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Organized Play Member. 3,395 posts (3,492 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 5 Organized Play characters. 4 aliases.



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What party would you build if you were trying to maximize the number of encounters the party could face in each day of gametime? Say for example that you wanted to clear the Emerald Spire Superdungeon in less than a week, and you can bring a party of 5.

Maybe something like:
1) Big Stupid Fighter
2) Gunslinger
3) Archery Ranger (gotta have someone who can use the CLW wand)
4) Kineticist
5) Unchained Rogue or Swashbuckler with UMD ranks

This is kind of inspired by that common experience of looking back over a campaign and being like "We've been playing for 6 months and only a week of time has elapsed!" So I am wondering about how far we could push that. In the extreme, you would level up from 1-20 in a single day. That seems unrealistic, but if you were trying to do it, how would you go about it?


Do you get any flanking bonus when attempting a grapple? It looks to me like you should not, since flanking specifies that it applies to melee attacks, and grapple does not appear to be a melee attack. Though by the same logic, flanking also shouldn't affect disarm/trip/sunder since they also don't appear to be melee attacks, they only take the place of a melee attack.

Flanking wrote:
When making a melee attack, you get a +2 flanking bonus if your opponent is threatened by another enemy character or creature on its opposite border or opposite corner.

The combat rules seem to imply that combat maneuvers aren't melee attacks, as specific combat maneuvers are called out as "taking the place of a melee attack"

Attack Action wrote:

An attack action is a type of standard action... You can apply these to any combat option that takes the place of a melee attack made using an attack action (such as the trip combat maneuver), though options that increase damage don’t cause attacks to deal damage if they wouldn’t otherwise do so (such as Vital Strike and trip).

Melee Attack: While a melee attack isn’t an action type itself, many options and other rules affect melee attacks. Some combat options (such as the disarm and sunder combat maneuvers) can be used anytime you make a melee attack, including attacks of opportunity. These options can’t be combined with each other (a single melee attack can be a disarm or sunder combat maneuver, but not both), but they can be combined with options that modify an attack action or are standard or full-round actions.

However, there's a counterexample in that the feat Dirty Fighting implies that combat maneuvers do benefit from flanking:

Dirty Fighting wrote:
Benefit(s): When you attempt a combat maneuver check against a foe you are flanking, you can forgo the +2 bonus on your attack roll for flanking to instead have the combat maneuver not provoke an attack of opportunity. If you have a feat or ability that allows you to attempt the combat maneuver without provoking an attack of opportunity, you can instead increase the bonus on your attack roll for flanking to +4 for the combat maneuver check.

But then it gets more complicated, like, if combat maneuvers benefit from flanking does that mean they are considered melee attacks? If so, could you use a maneuver like Dirty Trick at the end of a charge? Or is there a separate rule that allows combat maneuvers to benefit from flanking, even though they are not melee attacks?

Charge wrote:
After moving, you may make a single melee attack.

If so, what is the benefit of the feat Kitsune Style?

Kitsune Style wrote:

Prerequisite(s): Int 13, Combat Expertise, Improved Dirty Trick.

Benefit(s): While using this style, you can attempt to perform a dirty trick in place of an attack at the end of a charge.

So, a few related questions:

1) Do trip/disarm/sunder benefit from flanking?
2) Do other combat maneuvers like grapple and dirty trick benefit from flanking?
3) Are all combat maneuvers considered melee attacks?


A CG inquisitor of Groetus sounds like a ton of fun to play. I'll definitely take the Sin Eater archetype, but trying to decide if I should also take the Living Grimoire archetype.

On one hand, there's something aesthetically pleasing about killing people with an ironbound copy of the Book of the Last Moon. On the other hand, an archetype that loses Bane and Judgment and locks you into a low-damage light weapon sounds like it could be a real drag.

Is there any way to make Living Grimoire viable as a melee combatant? Or should I drop the archetype and use a better weapon?

Fluff:
Dr. Herby Covio is a big teddy bear figure, with a shaved head, a full beard, and a deep, friendly laugh. His favorite activity is killing people and eating their sins. After all, the more people that die, the faster the Last Days will arrive and transform the Material Plane into a new, more perfect realm of existence! And besides, why should people toil away in this miserable mortal coil, when a blissful afterlife could be mere moments away?

His knowledge of the divine realms is encyclopedic, an ability he always tries to leverage when convincing the goodfolk he meets that they'd be better off after he kills them. When this persuasion fails, he won't kill the unwilling, although he is perpetually perplexed as to why someone would choose to remain in this life rather than be transported to Shelyn's realm in Nirvana or the halls of Cayden Cailean in Elysium.

Dr. Herby is uniquely suited to delivering souls to happy afterlives, as Groetus has revealed to him the talent of obliviation, in which he can eat the sins of the dead and transform those sins into pure nothingness. Not only does this help deliver the lucky departed to a harmonious hereafter, but it also removes these misdeeds from the Akashic Record so that when the Portal of Incarnation crystallizes all essences into a purer form in the next Great Turning, the next world will be better for having these sins expunged. And it's also quite invigorating!


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By request, we're back! This 'Everything About' is looking into the four noble houses of Sandpoint: Deverin, Kaijitsu, Valdemar, and Scarnetti. Post all of your musings and homebrew material on any member of one of these families here!

Everything about 'Everything About':
I figure every GM wants to run 3-dimensional NPCs, but not everyone has the time to prep every one. So I'm hoping this can act as a reference thread for GMs starting the AP, where they can take advantage of the creativity of GMs who have already invested the time into making these characters interesting.

Previous threads in the series:

  • Belor Hemlock
  • The Sandpoint guards
  • Ameiko Kaijitsu
  • Brodert Quink
  • Let's see all of your content (original or not) about any member of the noble families, including but not limited to:

  • Non-canonical backstories
  • Mannerisms and descriptions
  • Relationships with other NPCs
  • Encounters or side-quests
  • Favorite activities
  • Images
  • Anything else that helps flesh out these characters!


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    Erik Mona has expressed his loathing for magic item identification in PF1. I think we can all sympathize - identifying magic items has always been super clunky. When you find a dragon hoard with 8 magic items, does anyone actually look up the CL of all eight items and then force each party member that uses Detect Magic to roll eight different Spellcraft checks?

    Resonance allows a super elegant and simple solution. My proposal:

    A character in contact with a magic item may expend one point of resonance to identify the magic properties of that item.

    That's it. No magic required, no checks, no slowing down the game by looking up item caster levels.

    It makes intuitive sense because resonance is a character's capacity for interacting with magic items.

    And it provides at least somewhat of a meaningful choice - when you find the item, do you blow your resonance immediately to identify it, in case you might want to use it later that day? Or do you conserve your resonance until just before resting, in case you need the resonance during a fight? And if you find multiple magic items (maybe more rare in PF2 but I assume dragons still exist) then which one do you identify first? Or do you blow through your resonance to identify them all?

    This seems about 1000x more elegant than PF1's system. What do other people think?


    PC death is a difficult balance: necessary to keep combat tense and decisions meaningful, but difficult to stomach.

    After all, when a player has invested tens of hours into a character (including backstory seedlings which haven't yet fruited) it can feel like a letdown to cut off that story with a bandit's axe. So you end up scaling back the combat difficulty so as not to chop down too many budding trees.

    But what if you could have both: meaningful combats and narrative satisfaction?

    What if: when a character dies, their player can choose for the PC not to die immediately... but the character must then die within 5 sessions (with no further resurrections.) Either the player or the GM can then pick an appropriate time and manner for the death.

    That way, combat remains meaningful, since once you first meet Death your clock is started, and there's no going back. But, it gives the player enough time to wrap up their loose ends and potentially go out on their own terms. For the GM, it provides a grace period to throw in any backstory-related content you've created, and also a potential narrative driver (for example, introduce a new enemy by having them kill a party member.)

    Should I try this system for the AP I'm running? The players have definitely invested a lot of time into backstory and I have some big reveals I want to get out. Has anyone done something like this?


    I made a poll in the General Discussion forum - for those who have played games with goblin PCs, have you found them disruptive? Please vote if you have experience playing a game with a goblin PC!

    Link here.

    I'm hoping we can leverage 8 years worth of data with goblin PCs to help determine how big of an issue this may become in PF2. If we find that goblins tend to be very disruptive, hopefully the design team can tailor the language used in the rulebook to discourage the problem behaviors.


    With the announcement that goblins will be a Core PC ancestry in PF2, many people have fears that they will disrupt the game.

    So I am curious, for those who have experience playing with goblin PCs, did you find that they were disruptive to your experience?

    (Please "favorite" the post below that applies to you.)


    How would you like to see crossbows implemented in PF2?


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    Bardarok had an interesting suggestion in the Dex to Damage thread: instead of giving Dex to damage, what if you could instead get 1.5xDex to-hit? That would make Dex-based fighting have better accuracy and more crits with fewer fumbles, but lower damage per hit. Dex-based fighting would "look and feel" different than Str-based, something that's not accomplished by just replacing Str with Dex.

    Since Dex is used for AC, it's probably best if Dex-based fighting does less DPR than Str-based fighting, but it should still do a viable amount of damage. As luck would have it, the math seems to work really well for that design goal!

    Here are the plots for DPR, crits per round, hits per round, and fumbles per round for three fighting styles: Power Attack, Normal Attack, and Dex-based "Finesse Attack". (Assumptions are in the spoiler below for how these were calculated.)

    Takeaways include:

    • Finesse fighting does less damage than normal fighting regardless of the opponent's AC. Power attack does the most damage.

    • Finesse fighting gets a lot more crits than the other fighting styles.

    • Finesse fighting gets significantly more hits than the other fighting styles.

    • Power attacking has the least fumbles (due to making fewer attacks and not taking a second iterative,) but finesse fighting has significantly fewer fumbles than normal fighting.

    Assumptions:
    Natural 20s always crit.

