Shambling Mound

Cernunos's page

Goblin Squad Member. Organized Play Member. 178 posts. No reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist. 1 alias.




Is this post treading on taboo PF RPG territory or just plain uninteresting? It's OK I can take it....

Cheers,
C.


One of the coolest tactics I ever saw used for a Rogue took advantage of terrain by forcing an enemy into combat on a slippery surface forcing them to make Balance checks. Anyone without 5 Ranks in the skill Balance is considered flatfooted while balancing and they lose thier Dex bonus to AC. Enter the Rogue - with 5 ranks of balance the rogue is just fine and every attack is a sneak attack. Under the new Acrobatics skill this doesn't seem to be possible. Is this deliberate or is there a way to enable this cool Rogue Tactic in the Pathfinder RPG?

Cheers,
C.


Under the new "Blood Pig" post I assume you meant "gaol" not "goal". You could make things a lot easier on yourselves by foregoing the archaic and just spelling it "jail"...

Cheers,
C.


One of the challenges I've found with the adventure paths is sorting out what the PC's are supposed to know at any given point as well as establishing clear goals for them to focus on. It's been in the back of my mind since "Three Faces of Evil" to bullet point PC Goals and "journal" style briefs of things they know for each of the adventures in the AP. Alas, I am woefully short on time and have been reading the APs as a graphic novel of sorts (haven't actually DM'd or played since my second son was born - about a year and half) but would love to see this kind of "DM aid" if anyone has put anything like this together. I finally decided to ask because I'm reading "Prince of Demons" and felt a peculiar lack of clarity.

Spoilers

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The PCs know that Demogorgon is the key to the Savage Tide and that stopping him means saving thier world. Now they have an army and are ready to assult Demogorgon's realm. I'm just not sure how they're supposed to figure out they need to attack Wat Dagon (or even if they do WHY they're doing it - I only figured it out after reading through to the end) instead attacking Demogorgon (I can see a big arguement with Orcus during the strategy stage and I'm not sure I've got the words to talk them down). There are a lot of things that seem assumed. I'm sure others that have actually been playing Savage Tide (or AoW for that matter) have had to deal with this; so, if there's anyone out there that feels like indulging me I'd be fascinating to hear your take.

Cheers,
C.


I'm just about finished reading Johnathan Stroud's "Bartimaeus Trilogy" and found myself looking up Genies in the Monter Manual (the books are about Wizards and Genies). I had forgotten that D&D v3 & 3.5 have left out the Dao and the Marid. Is anyone aware of an official D&D v3.5 publication that gives stats for these lost Genies?

Cheers,
Cernunos.


I'm a wee bit new to the history of Greyhawk. All this great stuff on the message boards and Eric's obvious love of the setting got me curious so I bought a few pdf's off the paizo web site. After reading just the smallest bit of Oerth's History it's obvious that Iuz would be a wee bit jealous about another god (i.e. Kyuss and his armies) on the scene. This got me thinking, wouldn't Iuz be a potential ally to the PC's. I mean, Kyuss seems bad and all; but, there is another bad god that may not want the competion.

Thoughts?

Cheers,
C.


Spoilers...

One of Kyuss' listed Special Qualities is "Discorporate" but there is no description of this power in his stat block. Help! What does "Discorporation" do?

Not that I think Kyuss needs an extra power. I'm going to have to role up some 20th level characters and pit them against Kyuss as a test drive. Even if they PC's play all the right cards and reduce his power before confronting Kyuss I can see him killing at least one PC a round with the "Engulf" power. The Sphere of Annihilation wouldn't work too well because he's actually a swarm and the PC's will only get one round to use it because he'll cast "Gate" on it the first chance he gets... Sorry, I'm ranting. Kyuss is just so freak'in scary (nice quote by H.P. Lovecraft in the front - that'll help me sleep at night!).

Right, anyway, "Discorporate" - what's that all about?

Cheers,
C.


Does Astral Projection work from other planes than the material? Specifically, if a tiefling wizard in say Hades were to cast the spell, could she project to the material plane?

I ask this because I’m considering a tactic whereby a wizard would plane shift to a nice place, like Arborea or something, and Astrally Project back to the material before embarking on hazardous adventures.

Look forward to the input.

Cheers,
C.


First let me say that I’m not writing this just to complain. I really like liches (for some strange reason) and I obsess about their deadliness. This is more of a suggestion for “fixing” Thesselar.

