Official Lost Omens canon conflicts and clarity thread


Lost Omens Campaign Setting General Discussion

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Kelinahat is an empyreal lord who is a patron of spies who steal information from the forces of Evil using shadow magic. She sounds awesome... and exists in all of three lines in 1e's Chronicle of the Righteous, seemingly never mentioned again since.

I'm always looking out for heroic Inquisitor patrons and Goodly deities for stealthy characters, so She of Ebon Wings is definitely a figure I'd love to see brought into 2e! Kalekot, from the Mwangi book, is a sneaky favorite of mine.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

In the Impossible Lands books, it refers to the large stew pots that the dwarves of Dongun Hold cook. It mentions some have been stewing and cooking since before the time of Nex and Geb according to their cooks. Just a few paragraphs later, it mentions that during the winter months, all fires are extinguished, and even cookfires go dark as dwarves eat only preserved or otherwise dry goods.

As written, it seems to imply these forever-cooking stews are allowed to just... sit for a season, which is understandably vile. Can we assume that these stews DO continue cooking and simply are not eaten, or is the assumption that the stews are somehow preserved or frozen in the mountain heights to be re-thawed when the fires roar back to life?


You know the alternate and more sensible interpretation is that they have been cooking and stewing in that place since before Nex & Geb. Maybe even cooking and stewing with the same pots since then (which means those are quality antique pots).

The interpretation that the liquid itself has not changed is pretty weird and has a lot of weird implications.


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Perpetual Stews are a real thing, I think the earliest reference I could find for them is 14th century Poland. The thing that keeps you safe, microbiologically speaking, is that under proper conditions these things ferment (like sauerkraut or kimchi) and the friendly bacteria that are fermenting outcompete any pathogens.

Normally the way this is done is that the pot contains what is essentially that is regularly skimmed, and then you dump in the stuff that you want in your stew (tubers, meat, whatever) to cook in the broth then ladle out the cooked things with some of the broth to have a stew.

Hypothetically, if you were to cool this down quickly enough you could safely freeze your broth and then reheat it later, but then your stew is less perpetual.

It seems to me that dumping preserved goods and dry grains to your tangy, salty broth would make a good winter meal.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
PossibleCabbage wrote:

Perpetual Stews are a real thing, I think the earliest reference I could find for them is 14th century Poland. The thing that keeps you safe, microbiologically speaking, is that under proper conditions these things ferment (like sauerkraut or kimchi) and the friendly bacteria that are fermenting outcompete any pathogens.

Normally the way this is done is that the pot contains what is essentially that is regularly skimmed, and then you dump in the stuff that you want in your stew (tubers, meat, whatever) to cook in the broth then ladle out the cooked things with some of the broth to have a stew.

Hypothetically, if you were to cool this down quickly enough you could safely freeze your broth and then reheat it later, but then your stew is less perpetual.

It seems to me that dumping preserved goods and dry grains to your tangy, salty broth would make a good winter meal.

So basically a Stew of Theseus? (Also, sourdough starters are much the same, but I had to make the reference)


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The Tian-Yae made their apparent debut in the Lost Omens Character Guide, as a Tian ethnic group of folk descended from the Shory flying city of Yjae... but all we've really seen of Yjae is it as a nightmare-wracked ruin lorded over by a trio of immortals in 1e, in a writeup that had no time for mortal inhabitants of the city (which seems like a deathtrap). The Tian-Yae themselves weren't super contextualized other than a geographic locale that makes sense (Shaguang, where Yjae flies), but I'm a little lost to their wider cultural place in the world.

Have the Tian-Yae been living in a rudderless airship-city for 5,000 years? 1e presents the idea that they're essentially inexplicable alien "sky spirits" to the Mutabi-qi tribes, but that's a little silly if they've been cohabitating for hundreds of generations.

Liberty's Edge

keftiu wrote:
1e presents the idea that they're essentially inexplicable alien "sky spirits" to the Mutabi-qi tribes, but that's a little silly if they've been cohabitating for hundreds of generations.

Wakanda.

And so many other lost civilisation tropes.


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The Raven Black wrote:
keftiu wrote:
1e presents the idea that they're essentially inexplicable alien "sky spirits" to the Mutabi-qi tribes, but that's a little silly if they've been cohabitating for hundreds of generations.