    Two-handed weapons do not get 1.5xStr to damage like in PF1, they only get Str to damage (do we have confirmation of whether this has changed or not?)

    Numbers are calculated at level 1, and magic weapons aren't considered.

    The "Power Attack" first attack is at +5 (4 for Str, 1 for proficiency) for 2d12+4 damage (3d12+8 on a crit), and the second attack is at +0 for 1d12+4 (2d12+8 on a crit.)

    The "Normal Attack" first attack is at +5 (4 for Str, 1 for proficiency) for 1d12+4 damage (2d12+8 on a crit), the second attack is at +0 for the same damage, and the third is at -5 for the same damage.

    The "Finesse Attack" is assumed to be with a weapon with both the Agile and Deadly qualities, so the iteratives are at -4/-8 and on a crit it does an extra 1d10 of damage. The attack bonus is 1.5xDex + proficiency, and the damage is the die + Str. I'm assuming 14 Str and 18 Dex. So, the first attack is at +7 (6 for 1.5xDex and 1 for proficiency) for 1d6+2 (2d6+4+1d10 on a crit), the second attack is at +3 for the same damage, and the third attack is at -1 for the same damage.

    (If people have other cases they'd like me to run, I can try to accommodate requests.)

    My super-janky Python code:
    import pandas as pd
    import numpy as np

    # For each attack routine, define each attack bonus, normal damage, and crit damage

    # Level 1 character with 18 Str and Power Attack
    Bonus = 5
    DiceDamage = 6.5
    BonusDamage = 4
    PowerAttack18Str = [[Bonus, (DiceDamage*2)+BonusDamage, (DiceDamage*3)+2*BonusDamage], [Bonus-5, DiceDamage+BonusDamage, (DiceDamage*2)+BonusDamage]]

    Bonus = 5
    DiceDamage = 6.5
    BonusDamage = 4
    Str18 = [[Bonus, DiceDamage+BonusDamage, (DiceDamage+BonusDamage)*2],[Bonus-5, DiceDamage+BonusDamage, (DiceDamage+BonusDamage)*2],[Bonus-10, DiceDamage+BonusDamage, (DiceDamage+BonusDamage)*2]]

    # Level 1 character with 18 Dex and 12 Str, attacking three times with a 1d6 agile deadly weapon with an attack bonus of 1.5xDex
    Bonus = 7
    DiceDamage = 3.5
    BonusDamage = 2
    BonusCritDamage = 5.5
    DexNimbleDeadly = [[Bonus, DiceDamage+BonusDamage, (DiceDamage+BonusDamage)*2+BonusCritDamage], [Bonus-4, DiceDamage+BonusDamage, (DiceDamage+BonusDamage)*2+BonusCritDamage], [Bonus-8, DiceDamage+BonusDamage, (DiceDamage+BonusDamage)*2+BonusCritDamage]]

    Routines = [PowerAttack18Str, Str18, DexNimbleDeadly]

    ACs = range(10,26)

    Damage = np.zeros((len(ACs),len(Routines)))
    Crits = np.zeros((len(ACs),len(Routines)))
    Hits = np.zeros((len(ACs),len(Routines)))
    Fumbles = np.zeros((len(ACs),len(Routines)))

    index = 0
    for routine in Routines:
    RoutineDamage = np.zeros((20,len(ACs)))
    RoutineCrits = np.zeros((20,len(ACs)))
    RoutineHits = np.zeros((20,len(ACs)))
    RoutineFumbles = np.zeros((20,len(ACs)))
    for attack in routine:
    AttackDamage = np.zeros((20,len(ACs)))
    AttackCrits = np.zeros((20,len(ACs)))
    AttackHits = np.zeros((20,len(ACs)))
    AttackFumbles = np.zeros((20,len(ACs)))
    for roll in range(1,21):
    for AC in ACs:
    Result = roll + attack[0]
    if (Result >= AC+10) or (roll==20):
    AttackDamage[roll-1,AC-ACs[0]] = attack[2]
    AttackCrits[roll-1,AC-ACs[0]] = 1
    elif Result >= AC:
    AttackDamage[roll-1,AC-ACs[0]] = attack[1]
    AttackHits[roll-1,AC-ACs[0]] = 1
    elif Result <= AC-10:
    AttackFumbles[roll-1,AC-ACs[0]] = 1
    RoutineDamage = RoutineDamage + AttackDamage
    RoutineCrits = RoutineCrits + AttackCrits
    RoutineHits = RoutineHits + AttackHits
    RoutineFumbles = RoutineFumbles + AttackFumbles
    Damage[:,index] = np.sum(RoutineDamage, axis=0)/20
    Crits[:,index] = np.sum(RoutineCrits, axis=0)/20
    Hits[:,index] = np.sum(RoutineHits, axis=0)/20
    Fumbles[:,index] = np.sum(RoutineFumbles, axis=0)/20

    index = index+1

    np.savetxt("Damage.csv", Damage, delimiter=",")
    np.savetxt("Crits.csv", Crits, delimiter=",")
    np.savetxt("Hits.csv", Hits, delimiter=",")
    np.savetxt("Fumbles.csv", Fumbles, delimiter=",")

    Could this be a viable option to differentiate Dex-based fighting from Str-based fighting, and give each its own "look and feel" while keeping them on a similar power curve?


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    In some ways, the >10< system multiplies the effect of bonuses by ~3x. You are more likely to hit, more likely to crit, and less likely to fumble. Is that going to make encounter design more challenging? In PF1, if you gave a monster an extra +2 to-hit it wouldn't really alter the fight all that much. But in PF2 that +2 could have a major impact (especially if the enemy has riders on a crit, or if you have PCs who have built around taking advantage of fumbles.) Likewise, a -2 to-hit could turn an encounter from challenging to easy. That's just the hypothetical case of giving a monster an arbitrary +2/-2, but more practically, is this going to make selecting a level-appropriate monster from the Bestiary more challenging?

    CR is already notoriously unreliable as a metric to judge how difficult a fight will be. You see countless stories of people saying "I gave my party an APL+3/+4 encounter and they didn't even break a sweat." So is the new crit/fumble system going to make this more difficult - you give them a CR8 encounter and they stomp all over it, then give them a CR10 encounter and it's a TPK?

    Is the "level-appropriate window" between cakewalk and TPK going to shrink? If so, can this be mitigated? Are the new Death and Dying rules going to be enough to prevent TPKs, or will it become a precarious balancing act for GMs everywhere?


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    Dex to damage is a controversial issue. How are you hoping they implement it in PF2?

    Arguments against allowing dex to damage include:


    • (C1) Allowing Dex to-hit and to-damage, when it's already used for AC, Ref save, ranged attacks, and skills, creates overpowered PCs.

    • (C2) SAD characters are more powerful out-of-the-gate and also scale better than MAD characters, making the options unbalanced.

    • (C3) Higher AC allows for lighter armor and faster tactical speed, again creating characters that are more capable than Str-based characters.

    • (C4) Creating a 1:1 equivalence between Str and Dex, in that regardless of the "source" (Str or Dex) the fighting styles look identical and have the same effect on the target, is bland.

    • (C5) AC is more valuable in PF2 due to the >10< crit system, further increasing the defensive importance of Dex.

    • (C6) Nimble weapons will crit more often due to their decreased iterative attack penalties, which could already bolster Dex fighters.

    • (C7) It's not believable to have a 7 Str character doing tons of damage with a sword.

    Arguments for dex to damage include:

    • (P1) In both fiction and real life many fighters rely more on speed and precision than strength (e.g., Arya Stark, Inigo Montoya, Jack Sparrow, D'Artagnan, and George Patton.) Many players want options to build these kind of finesse characters and still be deadly in a duel.

    • (P2) DPR in PF1 was still dominated by Str-based characters. Fully optimized swashbucklers could stay competitive using Precise Strike, but were never surpassing barbarians and other Str-based PCs.

    • (P3) In PF2, magic weapon damage scales off the weapon's damage die (instead of being a flat +1/+2/etc.) and so two-handed magic weapons will scale better finesse magic weapons. Additionally, the fact that finesse weapons typically have a smaller damage die already disadvantages Dex builds out-of-the-gate.

    • (P4) Starfinder-style ability boosts (i.e., increasing ~4 stats every 5 levels instead of 1 stat every 4 levels) will reduce the advantage that SAD characters have over MAD characters. Additionally, the devs have signaled ability-score-boosting belts and headbands will no longer exist, which also allows MAD characters to scale better against SAD characters.

    • (P5) Initiative is no longer usually based off Dex, as it will most commonly be a Perception check, with the option for using other skills in appropriate circumstances. This makes Dex significantly less powerful

    Personally, I feel like the changes we already know (skill checks for Initiative, magic weapons scaling with damage die, increasing multiple stats simultaneously, lack of stat-boosting belts) are all plenty of justification to allow very easy means for getting dex to damage!

    Issues of implementation that are worth discussion:

    • (I1) PF1 herky-jerky character advancement, when builds "come online" at a certain level (like getting Slashing Grace at level 5 and suddenly going from 0-60) was really frustrating from a player's perspective. That's why I'd like to see dex to damage easily available at level 1 (or at least a limited version of it, such as capping the damage bonus by your character level.)

    • (I2) Should dex to damage be a weapon special quality, or a feat?

    • (I3) What would be a good way to make Dex-based fighting "look and feel" different from Str-based fighting?

    • (I4) Should the rules still penalize SAD builds, such as by allowing Dex to damage but still subtracting your Str penalty, if you have one?

    • (I5) Should Dex-based fighting do precision damage instead of normal damage (so that you don't get the case where a water elemental is demolished by a rapier)?

    • (I6) Should critical hits look different or do extra damage for Dex-based fighting, on the theory that you are expert at hitting weak spots and critical organs?


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    Raging Courage (barbarian feat): allows you to spend actions to shake off being afraid.

