Planar Alchemical Catalyst

Jasque's page

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. Organized Play Member. 131 posts. 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 1 Organized Play character.


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There is a recycling system expansion bay for starships that states:

Starfinder #6: Empire of Bones pg. 46 wrote:

Note: The following Expansion Bay is compatible only with a Supercolossal ship.

A recycling system enables a Supercolossal starship to be nearly self-sustaining, operating independently for decades or even centuries. A combination of smelters, biomass processors, manufacturing, and UPB converters allows the ship to convert almost all its waste into goods and materials.

It appears that items can be broken down into UPBs with "smelters, biomass processors, and manufacturing." I assume the "UPB converters" then convert the UPBs back into useful items.

The recycling system is the size of a cargo bay, and it can convert "almost all" the waste generated on a starship into UPBs.

So, the raw materials for UPBs seem to be almost everything you can imagine. As to who makes them? Probably any organization with the resources and desire to make them.

Technological devices don't appear to be the only way to make UPBs. The stat block for the Assembly Ooze states the following:

Alien Archive wrote:
Thought to have been created on the planet Bretheda as a biotechnological replacement for automation processes, assembly oozes are essentially cores of nanobots suspended within blobs of animated protoplasm. As the ooze absorbs raw materials, the nanobots work at the molecular level to turn that matter into a functioning technological device, the blueprints of which have been entered into the machines’ original programming.

The Assembly Ooze can only make "virtual UPBs," but it does appear that UPBs might be created by both biotechnological and normal automation processes.

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I just figured out how to full attack while flying (without falling). Despite the post's title, it's not weird at all. It's surprisingly mundane.

A Hit-and-Run Soldier's 5th level ability, Nimble Fusillade, states the following:

CRB, Page 115 wrote:
When you make a full attack, you can also either take a guarded step or move up to half your speed. This movement can come before, between, or after your attacks, but it can’t be split up.

Correct me if I am wrong, but the additional movement from Nimble Fusillade should negate the need to spend a move/swift action to hover. The required guarded step might be slightly annoying, but it will usually be worth it to full attack without falling out of the sky.

I have not seen anything about this posted to the boards yet, so forgive me if this method is common knowledge. It is new to me. And it opens up a few possibilities. I was primarily looking for a way to keep a barathu PC in the air, because I can't stand their land speed of zero. I also think that a Hit-and-Run Dragonkin Soldier would be really powerful at level 5+.

Does this work? Has anybody seen a flying hit-and-run soldier at their table before?

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My best attempt to rename Vanguard is "Chaos Warden." However, I think that sounds too negative for a class. It would be a cool name for an archetype though.

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As Xenocrat points out, the Technomancer has a different playstyle. I don't think the Witchwarper makes the Technomancer obsolete.

I think the Witchwarper looks like an awesome class, but I still prefer Technomancers. The Technomancer matches my playstyle better. I like all the skills, the utilities, and the flavor. I'm alright with the Witchwarper being a little better in combat--my Technomancer still has plenty of useful and fun tricks up his sleeves.

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I like the existing names. However, Quantumancer might be an improvement; it has a more sci-fi feel.

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You should start with a Dex of 16 and put max ranks into piloting, as the others have said. This should take care of the driver and gunner roles.

The machine gunner role probably requires proficiency with heavy weapons. That's very feat intensive for a technomancer. If that's important to your build, I would consider a 1 level dip in soldier.

The radio operator role probably doesn't need any attention. Everybody in Starfinder should know about basic communication devices. If you are looking for a WW2 feel, maybe put a few ranks into Engineering. Or, for a more Starfinder feel, put those ranks into Computers.

A Commander would need some social skills, just like a Starship Captain. That's going to be a little more difficult on a Technomancer, but you can still do it with the right theme.

If you are homebrewing, ask your GM if he or she will let you use Supercharge Weapon on the tank's main gun. It would also be fun to use the Spellshot magic hack to cast spells through the tank's gun. You can use both those abilities on the machine gun without special homebrew rules.

A tank commander flinging magical nanites from the hatch and casting supercharge weapon on the gun/machine gun sounds amazing.

