you "default on" cultural observances based on what you "think" someone's culture is, then you are the biggest racist in this thread.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
Orfamay Quest wrote:


Treating everyone the same regardless of their social status is just as heinous as giving the same medical treatment to everyone regardless of their state of health.

This is about the best argument against having this kind of discussion at all. Seriously, if treating people the same is STILL racism, it is quite simply not something that can be avoided.
Have you considered treating people the way THEY want to be treated, instead of the way YOU feel they should be treated?

Again, you cannot possibly know that without having a relationship. For stranger/stranger encounters it is simply not possible.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:
The best I can do is treat you exactly the same as I would treat anyone else. If you demand more, I refuse. Does it make me a racist to refuse to treat someone differently because of their race or gender or whatnot?

Yes.

Treating everyone the same regardless of their social status is just as heinous as giving the same medical treatment to everyone regardless of their state of health.

That is simply too generic to be reasonable. What you suggest is direct racism. The kind that gets you shanked. As someone who worked retail in a neighborhood where the residents weren't the same color as me, I had to learn quickly that if I attempted to "respect the culture" of those in my neighborhood that I was causing offense.

In general, stranger/stranger encounters you should treat everyone the same. In friendships/partnerships/relationships/aquaintencships if that person wishes you to integrate cultural observations into your exchanges, they will tell you.


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thejeff wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:

That is a tough statistic to talk about. In the United States in 2008 it is estimated (ie, that isn't a reporting number) that 91,000 rapes happened of which 91% were female victims. Unless you count all rapes, including prison rapes, in which case the number goes upto a bit over 300,000 and 68% of the victims are male.

With no question, more men are raped in the United States than women. The question then becomes, should we care about statistics if a large portion of the population are prisoners or do we limit the discussion to less than 1/3 of victims because they aren't in jail.

Though call, certainly not black and white.

Huge sidetrack, but I'd say neither.

Prison rape (and prison conditions generally) is a huge problem and one that urgently needs to be dealt with. But it's such an entirely different problem that it really doesn't belong in the more general discussion about rape, but in the discussion about prison reform.

No doubt, but when we use the general term we should include all the players. If we are talking about problem solving then non-prison rape has a number of smaller divisions which need their own strategies but still collectively fall under the same umbrella.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:
With no question, more men are raped in the United States than women. The question then becomes, should we care about statistics if a large portion of the population are prisoners or do we limit the discussion to less than 1/3 of victims because they aren't in jail.

There's a difference between limiting the discussion and separating two distinct discussions. Unless you feel there's actually a useful lesson to be learned by conflating the two, you're simply muddying the waters -- and generally poisoning wells, to boot.

Not really, it's actually tied up with our discussion on white priviledge. 1/3 of black males baby's born today will see the inside of a prison cell (not jail, prison) while only 1/17 white males babies will.

Treating rape as a women's issue is part of white privilege.

Now, if you want to talk about date-rape or partner-rape those are distinct discussions but they shouldn't be lumped together in a problem solving discussion anymore than prison rape.


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ShinHakkaider wrote:
Simon Legrande wrote:
bugleyman wrote:
Simon Legrande wrote:
That chip up there is called collectivism. I keep it there as a reminder that even though I wish to be treated as an individual and strive to treat others the same, that will usually be considered bad because many other people would rather identify themselves by the group they belong to. Every now and then someone comes along and tries to load some guilt up there too. Because for some reason I should be held accountable for the actions of people I've never met just because we have the same skin color. Well there's no room for the guilt so don't expect me to feel any.

Nor should you.

But refusing to acknowledge racism doesn't eliminate it, just as the act of acknowledging racism is not itself racist.

I'm not sure that I ever said racism doesn't exist. I'm quite aware of its existence partly in thanks to the term "white privilege". I'm acknowledging that racism exists on all sides and that anyone who says only whites can be racist is flat out wrong. The way I see it, the only way to eliminate racism is for ALL people to stop practicing it.

That sounds great but so far your only point in this entire thread is to talk about how racism somehow overwhelmingly effects whites.

While I'm sure racism DOES effect whites you come across like the man in a thread discussing sexism and sexual assualt that cries out "but men are victims of rape too!!"

Men ARE victims of rape. Absolutely. But the OVERWHELMING victims of rape and sexual assault are women. And the guy no matter how well meaning who cries out that "men are raped too!!" comes across as trying to deflect from the actual problem. Some people would call that a sense of entitlement from being male. Some would call it a form of silencing. You know "well the people complaining of racism are racists too so they should just shut up." or "if everyone just stopped being racist/talking about racism/acknowledging race" etc...
Me I just call it poor form old...

That is a tough statistic to talk about. In the United States in 2008 it is estimated (ie, that isn't a reporting number) that 91,000 rapes happened of which 91% were female victims. Unless you count all rapes, including prison rapes, in which case the number goes upto a bit over 300,000 and 68% of the victims are male.

