Kwava

dirtypool's page

Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber. 1,859 posts (1,871 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 1 alias.


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I'm sorry your core GM passed, but finishing the campaign is a great way to honor the years together. That's awesome.

I've considered going back to our own Hellmouth, but those players are all scattered to the wind. Still, it'd be nice.

That's why I'm leaning toward running Exalted. One of the other players at my table is my brother, he is the only member of our old group still playing with me. We ran a nearly four year Exalted campaign that spanned both groups, with both he and I running for big stretches. It's been 20 years since that campaign began, and we're fast approaching 20 with the current group. It feels appropriate to go back to where it all started for our current players.


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Tim Emrick wrote:

I was also introduced to the Buffy RPG around this time, and have been playing with the same group in a highly-alternate-Buffyverse campaign on and off ever since (in person the first few years, then moving increasingly online).

I loved the Unisystem rules for Buffy and Angel, and the group I was with before this one played in several seasons of two separate series that I ran. I also was lucky enough to get to playtest for Eden Studios.

That game was a blast


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I'm now at that difficult point of deciding where the journey goes NEXT.

Our group has been playing together now for about 18 years, and throughout most of that I've been one of two or three rotating GM's. We're never at a loss for ideas on what we want to play next, if anything we have reached the point where we have more games than we have time for.

Even limiting ourselves to short form narratives and one shots, each of the three of us has so many campaign ideas that we might never get to them all - and great new games keep coming out.

I'm just about to wrap up an arc in our Hunter: The Vigil game, while another GM is about to come online with a Vampire: The Masquerade 5th Edition campaign that I'm looking forward to greatly as I've spent very little time with Masquerade and LOTS of time with Requiem.

But where to next? Bringing the current arc of Vigil to a landing has given me a plethora of ideas for that campaigns next major arc, but I was also deep into planning a return to the world of Exalted.

That said I also have ideas I want to explore in PF2, OSE, Shadowdark, Kids on Bikes, They Came From Classified, They Came From the Cyclops Cave, Trinity Adventure, Trinity Aberrant, Scion, Monster of the Week, Star Wars

Too many games, not enough time.


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Antony Walls wrote:
maybe that's why poor customer service brews conspiracy theories

I'm really hesitant to call Paizo's customer service "poor" they're by leaps and bounds more involved and organized than any other TTRPG's CS departments.


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They do know what Baylen is going after.

There is an arc of stories in The Clone Wars called The Mortis Arc, it ties in heavily to the world between worlds where Ahsoka faced Anakin. Baylen is standing on a statue of one of the mythical Force deities presented in that story.

I don't want to spoil too much, you should definitely check it out.


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Different systems they need access to. It’s less like a physical key and more like an MFA token, but in this case featuring high end encryption


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They're code cylinders. Security Access keys basically.


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Once again, trying to skirt the rules on the profanity filter. That's actually a violation of the TOS.

I'm harping on the idea that you think a fictional character has access to information that you gained only from watching a movie set in the universe he is a character in. I'm mentioning Ritson because he is the most SENIOR authority on who is considered an alien in the fictional policy he instigated about fighting Aliens on his fictional Earth.

See when determining who is an alien and who isn't, he can't log into Disney+ and watch the Thor movie, any more than you can watch what is happening in my home right now.

I'm sorry you don't understand the concept of the fourth wall, but I know Al Ewing does.


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What is that idea again, that President Ritson read the script for Thor: Love & Thunder so he knows that Christian Bale's character considered Asgardians to be gods and that is why he didn't include them in his anti alien policy?


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GM SuperTumbler wrote:


"The Best of Both Worlds" cliffhanger codified the season finale cliffhanger ending.

While it was awesome, I hate what it created. So many series ended with cliffhangers and were cancelled.

I'm not sure that the cliffhanger with Picard as a Borg was the first, but it was the wildly successful one that everyone copied and still copies.

"Who shot J.R.?" was a decade earlier. Dynasty, Falcon Crest, even Cheers routinely used cliffhanger endings before Best of Both Worlds.