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Linkified

http://bit.ly/SFcombatSheet

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Everybody knows that space horses ride in the space carts.

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Dracomicron, thanks! You're right. I missed that completely. I've been playing it wrong this entire time. Fortunately, it hasn't made a difference in any combats yet.

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Pantshandshake wrote:

Dude. No. Nobody cheats at the damn table. Tell your GM its his/her/their call, but you're either taking the operative player aside and talking about it, or talking about it at the table in public. Whichever way it goes, the operative needs to stop cheating or leave the game.

I agree 100%. Cheating diminishes the game for everyone, including the cheater. There is no reason to cheat. I could *almost* understand cheating if it was a life or death situation for your PC, but even then cheating is completely unacceptable.

A large part of the game is feeling like your heroes earn their victories. As a GM, I enjoy giving the players difficult combats that cause them to doubt their chance of survival. They really have to think about their strategies, and every dice roll is full of anxiety. The table cheers when somebody rolls a high number, and the table groans when they see a low dice. But the PCs always manage to find a way to overcome their obstacles, and everyone at the table gets to feel accomplished.

Even 1 player cheating takes that feeling of accomplishment away from everybody else.

I would not allow anybody to cheat at my table. Somebody should talk to the cheating player, and that player should roll out in the open so that others can see. Their character is going to fail sometimes. That's going to be frustrating. But the frustration makes the victories so much sweeter.

Isaac Zephyr wrote:

GMs are there to tell the story, and I accept that they will bend rules to tell a good one for the players. That's what I meant, as I don't know if our GM would do that in order to increase the challenge. Not as a counter-player attitude.

Sometimes GMs can fudge rolls to enhance the story. Not everybody agrees that GMs should fudge their rolls. Generally, though, the GM is not cheating. They are reducing the randomness to tell a story.

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From what I am reading, there seem to be 4 viable combat builds for Solarians:


  • Soldier 1 / Solarian X
  • Solarian (Weapon) + Heavy Armor Proficiency
  • Solarian (Armor) + Reach Weapon + Stellar Rush
  • Solarian (Armor) + Longarm Proficiency + Versatile Specialization

There are probably other ways to build a viable Solarian, but they all require system mastery.

It's very easy to build an unoptimized Solarian. For instance, the class seems designed for a solar weapon and light armor, but that combination doesn't work well in practice.

If the above isn't difficult enough, the melee Solarian almost requires a 14/14/14 point spread to be relevant at anything other than the captain role in starship combat. If you don't want to be the captain and you don't like a 14/14/14 point spread, you just about have to take your first level in soldier (blitz) so that you can start with a lower charisma.

Basically, there seem to be ways to build effective Solarians, but there are far more ways to build ineffective Solarians. New players and players without much system mastery are at a real risk of building a character that doesn't perform as well as they might like.

I know that was the experience at our table. The player who chose a Solarian was unhappy with his PC after the first level. The character was too MAD, and the 1st level revelations took too long to activate. I would really like to see a well built Solarian, but I don't expect anybody at my table to play that class again.

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I call dibs on the rocket stormcaller. Now, if I can just find the trigger on this thing...

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I agree that the language needs clarification. It's really not that clear, and I can see GMs interpreting the rule differently. I've marked this for a FAQ.

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This is a repost, but I believe it's obvious when a spell is being cast due to the two rules below.

Spell-Like Abilities (SP) wrote:
Spell-like abilities are magical abilities that function very much like spells do (see Casting Spells). The main difference is that you gained the ability through a different means than normal spellcasters gain spells. A spell-like ability has a casting time of a standard action unless noted otherwise in the ability or spell description. Usually, a spell-like ability either can be used a specific number of times per day, can be used at will, or can affect a creature constantly. If a spell requires an expenditure of credits or Resolve Points as part of its casting, a creature that can cast the spell as a spell-like ability does not need to pay such costs. Creatures with spell-like abilities that can be made permanent still must pay any costs and take the listed amount of time to do so. In all other ways, a spell-like ability functions just like a spell. [emphasis added]

And

Casting Spells wrote:
When your character casts a spell, she is harnessing the latent magical energy that permeates the universe to achieve specific, measured effects. Whether you’re playing a mystic or a technomancer, or a character who has gained the ability to manipulate magical energies through some other more unusual means, casting a spell follows one basic process, as described below. A cast spell always has obvious effects that are noticeable by nearby creatures; it is not possible to clandestinely cast a spell. For information about casting a spell as a spell-like ability, see Spell-Like Abilities. [emphasis added]

The section on spell-like abilities does not contradict the rule stating that spells have an obvious effect. So, I'd say that rule still applies.

