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1 person marked this as FAQ candidate.

so, as base with no upgrades, most computers can run for 24 hours off internal batteries.
i can't seem to find the following information though.

~maximum capacity
~method of charging
~cost of charging (if not by holding a battery to it)
~whether or not you can charge it with a battery

i want to know this in case my party ends up stranded somewhere with no access to a charging station for an extended period, but needs a computer. unless that doesn't happen in SF.

yes, i know about self charging, same questions apply for being stranded for over 8 days :P


2 people marked this as FAQ candidate. 1 person marked this as a favorite.

Would this give me two single armor slots, or would this give me a merged two armor slot?

Quote:
Your exocortex allows you to apply any one of the following drone mods to yourself as if you were a drone with that mod installed: armor slot, ...
Quote:
Your drone gains an armor upgrade slot for an armor upgrade. If you do not already have an armor upgrade to install, you must purchase one separately. You can install the armor upgrade only if your drone has enough open upgrade slots to meet the upgrade’s requirements...
Quote:
Androids have a single armor upgrade slot in their bodies. Regardless of whether androids are wearing physical armor, they can use this slot to install any one armor upgrade that could be installed into light armor.
Quote:
Each suit of armor contains a certain number of upgrade slots. This represents the maximum number of times the armor can be modified while still functioning.

so would my body count as one piece of armor, and the exocortex count as another, or would both combined be considered a part of my body?


Had a mass argument discussion with several people in a community I'm in about this, an we couldn't come to an agreement. I'd like some feedback here if possible, to bring back with me if this pops up again. Skip to the bottom for points that require clarification.

Point of conflict:

Spoiler:

http://www.d20pfsrd.com/classes/core-classes/druid

Druidic Herbalism Nature Bond Variant (Optional)

Source PPC:HH

Druidic herbalism is a nature bond option that can be taken by any druid at 1st level except those with archetypes or alternate class features that alter or replace nature bond or mandate a specific nature bond choice.

Instead of granting access to a domain or an animal companion, a druid’s bond with nature can take a third form: access to druidic herbalism.

A druid who chooses to learn druidic herbalism can use combinations of nuts, berries, dried herbs, and other natural ingredients along with appropriate containers to create herbal concoctions or magic consumables that function like potions. This acts like the Brew Potion feat, but only for spells on the druid spell list. Herbal concoctions are typically thick and sludgy, and their creation time, caster level, spell duplication capabilities, and all other variables and properties are identical to those of potions created using Brew Potion. Herbal concoctions created with herbs that cause special effects when ingested retain those effects as well as the appropriate spell effect.

A druid can create a number of free herbal concoctions per day equal to her Wisdom modifier. Additional concoctions cost the same as creating an equivalent potion using Brew Potion. Druids can sell their herbal concoctions just as if they were potions (though NPCs unfamiliar with druidic herbalism may need some convincing before purchasing these wares).

At 4th level, a druid’s increasing skill with herbalism means that she can disguise the effects of her herbal concoctions. When a creature attempts a Perception or Spellcraft check to identify one of the druid’s concoctions, the concoction appears to be a different herbal concoction of the druid’s choice unless the creature exceeds the identification DC by 5 or more. The druid must designate this false result when creating the concoction. If a creature exceeds the identification DC by 5 or more, it correctly identifies the concoction, though not that the druid tried to fool it.

Additionally, at 4th level, when the druid creates additional concoctions, she need pay only half the normal cost to create them. It takes her only half the normal time to create her concoctions, and she can create concoctions of spells from any spell list, as long as she can cast the spell.

At 7th level, when the druid creates concoctions with potential false identification results, a creature attempting to identify the concoction must exceed the identification DC by 10 or more to determine the concoction’s true identity.

Additionally, at 7th level, a druid can create any herbal concoction in 1 minute. She can also create a special concoction of any spell higher than 3rd level that she can cast, but to do so, she must expend a spell slot of the same level. These special concoctions do not cost her anything to create and function like extracts created by an alchemist with the infusion discovery.

The following is a summary of my opinions on the matter. A much shorter summary of my opposition will follow.