    Intimidating Strike (fighter feat): you spend 2 actions to make an attack against a foe. If it hits, your enemy is frightened and flat-footed until the end of your next turn.

    Why make these class feats? What if I want to play a fearless cleric? Or what if I want to play a really intimidating druid? These do not sound like the kind of feats that should be locked behind class walls!

    I think a lot of people are worried that by making feats "class feats" instead of "general feats" it will limit character options. I'm fine with class feats that largely only modify class features - barbarian feats modify rage, druid feats modify wild shape, rogue feats modify sneak attack, etc. But, the recent blog has thrown a red flag, in demonstrating that abilities that should be available to all classes are also going to be locked behind class feats.

    Free the feats! If a feat is not modifying a class feature, there should be a very very compelling reason that it is a class feat and not a general feat! Unless it's actually impossible for anyone of a different class to perform the feat, then locking the feat behind class walls is just going to limit character customization. Which is not why we play Pathfinder!


    According to this guy, TWF in PF2 does not seem to reduce the attack penalties on your iteratives or give you any extra attacks. For example, if you attack rapier/dagger/dagger, since the dagger has the "agile" quality you'll attack at +0/-4/-8.

    It seems like the benefit of TWF over simply full-attacking with an agile weapon is that your first hit could be with a non-agile weapon, giving you the possibility of one "big hit" followed by two hits with an agile weapon (presumably at a lower damage die.) It's a little difficult to see how that is going to be comparable to using a two-handed weapon with a larger damage die at 0/-5/10, but I guess we'll wait and see.

    I imagine there will be feats and class abilities that modify TWF, but I think this is our first confirmation of how the base mechanics work.


    (If the name Runelords of B'hem means anything to you, begone with ye!)

    I need to buff the sorceress in my game - she's a non-optimized blaster caster, and two sessions into the campaign her player is already getting frustrated at being useless in combat.

    She has a bonded staff, and I'd like to surprise her player by making it an intelligent magic item. One idea is that it isn't capable of any original thought, but it contains the "psychic echo" of her long-ago ancestor, and can recall memories of that ancestor's life. It has senses but can't communicate - the only ways to communicate with it are to use your own telepathy (in which case you can trigger the memories,) or for the staff to take control of you.

    The group might first discover this when I ask the sorceress to make a Will save during a combat, and if she fails her save then the staff will take possession of her for enough time to cast a (new) spell. From thence on, she'll be able to activate that spell as a 1/day ability, using her own CL and saves but without costing a spell slot (she remembers the words and actions from when she was possessed, and can now do it by herself by drawing from the staff's power.) As time goes on I'll add more spells (each time with the staff taking possession of her to "teach" her the new spell.)

    Should I give it an ego score? If so, what's a good ego? I am thinking the inhabitant of the staff was a 14th level Stormborn sorceress when she was alive, so the staff could eventually cast up to 7th-level spells, but I will slowly add those in.

    What are good spells to use? They should be thematic to the Stormborn bloodline (although reflavoring is fine). Currently the sorceress has shocking grasp and shock shield as her spells. I'm considering this list of spells right now, but clearly all won't make it on.

    Spells:
    1 Thunderstomp
    1 Ear-Piercing Scream
    1 Shock Arrow
    1 Alter Winds
    1 Windy Escape
    1 Feather Fall
    1 Obscuring Mist
    1 Grease (ice or water)
    2 Aggressive Thundercloud
    2 Gust of Wind
    2 Whispering Wind
    2 Sound Burst
    3 Lightning Bolt
    3 Storm Step
    3 Call Lightning
    3 Sheet Lightning
    3 Second Wind
    3 Wind Wall
    3 Fly
    3 Tailwind
    4 Blast of Wind
    5 Control Winds
    6 Chain Lightning
    6 Cold Ice Strike
    6 Sirocco
    7 Control Weather

    Would appreciate thoughts on:

    Mechanics: Right now it's kind of a mish-mash of a staff and a use/day wondrous item. I'm looking for a good power booster, but I'm not sure if this is the best solution.

    Related content: Is there anything existing in Pathfinder like a "psychic echo" (that can recall memories from its life but not create original thoughts)? Or anything like an intelligent item with senses but no communication?

    Flavor: The ancestor will be Varisian, so I'm looking to make the memories steeped in Varisian lore. Any good Varisian tidbits to try to work in would be great.

    Help me help my sorceress?


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    One interesting facet of the >10< system is the effect it has on support characters, in that their buffs will be amplified by not just causing more hits, but also by causing LOTS more crits.

    Say you hit on a nat 9 ordinarily. A +2 bonus only increases your chance to hit by 17%, but it increases your chance to crit by 100%!

    Now instead you get debuffed by -2. Your chance to hit has gone down by 17%, but you chance to crit has gone to 0%.

    If the prone penalty is still -4 to AC, this makes tripping way more deadly, as someone on the ground is likely to get demolished with crits.

    The dev team is signaling there are going to be plenty of abilities that only activate on a crit, and we've already seen the "deadly" weapon quality that adds an additional 1d6 to a crit, so I expect the "normal bonus damage" is only a part of the total crit package in PF2.

    It will be interesting to see if buffing and debuffing really is just going to become a much more critical part of the game, or if "fiddly buffs" like Inspire Courage are just going to be cut from the game. Although the fact that we've already seen the Enfeebled condition indicates fiddly debuffs are certainly not dead.

    So, will bards and witches be the new royalty of PF2?


    Is there any way we could see this in PF2? Is there any fundamental reason that Mystic Theurge has to be hot garbage?


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    In the GCP playtest, the crew ended up passing around a magic dagger to fight an incorporeal enemy, with up to three different PCs making attacks with the same dagger in the same round. Honestly it was pretty goofy, and they didn't even break it as badly as it could be broken - you could imagine a case where 8 PCs are totally surrounding an enemy, and each one on his turn takes one action to grab the dagger and then two actions to attack. The same dagger ends up getting used for 16 attacks in six seconds!

    Should that really be allowed? Is there any reasonable formulation of a rule in the vein of "the same object may only be interacted with (e.g., picked up, attacked with) for a total of 3 actions in each round" that isn't open to unintended abuse (e.g., "I attacked with my sword three times so the enemy can't disarm me because that would be the fourth action that interacts with it.")

    Or should we just live with this, in the same vein as the "peasant railgun"?


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    Glass Cannon Patreon subscribers can now listen to the post-playtest discussion between Erik Mona, Jason Bulmahn, and the GCP crew.

    • Dex damage is confirmed to no longer be in the game (assumedly, this also means all other ability damage is also removed.)

    • Magic Missile does 1d4+1 for every action you use to cast it. For every two levels you enhance the spell, it gets twice as many missiles (not specified whether this uses "regular multiplication" to go 3 -> 6 -> 12 or "Pathfinder multiplication" to go 3 -> 6 -> 9.)

    • There was also a discussion of the new >10< critical mechanism.

    Jason Bulmahn wrote:
    It adds drama to the rolls that are like, "That's pretty high... is that high enough? That's pretty low... is that low enough?" And there's real value to that, because it makes the rolls that aren't, like, you know, before people would just roll a 19 and they would just go "I hit." Well there's no drama to that, there's nothing exciting to that. But if you're like, "I got a 27... is that enough?" And that automatically adds a lot of agency to the player action. And to be honest, it's gonna take a little retraining, there's a little bit of a learning curve there about understanding that you can't just go "yeah, yeah, I miss. Yeah, yeah, I fail the saving throw, that's fine" because the GM will go "Well what did you get? I'm gonna need you to tell me, because it might be really important." Because let me tell you there are some spells at higher level that if you fumble, you are in a really bad place. Some of those spells that you consider "save-or-suck", right, you know, the like, "If you fail the save, you are basically out of play", most of those are now if you fumble the save you are out of play, and if you just fail the save you are heavily inconvenienced.
    Jason Bulmahn wrote:
    Attack rolls don't have an automatic fumble effect. But, some monsters can add a fumble mechanic if you fail an attack against them. And let me tell ya that really sucks the first time it happens, it's like, "Oh, he just ripped my weapon away. Aw, crap! Oh that's really not good I needed that." So, the great part is that it allows us to just be like "If it doesn't list, it's just nothing, it's just whatever you expect it to be." A fumble is just a fail if nothing is listed. A critical success is just a success if nothing is listed.

    My concern about the >10< system remains it may slow the game down, because NOT having to do math+communication is always quicker than HAVING to do math+communication. Jason Bulmahn may say there's no drama or excitement to rolling a nat 19 and saying "I hit", but at least there is speed. By adding >10< crit/fumbles, now there's a lot of rolls where you could previously just see the die number and move on, and now you have to go through the entire roll resolution process of "look up mod, add mod to die roll, tell GM the result, GM looks up DC, GM tell you how it resolves" which is significantly more time per roll than just being able to assume the results from the natural die result. Anyway, we'll see how that shakes out in the playtest, it's just my concern about whether the system may be compromising speed and momentum.


    What would be your ideal ruleset for how healing works in PF2?

    Have you played any other game systems that do healing particularly well? How could PF2 adapt those strategies?

    What would you consider the most important design goals when establishing a system for healing?


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    Some notes:

    • There are no negative hit points - if you take damage equal or greater than your HP, you go down to 0 HP and get the Dying 1 condition.
    • If a crit knocks you to 0, you gain Dying 2 instead of Dying 1.
    • Each round, you must make a save to stabilize. The save DC is based off the enemy - a boss may have a higher death DC than a mook, so you are more likely to be killed by bosses.
    • If you reach Dying 4, then you are dead.
    • If you make the stabilize check, you gain a hit point, but are still Dying. If you make another save at 1 HP, you are no longer Dying, and you regain consciousness.
    • If an ally heals you while you are Dying, you still have the Dying condition, even though you have positive HP. You still need to make a stabilize check to regain consciousness. But, once your HP is positive, you are no longer at danger of death from failing your checks - failing a stabilize check just means you stay unconscious.
    • The Stabilize cantrip puts you at 1 HP.


