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I am in the process of creating a custom campaign setting for my players, with the main premise being that the sun has shattered, leaving most of the world in perpetual night, while a host of nations have obtained a "sun stone", a shard of the broken sun, which keeps a reasonable swath of territory in perpetual daylight.

Assuming I go the mythological route and assume the world is a flat disc, how much territory would a "miniature sun" cover from different elevations? Say, from the top of a mountain? Or from the top of a floating city/fortress?


I am in the process of creating a custom campaign setting for my players, with the main premise being that the sun has shattered, leaving most of the world in perpetual night, while a host of nations have obtained a "sun stone", a shard of the broken sun, which keeps a reasonable swath of territory in perpetual daylight.

Assuming I go the mythological route and assume the world is a flat disc, how much territory would a "miniature sun" cover from different elevations? Say, from the top of a mountain? Or from the top of a floating city/fortress?


Greetings Hive!

A thought occurred to me last night while playing in a friend's ongoing game.

The Story:
Our party had arrived in a small town to attend the funeral of two friends. Several important town figures and family of the deceased were in attendance, including the local town wizard. Several individuals rose to deliver eulogies and goodbyes, until it came to the wizard's turn.

"Well, now that everyone else is done and quiet..." he began, his lips twisting into a snarl. My paladin was already tensing in his seat, and the rest of the party exchanged glances as mourners shuffled and mumbled in their seats, and fingers crept toward blade handles.

"It's MY TURN to have your attention." The wizard sneered and raised a glowing palm, the scent of ozone bursting in our nostrils as we rose to charge from our seats.

Our GM called for saving throws. All of us failed.

A clap of thunder burst in the centre of the seats, flinging us off our feet and scattering the mourners in a cacophony of pained cries and splintering wood. Our heads swam with the whine of tinnitis as we crawled forward, spitting curses and oaths of violence.

The wizard smiled and stood over Marie, the wife of one of the dead, who lay sprawled and struggling on her back. Again the wizard raised his outstretched palm, aiming down at the stunned widow.

"I see now that you'll never be mine, Marie." He said, as blue light gathered in his palm.

"If I can't have you, no one can." He snarled. The crackle of energy burst from his palm in a scattering of blue bolts that hammered down, blasting Marie's face into a red pulp.

Cries went up as we pushed to our feet - my fingers closed on my sword, the rogue brandished her sentient blade, and the cleric was pushing between the wrecked pews to meet the object of his wrath.

But the wizard had already grasped Marie's daughter, Yukiko, clasping the girl close to him.

"If I can't have your mother, then I shall have you instead, girl!" And casting a final, snarling smile across the carnage, the wizard pursed his fingers together, snapped his fingers, and was gone in a flash of light, and Yukiko with him.

TLDR; The local wizard ambushed a funeral and made off with the daughter of the deceased.

Now, this situation brought up several questions for me. How did no one in the town see this coming? Did no one know of the wizard's obsession ahead of time? Had there been no warning?

Then I started to consider some more far reaching implications of the situation:
Did the town even have any kind of response in case the wizard went awol? Or if another rogue caster arrived in town? What laws exist to respond to these situations?

In essence: How does a society regulate the use of magic?

Some thoughts have occurred to me already: The need for a registry, identification or "license" to practice magic.

But this also opens up a morally dubious area of questioning: "Learned" casters such as wizards and clerics would be voluntarily submitting themselves to this necessary invasion of their privacy. To make an analogy with gun regulation - anyone carrying a gun makes the choice to submit themselves to scrutiny. It is a choice they make in order to legally carry a weapon.

But what about sorcerers? Oracles? Bards? And other casters who are born with and have no choice? To continue the previous analogy, it would be akin to being born with a biological equivalent of a handgun gorwing from your arm instead of a hand.

How might different social and legal structures enforce magical regulation? How would they treat individuals who have no say over their connection to magic?

Regards,
A DM who wants to tell some interesting stories.


I'm having some trouble explaining to a player why the Archmage path ability, "Abundant Casting" does not work with "Scorching Ray"

According to the path ability description for Abundant Casting, "Whenever you cast a spell that specifically targets a limited number of targets (such as “one creature/level” or “one or more creatures”), add your tier to the number of targets the spell can affect."

My player has taken this to mean that he can fire off 2 additional bursts of Scorching Ray (thanks to his 2 mythic tiers), making for a total of 9 rays fired.

My understanding is that this shouldn't work as the spell isn't "targeting" a specific number of creatures, but manifesting bolts of fire that the caster can direct at will. For Abundant Casting to work (again, by my reading), a spell has to list in its descriptors something like "1 target/Caster level", and Scorching Ray doesn't have this descriptor.

I've tried to explain this to my player, but he is confused by my explanation as he is still "targeting" creatures with his scorching rays.