With no question, more men are raped in the United States than women. The question then becomes, should we care about statistics if a large portion of the population are prisoners or do we limit the discussion to less than 1/3 of victims because they aren't in jail.

Though call, certainly not black and white.


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FAQ'd

I don't think I want the answer though...


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Simon Legrande wrote:
Frankly, as a white male, I find the idea of "white privilege" offensive. Especially the damned if you do, damned if you don't thinking behind it.

You're in good company. People who aren't white find the idea offensive too.


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Headfirst wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:

Replace the big 5 bonuses with inherent bonuses at level up.

Reduce the price of magic items by 90%

Remove all big 5 bonus items from the game. (Flaming sword is OK, no +3 flaming)

Decrease treasure by 90%

Increase service-based goods by 10x. (Meals/ inns/ masterwork items)

Mundane goods keep book price.

Increase starting level to level 4. (All adults in the campaign setting should be at least level 4, 3 is teenager, 2 adolescent, 1 child)

Beginning characters have 1000gp.

Watch your issue with magic item shops vanish.

Watch your in-game economy begin to make sense.

I want to see you elaborate on this. Do you have a link to a document or another forum post where you show your big 5 inherent bonus charts? Also, is changing the starting level to 4 really mandatory to getting the rest of it to work? I run and play in a two-year-long E6 campaign, so that's kind of a no-go for us, but the rest of your suggestions sound interesting.

Linky Linky

If OP gives you grief about viewing the pages for some reason PM me and I will invite you into the campaign.

House Rule
New Gear &
Class Changes

are the sections you are looking for.

I don't think you need to start at 4th to make the inherent bonuses work, but I find playing games lower level than that to be more tedious and less interesting. I fully accept that is just my preference and not a universal truth, but it means that when I run games (which is basically all the time) that I don't like to run them below that level.


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I like that, even when I'm openly critical, moderators remove posts personally attacking me.

I like that an owner will take the time to show me I'm wrong about a criticism.

I like that the folks who work at Paizo are awesome enough to know that only passionate people get worked up about a game on the internet.

I like that they make a game that I'm passionate about.


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Vic Wertz wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:
(1) it didn't get fixed.
Yes, it did. We fixed the ligature problems in the PDF on July 30, 2010, and in a print edition released July 21, 2011.

Good to hear, I wasn't aware of the third run.


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GM Lamplighter wrote:

While that of course is true, frankly that doesn't matter to many (most?) of the people playing the campaign. If the campaign starts to turn into a mess, with frequent rules changes and genre shifts so that the players lose interest, then Paizo will lose that marketing avenue. Of course, maybe you will gain more players than you lose.

It sounds like Paizo gains very little from having the playtest material in the PFS campaign, due to the limited window and limited feedback. It also sounds like it causes a lot of problems for the campaign, in terms of handling rebuilds, dealing with broken stuff without being able to ban/errata things, and so on. My question, not having access to the data, is this: if Paizo did not legalize playtest material for PFS, who would lose? At worst, players would have to wait a few more months for the new classes, but that would sort itself out in a year as the schedule stabilized.

Or, put the playtest rules in as NPCs and let the GM's do the playtesting! ;)

Presumably Paizo would lose. In addition to the (albeit limited) playtest feedback they also get to spend 8 months generating buzz on their premier product for the year. This certainly has an impact on sales. Also, if your buzzin' your buyin', doesn't just apply to the source of the buzz. Basically they get to be the source of the "next big thing" for 8 months out of every year. This almost certainly boosts general brand sales.

I get that folks don't want to have crazy stuff in their game, but that's what you sign up for (and the trade off) with a managed campaign like PFS.


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GM Lamplighter wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Beta testing in any endeavour has never been for the risk adverse.
I agree. This is exactly why it should not be forced onto every PFS game by making it PFS-legal.

PFS is not a campaign that exists to serve it's own purpose. PFS exists solely as a marketing tool and research tool for Paizo. It will always serve those functions first, which is why allowing playtest material is good for PFS. It lets Paizo use PFS to serve its primary roles; market a new product and conduct research.


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Zedth wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:


Yea! I mean... I know you have a +1 sword, and I know the Mage just told you that +3 swords will get through his DR just like it was made of cold iron, but how could you possibly know about +2 swords! FREEKING metagamers! This is getting out of hand!

What do you mean you want a +2 cloak of resistance. You mean a "gracious cloak of avoiding harm of the 2nd circle?" Well you don't know about those! Metagame cheat game ruiner!

Rod of metamagic quickening? Are you insane? How does your character even know about that? Oh? You have the feat? And you have extend? And a rod of extend? Natural conclusion?!?!! NO WAY!!!!!! NO MOAR MAGIC ITEMS! Magic items are the special precious flowers and snowflakes that litter my campaign world like a bad Longfellow poem. From now on you will take only what you get, and you will equip it, and you won't try to sell it, and you will like it, AND THERE WILL BE SANITY ON THE MATERIAL PLANE!!!!!! ROWAR!!!!