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    PF1 has "persistent" nonlethal damage: when your total amount of nonlethal damage exceeds your remaining HP, you fall unconscious.

    SF has "instantaneous" nonlethal damage: the only difference between nonlethal damage and lethal damage is on the knockout blow. If the final blow that causes you to fall down is nonlethal, you are knocked unconscious, whereas if the final blow is lethal then you die. Other than that, whether a blow is lethal or nonlethal makes no difference.

    So far in PF2, it sounds like SF-style "instantaneous" nonlethal damage is being used.

    The main benefit I see to the "instantaneous" system is that it requires less tracking. You no longer have to keep two separate totals of lethal vs nonlethal damage, everything is just "damage".

    That said, I strongly dislike the SF-style nonlethal. If I bring a character to the table that doesn't like to kill people, in PF1 that is entirely doable. As long as I get one solid hit of nonlethal, it's very likely the opponent will not die during the combat. But in SF, in order to avoid killing, to some extent you have to convince your entire party to do nonlethal. Most critically, a character built to do only nonlethal can wound an enemy, and then an ally can finish off that enemy with lethal damage - this means my character who I specifically built to do nonlethal just contributed to the death of a person they were trying to redeem. That is just an awful feeling!!

    Not only does it just feel bad to accidentally contribute to killing a human being that you didn't want to kill, but it also damages party cohesion. Why should the character who values redemption continue to travel with a group of murderers? With persistent nonlethal it's basically win-win, because the enemy gets KOed (satisfying the party) and no one dies (satisfying the nonlethal PC.) With instantaneous nonlethal, there's perpetual tension between the character who wants to do nonlethal and the rest of the party.

    I'd like to get other people's feelings on this, so please favorite the post below for which system you prefer.


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    https://glasscannonpodcast.com/the-pathfinder-playtest-parts-3-and-4/

    Post below about your observations.


    Please "favorite" your preferred terminology in the posts below, or post your own if you don't like any of those posted.


    16 people marked this as a favorite.

    One concern I have, partially about the new >10< crit/fail system, and heightened by Mark Seifter's post regarding parrying, is that so far PF2e seem to have many more "If you pass/fail by X or more" types of effects.

    Every time one of these shows up, I'm worried about it slowing down the game. Because many times I don't want to take the time doing the math to calculate the exact result of a check, and then ask the player how that compares to their AC, or whatever. E.g., I roll a goblin's attack, see it's a nat 18, and so I know it's a hit. Or I roll a nat 3, so I know it's a miss. I don't want to spend my time adding up attack bonuses and flanking bonuses and penalties from Bane and etc. to figure out "a nat 18 +5 +2 -1 is a 24 to hit", and then have to ask the player "Does a 24 beat your AC by 10?" I'd much rather say "nat 18 is a hit" and move on.

    And the problem just gets worse when you are adding monsters on-the-fly and modifying stat blocks - "The goblin listed has a shield bonus +2, but this one is actually holding a bow, so I have to subtract 2 from their AC..."

    And then there's skill check DCs. Probably ~50% of skill check DCs are made up on the fly, and it's just so much quicker to ask the player "OK, roll me a Knowledge (local) check" and if they roll a nat 2 then you know it will fail, and if they roll a nat 16 then you know it will succeed. I may know in advance "The DC on this is going to be in the 12-15 range" but I might not pick an exact DC before the check is rolled. But if there are different consequences based off whether they fail by 10 or fail by 5 or pass by 5 or pass by 10, then getting the exact DC and exact bonuses correct becomes a lot more important... which takes more time.

    One example from PF1e is Mirror Image. Someone rolls their attack and says "I miss", and then you have to take extra time to ask them, "Well what was your exact total? If you failed by less than 5 you pop an image." That takes time away from the action.

    Am I making a mountain out of a molehill? Or do other people also worry that having too many "degrees of success" will slow the game?


    How should PF2e handle "save or die" and "save or suck" effects?


    I've only played a little 5E, but I thought it was well-designed overall and enjoyable. It definitely has major weaknesses, foremost among them being lack of character customization, but it does some things right.

    So, what are your favorite parts of 5E? How would you like to see similar concepts show up in PF2e?


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    Some Starfinder changes I thought were pretty cool (the way ability score increases are handled, and the stamina/HP/resolve system,) but other stuff I was put off by. So what changes that were made in Starfinder do you hope are not transferred to 2E?

    The rules on enemies dying in SF bug me - basically, when an enemy goes below 0 they die instantly, unless the GM decides he doesn't want them to die, in which case they stay alive for three rounds before dying. Now, I get that GMs are not at all interested in spending time during combat rolling a whole bunch of stabilize checks for six different mooks. I will admit to hand-waving that most of the time. But for the important NPCs who get downed, I really appreciate having rules that are there when you need them, instead of just relying on GM fiat. When an important NPC or ally goes unconscious, IMO that should be a moment of tension, where the PCs have to make tough decisions, evaluate their priorities, and decide how much they're willing to risk or expend to stop that character from dying. When it's all just GM fiat, there is no tension there.

    On a similar vein, I dislike how SF did nonlethal damage - it is literally no different than lethal damage, unless you use it for the knock-out blow. So doing a bit of nonlethal at the start of a combat as a buffer so you don't accidentally perma-kill an adversary is no longer an option. Again, I get how it simplifies bookkeeping - tracking one damage total is easier than tracking two separate damage totals and having to add them up. But it really sweeps the legs out from under characters who want to play mercifully, as they can no longer do it unilaterally - unless they convince everyone to fight nonlethally, a lot of enemies are still going to be killed. And what's worse, the character who was specifically trying to fight nonlethally has now done damage that contributed to that death, which is really demoralizing.

    So, what other changes do you want to see left in SFland?


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    Will smoother leveling be a feature of 2E? Too many builds are near-useless at low levels, until they hit that one feat or class ability that finally allows them to become viable.

    I find this especially problematic regarding damage bonuses, e.g.: Gunslinger 5 being leaps and bounds more effective than Gunslinger 4, or virtually any class that wants to get Dex to damage (there are a couple options that can do this at level 1, but unless you want to be a human or an Inspired Blade it's really tough.) It's frustrating to have a character in mind, and think "If I were starting at level 5 this would be totally viable, but if I start at level 1 I'll be deadweight for 4 levels."

    Options like "You may add your Dex modifier as a bonus to your damage roll, up to a maximum of your class level" are perfectly acceptable, because the leveling is graceful in that case. But herky-jerkyness in damage increases, whether due to an Agile weapon or Finesse Training II or Slashing Grace or Gun Training or Precise Strike or what-have-you, really puts you in a difficult position during character design. And it only gets worse when you aren't sure about the longevity of the campaign!


    I hope we can get some balanced new takes on:

    Arcane Trickster
    Unarmed Magus
    Blaster Casters
    Shadowdancer
    Mystic Theurge
    Low Templar
    Knife Thrower

    Bonus points if you don't have to hyper-specialize to the point where there's only one effective build for each option!


    Image version / Google Docs version

    Goal: Make it easier and faster to perform live Harrow card readings.

    Usage: Print out the 3 sheets, and place them somewhere convenient (like behind your GM screen.) Each sheet has two suits. In each suit, the placement of the card indicates the card's alignment. So, by seeing the suit and alignment of the card, you know exactly where you can find it on the cheat sheet (e.g., you draw The Winged Serpent and see it is the LG card of Stars. So you look at the Stars page, and look at the top-left cell because the card is LG.) Regular text are typical interpretations, and italicized text are possible interpretations of misaligned cards.


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    Image version / Google Docs version

    Recently I've been really enjoying doing harrow readings, but was worried about speed and momentum - the amount of time it was taking me to look up card interpretations would bog things down and kill the mood if I wanted to do a live reading. So, I put this together, and it speeds up the whole process greatly!

    The intention is that you print these 3 sheets, each one containing two suits, and keep them behind your GM screen or wherever else is convenient (I have mine taped to the wall behind my computer for my Roll20 game.) They are visually arranged by suit and alignment, so you can very quickly and easily find the card you're looking for. Regular text shows some typical interpretations, and italicized text shows possible interpretations of a misaligned card.

    Looking forward to hearing any comments you have!


    I'm not quite sure what the point of the Gresgurt encounter is supposed to be. It seems like a trivially easy combat against an enemy the PCs have already faced, with a foregone conclusion that Alergast dies and the PCs kill/capture Gresgurt. As written, it doesn't really seem like it adds anything to the story.

    Did you run this encounter, or skip it? If you ran it, how did it turn out? Would you make any recommendations on how to make it fun and interesting?


    My gnome paladin made a donation to the Turandarok Academy, and has shown interest in Ilsoari's invitation to come tour the premises. I'd like to have some memorable orphans to flesh the place out, hopefully ones that the PCs could become attached to. Any ideas? Here's a couple so far:

    Rini “Owl” Vezunia: A Varisian orphan, never far from the harrow deck that is an heirloom from her parents. She got the nickname Owl both from the harrow card, and due to her penchant for staying up late at night (sometimes to the annoyance of her bunkmates.) Owl is well-liked at Turandarok due to her concern over everyone's well-being, and also her enjoyable harrow readings, which she takes very seriously but also tries to give a bit of flair. But if she feels the subject is not taking the harrowing process seriously, she'll pack up her cards and leave. She considers herself a caretaker and spiritual advisor to the other children, even those that are much older than her. She never knew her father, and her mother was killed by the Chopper.

    Jannie Skiou: A slight girl, Jannie is often daydreaming and singing songs to herself. She is exceptionally fond of the Sandpoint Theater, and often harries Cyrdak for an audition. He's starting to soften up, and is now starting to take her more seriously, although not enough to actually cast her in any of the weekend shows. She doesn’t remember her parents, who died of illness when she was very young.