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Werthead wrote:
In The Way to Eden, the main hippy alien has at least two musical numbers where he sings.

There are five musical numbers in the episode, four of which contain Charles Napier’s vocals.


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DeathQuaker wrote:
Though the opening setting of "hey, what's the cheapest location we can shoot at where it would make sense for people to be?" was hilarious, as was the lampshading as to why it was that location. Spent too much money on animation I guess. ;)

Shot mostly on the holodeck, it was not a budgetary constraint but an homage to the backlot colony worlds from TOS.


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The girl playing with Spock is but one of five musical numbers in this particular episode. The other four are vocal numbers


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Firstly, I am not worked up over this at all.

Secondly, moderation of a web forum is not a particularly risky thing. If my posts get deleted, or god forbid a thread gets locked, the world does continue spinning.

Thirdly, Seitz, I’m not the only one who has commented on your need to get the final word. The difference between you and I is that for me these forums are a sometimes food.

It’s a bunch of cape stuff, is it REALLY that important to waste this many days on arguing that the President meant the Skrulls but not the Asgardians?


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Thomas Seitz wrote:
Blame Tristan for me refusing to not yield.

No dude, blame your incessant need to have the last word that you exhibit up and down this section of the forum.

The Meta narrative defines Asgardians as advanced aliens who are perceived by some cultures as gods. They are both. "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

Their existence in the narrative however, has no bearing on the actions of the character of Ritson because he is WITHIN the narrative and not AWARE of the narrative.


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Thomas Seitz wrote:
If you didn't see the trailer, it's not on me to make you understand my position that's I've stated clearly like 5 times...

President Ritson can’t see the trailer for Loki. He’s a fictional character without your viewers access to the film franchise.

Your meta argument that he didn’t mean the Asgardians because the movies define the Asgardians as gods is dumb. When you said you were giving it up the other day, you should have.


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DeathQuaker wrote:
So when did they move Rhodey because it seems like realistically if it was directly after the accident, they wouldn't have been able to keep him alive.

Of course medicine, like morality, is not one size fits all. Your friends spinal cord injury is not everyones spinal cord injury. In the film Captain America Civil War we saw Rhodey, without the need to be on a ventilator, while he was in the hospital.

DeathQuaker wrote:
that has horrendous implications as to his ability to recover from his injuries.

No more horrendous than the prior implication that he was only mobile because his rich friend built him a custom prosthesis.

DeathQuaker wrote:
As it is, I hate how they minimize extremity trauma with amputees like Bucky. Even if you get a magic prosthetic losing a limb impacts you mentally and emotionally.

This is another case of not having enough information. Bucky lost his arm, and then spent 70 years having his emotions and memories controlled by former Nazi scientists. Did they minimize his trauma, or did they simply just not show it because it would have been at its sharpest during the period of time our story did not take place in?


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Thomas Seitz wrote:
No but I still am standing by it after Loki season 2 trailer drops...

Standing by what dude?


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That’s probably for the best.


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Thomas Seitz wrote:
The sense that you clearly are taking my words out of context and phrasing them in such a way to justify you're own take that has NO bearing on the fact that ASGARDIANS ARE NOT ALIENS!!!

Not in the least. I’m asking you what the hell Gorr the god butchers claim of godhood for the Asgardians has to do with President Ritson who as a fictional character in that world has never seen that movie to know what the hell Gorr said in the first place.

As far as Ritson knows is that the Asgardians arrived from their HOME PLANET in a SPACESHIP and built a refugee camp in an unpopulated area of the world during the blip. That sure would sound like aliens to me.


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Thomas Seitz wrote:


in the whole "MCU is a story arcs" it should. Otherwise it makes no sense from any story perspective.

So narratives should ignore any sense of reality and treat the characters in the series as if they are also the audience for the series?

What kind of sense does THAT make?