So, Hivemind, can you please advise how I can more clearly explain my reasoning? Or else clarify if my reading of the ability and spell is incorrect?


Greetings, Hivemind,

My party are mythic heroes, currently disguising themselves as they explore the occupied town of Losthome in The Lands of the Linnorm Kings.

One of the NPCs they are interacting with is an Ulfen warrior who has allied himself to the winter witches - the party have bluffed their way into his confidence, and he has made them the proposition of competing in a series of "pit fights" to entertain the unruly Ulfen and try to endear them to the town's new leadership of Irriseni witches.

My current map of the "pit" is of a massive sandpit underneath wide floor gratings on the main level of the Ulfen warrior's longhouse (think Jabba The Hutt's trap door leading to the Rancor battle in Return of the Jedi). The pit features spiked walls, and several mechanical, spinning pillars that not only support the grating, but also serve as spinning hazards of jagged metal.

The hope here is that these hazards will affect movement and tactics, but that the players will also realize that they could destroy these pillars to bring the grating down - the encounters I have in mind will include challenges emerging above the fight as well, including other NPCs who may recognize the party as intruders.

But what improvements could I make to this encounter to encourage changing positions and force the players to keep on their toes?


I am about to run my party through an urban centered set of encounters and adventures. While several encounters will still feature traditional "Monsters", a greater percentage of the party's encounters will be with powerful NPCs.

A problem I have previously had when running NPC focused games has been the disproportionate quantity/need of treasure and magic items that powerful NPCs have in the rules as written. The issue I have with this is that I don't want my party collecting "+1 longsword" after "+1 longsword" after several encounters, as I feel this "cheapens" the value and importance of the players' magic items.

Your +3 Dragonbane Greatsword may have a long, mythical history behind it - but after encountering 12 swords of approximate power in the hands of the elite guards you just slew, you might start to wonder why your sword is considered so special.

Now, I like giving major antagonists and bosses powerful items for the party to recover, but not their rank and file minions.

Obviously, taking magic items away from NPCs represents a drop in effectiveness as enemies - are there some handy ways to balance this? Is it a simple matter of assuming this reduces their Challenge Rating and plan encounters accordingly? Or do you, The Hivemind, have any other suggestions?


Paizo have stated that they're never going to tell anyone how Aroden actually died. Okay.

But they do have a concrete explanation for how he died in the back of their minds...

So here's what I'm wondering...

Have Pathfinder's writers and publishers been leaving subtle hints and breadcrumbs throughout their published products? Like a jigsaw puzzle of seemingly disparate parts, rumors, myths and facts which are only visible once you line up all the pieces correctly?

For example, is it possible to draw any conclusions by comparing different regional timelines side by side? Immediately after Aroden's death, the Worldwound swallowed Sarkoris, and a continent sized hurricane separated the colony of Sargava from its mother nation of Cheliax.

These are merely surface level observations, are there other, perhaps less obvious effects and events that are tied to Aroden's death that help fill in the blanks surrounding his demise?


Recently I have been encountering a curious trend in my Mythic Pathfinder game. One that I worry will become problematic without my addressing it.

One player out of the group plays a powerhouse of a barbarian champion who wields a double ended sword to devastating effect when he "fleet charges" across the field, occasionally downing the party's major foes in one or two turns.

He enjoys this. Personally, I enjoy this too: It's part of the reason why I added Mythic Rules, so that my players could enjoy pulling off ridiculous/incredible feats.

At the moment, I believe that the other players find <some> enjoyment from this, and they still have moments to shine as well by doing similarly incredible stunts.

My concern is that this routine will become repetitive, and that as the player characters scale in power, the barbarian player (who creates his characters very intelligently, and tends to have the best grasp of combining different elements of the rules) will dominate combat situations to the point where the other players may feel out-classed or "left behind".

I should point out that my group and I are generally mature, friendly people who are able to give and receive criticism gracefully and tactfully. I don't want to rob anyone of enjoying combat, feeling useful as part of the group, or of feeling that I am punishing them for using the rules effectively, including our barbarian.

That being said, there are some possible changes I'm looking to implement to help balance the scales, and I'd like some feedback.

Spoiler:

1. Increasing the MP costs for "Fleet Charge" and other Path Abilities

This is a rule change that Legendary Games suggests in "Mythic Hero's Handbook", essentially adding a scale of increasing cost for certain path abilities and mythic spells rather than simply spending 1 MP for anything and everything. You want to fleet charge as a standard action? 1 MP. As a move action? 2 MP. As a swift action? 3 MP. This would mean the barbarian can still enjoy sprinting across an open field to eviscerate his enemies, but he might not be able to do so quite as often.

2. Banning "Fleet Warrior"

"Fleet Warrior" is a path ability that allows a character to move and make a full attack in the same turn. Essentially a "Fleet Charge" without an MP cost. To keep rule change "1" above relevant, I feel like this is a necessary change to include.