    Horgie Blum: A plump Chelaxian boy, he is usually reluctant to get himself in trouble, but always eager to tag right behind and encourage others to get into mischief. He has aspirations to become a wizard, and so takes his studies quite seriously.

    Anno Sprann: This 4-year-old boy is relentlessly curious.


    Trying to build a Kinetic Knight, and just want to make sure I can do Composite Blast damage with every Kinetic Blade hit (once I have composite blasts.)

    Relevant text:

    Kinetic Blade wrote:

    Element(s) universal; Type form infusion; Level 1; Burn 1

    Associated Blasts any
    Saving Throw none

    You form a weapon using your kinetic abilities. You create a nonreach, light or one-handed weapon in your hand formed of pure energy or elemental matter. (If you’re a telekineticist, you instead transfer the power of your kinetic blast to any object held in one hand.) The kinetic blade’s shape is purely cosmetic and doesn’t affect the damage dice, critical threat range, or critical multiplier of the kinetic blade, nor does it grant the kinetic blade any weapon special features. The object held by a telekineticist for this form infusion doesn’t prevent her from using gather power.

    You can use this form infusion once as part of an attack action, a charge action, or a full-attack action in order to make melee attacks with your kinetic blade. Since it’s part of another action (and isn’t an action itself), using this wild talent doesn’t provoke any additional attacks of opportunity. The kinetic blade deals your kinetic blast damage on each hit (applying any modifiers to your kinetic blast’s damage as normal, but not your Strength modifier). The blade disappears at the end of your turn. The weapon deals the same damage type that your kinetic blast deals, and it interacts with Armor Class and spell resistance as normal for a blast of its type. Even if a telekineticist uses this power on a magic weapon or another unusual object, the attack doesn’t use any of the magic weapon’s bonuses or effects and simply deals the telekineticist’s blast damage. The kinetic blade doesn’t add the damage bonus from elemental overflow.

    Kinetic Blast wrote:

    Most composite blasts are either physical or energy blasts, like simple blasts.

    Physical composite blasts deal an amount of damage equal to 2d6+2 + the kineticist’s Constitution modifier, increasing by 2d6+2 for every 2 kineticist levels beyond 1st.

    Energy composite blasts deal an amount of damage equal to 2d6 + 1/2 the kineticist’s Constitution modifier, increasing by 2d6 for every 2 kineticist levels beyond 1st.

    So, say I have an 9th-level Kinetic Knight with 20 Con. I can full-attack with a physical composite blast for 10d6+15 damage on each hit, correct? And since the Kinetic Knight archetype reduces the burn from Kinetic Blade to 0, I can do that every round with no burn?


    Looking for brainstorm ideas on a character that doesn't just fight stuff but also puts on a good show while they're doing it. Doesn't necessarily have to be optimized for the Performance Combat rules, but it could be. A lot of ideas come to mind - swashbuckler, brawler, bard, magus, inquisitor of Shelyn, maybe take Blade of Mercy and Enforcer... could be multiclassed or single-classed.

    The build might be a little secondary to the roleplay, but a good build that allows combat maneuvers and stuff can't hurt to add some spice.


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    At the Swallowtail Festival, I ran a scavenger hunt for my players, to help introduce them to Sandpoint. I think it was received really well! Overall it took 1.25 hours with 3 PCs, just about where I was aiming for pacing. They had fun with it, and it got them a bit acquainted with the city (and with their character sheets!)

    Other mechanics:
    I used the chase mechanics (slightly modified - if you attempted both checks and passed both you moved two spaces, if you failed either check you don't move at all, but you never lose an entire turn.) Sandpoint non-locals got a three-round head start (this was mainly so I could justify why the PCs have a chance of winning against scores of other contestants.) For the opponents, I just put three Varisians on the map that started simultaneously with the PCs, and for them I just rolled a d6 each round and moved them on a 5 or 6 (I didn't feel like drawing up character sheets for them and rolling the actual skill checks.) The prize for winning the scavenger hunt was 50 gp which was the grand prize of the day (I think it was good to offer such a large prize because two of my PCs talked about "using the time while people are distracted with the scavenger hunt to snoop around looking for anything strange," but once I reminded them "The prize for the scavenger hunt is 50 gold pieces!" they got in line to join.)

    Welcome to Sandpoint!

    Travel through the town and pick up the bold items on the list.

    Note, each time after moving the leader must make a DC8 Survival or Knowledge (local) check to avoid become disoriented. If they fail, they take a -2 penalty to all their checks for one round.

    1) The Way North

    Receive a scavenger hunt map

    Bearing a sign that says “The Way North”, this cramped building is festooned with nautical charts and maps, and through the windows you can see much more of the same, with barrels of rolled up papers, maps on the walls, and shelves and shelves of books. The far side of the room is dominated by a large work table with a half-completed map of the region.

    An aged but spry gnome with white hair and only a few teeth left is handing out maps as fast as he can, but he's mobbed by scavengers grabbing their maps. Make a DC13 Intimidate check to get the others to move aside, or a DC11 Sleight of Hand check to snatch a map out of his hand.

    2) The Old Light

    Get a worked stone

    Like a spike driven up into the sky, this ruin towers over the city, sitting atop the sea cliff that forms Sandpoint’s northern boundary. A cylindrical base of 40 foot diameter indicates this was once a towering structure, though time has taken its toll. The eastern side stands five stories in height, while the western edge has just 15 feet of height remaining. Archaic runes adorn parts of the existing facade and seem strangely well preserved, considering the extent of erosion on the rest of the structure. Large chunks of worked stone lie on the ground, but up on a low ledge you can see smaller pieces of rubble as well. Your nose fills with the smell of sea spray, and you feel a light mist on your skin, as the gulls circle and caw overhead. The bluff affords a stunning view of the Varisian Gulf, as the famous mists of the Lost Coast are just receding from the shore.

    Make a DC7 Strength check to pry loose a large rock (this weighs 20 lbs, and if it encumbers you then you take a -2 to subsequent checks for the hunt.) Or, make a DC12 Climb check to scramble up and find a smaller stone.

    3) Town Hall

    Pick up a bank deposit slip

    This two-story stone building is impressively large, although not even a quarter of the size of the new cathedral. Upon entering you find yourself in a large empty meeting hall, with the chairs currently stacked off to the sides. A sign instructs you to head downstairs to the bank for the scavenger hunt.

    To find a bank deposit slip among the various paperwork in the town hall basement, make a DC10 Profession or Knowledge (local) check, or make a DC12 Linguistics check to rapidly scan the forms and find the right one.

    4) The House of Blue Stones

    Find a painted blue stone

    Inside this stone building is a large open floor covered in polished round blue stones. The air is thick with the resinous tang of burning incense. Reed mats on the floor form winding walkways, and they rustle gently as you walk over them. Several round cushions are placed sporadically across the floor. Besides a spiral staircase leading down in the far corner, the only other feature is a reflecting pool in the center of the room. A dark-skinned woman watches observantly from near the door.

    While the floor in this large hall is covered with smooth blue stones, the ones for the hunt are painted blue, not naturally blue like the rest. Make a DC14 Perception check to find a painted stone, or a DC10 Wisdom check to instinctively determine which stones are out of place and were recently placed here for the hunt.

    5) Kaijitsu Glassworks

    Grab a pinch of soda ash

    This large stone factory’s impressive facade is brightened by five colorful stained glass windows, each masterfully worked in the Eastern style. They depict scenes ranging from travelers on a snowy field, to a fiery portrayal of the process of glassblowing.

    Out in the yard under an awning lie three large piles of white powder. To distinguish the soda ash from the limestone and the mature sand, make a DC9 Appraise check or a DC12 Knowledge (engineering) or (nature) check.

    6) Turch’s Fishmarket

    Find a cockle shell

    As you rush along the boardwalk overlooking the harbor, the smell of fish is overwhelming. A large sign proclaims “Valdemar Fishmarket”. Under the roof are many stalls with fish, crabs, eels, mussels and other shellfish, and even a large octopus out on display. You can hear the waves gently lapping at the rocks

    Under the boardwalk is all manner of discarded shells and fish skeletons, but the hunt is specifically calling for a cockle shell. Make a DC9 Knowledge (nature) or Profession (fisherman) check to pick out a cockle shell, or make a DC12 Diplomacy check to ask someone to help you identify one.

    7) Meat Market

    Get a chicken shinbone

    The smell of blood and fresh meat is thick in the air, and the counter display shows cuts of pork, venison, beef, pheasant, chicken, mutton, and rabbit.

    Outside the back of the market is the bone heap. To identify a chicken shinbone among the heap, make a DC10 Heal or Knowledge (nature) check, or a DC8 Profession (cook) check.

    8) Goblin Squash Stables

    Take a handful of hay

    A painted sign over the door of these stables depicts a goblin being trampled underfoot by a horse. Enhancing the motif is a grisly display on the entrance to the barn, which bears three rafters covered with dozens of goblin ears that have been nailed on. Many of the ears have a name branded on, presumably that of the dead goblin itself. The scent of hay and dung fills the air.

    The horses are getting antsy at having so many visitors, and the hay is behind them. Make a DC12 Handle Animal check to calm them down so you can grab some hay, or else make a DC13 Stealth check to sneak through without them noticing.

    9) Valdemar Shipyard

    Get a bit of rope

    This long building has no wall along its southern facade, allowing easy movement between the workshop and the four large dry docks that lead out into the harbor. One dry dock holds an almost-completed galley bearing a dozen oars on each side, and another holds the skeleton of a larger carvel in the early stages of construction. There are enough tools lying around to support a small army of shipwrights. You can smell the sulphurous scent of the boggy water.