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pithica42 wrote:
Why does this tentacled nosebeast keep rolling into me? It's starting to hurt.

Now I want to create a blitz soldier bantrid that mounts a pike to its back, tilts its head down, and rolls full speed into its enemies.

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How should perception beyond 30 feet be handled for khizars?

For reference, here is the text for their racial trait on senses.

Pact Words, page 212 wrote:
Khizars have no eyes or visual senses, other than the ability to perceive the presence or absence of light. Khizars have blindsense (vibration) and blindsight (life), each with a range of 30 feet. Khizars can't speak and can communicate only via telepathy.

It seems fair to treat Khizars as blinded in relation to any creatures that are farther than 30 feet. But I'm not even sure what that means in rule terms. Blinded states the following:

Quote:
Creatures that become blinded but that have a precise sense other than vision still automatically fail all checks and activities relying on vision, but they suffer none of the other effects.

1) Khizar's blindsight is a precise sense. So, do khizars suffer a penalty to perception when attempting to perceive creatures beyond 30 feet? They can't use their precise sense (blindsight) beyond that range.

2) Should khizars be treated as flatfooted for attacks that originate beyond 30 feet from the khizar?

3) Can khizar's fire a starship weapon without penalty? Can Khizars even interact with any starship systems? khizar's can't directly perceive the starship with their precise sense unless they are in a living oma.

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Nixitur wrote:

You don't need ten minutes of "leave immediately" for it to function as a translator. You can attune it to some language beforehand, perhaps by just listening to the locals. Heck, with the omnipresence of infospheres on civilized planets and stations, a character could probably just tune in to the local radio or TV and that would be that. Then, you can take your translator with you to more risky endeavors.

It's useless if you don't prepare, but there doesn't appear to be a limit on the number of languages it can save. And I don't see why it would lose any of that data when it runs out of power. Even if that was the case, I feel it's totally reasonable for a skilled hacker to make a backup of that data and to copy it back over after turning it on again. So, this could potentially be very powerful.

That's a good point. Okay, that does make it very useful.

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Mistwalker wrote:

There is a translator in the Starfinder Society RPG Guild guide, page 31.

TETRAD CERTIFIED TRANSLATOR LEVEL 2
ITEM PRICE BULK
TECHNOLOGICAL 500 L

This elaborate datapad has several additional audio receptors
to capture nearby sounds. If you don’t share a language with
creatures you encounter, you can activate this device to collect
basic linguistic information. The device requires 10 minutes of
observed conversation to gain enough information to operate.
The device then acts as a rudimentary translator. It does not
allow you to converse with creatures with whom you don’t share
a language, but it can relate very basic information. Examples
of statements the device could interpret would be: “come with
us,” “lower your weapons,” or “leave immediately.” The device
cannot parse proper names, including personal designations or
the names of items and places. Some extraordinary complex or
obscure languages might not translate clearly with this device.
A Tetrad certified translator has 10 capacity and 1/hour usage.

That doesn't seem very useful unless you are stealthily listening to a group of creatures speak to each other. Even then, what creatures (other than Tolkien-like treants) take ten minutes to say "leave immediately"?

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Fabricate Tech can definitely use some clarification. The ability may be useless. But certain interpretations of the ability could make it overpowered, as Nixitur and I briefly discussed in another thread.

For instance, handheld voice translation devices exist in the real world. I can even download a free app to my phone claiming to be a "voice translator for all languages." It's arguably a "minor piece of equipment with a real-world equivalent." Is that something that Fabricate Tech can create? I wouldn't allow it in my game for balance reasons, but the rules aren't that clear.