Thesselar is a transmuter with enchmantment and illusion as his banned schools. This is incongruent with the recommended tactics that he uses a Project Image spell (i.e. it’s an illusion); especially since the spell isn’t on his list of prepared spells.

Next, for a character with no enchanment spells he sure has a lot of item creation feats. Presumably this is to account for his creature creation obsession? He doesn’t even really have a lot of magic items to use. I would presume a character with that many item creation feats would have a few more tools at his disposal (just seemed a little short). Personally, I’d ditch a few item creation feats for some skill focus feats in his areas of expertise.

Lastly, his spell selection doesn’t include a lot of defensive options. If he succeeds in casting fly and energy resistance as suggested (presumably vs. fire) he can remove himself from melee and get one additional layer of protection from energy; however, he’s up against a 19th level party! He really would benefit from some other defensive strategy if he’s going to last long (seeing as project image isn’t going to work). Personally, I could even leave the spell selection alone if Thesselar had a few strategies for his wish spells (Unholy Aura, Mass Inflict Critical Wounds, etc…).

Anyway, just wanted to make a cool NPC a little cooler. Take it for what its worth.

Cheers,
C.


For those of you who play wizards (Conjurers specifically but this applies to wizards too) do you make use of the "Planar Binding" spells? If so, how do you use it and what challenges do you encounter with your DM.

Cheers,
Cernunos


Here's another silly question:

Can you Coup de Grace someone who is stunned?

O heck, while I'm at it - inspired from a certain demon tactic in a recent Dungeon - when using "Project Image" you "project an image of yourself". Is that an image of yourself as you normally look or an image as you look now (i.e. what about polymorphed casters and the like)?

Cheers,
C.


O.K. I admit this is trivial; but, has anyone ever noticed the weight difference between the Balor and Pit Fiend?

Balor: A balor stands about 12 feet tall. Its skin is usually dark red. It weighs about 4,500 pounds.

Pit Fiend: A pit fiend is 12 feet tall and weighs 800 pounds.

These guys are the same height. The Pit Fiend is stronger and fights with natural weapons and weighs less than a quarter of the weight of a Balor? Seemed weird to me.

Cheers,
C.


I have been planning some spell combo's for an Evoker/Loremaster character experiment I'm playing with and came up with the idea of using the Otiluke`s Resilient Sphere spell as a defensive option. However, I'm not 100% sure my basic assumptions are accurate.

If used defensively the caster would cast the spell on herself and become encased in a protective forcefield. Now, I know that nothing can pass through the sphere so attack options are limited. No more Magic Missles, Fireballs or Lightning Bolts. My assumption is that certain spells like Summon Monster, Mordenkainen's Sword or Ice Storm could still be effective because they have a range and the point of origin is NOT the caster. Likewise, a Spectral Hand cast before the Sphere was raised (and left outside) could still deliver touch spells (i.e. Shocking Grasp, Vampiric Touch, etc...).

What do people think? Is this a valid interpretation or am I missing something?

Cheers,
C.


Wow - I've only just received issue 132 (last week) and posts are already up about 133!

I haven't seen many posts about 131's Prince of Red Hand.

I have always wanted to see a higher level adventure that could challenge PC's in a Non Combat capacity. I was quite enthralled with this adventure. It had a bit of a "creepy circus" atmosphere to it (kind of a Jim Rose Circus Side Show feel with Prince Zeech as the ring leader and Lashona as some kind of star attraction) as well as dreamy quality. The dreamy quality is that surreal feeling that you’re stuck in a dangerous situation without a lot of control. Personally I really liked it but I think my players are unprepared for it due to lack of experience with this kind of game.

Two questions:

What do others think of this adventure; and,

What other experiences have you had or designed for a game that is non combat oriented?

I’d love to incorporate some of your suggestions into my AoW campaign prior to The Prince of Red Hand (plenty of time – my players are still trying to finish the Whispering Cairn) to give my players a bit of a background and some experience to gaming in a socio/political/intrigue capacity.

Cheers,
C.


Can anybody out there make this real for me?

This sounds like such a cool ability but I'm having trouble trying to imagine how it works. Lets say a high level Ranger is hiding at the side of forest path and snipes some passing orcs. The orcs turn around to see the culprit and start moving in to kill the Ranger. On her round the Ranger "Hides in Plain Sight". What does that mean? Does she just disappear like turning invisible?