Nowhere did I infer players wouldn't know about magic items. I inferred players having the full knowledge of the extensive array of magic items in the CRB and other books is the very definition of metagaming. You're free to disagree, but your attack on my opinion is extremely childish. You may have missed the "Help us keep the messageboards a fun and friendly place" rule.

So which items can I know about and not be a metagame cheat? Which items make me a metagame cheat?


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DrDeth wrote:
Sean K Reynolds wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:
(skipping other product line mentions such as the adventure's armory that got stats for a buttery knife in two separate printings)

Please do not propagate false information, especially if it's easily refuted.

(Despite your assertion, the book did not "include stats for a 'buttery knife.'" There was a minor PDF error where in one paragraph of chapter introductory text, the weapon called "butterfly knife" had a font ligature issue and showed up as "buttery knife," but the actual listing of the weapon in the table and weapon description correctly showed up as "butterfly knife." I can post photos or video of the actual 1st printing of the book to prove it.)

(Relevant link to why this problem happens.)

Edit: My kinfe/knife typo fixed. :)

Yeah. I mean- "ooh, there was a TYPO!!!!". Big fricken deal. I mean unless the typo can lead to rules arguments.

That would have just been hilarious to leave in. "I whip out my buttery knife and cover him with margarine- take That!"

Interesting to note we have complaints about a "huge decline in quality" and all we have seen is a rather humorous typo that got fixed.

(1) it didn't get fixed.

(2) it was a parenthetical aside to my other points; or did your UM have cantrips in it?

(3) read that introductory paragraph and tell me that you only see A typo.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:

I've done away with "gold = magic items." Instead, the characters gain their WBL equivalent directly as personal "mojo" and declare what items they are finding, and what their properties are, subject to that limit.

Say they've leveled (read: now have a higher mojo limit) and are in a crypt. I've described that there are iron torch-holders on the walls, etc. They kill some spectres or whatever, and it's time to look for loot. Mundane treasure is mundane treasure; they find what's there, and can spend it on hookers and blow or castles or horse food or whatever. But magic gear is special.

  • Rogue: "Using my awesome Appraise skill, I recognize that some of the jewelry is actually a necklace of fireballs. That still leaves me some extra mojo -- I'll think about it and get back to you, okay?"

  • Fighter: "Hmmm, I've got 6,000 mojo to burn. How about this: the essence of one of the spectres has infused my sword; it's now a +1 ghost touch sword instead of just being +1."

  • Cleric: "I've still got a huge pile of unspent mojo because I always forget to spend it. So here it is: I recognize one of the torch holders as my ancestor's mace of disruption, so this must have been a family crypt! I perform funerary rites over the spectres so their souls will rest easier, and I take the mace."

    This means that the PCs generally get the gear that they imagine themselves having, without me needing to include Ye Olde Magic Item Shoppe in every town, and without me needing to read their minds and specifically include this stuff as treasure.

    The catch is that the limits need to be enforced. If they loot the BBEG and take his magic items, and those items put them over their limit, then they don't have the personal mojo to actually hold onto and use the extra stuff, long-term. Maybe it just won't function for them. Maybe it gets destroyed by the next fireball. Maybe it manifests as a personality conflict with an intelligent item. Whatever.

  • I like this idea. I'm going to implement a version of this in my next game.


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    CraziFuzzy wrote:

    I dislike the comments that 'INSERT GAME FEATURE HERE' are required by the system. A GM should be able to adjust encounters so that they are workable no matter what 'IS REMOVED FROM THE GAME'.

    Good choices could be:

    Base Attack Bonus
    Spells
    Classes
    Saves
    Hit Points
    Weapons
    XP
    Feats

    The point is that, sure, you can start monkeying with the game so long as you are actually doing that. Most people's experience is that the GM doesn't adjust and is just being a campaign setting control freak. You can easily spot them when they say things like, "I don't like magic wal-mart because magic items are special. Who cares is every city has casters 7 levels higher than you, and the bad guys are geared out to fit their builds perfectly, and everytime you turn around there is some magical effect that your wizard with knowledge arcana and spellcraft maxed out doesn't have a clue about... items are special."

    BS on that. The GM is a control freak. Same GM will complain about Kitsune, new classes, oriental weapons, etc, etc, that makes their world not look like Tolkeinized Europe.


    Pathfinder Modules Subscriber

    I like the idea of an "attribute gate" to open up abilities in the game that don't require feats. However, I don't think anything is gained by adding the granularity of a new weapon category. Perhaps new weapon "special" along the lines of trip or reach that allows you to use it as you describe.

    "hafted" weapons (or whatever) can be used in one hand if your strength bonus is => xxx, or conversely "hafted" weapons can be used in 2 hands and get the corresponding extra strength bonus, power attack advantage, and qaulify for feats and abilities requiring the use of a 2 handed weapon. Normal: light and one-handed weapons gain no benefit from being used in 2 hands.

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