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I'm excited for the undead race. It will be nice for players to choose undeath without having to go the lich or vampire route.

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I am curious how a group of all operatives would do.

I think 4 operatives could handle themselves just fine. The lack of spell casting would hurt a little, but the abundance of skills would help make up for it.

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Cthulhudrew wrote:
Jasque wrote:
I once played a game where a fellow PC killed the final boss with an interdimensional ballistic missile (IDBM) with a nuclear warhead.
Was his character's name Waldorf?

I had to look up that reference, and I'm glad I did! Stories of Waldorf might just crop up if my PCs investigate the cause of the Gap.

The Tale of Waldorf:

Dragon Magazine, Issue 137, September 1988 wrote:

Dear Dragon,

Recently my AD&D® game character, Waldorf, a 358th-level magic-user, created the nuclear bomb. Due to this action, all of Greyhawk has been utterly obliterated, except for a 3 × 4 mile island with a castle called Castle Waldorf. All creatures from the Monster Manuals were destroyed due to large amounts of nuclear fallout. All the deities work in a salt mine under Waldorf’s castle. I would greatly appreciate it if everyone would mail their character sheets to me so that I may tally up Waldorf’s experience. All of the game manuals and modules are now totally false and untrue. Any profit made from TSR’s merchandise from this day onward should be mailed to Waldorf’s castle (in gold pieces, of course).

Waldorf Comic

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Nixitur wrote:
A lot of those ideas don't seem in line with what technological items can do and definitely don't fall under "minor piece of equipment with a real-world equivalent".

I mostly agree with you. Personally, I would not take Fabricate Tech without some good house rules. The ability is ripe for abuse. Worse still, it can easily create arguments at the table. For any technological item not in a book, the GM has to decide:

1) if that device exists in the universe
2) what level the device is
3) what mechanical benefits (if any) the device provides

And how likely is it that the player and the GM will agree on all 3?

Take something as simple as a Geiger counter. That should probably exist. However, it has the power to replace the Detect Radiation spell. Is that too powerful? And does anybody at the table really know enough about Geiger counters to stat one out without Googling them first?

I like coming up with creative uses for Fabricate Tech, but I agree that GMs should definitely restrict what it can do. For starters, I don't think that any tech items created should be able to duplicate a spell effect, unless that tech item is listed in an official Starfinder source. That would eliminate a lot of the abusive items.

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One idea if he is not intentionally evil and is only causing harm by accident (or against his will):

The Percival Rothmire Music Conservatory has a number of instruments that are family heirlooms of the Rothmire family. Rumor has it that these instruments could play themselves during Percival's time, although they stopped long ago. Within the last few days they have started playing again late at night when the conservatory is closed. Everybody who has investigated so far has been killed. As the PCs look into this, they learn that the instruments are actually animated objects, and the instruments have begun playing again now that Percival has returned. Only, with Percival an abomination, the instruments have started acting strangely, and now they attack anyone who observes them playing. Animated objects have a CR based on their size. A violin might be a CR2, a cello a CR3, and a grand piano a CR5. A set of pipe organs could be CR7 to CR9 if you really want to challenge the PCs.

Destroying the Rothmire family heirlooms might cause Percival to lose another piece of his humanity.

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He will need to set up a secure base of operations. The vampire will likely invest his time and resources into the city to make sure he stays hidden, while also maintaining ties to influential figures in order to procure anything he needs.

The PCs could find some of the vampire's minions traveling with the last of the vampire's belongings on a cart. The minions are rather dumb, completely lost, and don't actually know where Rothmire's new layer is, but they do know some of the things he is up to.

A few ideas:

  • He has threatened the city's Cemetery Groundskeeper into letting a few things go unnoticed. The groundskeeper has also been secretly burying some of Rothmire's victims in mass graves. Some of these victims have started to rise up as undead, and the PCs need to investigate. Make the undead of an appropriate CR.