I'd be sooo stoked to have this ability; but, as either a DM or a player I can't imagine how to describe this happening. I'm pretty sure I understand the game mechanics - its the story telling/role playing execution of the ability thats troubling me. There has to be some description that allows the players to suspend thier disbelief - HELP!!!

Cheers,
C.


After playing around with some character designs I’ve come to the conclusion that the Ranger’s “Combat Style” ability isn’t worth pursuing at mid to high levels. I welcome objections because I’ve honestly tried to make it work but find that the use of the combat style becomes a real deficit.

My comment and observations are the result of some character creation experiments I’ve been running after reading through the recent installments in the AoW Adventure Path. I’ve felt that the challenges were pretty difficult for a party of four and wanted to test my theory by making up characters and comparing their capabilities against the challenges in the magazine. The parameters I set myself were to use 13th level characters with a 20pt point buy for abilities (starting at 10 and 1 point per ability score increase with no graduated purchases for high ability scores). All characters were allotted 110000gp to spend on equipment. Races, classes, equipment, feats etc… were limited to those found in the core rule books.

I was inspired by Dungeon’s Iconic characters and modeled my designs a bit after what I was seeing. I made up a Drow Bard, Tiefling Fighter, Human Cleric, Human Paladin, Half-Elf Rogue, and a Human Sorcerer. All of them worked out pretty well when compared to the challenges facing them. The Cleric and Paladin had some problems with the general Dungeon Environments: i.e. climbing, swimming, darkness and general getting around; however, the other characters and some handy equipment choices helped out. For combat encounters the big problems were overcoming high AC’s, SR and DR. Again, all classes had some “gimmick” to help out where it was needed: Tactics (flanking, bluffing, surprise and sneak attacks were the Rogue’s friend), special abilities (The Bard’s Inspire abilities, the Paladin’s Smite, The Fighter’s Weapon Specialization), or spells. The Ranger was great at getting around, finding things, scouting and all that; BUT, when combat broke out I began to see that the “Combat Style” had some limitations.

The Combat Style ability of the Ranger seemed to work really well for lower challenge minion types. This is because the ability is essentially a “Buffet” style of Fighting that concentrates on quantity. The 13th level Ranger walking into a room of humanoids or the like turned into a vegematic. However, enter the lone elemental, undead or outsider with a high AC and/or DR and the Ranger was sunk unless the character was lucky enough to have that particular flavor of enemy maxed out as his Favored Enemy.

Here’s some of the problems:

1. Ranger’s need to put a focus on a wider array of abilities; dexterity, and wisdom are biggies. They also need good strength and constitution to survive combat. But, they can’t really focus on an ability as much as other classes without jeopardizing some other aspect of the class. So, they’re probably going to have lower strength and dexterity than the Fighter or the Rogue. This will lower their attack role which is a bad thing for a character that has to sacrifice attack bonus to gain extra attacks. Also, it lowers their damage potential.

2. Damage limits due to Combat Style: Causing lots of damage with one hit becomes pretty important at higher levels. This is to take advantage of successful hits when they are becoming rarer due to increasing enemy AC’s; and, to stay in the game against enemies with DR (sometimes you’re lucky and have the tools necessary to bypass an enemies DR but often – unless you have a bag of holding stuffed with a variety of weapon types, materials and align weapon and magic weapon potions – you’re just going to have to hit the sucker with all you’ve got). The Ranger just doesn’t have the damage potential with one hit. I’ve already mentioned the ability limitations so strength is not likely to be a saving grace. The Ranger doesn’t have access to weapon specialization and the only ability at the Ranger’s disposal for improving damage is the Favored Enemy and that can’t be counted on in all situations. Most other classes have something they can call upon a number of times per day (Rage, Bardic Inspiration, Smite Evil, Spells, etc…). Even feats are of limited value. Power Attack would be great for the two-weapon style except the Ranger will be further handicapped by a decreased attack bonus and the feat doesn’t apply light weapons which negates the benefit of the combat style. The only feat available for the Archer is point blank shot. Again, limited.

3. Fighting is all the Ranger's got. Unlike Bards, Clerics, Druids, and even Paladin's the Ranger hasn't got other spells or special abilities to fall back on. Like the Fighter, Monk & Rogue the Ranger has to get through hostile encounters with skill at arms. Without great strength, special abilities, and buckets of feats the Ranger is left with a great quantity of less effective attacks and not much else. Good for the goons but bad against the special monsters. Again, the favoured enemy special ability is a boon but not reliable.