3. Changing up encounter terrains, dynamics and "goals"

Barbarian can't eviscerate an enemy if he can't reach them without help, and adding some additional goals or time constraints serves to add challenge for the entire party. Additionally challenges that don't revolve around combat ability can also help other party members feel useful - if not integral - to the party's success... Though I could use some suggestions on how to implement this.

4. Buffing up the enemies.

Truth be told: I haven't thrown that many mythic foes against the party, though they still have held their own against the ones they have faced.

I want to implement this with the philosophy that Pathfinder is built to favor the players' chances of winning - but victory should not feel trivial, especially in a mythic game.

Important foes, I have thought, should not only have maxed HP, but receive double the recommended hit points from their mythic tiers, possibly more...

They need smaller mooks, to help divide the party's action economy.

Increases to a major foes offenses should be minimal: If the foe can take down one of the players with a single attack, then they are generally too powerful.

I am also considering giving most important foes an additional "true" damage resistance of 10 or 15, depending on how challenging they are meant to be, along with varying levels of fast healing or regeneration, depending on the circumstances.

Over all, I feel that our barbarian hits foes 85% of the time, for massive damage while remaining difficult to hit himself. I want to keep fights interesting for the entire party without punishing anyone.

All of my players are reasonable, and they have so far embraced my suggested changes positively - but now I'd like your opinion, fellow players.

What are your thoughts?


I like that idea!

Do you have any advice on general things to keep in mind to optimize the building of Ingrimundr as either a myhic NPC or a mythic creature?


Hello Paizo posters!

My group of players in a "Lands of The Linnorm Kings" based game have reached level 10, Mythic Tier 2, and I'm now starting to understand just how much even one to two tiers has a way of trivializing "mundane" encounters.

This has been fine so far; My players are having fun dominating high powered monsters and npcs with their mythic power.

However, I ultimately want to steer things toward "atmospheric norse myth" as opposed to "massive number crunching for total pwnage" - and to that end I want to create some foes that can actually stand toe to toe with my player characters while embodying "mythical themes".

What I'm hoping for are some general guidelines: Who else has had experience adding Mythic ranks or tiers to their NPCS and monsters? How did you balance things out for your game? How did it work out? How can I tweak things to optimize my "mythical" NPCs?

To give an example: Ingrimundr the Unruly is an NPC barbarian king in the lands of the linnorm kings. My plot is that he will eventually set off a civil war out of a desire to return his people back to their "glorious viking days".

Here's where I want to add a spark of "mythic" to the mix, taking a healthy dose of inspiration from the tale of Sigurd and Fafnir.

Here's the deal: In order to become king of a region, a warrior must slay a linnorm - a primordial fey dragon. However, Ingrimundr, being the hyper-masculine nut-job that he is, starts taking advice from demon lord Kostchtchie (also an enemy of Baba Yaga). Kostchtchie congratulates Ingrimundr on besting a worm, but then says that if he REALLY wants to go hardcore, he should mix up a potion of Linnorm's blood and chug that sucker for some major gain.

So Ingrimundr chugs a mix of wyrm blood and gets even more ripped than before, including the benefits of mythic power, as well as some... draconic abilities.

Get him down to a low enough number of Hit Points however, and Ingrimundr's dragon blood will boil over, ripping his body apart and turning him into a monster.

So I'm in two minds:
Either stat up Ingrimundr as a mythic (half dragon?) barbarian with the unique ability to go "dragon mode" when his Hit Points fall too low, or simply stat him up as a unique, mythic dragon.

Any advice, Paizo Posters?


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What kind of creatures might we see accompanying a military force of duergar?

Monster codex has helpfully provided some beetles, but what else could be logically added for variety?

Would we see constructs? Slave auxiliaries?

What about summoned and bound outsiders? What outsiders are even associated with the duergar deity, Droskar? He's neutral evil, has a home on the abyss... so does he have stronger connections with demons? Devils? Daemons (who hate mortals because they are the source of sin - and therefore demons)?

Any thoughts and suggestions welcome


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In The Lands of the Linnorm Kings, rulership is decided by proving your worth and slaying a fey dragon.

So what happens when a ruler dies? Where does that authority go? Do the citizens hold a Thing and elect a "placeholder"? Does the kingdom descend into total anarchy as lesser jarls make a bid for power? Or does another Linnorm King "step in" and take control?


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Hello all, thank you for the advice so far.

Chemlak wrote:

I'm spotting two technical errors.

First, it's impossible for a mythic creature to have CR 14. Base CR 11 with 5 MR gets +2 CR, for a total of 13. Base CR 12 would have MR 6, +3 CR, so 15.

Second, MR 5 has 5 mythic power, not 7. And if it was mythic tier instead of mythic rank, it would have 11.

I am fudging the "Mythic Rank equals one half of the original CR of the creature" a bit to avoid making her TOO overkill.