Wakanda.

And so many other lost civilisation tropes.

If Wakanda’s infrastructure had been irreparably damaged and the city filled with Mythic threats when the Pyramids were being built (that’s how long ago Yjae smashed into the mountains), then I would absolutely expect Wakandans to have left and integrated with their surroundings. Why stay?

Likewise, Wakanda is hidden - Yjae is not.


keftiu wrote:
The Raven Black wrote:
keftiu wrote:
1e presents the idea that they're essentially inexplicable alien "sky spirits" to the Mutabi-qi tribes, but that's a little silly if they've been cohabitating for hundreds of generations.

Wakanda.

And so many other lost civilisation tropes.

If Wakanda’s infrastructure had been irreparably damaged and the city filled with Mythic threats when the Pyramids were being built (that’s how long ago Yjae smashed into the mountains), then I would absolutely expect Wakandans to have left and integrated with their surroundings. Why stay?

Likewise, Wakanda is hidden - Yjae is not.

Was hidden, at best now its just "hard to find".


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When the Shory city of Opong'we came crashing down its people bailed out as best they could, scattering across the northern Mwangi Expanse and southern Thuvia in flying platforms used as lifeboats. Perhaps Yjae did the same, some assimilating into the Mutabi-qi and the legend of Yjae turned into myth through millennia of retelling, while others remained on Yjae? Depending on how big a Shory flying city is (and they seem pretty big, Kho serving as a self-contained nation powerful enough to hold the forces of Ancient Osirion back like it was a toddler with a hand on the forehead) you could have entire districts overrun while still leaving plenty of room for people to keep living.


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Morhek wrote:
When the Shory city of Opong'we came crashing down its people bailed out as best they could, scattering across the northern Mwangi Expanse and southern Thuvia in flying platforms used as lifeboats. Perhaps the Yjae did the same, and have assimilated into the Mutabi-qi and becoming the Tian-Yae, the legend of Yjae turned into myth through millennia of retelling, while others remained on Yjae? Depending on how big a Shory flying city is (and they seem pretty big, Kho serving as a self-contained nation powerful enough to hold the forces of Ancient Osirion back like it was a toddler with a hand on the forehead) you could have entire districts overrun while still leaving plenty of room for people to keep living.

My personal hope is that a large part of the reason the Mutabi-qi are considered a distinct people from the Hongali Tian-La is because of Tian-Yae influence and admixture. 1e painted the Mutabi-qi as wholly separate and ignorant of Yjae; I'd like to see them know a little better than that, and just broadly be a bit more interesting, which inherited Shory secrets would certainly do.

I'd love what you propose! It just doesn't seem to be the old canon, at the very least - but those gaps 1e leaves are fertile ground for exactly stuff like this.


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I apologize for the double post, but I've hit a niche canon conflict that's dear to my heart:

1e's Numeria book has the witchwyrd Cythrul as a resident of Hajoth Hakados, a gifted alchemist and technologist, and a friend of that city's ruler, Lady Altouna. The pair run a nameless resistance network in opposition to the Technic League, their agents working to save their fellow aliens for dark fates at the hands of the vicious scientists.

2e's Age of Ashes #5 has an article in the back on Witchwyrds, and Cythrul gets a namedrop... as someone who "gladly consorts with the Technic League," and needs "new friends" with their fall from power. Nothing is said of Altouna, or co-running a secret anti-Technic League organization of troubleshooters with her.

I'm curious how the author of the latter found Cythrul's name, but seemingly wrote her with completely reversed motivations from what came before. As Lady Altouna is a personal favorite little tidbit, seeing Cythrul potentially get mishandled bums me out, and I'd hate for the mismatch to take precedent if and when we return to Numeria.

Liberty's Edge

keftiu wrote:

I apologize for the double post, but I've hit a niche canon conflict that's dear to my heart:

1e's Numeria book has the witchwyrd Cythrul as a resident of Hajoth Hakados, a gifted alchemist and technologist, and a friend of that city's ruler, Lady Altouna. The pair run a nameless resistance network in opposition to the Technic League, their agents working to save their fellow aliens for dark fates at the hands of the vicious scientists.