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Thomas Seitz wrote:

Well since DQ, explains it better, then yes, Asgardians count as Non-terrestrial. Even if they are gods. But I'm just saying a) if you discount Gorr's belief in gods and/or his need to kill them, then you're basically saying that Asgardians aren't gods. Which makes no sense to me.

But if President Ritson is saying "No more non-terrestrials!" then that's different.

Why do the actions of the President have to account for the opinion of Gorr the God Butcher?


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Aberzombie wrote:
To be honest, it doesn’t really bother me all that much, other than a vague feeling of sadness at how the mighty have fallen.

What does that even mean?

“Amberzombie” wrote:
I’ve got my Blu-ray copies of the original series and Next Generation to make up for the loss.

So you can go watch the time the did a Noir episode, or the time they die a Sherlock Holmes episode; or the time they did a Robin Hood episode, or the time they did a western episode, or the times they did a procedural, or the times they did a trial, or the time they did an episode where they interpreted any existing genre into their episodic format.

That’s the exact same thing they’re doing on SNW


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Wait are you suggesting that a reactionary policy from a United States President is based in some part on the actions of someone who called himself a God Butcher?

Like dude woke up and said “we’ll hunt down the aliens, except those people because the God Butcher said they were gods”


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BigNorseWolf wrote:

The downside of streaming, they "just" did one of those with the alien forcing them to have the fairy tale.

I don't really feel like doing an alien influence episode in the back half of season one and another in the back half of season two is really THAT much of a problem


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Yeah I just don't get the resistance to the idea of a musical episode.

Had Gene thought of the idea of doing an entire episode that capitalized on Nichelle and Leonard's vocal training - he would absolutely have done it.

Berman era Trek would also be a natural fit for a musical episode. TNG it would have been at home in a holodeck episode, a Q episode, or as one of Dr. Crusher's productions. DS9 it would have been more successful than "Move Along Home" and in the back half of the series would 100% have involved Vic Fontaine's lounge. Voyager basically did an episode that was one long Opera recital by The Doctor.


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Also

DeathQuaker wrote:
We know Pike is going to die.

No we know explicitly that Pike is NOT going to die.

DeathQuaker wrote:
We know that because Pike knows he's going to die.

Pike knows he is going to lose all mobility and communication skills and be confined to a chair that beeps once for yes and twice for no.

That is his fate. Not death. He knows that fate.


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I wouldn't exactly say that Christine Chapel was a main character in TOS with her 33 appearances.

As for M'benga we know that he remains a medical officer on the Enterprise, though no longer the Chief Medical Officer


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Squiggit wrote:
dirtypool wrote:
Getting it early or getting it late is a quirk of the process and nothing more.
Okay but does that make it a good thing?

No it makes it a completely neutral thing

Quote:
Quote:
We really need to uncouple our emotional experience from the process at which stuff moves through the mail.
Why? Emotional experience is central to our existence as a species.

Take a beat, divorce yourself from the idea that we're talking about a TTRPG product from Paizo.

Does Amazon need to tailer its shipping practices around what makes you "feel good?" Does UPS? Does the Postal Service?

Quote:
Discounting that is silly. Pretending customer experience doesn't matter is just flat out wrong given how much business can live or die on UX (not really at issue here, more speaking generally to an earlier statement).

It's not a matter of the user experience, they aren't a shipping company. Their product is not the delivery method.

Quote:
It also feels a little weird to worry about their emotional state given the way this thread has been going, but whatever.

The whole argument has been about it "feeling bad" when books don't show up early and finding ways to tailor the process so everyone "feels good". The whole thread has been based on emotionality, but whatever.


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They are currently listed as the next four available books in the Rulebook subscription.


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Themetricsystem wrote:
"vibe/customer experience"

Why does this matter in the least?

Getting it early or getting it late is a quirk of the process and nothing more.

People who get it early aren't being rewarded, people who get it late aren't being punished. There is not some mass inequity that needs resolving.

We really need to uncouple our emotional experience from the process at which stuff moves through the mail.