    Some of the bollards on the docks have knotted rope ends tied on, that seem to have been hacked off by hasty departing sailors. To untie a rope, make a DC13 CMB check, or a DC11 Escape Artist check.

    10) Two Knights Brewery

    Find some bitter hops

    This stone building greets you with a life-size painted wooden cutout of two knights in full armor, toasting each other with brimming-over mugs and holding swords in their off hands. At the feet of one of the cutouts is a fresh wreath of flowers. The strong scent of beer wafts from the building.

    The storehouse is open, and several barrels hold different brewing ingredients. To distinguish the bitter hops from the other ingredients, make a DC9 Profession (brewer), Knowledge (nature), or Craft (alchemy) check, or a DC13 Perception check to find the bitter hops by its odor.

    11) Scarnetti Mill

    Grab a pinch of grains

    You see a large water wheel turning behind this old wooden building, and you can hear the low scraping sound of the grindstone before you even enter into the building. The interior bears the subtle aroma of fresh flour.

    The gristmill is running. To grab the grains, make a DC13 Climb check to get up to the hopper, or, to safely grab grains from the mill, first shut the sluice by making a DC10 Disable Device or Knowledge (engineering) check.

    12) Sandpoint Lumber Mill

    Get a piece of driftwood

    The wood of this long building seems old and weathered, in stark contrast to the freshly cut red-blonde surfaces of the lumber lying in huge piles all around. The scent of fresh pine mixes with the brackish odor of the river.

    There are plenty of branches floating in the water, along with an abundance of larger logs. Make a DC10 Swim check to get in the water and grab a branch, or use a lasso to grab one by making a ranged attack against AC12.

    13) Carpenter’s Guild

    Pick up a nail

    It looks like every square foot of this large building is being well-used for all manner of construction projects, some of which have spilled outside. A red-bearded dwarf watches hawkishly but with a smile, seeming to enjoy the ruckus of the day.

    Various odd bits of discarded lumber are strewn about, and while lots of nails are visible, all are embedded in various bits of wood. Make a DC9 Profession (carpenter) or Knowledge (engineering) check to locate one that looks loose, or make a DC12 Strength check to pry one free.

    14) Sandpoint Theater

    Receive a playbill

    This huge wooden building well outsizes the town hall, and once you enter you can see an auditorium that could sit 250 in its stuffed red folding seats. On the stage is a mustachioed man wearing a feather cap, and holding a stack of playbills for the upcoming show, The Harpy’s Curse.

    Cyrdak Drokkus demands a performance before he gives you a playbill. Make a DC10 Perform check, or make a DC14 Knowledge (local or nobility) check to make a witty observation to make him smile.

    15) Sandpoint Cathedral

    Rush back to the new cathedral with all the listed items!

    Here's the map I used for Roll20 (turn grid off while using it.)

    To make it look pretty I used The Homebrewery with the following code:

    Homebrewery code:
    # Scavenger Hunt

    ## Welcome to Sandpoint!
    Travel through the town and pick up the bold items on the list.

    *Note, each time after moving the leader must make a DC8 Survival or Knowledge (local) check to avoid become disoriented. If they fail, they take a -2 penalty to all their checks for one round.*

    ### 1) The Way North

    ***Receive a scavenger hunt map***

    Bearing a sign that says “The Way North”, this cramped building is festooned with nautical charts and maps, and through the windows you can see much more of the same, with barrels of rolled up papers, maps on the walls, and shelves and shelves of books. The far side of the room is dominated by a large worktable with a half-completed map of the region.

    *An aged buy spry gnome with white hair and only a few teeth left is handing out maps as fast as he can, but he's mobbed by scavengers grabbing their maps. Make a DC13 Intimidate check to get the others to move aside, or a DC11 Sleight of Hand check to snatch a map out of his hand.*

    ### 2) The Old Light

    ***Get a worked stone***

    Like a spike driven up into the sky, this ruin towers over the city, sitting atop the sea cliff that forms Sandpoint’s northern boundary. A cylindrical base of 40 foot diameter indicates this was once a towering structure, though time has taken its toll. The eastern side stands five stories in height, while the western edge has just 15 feet of height remaining. Archaic runes adorn parts of the existing facade and seem strangely well preserved, considering the extent of erosion on the rest of the structure. Large chunks of worked stone lie on the ground, but up on a low ledge you can see smaller pieces of rubble as well. Your nose fills with the smell of sea spray, and you feel a light mist on your skin, as the gulls circle and caw overhead. The bluff affords a stunning view of the Varisian Gulf, as the famous mists of the Lost Coast are just receding from the shore.

    *Make a DC7 Strength check to pry loose a large rock (this weighs 20 lbs, and if it encumbers you then you take a -2 to subsequent checks for the hunt.) Or, make a DC12 Climb check to scramble up and find a smaller stone.*

    ### 3) Town Hall

    ***Pick up a bank deposit slip***

    This two-story stone building is impressively large, although not even a quarter of the size of the new cathedral. Upon entering you find yourself in a large empty meeting hall, with the chairs currently stacked off to the sides. A sign instructs you to head downstairs to the bank for the scavenger hunt.

    *To find a bank deposit slip among the various paperwork in the town hall basement, make a DC10 Profession or Knowledge (local) check, or make a DC12 Linguistics check to rapidly scan the forms and find the right one.*

    ### 4) The House of Blue Stones

    ***Find a painted blue stone***

    Inside this stone building is a large open floor covered in polished round blue stones. The air is thick with the resinous tang of burning incense. Reed mats on the floor form winding walkways, and they rustle gently as you walk over them. Several round cushions are placed sporadically across the floor. Besides a spiral staircase leading down in the far corner, the only other feature is a reflecting pool in the center of the room. A dark-skinned woman watches observantly from near the door.

    *While the floor in this large hall is covered with smooth blue stones, the ones for the hunt are painted blue, not naturally blue like the rest. Make a DC14 Perception check to find a painted stone, or a DC10 Wisdom check to instinctively determine which stones are out of place and were recently placed here for the hunt.*

    ### 5) Kaijitsu Glassworks

    ***Grab a pinch of soda ash***

    This large stone factory’s impressive facade is brightened by five colorful stained glass windows, each masterfully worked in the Eastern style. They depict scenes ranging from travelers on a snowy field, to a fiery portrayal of the process of glassblowing.

    *Out in the yard under an awning lie three large piles of white powder. To distinguish the soda ash from the limestone and the mature sand, make a DC9 Appraise check or a DC12 Knowledge (engineering) or (nature) check.*

    ### 6) Turch’s Fishmarket

    ***Find a cockle shell***

    As you rush along the boardwalk overlooking the harbor, the smell of fish is overwhelming. A large sign proclaims “Valdemar Fishmarket”. Under the roof are many stalls with fish, crabs, eels, mussels and other shellfish, and even a large octopus out on display. You can hear the waves gently lapping at the rocks

    *Under the boardwalk is all manner of discarded shells and fish skeletons, but the hunt is specifically calling for a cockle shell. Make a DC9 Knowledge (nature) or Profession (fisherman) check to pick out a cockle shell, or make a DC12 Diplomacy check to ask someone to help you identify one.*

    ### 7) Meat Market

    ***Get a chicken shinbone***

    The smell of blood and fresh meat is thick in the air, and the counter display shows cuts of pork, venison, beef, pheasant, chicken, mutton, and rabbit.

    *Outside the back of the market is the bone heap. To identify a chicken shinbone among the heap, make a DC10 Heal or Knowledge (nature) check, or a DC8 Profession (cook) check.*
    \page
    ### 8) Goblin Squash Stables

    ***Take a handful of hay***

    A painted sign over the door of these stables depicts a goblin being trampled underfoot by a horse. Enhancing the motif is a grisly display on the entrance to the barn, which bears three rafters covered with dozens of goblin ears that have been nailed on. Many of the ears have a name branded on, presumably that of the dead goblin itself. The scent of hay and dung fills the air.

    *The horses are getting antsy at having so many visitors, and the hay is behind them. Make a DC12 Handle Animal check to calm them down so you can grab some hay, or else make a DC13 Stealth check to sneak through without them noticing.*

    ### 9) Valdemar Shipyard

    ***Get a bit of rope***

    This long building has no wall along its southern facade, allowing easy movement between the workshop and the four large dry docks that lead out into the harbor. One dry dock holds an almost-completed galley bearing a dozen oars on each side, and another holds the skeleton of a larger carvel in the early stages of construction. There are enough tools lying around to support a small army of shipwrights. You can smell the sulphurous scent of the boggy water.

    *Some of the bollards on the docks have knotted rope ends tied on, that seem to have been hacked off by hasty departing sailors. To untie a rope, make a DC13 CMB check, or a DC11 Escape Artist check.*

    ### 10) Two Knights Brewery

    ***Find some bitter hops***

    This stone building greets you with a life-size painted wooden cutout of two knights in full armor, toasting each other with brimming-over mugs and holding swords in their off hands. At the feet of one of the cutouts is a fresh wreath of flowers. The strong scent of beer wafts from the building.

    *The storehouse is open, and several barrels hold different brewing ingredients. To distinguish the bitter hops from the other ingredients, make a DC9 Profession (brewer), Knowledge (nature), or Craft (alchemy) check, or a DC13 Perception check to find the bitter hops by its odor.*

    ### 11) Scarnetti Mill

    ***Grab a pinch of grains***

    You see a large water wheel turning behind this old wooden building, and you can hear the low scraping sound of the grindstone before you even enter into the building. The interior bears the subtle aroma of fresh flour.

    *The gristmill is running. To grab the grains, make a DC13 Climb check to get up to the hopper, or, to safely grab grains from the mill, first shut the sluice by making a DC10 Disable Device or Knowledge (engineering) check.*

    ### 12) Sandpoint Lumber Mill

    ***Get a piece of driftwood***

    The wood of this long building seems old and weathered, in stark contrast to the freshly cut red-blonde surfaces of the lumber lying in huge piles all around. The scent of fresh pine mixes with the brackish odor of the river.