I've also now added in "Extra Mythic Power" as one of her chosen mythic abilities, drawing on the "Universal Path" ability, to give her the extra mythic points.

Eltacolibre wrote:

Saves are a bit too low for CR 14 but I guess with some mythic power surge spent, it kinda make up for it.

Average high DC of your ability/spells is supposed to be DC 22 at CR 14, might be worth reducing the DC a little bit (just one off would be enough) because remember that mythic characters outside of spending mythic surges powers don't really increase their saving throws.

As for the encounter in general:

Since they are going to be level 10 with mythic tier 2, their party APL is effectively 11.

It should be a decent fight 2 or 3 rounds.

I've done some shifting around and leveling out of her ability scores to boost her saving throws, and lower the dc of her spells.

As for the fight lasting 2 or 3 rounds, I'm hoping it will be a little longer than that. For that reason I'm adding in other "Wendigo Spawn" (see below)

Any advice on how many of these nasties to add in?

Spoiler:

Wendigo Spawn CR 10
CE Medium Outsider (Chaotic, Evil, Native, Cold)
Initiative +12 Senses Blindsight 60 ft, Darkvision 60 ft, low light vision; Perception +17

AC 24 Touch 18 Flat Footed 16 (+8 Dex, +6 Nat)
HP 132 (11d10+66); Regeneration 10 (fire)
Fort +9 Ref +15 Will +10
DR 10/magic and cold iron; Immune to cold and fear; SR 21; Vulnerable to Fire (x1.5)

Speed 120ft fly (perfect)
Space/reach 5ft
Melee Bite+14 (2d6+3/19-20 plus 2d6 cold and grab), 2 claws +14 (1d8+3/19-20 plus 2d6 cold)

Special Attacks Howl, Rend (2 claws 1d8+4 plus 2d6 cold)

Str 17 Dex 27 Con 23 Int 22 Wis 16 Cha 20

Base Atk +11 CMB +14 (+18 Grapple) CMD 32

Feats: Ability Focus (howl), Critical focus, flyby attack, improved critical (bite, claws), improved initiative

Howl: 3/day as a standard action. Range 1 mile. Any who hear howl must make a dc 20 will save to avoid being shaken for 1 hour. creatures in 120 feet become panicked for 1d4+4 rounds, those in 30 feet cower in fear for 1d4 rounds (mind affecting).

Here are the boss' new stats based on advice so far:

Spoiler:

Nazhena CR14/MR 5
XP
Female Wendigo Spawn Simple Witch
CE Medium Outsider (Cold, Native, Evil, Chaotic)
Init +32/+12 (Dual Initiative); Senses Blindsight 60 ft, Darkvision 60 ft, low light vision; Perception +19
Defense
AC 29; Touch 18; Flat-Footed 29; (+8 Dex, +11 Natural) 20% concealment miss chance (blur), Resist Fire 30 (+4 on Reflex saves to half damage)
HP 248 (11d10+138) Regeneration 10 (fire)
Fort +11; Ref +17; Will + 12
Defensive Abilities ; DR 10/Epic and Cold Iron; Immune Cold and Fear; Resist ; SR 26
Vulnerable to Fire (x 1.5)
Offense
Speed 120 ft fly (Perfect)
Space 5ft; Reach 5ft
Melee Bite +17 (2d6+6/19-20 plus 3d6 cold and grab), 2 claws +14 (1d8+6/19-20 plus 3d6 cold)

Special Attacks Mythic Power (7/day; surge +1d8 – 2 already spent on Detect Scrying and Resist Energy), Extra Mythic Power (factored in), Mythic Spellcasting, Mythic Spellpower 2/day (one spent on resist energy), Abundant Casting, Rend (2 claws, 1d8+9/19-20 plus 2d6 cold)
Spell-Like Abilities (CL )

Spells Known/Prepared (CL )
5th (/day, spontanious only)— DC 23 Cone of Cold M (2), Dominate Person M
4th (/day, spontanious only)— DC 22 Solid Fog M, Scrying, Detect ScryingM *
3rd (/day, spontanious only)— DC 21 Bestow Curse , Ice Ball M (3) (as fireball)
2nd (/day, spontanious only)— DC 20 Blur *, Resist Energy (Fire)M*, Blindness/Deafness (2)

Statistics
Str 22, Dex 27, Con 27, Int 26, Wis 20, Cha 20
Base Atk +11; CMB +16 (+20 grapple); CMD 34
Feats Ability Focus (Howl), Critical Focus, Flyby Attack, Improved Critical (bite, claws), Improved Initiative
Skills ;
Languages
SQ

Dream Haunting (Su) When a wendigo uses its nightmare spell-like ability, the victim is also exposed to wendigo psychosis.
Howl (Ex) Three times per day as a standard action, a wendigo can emit a forlorn howl that can be heard up to a mile away. Any who hear the howl must make a DC 22 Will save to avoid becoming shaken for an hour. Creatures within 120 feet become panicked for 1d4+4 rounds, and those within 30 feet cower with fear for 1d4 rounds. This is a mind-affecting fear effect. The save DC is Charisma-based.