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The process of sending the pdf at the time the book is processed for shipping is also a unified process for each order. Your card is charged and auth code verified; physical product is picked, packed, labeled and set aside for shipper pickup; your digital product is released to your account.

Doing it in the ways suggested above alters that into multiple batched processes.

Processing all payments -> Picking all physical products -> Packing, labeling and shipping all products -> releasing all digital products.

Paizo isn't a huge megacorporation with hundreds of warehouse and fulfillment staff members, any change to their workflow is a change to the amount of work their employees are engaging with. What improves your sense of whether a business process feels good or not, might have the opposite effect on the employee.


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Gortle wrote:
dirtypool wrote:
I think the real question is, does the company really need to amend their entire release workflow so as to not bum someone out?
Because it is not one person.

The number of people who have a negative emotional response to a shipping practice is immaterial to the point that the shipping practice doesn't need to be built around emotional responses.

Old_Man_Robot wrote:
A surprising number of people in this thread seem to have a para-social investment with the billing and shipping methods of this company

It's a shipping method, it can't invest back.


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As a subscriber I have received my pdf early in the advance cycle, and I have received my pdf late in the advance cycle. I've even once received my pdf after the book was available on store shelves to the general public.

I get that this can feel frustrating to the people effected negatively by it, but I don't think that a company (any company not just Paizo) should adjust their shipping and release scheme based on what "feels good" to any specific set of customers.


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Allowing Spock to have such a deep glimpse of his human side, and setting him up for a relationship with Chapel whom we know is going to marry another man gives a reason for Nimoy Spock to so fiercely cling to his Vulcan identity in TOS. It allows them to move Peck Spock to the Where No Man Has Gone Before starting point so that Kirk and Bones can draw him toward the balanced Spock he grows to become.

It also gives the dissolution of the Spock and T’Pring relationship a deeper meaning. She was not as we saw in Amok Time, a calculating opportunist attempting to move upward in Vulcan society with Stonn, she was someone who truly cared for Spock and was hurt by him deeply.


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As much as I love a race that evolves beyond physical form, I was thinking the idea of a race on a moon in the Vulcan system that disappeared without a trace might be a series of early hints about the Romulan diaspora.


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DeathQuaker wrote:
But you can extrapolate it from the other residents of the planet, who are not sociopathic.

Not really, because the other residents of the planet were residents of the planet and were not marooned there, only to forget why before clawing their way into a leadership position to take the palace and recover their memories.

It also feels a little quick to give a psychological diagnosis to a character we see in exactly two scenes.

"DeathQuaker wrote:
That's a cool interpretation. In the story, I would have thought the fortress was built before the asteroid hit, and just happened to be made of something that shield the residents from its effects, which added to the society's existing stratification. But symbolically it could still stand for that.

The palace was built out of the asteroid itself, as confirmed by Yeoman Zac's dialogue with Pike when Pike returns to the palace.


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If getting abandoned on an island can change Robinson Crusoe or Oliver Queen; if getting abandoned on a planet can make Khan more revenge driven - then why must abandoning one of the lowest tier Starfleet crewman have had no effect on the nature of this character?

The lowest guy on the totem poll who basically serves as Pike’s assistant was left on a planet full of violent Bronze Age warriors and had his memories stripped away. Presumably he then had to fight his way as a Kalar back to the palace to get his memories back to THEN use his knowledge to take control. But sure, deep down he must always have been a terrible person because… reasons.


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First off, the mission briefing at the beginning of the episode establishes that Zac was left behind FIVE YEARS AGO.

Rigel is stated to only be observable in very specific long range sensor windows.

So Zac has not recovered over a period of months, he did so over a period of years on an inhospitable planet that is constantly bombarding him with radiation, even if the walls of the castle deaden the effects on his long term memory.

AS for "building phaser rifles" we have literally no indication that he did so. He claims that the box of Starfleet gear is all that he has, and it is basically a mid sized pelican case.