    *There are plenty of branches floating in the water, along with an abundance of larger logs. Make a DC10 Swim check to get in the water and grab a branch, or use a lasso to grab one by making a ranged attack against AC12.*

    ### 13) Carpenter’s Guild

    ***Pick up a nail***

    It looks like every square foot of this large building is being well-used for all manner of construction projects, some of which have spilled outside. A red-bearded dwarf watches hawkishly but with a smile, seeming to enjoy the ruckus of the day.

    *Various odd bits of discarded lumber are strewn about, and while lots of nails are visible, all are embedded in various bits of wood. Make a DC9 Profession (carpenter) or Knowledge (engineering) check to locate one that looks loose, or make a DC12 Strength check to pry one free.*

    ### 14) Sandpoint Theater

    ***Receive a playbill***

    This huge wooden building well outsizes the town hall, and once you enter you can see an auditorium that could sit 250 in its stuffed red folding seats. On the stage is a mustachioed man wearing a feather cap, and holding a stack of playbills for the upcoming show, The Harpy’s Curse.

    *Cyrdak Drokkus demands a performance before he gives you a playbill. Make a DC10 Perform check, or make a DC14 Knowledge (local or nobility) check to make a witty observation to make him smile.*

    ### 15) Sandpoint Cathedral

    ***Rush back to the new cathedral with all the listed items!***


    Let's flesh out the character of Ameiko Kaijitsu!

    Let's see all of your content (original or not) about Ameiko Kaijitsu, including but not limited to:

    • Non-canonical backstories
    • Mannerisms and descriptions
    • Relationships with other NPCs
    • Encounters or side-quests
    • Favorite activities
    • Images
    • Anything else that helps flesh out this character!


    Would anyone else be interested in hearing a podcast of people playing a game of Pathfinder in which you never hear the terms "points of damage", "skill check", "attack roll", or "standard action"? All of the content is completely immersive, without any explicit mention of the game mechanics? The players could stay in character and maintain the 4th wall to further the immersion.

    I'm imagining it working like this: A group plays on Roll20, and as much as possible does all of the mechanics silently in the chat window (pre-rolling to keep things quick.) Once the mechanics are resolved, only then does the player speak up and describe in-game what their action was. Or if they need to talk about their actions, then that's edited out in post-production.

    I understand it would be an editing nightmare - but would it be worthwhile to create a unique listening experience, in which the players adventure through Golarion, adhering to PFRPG rules but without discussing them?

    Besides the story-telling aspect of it, I think it would also be fun for us PF veterans to guess what mechanics they're using (since you wouldn't have any pre-knowledge on what feats, archetypes, and items they are using.) I love when listening to the Glass Cannon Podcast for example when Troy has a monster cast a spell, he doesn't say up front what the spell is but he gives a description of the physical manifestation of the spell, or has the caster say some phrase that hints at what the spell is, at which point it's fun to guess at what is being cast. So this idea kind of cranks that up an order of magnitude, to where none of the mechanics are revealed (unless there are separate behind-the-scenes episodes.)


    I have a vision of a monk that runs through the air, tossing enemies much bigger than herself around the battlefield, grappling dragons, etc.

    How best to build? What's the best way to get air walk or something similar? Let's assume 11th-level so she can use quickened true strike (from Quickened Spell-Like Ability + Qinggong Power) to easily hit crazy numbers on CMB checks.

    If I take Windstep Master, is there any way to enhance my monk fast movement bonus to get better mileage out of the Wind Step ability?

    For gear, I like the Belt of Impossible Action, and the Sandals of the Lightest Step are an attractively cheap way to get air walk that uses my full movement speed. Any other cool gear that lets me do crazy kung fu stuff?


    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    As a fun way to introduce the players to Sandpoint, I've been trying to cook up a scavenger hunt using the chase mechanics for the Swallowtail Festival at the start of RotRL.

    What I'm still looking for - I'm having trouble thinking of items/challenges for some of the prominent locations that Sandpoint would want to show off, such as: The Kaijitsu Glassworks, The Two Knights Brewery, the Scarnetti Mill, and the Grocer's Hall. Creative suggestions would be thoroughly appreciated!

    Any other feedback would be appreciated as well. My general goal is to introduce Sandpoint and show its richness while also making a fun minigame for the players. Any suggestions that do either of those things are great!

    Here's my list so far. This is obviously a work in progress, so please tell me which ones you don't like and which you do.

    (1) The Way North: a scavenger hunt map

    Bearing a sign that says “The Way North”, this cramped building is festooned with nautical charts and maps, and through the windows you can see much more of the same, with barrels of rolled up papers, maps on the walls, and shelves and shelves of books. The far side of the room is dominated by a large worktable with a half-completed map of the region.

    An aged buy spry gnome with white hair and only a few teeth left is handing out maps as fast as he can, but he's mobbed by scavengers grabbing their maps. Make a DC13 Intimidate check to get the others to move aside, or a DC11 Sleight of Hand check to snatch a map out of his hand.

    (2) Town Hall: a bank deposit slip

    This two-story stone building is impressively large, although not even a quarter of the size of the new cathedral. Upon entering you find yourself in a large empty meeting hall, with the chairs currently stacked off to the sides. A sign instructs you to head downstairs to the bank for the scavenger hunt.

    To find a bank deposit slip among the various paperwork in the town hall basement, make a DC10 Profession or Knowledge (local) check, or make a DC12 Linguistics check to rapidly scan the forms and find the right one.

    (3) The Old Light: a piece of worked stone

    Like a spike driven up into the sky, this ruin towers over the city, sitting atop the sea cliff that forms Sandpoint’s northern boundary. A cylindrical base of 40 foot diameter indicates this was once a towering structure, though time has taken its toll. The eastern side stands five stories in height, while the western edge has just 15 feet of height remaining. Archaic runes adorn parts of the existing facade and seem strangely well preserved, considering the extent of erosion on the rest of the structure. Large chunks of worked stone lie on the ground, but up on a low ledge you can see smaller pieces of rubble as well. Your nose fills with the smell of sea spray, and you feel a light mist on your skin, as the gulls circle and caw overhead. The bluff affords a stunning view of the Varisian Gulf, as the famous mists of the Lost Coast are just receding from the shore.

    Make a DC7 Strength check to pry loose a large rock (this weighs 20 lbs, and if it encumbers you then you take a -2 to subsequent checks for the hunt.) Or, make a DC12 Climb check to scramble up and find a smaller stone.

    (4) House of Blue Stones: a blue stone

    Inside this stone building is a large open floor covered in polished round blue stones. The air is thick with the resinous tang of burning incense. Reed mats on the floor form winding walkways, and they rustle gently as you walk over them. Several round cushions are placed sporadically across the floor. Besides a spiral staircase leading down in the far corner, the only other feature is a reflecting pool in the center of the room. A dark-skinned woman watches observantly from near the door.

    While the floor in this large hall is covered with smooth blue stones, the ones for the hunt are painted blue, not naturally blue like the rest. Make a DC14 Perception check to find a painted stone, or a DC10 Wisdom check to instinctively determine which stones are out of place and were recently placed here for the hunt.

    (5) Sandpoint Theater: a playbill

    This huge wooden building well outsizes the town hall, and once you enter you can see an auditorium that could sit 250 in its stuffed red folding seats. On the stage is a mustachioed man wearing a feather cap, and holding a stack of playbills for the upcoming show, The Harpy’s Curse.

    Cyrdak Drokkus demands a performance before he gives you a playbill. Make a DC10 Perform check, or make a DC14 Knowledge (local or nobility) check to make a witty observation to make him smile.

    (6) Carpenter’s Guild: a nail

    It looks like every square foot of this large building is being well-used for all manner of construction projects, some of which have spilled outside. A red-bearded dwarf watches hawkishly but with a smile, seeming to enjoy the ruckus of the day.

    Various odd bits of discarded lumber are strewn about, and while lots of nails are visible, all are embedded in various bits of wood. Make a DC9 Profession (carpenter) or Knowledge (engineering) check to locate one that looks loose, or make a DC12 Strength check to pry one free.

    (7) Lumber Mill: a piece of driftwood

    The wood of this long building seems old and weathered, in stark contrast to the freshly cut red-blonde surfaces of the lumber lying in huge piles all around. The scent of fresh pine mixes with the brackish odor of the river.

    There are plenty of branches floating in the water, along with an abundance of larger logs. Make a DC10 Swim check to get in the water and grab a branch, or use a lasso to grab one by making a ranged attack against AC12.

    (8) Harbor: a bit of rope

    (description?)

    Some of the bollards have knotted rope ends tied on, that seem to have been hacked off by hasty departing sailors. To untie a rope, make a DC13 CMB check, or a DC11 Escape Artist check.

    (9) Goblin Squash Stables: a bit of hay

    (description?)

    The horses are getting antsy at having so many visitors. Make a DC12 Handle Animal check to calm them down so you can grab some hay, or else make a DC13 Stealth check to sneak through without them noticing.

    (10) Valdemar Fishmarket: a cockle shell

    (description?)

    Under the boardwalk is all manner of discarded shells and fish skeletons, but the hunt is specifically calling for a cockle shell. Make a DC9 Knowledge (nature) or Profession (fisherman) check to pick out a cockle shell, or make a DC12 Diplomacy check to ask someone to help you identify one.

    Special: Mayor Deverin is officiating, and as part of her goal of using the hunt to advertise Sandpoint to visitors, she gives all non-locals a 3-round head start. Whoever is in the lead must make a DC8 Survival or Knowledge (local) check any round after they move to find the next location. Failure means they take a -2 to their checks for one round as they struggle to orient themselves. Sandpoint locals get a +2 circumstance bonus to this check.