Wendigo Psychosis (Su) Curse—Nightmare or wind walk; save Will DC 20; onset 1 minute; frequency 1/day; effect 1d4 Wis drain (minimum Wis 1); cure 3 consecutive saves. When a victim's Wisdom reaches 1, he seeks an individual of his race to kill and devour. After completing this act, the afflicted individual takes off at a run, and in 1d4 rounds sprints up into the sky at such a speed that his feet burn away into jagged stumps. The transformation into a wendigo takes 2d6 minutes as the victim wind walks across the sky. Once the transformation is complete, the victim is effectively dead, replaced by a new wendigo. True resurrection, miracle, or wish can restore such a victim to life, yet doing so does not harm the new wendigo. The save is Charisma-based.

Wind Walk (Sp) If a wendigo pins a grappled foe, it can attempt to wind walk with the target by using its spell-like ability—it automatically succeeds on all concentration checks made to use wind walk. If the victim fails to resist the spell, the wendigo hurtles into the sky with him. Each round, a victim can make a new DC 20 Will save to turn solid again, but at this point he falls if he cannot fly. Eventually, the wendigo strands the victim in some rural area, usually miles from where it began. A creature that wind walks with a wendigo is exposed to wendigo psychosis. The save DC is Charisma-based.


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I am introducing a new "boss" enemy to my players in the next few sessions of a mythic game set in the Lands of the Linnorm Kings. The party has just reached level 9, and their 2nd mythic tier, but I expect they will reach level 10 before facing the following encounter.

The party makeup is as follows:
a shifter barbarian/ranger Champion
a human ranger Guardian
an elf evoker Archmage
an elf (reincarnated human)monk/ninja Trickster
a human druid Hierophant

The party will soon be headed into invaded territory, now occupied by a force of lesser "wendigo spawn" (a dialed down, or "younger" version of a true wendigo) and a winter witch from Irrisen who, through contact with a powerful artifact, has not only suffered a transformation into a wendigo, but also unlocked mythic power...

Her stats are below.

In particular, I am looking for a critique of whether there are any significant design holes - anything that makes her either game-breakingly difficult or easy for this party makeup (they do tend to be able to easily handle encounters considered "challenging", but I also want to gauge whether I'm throwing them into a TPK)

Spoiler:

Nazhena CR14/MR 5
XP
Female Wendigo Spawn Simple Witch
CE Medium Outsider (Cold, Native, Evil, Chaotic)
Init +32/+12 (Dual Initiative); Senses Blindsight 60 ft, Darkvision 60 ft, low light vision; Perception +17
Defense
AC 29; Touch 18; Flat-Footed 29; (+8 Dex, +11 Natural) 20% concealment miss chance (blur), Resist Fire 30 (+4 on Reflex saves to half damage)
HP 226 (11d10+116) Regeneration 10 (fire)
Fort +9; Ref +15; Will + 10
Defensive Abilities ; DR 10/Epic and Cold Iron; Immune Cold and Fear; Resist ; SR 26
Vulnerable to Fire (x 1.5)
Offense
Speed 120 ft fly (Perfect)
Space 5ft; Reach 5ft
Melee Bite +14 (2d6+3/19-20 plus 2d6 cold and grab), 2 claws +14 (1d8+3/19-20 plus 2d6 cold)

Special Attacks Mythic Power (7/day; surge +1d8 – 2 already spent on Detect Scrying and Resist Energy), Mythic Spellcasting, Mythic Spellpower 2/day (one spent on resist energy), Abundant Casting
Spell-Like Abilities (CL )

Spells Known/Prepared (CL )
5th — DC 25 Cone of Cold M (2), Dominate Person M
4th — DC 24 Solid Fog M, Scrying, Detect ScryingM *
3rd — DC 23 Bestow Curse , Ice Ball M (3) (as fireball)
2nd — DC 22 Blur *, Resist Energy (Fire)M*, Blindness/Deafness (2)

Statistics
Str 17, Dex 27, Con 23, Int 30, Wis 16, Cha 20
Base Atk +11; CMB +14 (+18 grapple); CMD 32
Feats Ability Focus (Howl), Critical Focus, Flyby Attack, Improved Critical (bite, claws), Improved Initiative
Skills ;
Languages
SQ

Dream Haunting (Su) When a wendigo uses its nightmare spell-like ability, the victim is also exposed to wendigo psychosis.
Howl (Ex) Three times per day as a standard action, a wendigo can emit a forlorn howl that can be heard up to a mile away. Any who hear the howl must make a DC 22 Will save to avoid becoming shaken for an hour. Creatures within 120 feet become panicked for 1d4+4 rounds, and those within 30 feet cower with fear for 1d4 rounds. This is a mind-affecting fear effect. The save DC is Charisma-based.