Starting with the third paragraph, these points:

Spoiler:
A druid who chooses to learn druidic herbalism can use combinations of nuts, berries, dried herbs, and other natural ingredients along with appropriate containers to create herbal concoctions or magic consumables that function like potions. This acts like the Brew Potion feat, but only for spells on the druid spell list. Herbal concoctions are typically thick and sludgy, and their creation time, caster level, spell duplication capabilities, and all other variables and properties are identical to those of potions created using Brew Potion. Herbal concoctions created with herbs that cause special effects when ingested retain those effects as well as the appropriate spell effect.

mean to me, that;

Spoiler:

http://www.d20pfsrd.com/magic-items#TOC-Magic-Item-Creation

To create magic items, spellcasters use special feats which allow them to invest time and money in an item’s creation. At the end of this process, the spellcaster must make a single skill check (usually Spellcraft, but sometimes another skill) to finish the item. If an item type has multiple possible skills, you choose which skill to make the check with. The DC to create a magic item is 5 + the caster level for the item. Failing this check means that the item does not function and the materials and time are wasted. Failing this check by 5 or more results in a cursed item.

Note that all items have prerequisites in their descriptions. These prerequisites must be met for the item to be created. Most of the time, they take the form of spells that must be known by the item’s creator (although access through another magic item or spellcaster is allowed). The DC to create a magic item increases by 5 for each prerequisite the caster does not meet. The only exception to this is the requisite item creation feat, which is mandatory. In addition, you cannot create potions, spell-trigger, or spell-completion magic items without meeting its prerequisites.

While item creation costs are handled in detail below, note that normally the two primary factors are the caster level of the creator and the level of the spell or spells put into the item. A creator can create an item at a lower caster level than her own, but never lower than the minimum level needed to cast the needed spell. Using metamagic feats, a caster can place spells in items at a higher level than normal.

...

In addition, some items cast or replicate spells with costly material components. For these items, the market price equals the base price plus an extra price for the spell component costs. The cost to create these items is the magic supplies cost plus the costs for the components. Descriptions of these items include an entry that gives the total cost of creating the item.

The creator also needs a fairly quiet, comfortable, and well-lit place in which to work. Any place suitable for preparing spells is suitable for making items. Creating an item requires 8 hours of work per 1,000 gp in the item’s base price (or fraction thereof), with a minimum of at least 8 hours. Potions and scrolls are an exception to this rule; they can take as little as 2 hours to create (if their base price is 250 gp or less). Scrolls and potions whose base price is more than 250 gp, but less than 1,000 gp, take 8 hours to create, just like any other magic item. The character must spend the gold at the beginning of the construction process. Regardless of the time needed for construction, a caster can create no more than one magic item per day. This process can be accelerated to 4 hours of work per 1,000 gp in the item’s base price (or fraction thereof) by increasing the DC to create the item by 5.

The caster can work for up to 8 hours each day. He cannot rush the process by working longer each day, but the days need not be consecutive, and the caster can use the rest of his time as he sees fit. If the caster is out adventuring, he can devote 4 hours each day to item creation, although he nets only 2 hours’ worth of work. This time is not spent in one continuous period, but rather during lunch, morning preparation, and during watches at night. If time is dedicated to creation, it must be spent in uninterrupted 4-hour blocks. This work is generally done in a controlled environment, where distractions are at a minimum, such as a laboratory or shrine. Work that is performed in a distracting or dangerous environment nets only half the amount of progress (just as with the adventuring caster).

applies to this class feature.

Note: potion and herbal concoctions of lvl 1-3 shall be used interchangeably in the magical item creation paragraph.

Paragraph four:

Spoiler:

A druid can create a number of free herbal concoctions per day equal to her Wisdom modifier. Additional concoctions cost the same as creating an equivalent potion using Brew Potion. Druids can sell their herbal concoctions just as if they were potions (though NPCs unfamiliar with druidic herbalism may need some convincing before purchasing these wares).

modifies the magical item creation rules in that only:

Spoiler:

Regardless of the time needed for construction, a caster can create no more than one magic item per day.

is altered to:

Spoiler:

A druid with Druidic Herbalism Nature Bond class feature can create a number of free herbal concoctions per day equal to her Wisdom modifier, plus any additional concoctions she wants to craft.