So, at the end of the day I concluded the Combat Style wasn’t worth worrying about and the best I could do was take the Archery Style to snipe at a distance when situations permitted but to throw some feats into combat (Weapon Focus, Power Attack, Improved Critical and the like) and be ready to wield a weapon with two hands to get through the tough encounters and count my lucky stars when the character could make use of the Favored Enemy bonus (BTW – the most useful selections for favored enemy IMHO are Evil Outsider and Undead).

I love the Ranger Class for it’s diversity but I was really humbled by this combat weakness. I’d love to hear from others if they have ideas to improve the effectiveness of the Combat Style; or, do you agree? Please, no solutions through equipment. Any Class can prop up their weaknesses with an equipment crutch.

Cheers,
C.


The following discussion started as an off topic debate on another thread. The main point under debate was a combat tactic I introduced that others did not see as an accurate interpretation of the D&D Rules System.

Before I give out the specifics I’d like to preface the discussion with a little insight into our gaming group – it should add context.

There are really only two people in our regular group of six that have any interest in reading the D&D Rule Books outside of actual game days: the group’s other DM and I. So, when we play I tell my group not to worry too much about the rules and to think more about what their character would do. I simply ask them to tell me what they want to do and let me figure out the rules that apply. This has led to an “outside of the box” approach to gaming. Over time the group has learned the rules too but they don’t let the rules get in the way of how they think about their character’s actions. I try to do this myself but its hard when you think in terms of game stats as opposed to pure narrative.

In the other thread I introduced a combat tactic that is a sort of defensive “hit & run” as a way to survive combat against a Min/Maxed Combat oriented character wielding a net & trident. In the spirit of following my own advice to my players I’ll tell you what I want the defensive character to do without worrying too much about the rules.

The defendant will wield a reach weapon; let’s say it’s a long spear. The defendant isn’t a big tough guy like the trident wielding opponent so he really doesn’t want to get into melee. Fortunately, he’s got a long spear; all he wants to do is to prepare himself to attack his opponent once with the spear when he gets into range and then run away before he closes within melee range.

As a typical Canadian who’s played his fair share of street hockey I can speak with some experience when I say that it’s dead easy to whack an incoming player with your hockey stick before he gets to you and take off with the puck while he’s thinking about what just happened (I have been on the receiving end of this tactic more often than not – usually because we put the younger siblings on defense and they can’t think of a better way to stop you from reaching the net – Canadian humor, LOL). So, when it comes to gaming it makes sense to me that there should be a way to accommodate this sort of hit and run defensive tactic (you won’t win any bravery awards but sometimes its better to stay "in the game" than worry about honor).

My suggested approach was to have the defendant “Ready” a move action to “Retreat” (run away) when an opponent entered his threatened area. The opponent would provoke an attack of opportunity for moving within the defendant’s threat range (10’ with the long spear) so the defendant would get his attack of opportunity and take off before the thug could close for melee, net him and poke him mercilessly with the trident.

How would you accommodate this tactic? Or, would you? Do you agree with my approach? Disagree? I look forward to any comments.

Cheers,
C.


It's an age old party question: "If you were reincarnated what would you come back as"? But this is D&D, so: "if you were reincarnated in D&D land, what would you come back as - and why"?

Me? I'd come back as Treant druid (there's a shocker). I love the wilderness but feel pathetic as lone human attempting to survive in the wild. Treants and the D&D portrayal of druidical faith seem to really define the spirit of the wild so what better combo. Plus, I've got Tree Beard for inspiration. Perhaps a lesser known fictional character are the Forestals from Steven Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant - Earth Power baby (I'm not really that much of a hippie type if you met me).

Cheers,
C.


Has anybody calculated the various jump difficulties for this room?

Cheers,
C.


I've been trying to figure out the fairness of allowing a character the opportunity to "coup de grace" an opponent they have snuck up on. The opponent must be "helpless" and the PHB describes helpless as:

A helpless character is paralyzed, held, bound, sleeping, unconscious, or otherwise completely at an opponent’s mercy. A helpless target is treated as having a Dexterity of 0 (-5 modifier). Melee attacks against a helpless target get a +4 bonus (equivalent to attacking a prone target). Ranged attacks gets no special bonus against helpless targets. Rogues can sneak attack helpless targets. Etcetera.......

It's the line that states "or otherwise completely at an opponent's mercy" that catches my attention. IMHO it would be reasonable to assume that an opponent whom you threaten who is completely unaware of your presense is helpless against at least one action which (if you've got the time) could be a coup de grace.