Wendigo Psychosis (Su) Curse—Nightmare or wind walk; save Will DC 20; onset 1 minute; frequency 1/day; effect 1d4 Wis drain (minimum Wis 1); cure 3 consecutive saves. When a victim's Wisdom reaches 1, he seeks an individual of his race to kill and devour. After completing this act, the afflicted individual takes off at a run, and in 1d4 rounds sprints up into the sky at such a speed that his feet burn away into jagged stumps. The transformation into a wendigo takes 2d6 minutes as the victim wind walks across the sky. Once the transformation is complete, the victim is effectively dead, replaced by a new wendigo. True resurrection, miracle, or wish can restore such a victim to life, yet doing so does not harm the new wendigo. The save is Charisma-based.

Wind Walk (Sp) If a wendigo pins a grappled foe, it can attempt to wind walk with the target by using its spell-like ability—it automatically succeeds on all concentration checks made to use wind walk. If the victim fails to resist the spell, the wendigo hurtles into the sky with him. Each round, a victim can make a new DC 20 Will save to turn solid again, but at this point he falls if he cannot fly. Eventually, the wendigo strands the victim in some rural area, usually miles from where it began. A creature that wind walks with a wendigo is exposed to wendigo psychosis. The save DC is Charisma-based.

Any advice or warnings will be greatly appreciated.


Another thought on one of the tests:

Entering into the next room of the temple, the party receives instructions from a celestial being sworn to Erastil's service that they must enter an "astral state" that will project their consciousness into an illusory scenario:

Within, they encounter a village preparing for a hard winter season. However, the villagers have spotted a great beast wandering the forest.

Killing the monster and bringing back its carcass would provide the village more than enough food for the season, and so the villagers urge the party to hunt the creature for them.

The next section could involve some skill checks using the rangers' tracking skills, and possibly use the chase rules as the party closes in on the beast before they finally fight the creature. As the party are close to finishing it however, the assumed animal cries out for mercy, saying that she has cubs/foals/children that she must provide for. They will surely die if she isn't there to provide for them!

The reality is that there is no right or wrong answer to this dilemma.

When the party emerges from the scenario, they are questioned one way or another by the celestial, who challenges them to explain why they did what they did, whether they chose to let the animal go free and potentially let the village starve, or whether they slaughtered the creature to insure the village's survival.

The real test here is for the party to acknowledge the difficulty of deciding on this difficult dilemma: Providing for your family and community means striking a delicate balance with how you interact with the resources around you, as well as the needs of others who may not belong to your community.

Thoughts?


The idea is not really to test a potential entrant's belief in Erastil himself, but rather their dedication to his ideals.

Meanwhile, Detect the Faithful can still fail to detect spies or heretics, depending on the beliefs of that individual.

Therefore the only full proof way to determine an individual's "piety" in this case is to force them to effectively put their money where their mouth is through their actions.

While I get your point that tests like this aren't the norm in Golarion for a number of valid reasons, I am asserting some "creative interpretation" for the sake of foreshadowing potential developments later in the campaign, give the players some opportunities to role-play, draw on some of their characters' backstories, and allow them to learn more about Erastil (who I plan to feature as a prominent figure in the ongoing story)

So I guess what I'm saying is... Valid points. It's just that I'm going for something that perhaps deviates from "Golarion as written".


I am preparing a set of upcoming encounters for my players to take place in an entrance to an ancient, hidden temple of Erastil beneath a fortress.

This temple houses wards and spells designed primarily to keep something very bad from escaping, but remains accessible to those who adhere to the faith and customs of Erastil.

That's the idea in any case.

To that end, I want to build a set of "trials", taking inspiration from "The Last Crusade's" set of challenges. The trouble I am having is coming up with a set of magical and mundane obstacles that test potential entrants' ability and willingness to follow "Erastil's Way"

Erastil is a Lawful Good deity of hunting, community, agriculture, and tradition. His faith, in general terms, espouses:
- Loyalty to friends, family, and the wider community
- Serving the needs of the many over the few
- Respecting the traditions, teachings, advice, and instructions of elders
- Embracing the responsibility and sanctity of family, marriage, and parent-hood

I already have an idea for one of the challenges, in which the characters are faced with safely crossing a trap-ridden room. The eldest of the characters, however, receives a vision of a stag, safely traversing the room while following a specific path. The challenge here is for the elder to take responsibility, and for the younger party members to place trust in their elder.

However, I am having trouble coming up with more challenges that align with a "test of the faithful" for Erastil's followers.

So now I turn to you, wise ones. How else may the Elk-Father test his flock?