Simultaneously, paragraph six:

Spoiler:

Additionally, at 4th level, when the druid creates additional concoctions, she need pay only half the normal cost to create them. It takes her only half the normal time to create her concoctions, and she can create concoctions of spells from any spell list, as long as she can cast the spell.

has the first sentence modify the crafting cost of a potion from .5(spell level*CL*50) to 0.5(0.5(spell level*CL*50)), while the second sentence modifies the magical item creation rules from:

Spoiler:

Potions and scrolls are an exception to this rule; they can take as little as 2 hours to create (if their base price is 250 gp or less). Scrolls and potions whose base price is more than 250 gp, but less than 1,000 gp, take 8 hours to create, just like any other magic item.

to

Spoiler:

Potions and scrolls are an exception to this rule; a druid with Druidic Herbalism Nature Bond class feature can take as little as 1 hour to create (if their base price is 250 gp or less). Scrolls and potions whose base price is more than 250 gp, but less than 1,000 gp, take 4 hours to create, just like any other magic item.

additionally, the last paragraph:

Spoiler:

Additionally, at 7th level, a druid can create any herbal concoction in 1 minute. She can also create a special concoction of any spell higher than 3rd level that she can cast, but to do so, she must expend a spell slot of the same level. These special concoctions do not cost her anything to create and function like extracts created by an alchemist with the infusion discovery.

further alters the section that paragraph 4, sentence 2 alters to:

Spoiler:

Potions and scrolls are an exception to this rule; a druid level 4 with Druidic Herbalism Nature Bond class feature can take as little as 1 hour to create (if their base price is 250 gp or less). Scrolls and potions whose base price is more than 250 gp, but less than 1,000 gp, take 4 hours to create, just like any other magic item. A druid level 7 with Druidic Herbalism Nature Bond class feature can create an herbal concoction in 1 minute.

The final alteration to the magical item crafting rules for the purposes of this class feature looks like:

Spoiler:

To create magic items, spellcasters use special feats which allow them to invest time and money in an item’s creation. At the end of this process, the spellcaster must make a single skill check (usually Spellcraft, but sometimes another skill) to finish the item. If an item type has multiple possible skills, you choose which skill to make the check with. The DC to create a magic item is 5 + the caster level for the item. Failing this check means that the item does not function and the materials and time are wasted. Failing this check by 5 or more results in a cursed item.

Note that all items have prerequisites in their descriptions. These prerequisites must be met for the item to be created. Most of the time, they take the form of spells that must be known by the item’s creator (although access through another magic item or spellcaster is allowed). The DC to create a magic item increases by 5 for each prerequisite the caster does not meet. The only exception to this is the requisite item creation feat, which is mandatory. In addition, you cannot create potions, spell-trigger, or spell-completion magic items without meeting its prerequisites.

While item creation costs are handled in detail below, note that normally the two primary factors are the caster level of the creator and the level of the spell or spells put into the item. A creator can create an item at a lower caster level than her own, but never lower than the minimum level needed to cast the needed spell. Using metamagic feats, a caster can place spells in items at a higher level than normal.

...

In addition, some items cast or replicate spells with costly material components. For these items, the market price equals the base price plus an extra price for the spell component costs. The cost to create these items is the magic supplies cost plus the costs for the components. Descriptions of these items include an entry that gives the total cost of creating the item.

The creator also needs a fairly quiet, comfortable, and well-lit place in which to work. Any place suitable for preparing spells is suitable for making items. Creating an item requires 8 hours of work per 1,000 gp in the item’s base price (or fraction thereof), with a minimum of at least 8 hours. Potions and scrolls are an exception to this rule; a druid level 4 with Druidic Herbalism Nature Bond class feature can take as little as 1 hour to create (if their base price is 250 gp or less). Scrolls and potions whose base price is more than 250 gp, but less than 1,000 gp, take 4 hours to create, just like any other magic item. A druid level 7 with Druidic Herbalism Nature Bond class feature can create an herbal concoction in 1 minute. The character must spend the gold at the beginning of the construction process. A druid with Druidic Herbalism Nature Bond class feature can create a number of free herbal concoctions per day equal to her Wisdom modifier, plus any additional concoctions she wants to craft. This process can be accelerated to 4 hours of work per 1,000 gp in the item’s base price (or fraction thereof) by increasing the DC to create the item by 5.

