What does your Golarion setting look like / what changes have you made to the setting?


Pathfinder Second Edition General Discussion

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Eh, we've got Rarity for a reason in 2e, and it puts Dwarves and Gnomes on par with Humans for the Inner Sea. Humans might be the most populous of the bunch, but I quite like that none of the CRB bunch are raising eyebrows most places - and that some regions move other Ancestries down to Common the same way!


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I feel like both ways are good for different things. On the one hand, you can create a really interesting, tightly themed setting where to humans, elves are those strange tall people who live in the giant forest over there, orcs are the mighty warriors of the badlands (and to elves, humans are the strange stocky people who cluster on the fields where they make their own food, and to orcs humans are the little folk who are almost as good beast wranglers as themselves)

On the other hand, it would feel rather strange if these people have been living on the same planet already for millennia but still have barely integrated into each other's societies. I feel like once a place gets large enough, it should be a big enough a deal that any people who participate in this whole civilization thing can plausibly be found there, often in proportionate numbers.

And of course, a city the size of Absalom can be truly cosmopolitan, while maybe a town in a nation where simply due to geographical distribution there is a different proportion of species present. We can have it both ways, even in one setting, if we choose.


Sibelius Eos Owm wrote:

I feel like both ways are good for different things. On the one hand, you can create a really interesting, tightly themed setting where to humans, elves are those strange tall people who live in the giant forest over there, orcs are the mighty warriors of the badlands (and to elves, humans are the strange stocky people who cluster on the fields where they make their own food, and to orcs humans are the little folk who are almost as good beast wranglers as themselves)

On the other hand, it would feel rather strange if these people have been living on the same planet already for millennia but still have barely integrated into each other's societies. I feel like once a place gets large enough, it should be a big enough a deal that any people who participate in this whole civilization thing can plausibly be found there, often in proportionate numbers.

And of course, a city the size of Absalom can be truly cosmopolitan, while maybe a town in a nation where simply due to geographical distribution there is a different proportion of species present. We can have it both ways, even in one setting, if we choose.

Oh sure I have no problem with doing things as they would logically turn out. Just too many times the default to human is just because of obvious internal bias.


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Lucas Yew wrote:

1) Any True Elixir of Life drastically slows down your aging speed to a practical zero, for about a month.

2) Monks who unlocked the Timeless Body ability DO potentially live forever unaged (until they "ascend to a higher existence" or do something similar).
3) Your soul doesn't get degraded to building blocks for the Outer Planes if you want so, and no harmful repercussions at all.

Those are what I'd immediately change. Others, I might think of in some other free time...

Fwiw this really exhibits the shortcomings of the system (that existed in 1e and SF as well) in failing to reconcile story with mechanics. Or even make a solid benchmark system for that kind of thing.


never understand this obsesion with living forever

isn't thousand year old high level creature die by hundred in every level 20 ap

immortality doesn't last long anyway


Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
Oceanshieldwolf wrote:
Yep, Osirion bugs me for this exact reason. What is doubly weird is that Kobold Press’ Midgard Campaign Setting does exactly the same thing with their nation of Nuria-Natal, replete with Egyptian gods et al. I just don’t understand why this region is so compelling to be lifted almost whole cloth..twice.
THREE times if you count Mullhorand from Forgotten Realms!

Like I said, twice.

There is a reaso….umm, hundreds of reasons it is called the Forgotten Realms.


FormerFiend wrote:
Some of y'all didn't have an ancient egypt phase as kids & it shows.

Studied Eqypt in Ancient History all through high school. Loved poring through Desroches and Noblecourt et al back in the day. Happy to leave it as history.

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