Has anyone played through this adventure? I'm very interested in running it for my group, but I also wonder if it needs any adjustment for the final battle.


YARP


I'm also inclined to vote yes regarding the scorpion whip


Baleon will direct his swing to the maggot directly to his right - though based on his roll, he probably isn't hitting much this turn :P


Totally fine, Asmodina - actually appreciate a little tongue in cheek to offset the AP's darker moments


Let's see what we get!

3d6 ⇒ (1, 6, 6) = 13 12+6=18
3d6 ⇒ (2, 6, 4) = 12 10+6=16
3d6 ⇒ (1, 4, 6) = 11 10+6=16
3d6 ⇒ (2, 3, 3) = 8 6+6=12
3d6 ⇒ (3, 1, 1) = 5 7+6=13
3d6 ⇒ (1, 2, 6) = 9 8+6=14

1 Re-rolls:
1d6 ⇒ 4
1d6 ⇒ 1
1d6 ⇒ 4
1d6 ⇒ 2
1d6 ⇒ 1


A question about the Mythic javelins: The adventure describes these as

"javelins of lightning with an additional thundering property, and when the thunder effect happens on a critical hit they are always consumed in
use."

Ordinary Javelins of Lightning are always consumed after their attack, but the above seems to imply that the mythic javelins in this adventure are only consumed on a critical hit, and could be re-used until a character scores a crit with one of these javelins.

Is this the correct reading? Or have I mis-interpreted?

Edit: Also, an excellent, challenging module based on an old - school premise and Norse flavor.

I'm really looking forward to running this.


Evelyn Jones wrote:

I feel like using the old "and then a Runelord was the villain!" standby for a Land of the Linnorm Kings AP is a bit of a copout. If you're playing there, the most likely candidates for characters would be people native to the region or merchants/travelers from specific locations; Minkai and Osirion specifically, considering the trade routes. So, at least in my opinion, it would make more sense for a campaign set there to utilize the unique aspects of the Linnorm Kingdoms to create an interesting story.

There doesn't need to be a "great cosmic evil" threatening the place; enough high-level savages and cannibals from the frozen islands, or fey invaders from Irrisen, can be just as much of a threat as an ancient wizard or shoggoth from beyond, if not moreso because they can withstand the natural harshness of the land. In addition, the location practically begs the players to be open-ended in their individual goals while aiming for a single obvious target: "Kill Fahfnir, Drag the Corpse, Become THE Linnorm Kings, Conquer All!" The feel of the location lends itself more to Conan, to the Grey Mouser, to Siegfried and Merlin and Moses and other sorts of fantastically-powerful individuals who can come in, kick ass, crush their enemies, see them driven before them, and hear the lamentations of their women.

THAT feels like a more interesting AP than "Another Runelord, Part 3" or "Cthulhu Lands On Golarion".

Well said, EJ.

It is interesting that you bring up Conan and Grey Mouser, since they are characters who experience "episodic" adventures rather than "campaign arc" adventures - and it brings me to a question that I've been considering for this AP idea: Does it need an over-arching plot-thread (such as a BEBG) to "unify" everything that goes on? - Or would it be better to be flexible and allow the party to interact with the situation of the civil war, and the various factions that have risen as a result?

In the latter case, I see the players (partially) determining which "mini-arc" they embark on next. Otherwise, they determine their own goals in the region, and how they react to the circumstances of the civil war.


What I had been thinking of with regards to BEBG was more or less a

Spoiler:
wendigo god - or "wendigo all-father".
Only a select few know about him because
Spoiler:
Erastil
locked him away before any real civilization had developed - but the invasion of Baba Yaga and the ongoing eternal winter of Irrisen started to degrade the wards locking the guy away...

With regards to Kalindlara's NPC suggestion, I had thought that he had discovered the wards imprisoning BEBG, and had devised a way to drain his power, or otherwise make use of him, setting up an animosity between the two that the party could discover and potentially exploit.


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Spoiler:
Xanderghul. I know :)

Plus the ruin of Xin-Edasseril in the Ironbound Archipelago.

As for the "cosmic evil" - I see your point. I'll need to consider that...


"Sveinn Bloodeagle is dead.

The remaining Linnorm Kings: White Estrid, Ingrimundr The Unruly, and Opir Eight-fingers, all vie for greater power - and the jewel that is Kalsgard - with Freyr Darkwine caught in the middle.

After Sveinn's funeral, Ingrimundr and Opir ally, staging a coup that calls on all "true - hearted ulfen" to join their cause. In the confusion, Estrid's and Freyr's retinues die to the usurpers' axes. Estrid vanishes - some say escaped to regroup and fight, others that she is dead, still others believe she is shackled in the dungeons beneath Kalsgard, alongside Freyr Darkwine.