Now granted, this is a powerful tool for Rogues and other sneaky types but I do believe it's fair. It's not always easy sneaking up on people and it's really only useful against one opponent before you give yourself away.

Otherwise, how useful is the coup de grace anyway? It seems a little anti-climactic to paste an opponent you've already beaten anyway. Does anyone make use of the rule?

Any thoughts? Agree, Disagree?

Cheers,
C.


I have a quick question about the Druid's Wildshape ability for anyone who cares to offer an opinion.

In the first part of the Wildshape description it states that the ability is the same as the Polymorph spell excepted as noted in the ability description. In the Polymorph spell description it states that the user of the spell takes on the creature type of whatever shape is assumed. Back to the Wildshape description: skipping down to the bottom of the description it states that the druid can assume the form of an elemental but retains her own creature type. Thats the only place in the ability description it makes this distinction.

So, my question is: does the druid assume the "Animal" & "Plant" creature types when assuming those forms?

Personally I think this would be very cool for the druid. However, given the Elemental exception I can see how how some would argue for limiting this ability. I'm curious to recieve your opinions.

Cheers,
C.


I'm interested in hearing tales, opinions and ideas on alternate spell systems for D&D.

First let me clarify, I'm not talking about new schools of magic or anything like that. I'm talking about the whole d20 magic system being chucked out the window. Something brand new!

I've been feeling a little like Einstien must have (I'm not comparing myself to him intellectually - just frustrationally) when trying to rectify the differences between general realativity & quantum mechanics - they both work but not together. D&D has Arcane magic, divine magic, psionics and they're class dependent. Wouldn't it be nice to have a unified theory of everything for D&D magic?!

I've purchased Unearthed Arcana but the alternate systems there don't really go out on a limb. The variant systems really only replace the mechanics for how many spells per day and in what order and when you can cast them; except for the "Incantation" Rules, which are fresh and new but not really usable in a "day-to-day" sense that most characters would be interested in.

Although it is a different game system d20 Cthulhu presents an interesting alternate system that any character can use but it is at thier peril. Again, interesting, but not something most D&D characters would cling to.

As a conceptual backdrop to my own attempt to design a new magic system I struck upon the idea of the "Genius Loki" often called the spirit of place. In my own understanding I think of this as the "Animus" or life force. In Greek mythology this would be initially attributed to Gaia who gave birth to the Titans. The "animus" (soul, genius loki, whatever name you give it) is the inheritance of all life from the original "Force" (worked well for Star Wars). Some life forms have more or less of this "animus" as do some places (people have more than animals but celestials and demons have more than people - also opens the ideas of power places and ley lines, etcetera). The "animus" (mana, spell points, its been given a variety of names)forms the basis for the magic concept. It is a kind of fuel that is spent/converted from it's raw form into a magical effect. All life has this energy but it takes talent (feats and skills) to learn how to store it (either in yourself or an item), channel it (make use of it in its raw form) and manifest an effect (spells).

Anyway, the concept is there as a kind of universally accessible magic that depends on your species predisposition and resources spent to develop it kind of thing; alas, I haven't put it into a game mechanic. Also, I think it would be easier to impliment something like this into the d20 Modern system as D&D is pretty entrenched.

In any case, I'd be very interested to hear other views and opinions on the matter.

Cheers,
C.


I've been jealously reading posts on issue 126 for some time now but still haven't received my copy. I know from other posts that the subscription delivery can be slow; but, this is beginning to feel unusually slow.

Have any other Ontario or Canadian subscribers received theirs yet?

Waiting patiently,
C.


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Before my question I just have to say the AoW Adventure Path rocks.

I have two questions for other Game Masters:

1. In the Whispering Cairn, how did your players approach the encounter with Balabar’s gang (Kullen & the boys)?

I ask this because my PC’s are acting like they’ve never played D&D before. They found Kullen (hulking albino half-orc with a forehead tattoo – not too hard to miss) and made out his buddies by watching them for a couple of hours. They tried eaves dropping (I gave them a 1 in 6 chance of overhearing something useful but they didn’t succeed) and they tried waiting for the gang outside the bar which also failed them – though, this later may have been my fault for two reasons: A) I gave the gang a chance to notice the PC’s “watching” them in the bar and they succeeded; B) medieval towns (at least the poor one’s) don’t have street lights so night time in the city can be a tricky business – the gang snuck out without the PC’s noticing and (thanks to Kullen’s Darkvision) trailed them back to the Able Carter Coach House. I’m worried the PC’s are going to end up being assassinated before they even have a chance to talk with the gang. I’m interested to hear the experiences of others.