The caster can work for up to 8 hours each day. He cannot rush the process by working longer each day, but the days need not be consecutive, and the caster can use the rest of his time as he sees fit. If the caster is out adventuring, he can devote 4 hours each day to item creation, although he nets only 2 hours’ worth of work. This time is not spent in one continuous period, but rather during lunch, morning preparation, and during watches at night. If time is dedicated to creation, it must be spent in uninterrupted 4-hour blocks. This work is generally done in a controlled environment, where distractions are at a minimum, such as a laboratory or shrine. Work that is performed in a distracting or dangerous environment nets only half the amount of progress (just as with the adventuring caster).

A special concoction will also follow the rules of an alchemist infused extract

Spoiler:

https://www.d20pfsrd.com/classes/base-classes/alchemist/discoveries/paizo-- -alchemist-discoveries/infusion/

Benefit: When the alchemist creates an extract, he can infuse it with an extra bit of his own magical power. The extract created now persists even after the alchemist sets it down. As long as the extract exists, it continues to occupy one of the alchemist’s daily extract slots. An infused extract can be imbibed by a non-alchemist to gain its effects.

as well as the rules for crafting a magical item that is not a potion, market price being determined by the potion price formula.

Finally, how material components are handled, costly or otherwise:

Spoiler:

http://www.d20pfsrd.com/magic-items#TOC-Creating-Potions

Material components are consumed when he begins working, but a focus is not. (a focus used in brewing a potion can be reused.) The act of brewing triggers the prepared spell, making it unavailable for casting until the character has rested and regained spells. (That is, that spell slot is expended from the caster’s currently prepared spells, just as if it had been cast.)

The following assumes the above is true.

1) A free or additional herbal concoction consumes time and spells as per brew potion.
2) A level 1-3 requires a minimum of 2 hours to craft each without rushing, with each day being a maximum of 8 hours of work
3) Therefore, a level 1-3 druid with 20+ wis has 5+ free concoctions available, but may only create 4 a day without rushing.
4) A skill check must be performed for any herbal concoction, being either spellcraft or craft (alchemy)
5) Material component costs are added to the market price and crafting cost of free and additional herbal concoctions
6) Because material components are consumed when starting, you must have the components before you start even a free concoction (clarification required)
7) For special concoctions, as per an extract with infusion, material components are consumed upon consuming the extract, similar to a wizard casting a spell. No free wish for you.
8) A special concoction, as per an extract with infusion, lasts 24 hours and only affects the consumer.
9) A special concoction can also be free concoction.

Opposition view:

This single sentence

Spoiler:

A druid can create a number of free herbal concoctions per day equal to her Wisdom modifier.

Invalidates all above points for free concoctions, because:
1) You must be able to get as many free concoctions as their wisdom modifier, because "A druid can create"
2) This invalidates the time requirements entirely for free concoctions
3) A free concoction has no cost, because it is "free"
4) Cost includes time, material components, base potion price
5) This invalidates paragraph 3 of the druid class feature, and the remainder of the magic item creation rules for free concoctions
6) Got to other potential opposition arguments, such as skill checks...

Clarification required:
1) Which interpretation, or parts thereof are correct?
2) Because material components are consumed when starting, do you need to have the components before you start even a free concoction? In other words, do you have to pay costly material component costs for free concoctions? I noticed that you can also do....

Spoiler:
Herbal concoctions created with herbs that cause special effects when ingested retain those effects as well as the appropriate spell effect.
, do those count as costly material components as well?

Thank you for following this far. I await your answers. Please correct any rules that I have misquoted, or misinterpreted.
This should be viewed entirely RAW, with no (or minimal) RAI interpretations.