Nowhere in the episode does he claim to have built them, and Pike's assumption is that they were left behind as they fled the planet during the initial away mission.


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I mean, the ORC license is finalized and given the release window - so is the remaster.


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I think you're reading more into what both I and The Raven Black said.

We're talking about how PF2 narrows the gulf between optimizers and non optimizers, that's all.


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Claxon wrote:


Although terrain is talked about and that it should impact the challenge, here are no hard rules for it. Same for Hazards in combat.

There are hard rules for Environment (including both Terrain and Weather) beginning on page 512 - including the DC's to overcome and damage imposed for those that have specific encounter effects.

Hazards explicit rules, including their levels for inclusion in the Encounter Budget begins on page 520 in the CRB and page 74 in the GMG


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GM DarkLightHitomi wrote:

Why would wolves ever attack like this? They wouldn't. Neither if basing tactics on slim knowledge of real wolf tactics nor on just logical tactics based on the wolves' goals.

Firstly, because this is a game and the Pack Attack is one of their pre-statted actions that appears in their Bestiary entry.

Secondly, because surrounding opponents is a documented tactic of real life wolf packs.


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The Raven Black wrote:

The gap between a character built for fun and one built for mechanical optimisation is orders of magnitude lower in PF2.

It is quite feasible to have both adventure side by side.

This. This right here is why I prefer PF2. Players who want to let the narrative of the story shape how they build without focusing on the quest for the best mathematical synergies and players who want to optimize can play in the same campaign without the former getting left behind by the latter.


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GM DarkLightHitomi wrote:
That is starting to sound like the obligation system from the latest star wars system. You get benefits by accepting debts, responsibilities, etc.

I do not see how Edicts/Anathema's, given what we have been told, sounds anything like obligation.

Obligation is a purely narrative component of your character where each players takes a complication to their characters life (debt for your ship, favors owed to a gangster, poor moisture farmer family you send money to) and each session the GM rolls on a table of each players obligations to determine which one will attempt to negatively impact the session they are about play. You only gain the benefit of extra XP or money by taking ADDITIONAL Obligation.

Edicts/Anathema's is presented as a loose replacement for alignment that more closely resembles Virtues and Vices from WoD/CoD


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I’m pretty much the opposite. I prefer most of the New WoD material to the old. I think Werewolf is the one exception where I like OWoD better.


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Freehold DM wrote:
CHANGELING THE LOST THE ONLY THING I OWN EVERYTHING FORRRRRRRRRRR

I never gave Changeling a real proper try. We did a round-robin Chronicle where we all built from different splats and each player was the ST for stories involving a specific group. We had a Werewolf, two vamps, a Hunter, and a 'Ling as a group charged with keeping a very tightly controlled peace in the city.

Our 'Ling player was sort of problematic, and it sort of colored us against the splat as a whole - which is sad.


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keftiu wrote:

I’d prefer not to get into it. There are some good folks on their staff, but I just don’t hang with the company for a bunch of reasons that added up over time.

M:tC really went in on non-linear chronology with Book of the Deceived and Sothis Ascends, two brain-bending supplements I still absolutely adore. I’ve been chasing the feeling for years - and have a new game in development that sort of scratches the itch…

Been a while since I read any of the 1e supplements, but 2e just flat out establishes the non linear nature of their summoning. I explained it to my players when it came out that if 1e was Highlander where the flashback memories of your life shape who you are now - 2e is Quantum Leap and all the days of your life touch each other and you can be anywhen.


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Hunter is my jam, Vampire as well. Both significant improvements on the OWoD versions in my mind. I really enjoyed Mummy 1e but never got my group interested enough to play it. The slightly more timey wimey Mummy 2e is even more amazing, but still it remains unplayed.

Why are you boycotting Onyx Path if you don't mind my asking.


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I know it's the official title now, but I so seldom remember to call the stuff Onyx Path is putting out by the name Chronicles. Spent too long calling it the New WoD I guess.

What was the Chronicles game that really clicked with you?

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