2. In the Three Faces of Evil: how are you planning to run the labyrinth encounter with the Kenku in the Temple of Vecna?

I thought about this one (the Kenku tactics and the game rules associated them) and admit to be a little worried for a 3rd level party (or maybe just my party). My plan is to have the Kenku manoeuvre in advance of the party with one to use mimicry as a lure. They all prepare a readied action to fire their crossbows when the PC’s come to within 30feet so they can get their sneak attack damage on the flatfooted PC’s then to take a move action to disappear through a secret door (opening the door is a free action for the Kenku). None of the PC’s has Darkvision so the Kenku will likely get their attacks off without ever being seen as torch light only illuminates a 20’ radius. Since the Kenku have prepared readied actions they will always get an attack against the PC’s before the PC’s can react; unless the PC’s can turn the tables and surprise the Kenku. In an unfamiliar darkened labyrinth full of secret doors they are at a serious disadvantage. I smell a TPK coming with this one. I’m trying to think of ways to improve the PC’s chances without playing the Kenku’s as chumps – they should be threatening but maybe not invincible. Thoughts?

Cernunos


I’ve been reading the “Is There A Hole In The Submissions Room” string with a little envy for the people who find the time to write up their ideas and send them in to Dungeon (I’d like to be one too). Alas, my job, house and family make that difficult. Thank goodness a magazine like Dungeon is here for me when I finally get the chance play a little D&D.

With no time to make up adventures of my own I pretty much rely on Dungeon exclusively. One of the fun little challenges is putting together a series of adventures from the magazine to make your own Adventure Path (needless to say I have been thrilled with the publication of the Shackled City, Istivin and the upcoming Age of Worms Adventure Paths). I realized I can’t be the only one in this boat and was curious to know what Adventure Paths others have put together from the modules published in Dungeon.

My current Campaign has just begun and will consist of the following:
LEVEL 01: Issue 114 – Mad God’s Key
LEVEL 02: Issue 123 – Salvage Operation
LEVEL 03: Issue 115 – Raiders of the Black Ice
LEVEL 04: Issue 121 – Fiend’s Embrace
LEVEL 05: Issue 122 – Fiendish Footprints (Adapted from 6th to 5th)
LEVEL 06: Issue 106 – Tameraut’s Fate
LEVEL 07: Issue 114 – Torrents of Dread (Adapted from 6th to 7th)
LEVEL 08: Issue 121 – The Styes (Adapted from 9th to 8th)
LEVEL 09: Issue 113 – Practical Magic (Adapted to continue adventuring in the Styes)

That’s all I have planned for the moment though it would be easy to craft a campaign right up to 20th level.

So, what dungeon adventures would you use to create your own adventure path?


I just finished reading Issue 123's "Amarantha Agenda" and I'm left with totally mixed feelings. On the one hand, I think Amarantha is one of the coolest most unique adversaries I've seen written in the pages of Dungeon in a long time. On the other hand, she's really only been allowed a "One Scene" show.

I was dismayed that such an interesting character with such a tragic background was set up as a one shot monster battle with minimal dialogue.

I've been trying to imagine ways to expand the story and expand Amarantha's role. The obvious seems to use the adventure as an intro to her character and set her up as an ongoing nemesis. I've even thought of the PC's joining Amarantha's cause in an effort to end her curse and enable her triumphant return to the wood as new and potent guardian of the forest (to drag in another thread - the Ironmaw could be transformed into an awakened Oak or something like that).

I'd be interested to know if anybody else liked this NPC as much as I did and what you've done to keep Amarantha "in the game".


I'm planning to run a game in the near future that has a lot of spider swarms in it (Salvage Operation in this month's Dungeon Magazine).

I read the description of the Swarm Creature Type in the back of the MM and it states that swarms made up of Diminutive and Fine creature take no weapon damage. Spiders in the Spider Swarm are one of these (fine or diminutive - I forget) but their Special Qualities do not mention anything about immunity to weapon damage as is the case for other swarms made up of similarly sized creatures.

Am I being fair to my PC's to run the Swarm as described in the MM's Creature Type for Swarms or am I intended to let them slay this 9hp menace by stabbing the spiders to death with spears and rapiers (shish kabob anyone)?

Thoughts?