  • Rothmire has bribed the local dockmaster, who is accepting deliveries and secretly passing them on to Rothmire's minions. The dockmaster has a gang of thugs to back him up. The PCs may wish to cut off one of Rothmire's supply channels. They will have to defeat the gang of thugs and deal with the dockmaster.

  • Rothmire is controlling, threatening, and bribing the city guard into arresting "undesirables" (homeless people, prostitutes, etc.) and bringing them to his minions. Rothmire has been feeding on these innocents. The PCs must discover which guards are abducting the citizens, and put an end to it.

  • Rothmire has invested some of his personal wealth into a local merchant who is buying and selling evil (or cursed) items. The merchant has become very wealthy very quickly, and is gaining political influence which he will use to assist Rothmire. The PCs must bring down the merchant without making enemies with the merchant's powerful allies and trade partners.

  • A well-known vampire slayer was murdered, just hours ago. His body is missing, and there are many who fear he was killed by a vampire. The PCs have 1d4 days to find the body and prevent the former-vampire-slayer from turning into a vampire himself.

These ideas are pretty basic because I don't know what level your PCs are. But, if the PCs pursue any of these, they are likely to make enemies with Rothmire, and he will be sure to turn his attention to them soon enough.

Best of luck!

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The goblin spell, Vomit Twin, is about as silly as they come:

Vomit Twin wrote:

Upon casting this spell, you vomit forth a disgusting ooze copy of yourself into a single adjacent square. As long as the twin exists, whenever you take a move action to move, the twin can move as well, although it does not need to follow you and cannot take any other actions. On subsequent rounds, at the start of your turn, you can instantaneously exchange places with your twin, as if using teleport. This is not an action and does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

The twin has a speed of 30 feet and provokes attacks of opportunity from movement as normal. It has an AC equal to 10 + 1/2 your caster level and a number of hit points equal to your caster level. If the twin is reduced to 0 hit points, it is destroyed, although you can create a new one on your turn as a standard action as long as the duration persists. You cannot have more than one vomit twin at a time.

Mudball is pretty silly, too. I've always wanted to try that one. A 1st level spell that blinds the target* with no chance for SR or save? Yes, please.

*You do have to succeed on a ranged touch attack, and the target or and adjacent ally can easily remove the blinded condition on their turn.

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First attempt: you find 25gp of diamond dust in 5 minutes.

Second attempt: you find your 25gp of diamond dust in 0 seconds. It was in your belongings, exactly where you placed it moments ago.

Third attempt: you hand your diamond dust to a servant who hides it. You then find it in 10 minutes.

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Our group is the same. Perhaps part of the reason is due to the differences between PCs and NPCs.

If a PC dies, you know that the player will just create a new PC. You might be sad, but the loss doesn't seem as permanent. You still get to play the game with the same player.

If an NPC dies, there is no guarantee that the GM will create another NPC to take his place. We also seem more willing to suspend our disbelief when it comes to NPCs than to PCs. So, the death of a favorite NPC just feels more permanent to us.

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I would say that person was acting evil. Killing people for stealing is a bit disproportionate. Seeking out petty thieves to kill isn't much different than looking to murder prostitutes because nobody will care.

Lawful Evil wrote:
Lawful evil is the realm of the individual who knows what they want and will manipulate the system (legal, cultural, and so forth) to achieve those ends, no matter the consequence. This can be for personal gain (for example, the traditional evil vizier who seeks to claim the kingdom for himself) or to better society at all costs - the "I know what's best for everyone else"-attitude without any of the compassionate limits to action found in lawful good (an excellant example is Cardinal Richelieu of Three Musketeers fame).

The 'desire to better society at all costs' seems to be the motivation of the character you mentioned. So, I'd argue that specific action would be Lawful Evil. If the character didn't care about stomping out crime, then I would argue it was a Chaotic Evil action.

A CG character might do this if thievery was out of control and they were just fed up. If I was the GM and a player did this, I would have the half-starved children of the deceased thieves come up and cry at the death of their parents, just to make sure the player knew to stop their evil actions.

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I just realized that the purchased version of 'Player Handouts' does not contain any doors in the Horn. This was a problem for me. But Fire Mountain Games does include the doors on the online version of the same map found here.