Kalsgard stands divided. Opir and Ingrimundr pressing their iron boots upon the many foreign dignitaries, travellers and merchants that call the city home. Even among the jarls and thanes that have joined the usurpers' cause, there is dissent and envy - with each lord vying for influence in the new order.

Disenfranchised jarls in Halgrim have likewise raised their axes for Ingrimundr, quashing the people of the Ironbound Islands, and chasing the Linnorm, Boiltongue, into the mountainous wilds of the Island. To maintain control, they have grudgingly allied with the nearby giant tribes, and now maintain an armada that prevents entry from or exit through the southern seas.

Among the smaller settlements, rebellion flares to life like forest fire roaring against a winter blizzard. Time and the gods will decide if they last against the forces of the usurpers.

To the East, The Hagreach reels. The Blackravens maintain control, but the folk living along the border with Irrisen are starting to panic in the absence of their stoic leader, as the nation of winter pours forth emboldened hordes of monsters, and watches the ensuing chaos with cold, calculating eyes.

Amidst this turmoil, a long dormant, cosmic evil stirs in its prison, as it sets forth a plan to both reclaim its freedom, and visit bloody vengeance upon the god who imprisoned it..."

Thoughts?


Blackvial wrote:
I do believe that you are talking about the High King, there is a way to become said king.

Assuming a civil war broke out among the Linnorm Kings, killing Fafneihr would be the best way to bring it to an end.

I guess the question then becomes "would the Linnorm Kings war with each other over the Thanelands?"

There's certainly a lot of enmity between the other three Linnorm Kings:

White Estrid is forward thinking, yes, but also extremely ambitious.

Ingrimundr the Unruly wants to return the Linnorm Kingdoms to "ye good ol' days of plunder and loot everything that's weaker than us!" - A tradition that Estrid incidentally challenges by inviting foreign ships to trade in Halgrim.

Opir Eightfingers wants to prove himself and cement his legitimacy as a king - everyone doubts he actually killed a linnorm - and making a claim on The Thanelands (whom everyone in Southmoor is jealous of) would secure him the adoration of his people.

The only absolute opponent to a civil war would be Freyr Darkwine, who is intent on protecting the Linnorm Kingdoms from the threat of Irrisen. He is also noted as being the only significant leader in the Linnorm Kingdoms with a "good" alignment.

There's also a lot of violence inherent to the lower echelons of the region: Blood feuds, weregild and effigies are common practices: As a rule, the Ulfen people seem to stand by the rule of "might makes right" with an emphasis on "kick in their teeth if they mess with you, your property, your lord, or your friends and family.


This is a thought that has been bugging me, and I haven't been able to find a clear answer: Who takes power in a Linnorm Kingdom when a Linnorm King dies? There has been a case of hereditary power (resulting in the kingdoms being unprepared for the invasion of Baba Yaga), which the Linnorm Kingdoms now reject, so how does a region maintain stability after a ruler dies?

Does it maintain stability at all? Or does it fall to infighting amongst minor jarls and huskarls? Or does a neighbouring Linnorm King step in and add the vacated lands to their domain?

There are two possibilities I have come up with:

1) A lesser Jarl or lord acts as a "place-holder" until a new Linnorm King claims power (which seems to be what Freyr Darkwine is doing in Hagreach)

2) A preexisting Linnorm King takes control, either through conquest, or the will of the deceased ruler.

Granted, The Linnorm Kingdoms are a chaotic, barbaric region, so its entirely possible there is no one tradition that defines the transition of power. But this leads me to beg a larger question:

What would happen if King Sveinn Blood-eagle suddenly died of a heart-attack?

Kalsgard is a metropolis that connects Northern Avistan to Tian Xia, and is at least open to the possibility of trade rather than war with the southern lands, just as The Ironbound Islands are.

So who would take over Kalsgard in Sveinn's absence? And what are the consequences?

Would Sveinn's will name a successor among one of the still living Linnorm Kings? Would power fall to Sveinn's advisors and huskarls? Or would The Linnorm Kingdoms simply slide into a bloody civil war, with the victor vying for Kalsgard's enviable seat of power and influence?


I'd say look to Dark Horse Comics interpretation of Conan in general for the Golarion setting. Though "Volume I: The Frost Giant's Daughter" definitely stands out as an arc that would fit into the linnorm kingdoms.

Game of Thrones' chapters focusing on Jon and Sam and The Night's Watch are, I believe, a significant inspiration behind The Blackravens of Hagreach.

The Vikings (with Kirk Douglas) also features an entertaining if sometimes campy viking tale.

As for classes that "don't belong". Halgrim is considered highly cosmopolitan, and White Estrid is very open to embracing traditions and travellers from the south. Likewise, Freyr Darkwine needs every able soldier or spell caster he can get his hands on.


Hello all,

I have recently moved to Christchurch, and I am currently seeking players interested in playing Pathfinder.

Please let me know if you are interested in playing pathfinder via the board or private message.