    (Please keep any comments spoilers-free unless it's behind a spoiler tag. I posted in this forum because I believe several APs/modules use Sandpoint as a setting, but let me know if you think this belongs in the RotRL forum instead.)


    Working on a backstory with one of my players, and he decided his stormborn sorceress was abandoned at age two due to the dangerous powers she was already manifesting when under distress. So, she was left in the care of Chask Haladan, and she knows her parents' names but not their whereabouts.

    So, I was trying to figure out how I could weave this into the plot and started wondering, what if her true parents are actually Aldern and Iesha Foxglove?

    Here are my ideas so far: Iesha was also a stormborn sorceress (which works well with the canonical meeting of Aldern and Iesha in a terrible storm,) although she was never in control of her powers. In fact, in a fit of uncontrolled magic Iesha accidentally killed her own mother. So, when Iesha's daughter (the PC) started manifesting the same "curse", Iesha was scared for her life, and insisted on giving away their daughter, over Aldern's objections.

    After Iesha's death, he decides he can finally come back to Sandpoint to try and seek out his daughter. However, Aldern is still suspicious of Iesha's fidelity, so while he knows the PC is Iesha's, he isn't fully sure if she is his, so his probing during the boar hunt is mainly aimed towards trying to determine whether she is a true Foxglove.

    Skipping forward, before the PC leaves for Thistletop, Chask Haladan gives her a surprise "present": a kapenia. Iesha left the kapenia with her as a baby, out of guilt about totally cutting the child off from her Varisian heritage. Chask reveals her parents weren't the Chelaxian merchants he told her they were. He doesn't know who her real parents are, but tells her the kapenia could give her the clues she needs to find out. Of course, since Aldern isn't Varisian the kapenia only gives details about Iesha's side of the family. Once the PCs reach Foxglove Manor, along with Vorel's stained glass windows is a newer window in a different style, depicting a child being born in the midst of a storm, with the border of the window matching the kapenia. They had it installed long ago, before giving the child away.

    That's what I have so far. Any advice/ideas?


    Would Detect Magic see a witch's Scar hex? If so, what would the school and strength of the aura be?


    10 people marked this as FAQ candidate.

    An observed creature can't make a Stealth check, but any creature that you aren't observing is considered "unseen" and gets a +20 bonus to their Stealth check (or +40 if they aren't moving.) Doesn't this mean any creature that ever attempts a Stealth check gets a +20 bonus?

    Dealing with Unseen Creatures wrote:
    If you are unaware of a creature, aware of a creature’s presence, or aware of a creature’s location, that creature is considered to be “unseen” for you. A stationary unseen creature has a +40 bonus to Stealth checks, but this bonus is reduced to +20 if the unseen creature moves (and these bonuses are negated for potential observers with blindsense). An unseen creature benefits from total concealment (50% miss chance) against attacks. In addition, you are considered flat-footed against an unseen creature’s attacks. If you are unaware of a creature or aware only of its presence, you cannot directly attack it. You must first succeed at a Perception check to pinpoint the creature’s location, which then allows you to become aware of the creature’s location (if using an imprecise sense) or to observe the creature (if using a precise sense). If an unseen creature makes a melee attack against you from a space adjacent to you, you automatically determine its location, though this doesn’t stop it from moving after the attack.

    Four states of awareness for reference:

    Unaware wrote:

    When you are unaware of another creature, you don’t even know it is present. Generally this occurs because the creature is hidden, you failed your Perception check to notice it, and the creature

    hasn’t yet performed any actions that would alert you to its presence. You cannot directly attack a creature you are unaware of, but it is subject to area effects.
    Aware of Presence wrote:
    When you are aware of another creature’s presence, you don’t necessarily know exactly where it is. Typically this occurs when the hidden creature has taken some action that revealed its general presence in the area but has successfully used Stealth since then to hide its exact location. If you have succeeded at a Perception check to notice a creature with an imprecise sense other than blindsense, you are aware of the creature’s presence (if you have blindsense, a successful Perception check means you are aware of the creature’s location; see below). You cannot directly attack a creature if you are only aware of its presence, but it is subject to area effects affecting its location. In order to directly attack such a creature, you must pinpoint its exact location with an additional Perception check. If this check is successful and you are using an imprecise sense to pinpoint a creature, you become aware of the creature’s location (see Aware of Location below). If this check is successful and you are using a precise sense to pinpoint a creature, you are observing the creature (see Observing below).
    Aware of Location wrote:
    When you are aware of a creature’s location, you know exactly where the creature is located, but you still can’t observe the creature with a precise sense such as vision. Generally, this occurs because you have blindsense, or because the creature is hidden but you have succeeded at a Perception check to pinpoint the creature with an imprecise sense. You must at least be aware of a creature’s location in order to directly attack it, though it is considered to have total concealment from you (see page 253). It is, however, subject to area effects affecting that location.
    Observing wrote:
    When you are observing a creature, you can directly perceive the creature with a precise sense. Generally, this occurs when a creature is visible, when the situation makes it impossible for the creature use Stealth to hide, or when you have succeeded at a Perception check to pinpoint the creature using a precise sense such as blindsight. You must be observing a creature to use a ranged effect that targets a specific creature without requiring an attack roll to hit (such as magic missile). You can also make normal attacks, including ones using ranged abilities, against creatures that you are observing. Again, it is subject to area effects that affect its location. A creature currently being observed can’t attempt a Stealth check without first breaking that observation. To break observation, the creature must either mask itself from your precise senses (with darkness, fog, invisibility, or the like, but not with effects such as displacement that still leave a clear visual indicator of its location), move somewhere it can’t be observed (a place with cover, for example), or use Bluff to create a distraction to momentarily break your observation of it.

    Is there any way a creature can make a Stealth check without getting that +20 bonus?


    It seems like almost every single thing about spell disruption is different in SF vs PF. So, let's start from scratch, and try to answer two questions: What tactics are available to a typical character to allow them to disrupt enemy spellcasters when needed? How would you build a character who specifically specializes in incapacitating enemy spellcasters?

    Differences between Starfinder and Pathfinder:
    A) Readied action cannot disrupt spells in Starfinder, because the readied action is resolved after the spellcasting action
    B) "Casting defensively" does not seem to exist or have any equivalent in Starfinder
    C) Taking even one point of damage automatically disrupts your spell in Starfinder (no concentration check to continue casting)
    D) Step Up no longer allows you to continue threatening, since in Starfinder it uses up your Reaction (and there is no Combat Reflexes)
    E) Reach weapons now threaten both adjacent and reach

    I'm not seeing a whole lot of options, but here's what I got:

    • Reach weapons are the #1 best way to disrupt spellcasters, so use a reach weapon of your choice that doesn't have the unwieldy property.
    • At level 6, you can take Step Up and Strike, and no longer need to use a reach weapon.
    • The soldier's Blitz style gives you the initiative boost and extra movement you need to get into close range quickly.
    • If you are able to give them the staggered condition somehow, that could help, but not sure how to do this without a crit or a friendly caster casting slow.

    One issue I'm seeing is an inability to counter the spellcaster's tactic of "eat an AoO by moving away and casting", at least without having an adjacent ally with the Stand Still feat.

    Any other options for magekilling? Any spellcaster defensive options I'm overlooking?


    There's nothing stopping you from tossing a grenade (or using literally any weapon) non-lethally, is that correct?

    Starfinder Combat wrote:

    Nonlethal Damage with a Weapon That Deals Lethal Damage

    You can use a weapon that deals lethal damage to deal nonlethal damage instead, but you take a –4 penalty to your attack roll.

    For reference, in Pathfinder this was only allowed with melee weapons.

    Pathfinder Combat wrote:

    Nonlethal Damage with a Weapon that Deals Lethal Damage

    You can use a melee weapon that deals lethal damage to deal nonlethal damage instead, but you take a –4 penalty on your attack roll.

    So I can toss a non-lethal frag grenade by hitting AC 9 instead of AC 5, or shoot someone non-lethally with my gun?


    Starting RotRL soon, and I want to do what I can to make combat memorable, interesting, and exciting. One idea I'm considering is awarding +1 bonus damage whenever the players give a cinematic description of their combat action (or a +1 DC to spells for cinematic spellcasting descriptions.)

    Is this a good idea? Bad idea? Do you have a better idea, however tangential, to make combat more engaging?


    Quote:
    When Pharasma judges the last soul after the last living body dies on the Material Plane, Groetus will descend to the Boneyard to do something to it and Pharasma before he moves on to the Material Plane to "clean up" and pack the dust away for another reality.
    Quote:
    Cultists of Groetus have many theories about how their god will manifest in the End Time and what his ultimate role will be. These theories or interpretations are known as dooms
    Quote:
    Portal of Incarnation: This doom holds that as the last soul is judged and creation erodes, Groetus will collect the greatest essences of heroes, villains, dragons, earth, fire, and other fundamental concepts. While the multiverse collapses and is reformed into something greater than its current state, he will shelter these essences from destruction and distill them into purer forms so they can become the first gods and the raw materials for the next reality. He will then wait countless ages for the cycle to end again. The members of this cult are the Heralds of the Incarnate Moon, and they believe the current world is an impure predecessor to the next, clarified reality. They wish to hasten the cycle so the next world comes sooner, and believe that their souls will be part of the next cycle's gods.


    I'm writing some short adventures that are meant to be "Deep Space Nine" meets "Brooklyn Nine-Nine", and I want to have pre-gen characters to accommodate players that are totally new to Starfinder (or to role-playing in general.) What kind of space cop would you want to play?


    I have an NPC who I'd like to be an undead mystic. I imagine Pact Worlds is going to include rules on intelligent undead in its Eox section, but I'd prefer not to wait until March to stat up this NPC (I could handle a little bit of retconning once the book comes out, but it would be good to maintain continuity as much as I can.)

    So, what do we know about intelligent undead in Starfinder? Official material? Rumors? Speculation?

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