2e's Age of Ashes #5 has an article in the back on Witchwyrds, and Cythrul gets a namedrop... as someone who "gladly consorts with the Technic League," and needs "new friends" with their fall from power. Nothing is said of Altouna, or co-running a secret anti-Technic League organization of troubleshooters with her.

I'm curious how the author of the latter found Cythrul's name, but seemingly wrote her with completely reversed motivations from what came before. As Lady Altouna is a personal favorite little tidbit, seeing Cythrul potentially get mishandled bums me out, and I'd hate for the mismatch to take precedent if and when we return to Numeria.

Brain transfer ?


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
PossibleCabbage wrote:
Perpetual Stews are a real thing...

This was what I was thinking. Perpetual Stews that stop every winter seem... not perpetual lol. I would have said magic preservation but Dongun Hold is a no-magic zone, too, so it has to be done in a mundane fashion.


Quick Question from PPC Chronicle of Legends expanding on Distant Realms (Lost Omens) Magic tricks that cropped up in PF1 Rules thread.
Do the listed abilities of the feat occur during a casting of the spell? And if so the casting may need to be (or optionally) extended and concentration checks come into it...


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Azothath wrote:

Quick Question from PPC Chronicle of Legends expanding on Distant Realms (Lost Omens) Magic tricks that cropped up in PF1 Rules thread.

Do the listed abilities of the feat occur during a casting of the spell? And if so the casting may need to be (or optionally) extended and concentration checks come into it...

Luis makes it pretty clear that thread is about lore issues to be tackled by the current line of 2e setting books, not a mechanical snarl from a 1e release that's years-old now. I might suggest making a thread in one of the 1e/rules-focused subforums.


keftiu wrote:
Azothath wrote:

Quick Question from PPC Chronicle of Legends expanding on Distant Realms (Lost Omens) Magic tricks that cropped up in PF1 Rules thread.

Do the listed abilities of the feat occur during a casting of the spell? And if so the casting may need to be (or optionally) extended and concentration checks come into it...
Luis makes it pretty clear that thread is about lore issues to be tackled by the current line of 2e setting books, ...

Thanks - I didn't see that notice of PF2 only topics in the title or opening thread as he chatted about it going on for 5 years now. Another lost omen I suppose.


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Azothath wrote:
keftiu wrote:
Azothath wrote:

Quick Question from PPC Chronicle of Legends expanding on Distant Realms (Lost Omens) Magic tricks that cropped up in PF1 Rules thread.

Do the listed abilities of the feat occur during a casting of the spell? And if so the casting may need to be (or optionally) extended and concentration checks come into it...
Luis makes it pretty clear that thread is about lore issues to be tackled by the current line of 2e setting books, ...
Thanks - I didn't see that notice of PF2 only topics in the title or opening thread as he chatted about it going on for 5 years now. Another lost omen I suppose.

I think the key word overlooked here is actually lore. Even so, the 1e subforum should find the most interested parties, if not necessarily an official ruling.


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While I'm here, another question has come to my attention regarding the mechanisms of the afterlife. This may also end up in the 'unanswerable due to being intentionally left vague' bin, but as I've been looking at Tyrant's Grasp I've been wondering a little about the post-mortem process for the soul.

In particular, I'm wondering about the unique situation in Book 1 (very early spoilers under the cut):

The Dead Roads:
The town of Roslar's Coffer arrives in the Boneyard directly, without the residents being aware--to the point where most of them cannot even see the Boneyard around them for what it is. Meanwhile, it seems that the trip down (up?) the River of Souls is normally a fairly lengthy affair, at in the metaphysical relativity the planes exist in.

Did the townsfolk travel the River of Souls, unaware and all at once? Or perhaps did they simply not wake up until they arrived? The AP makes it sound like the souls appeared pretty much immediately in the Boneyard, but is this a unique situation or do the psychopomps often circumvent the River of Souls in a mass death event?

---

More generally, how do souls usually arrive in the Boneyard? Do they typically arrive along the edge or just drop down directly into the Spirelands? Among the legs of the journey, I am particularly fond of one feature on the Astral Plane, the Soulmouth, which offers a place for reluctant souls to receive counselling from a catarina psychopomp and come to terms with their death. Do most souls arrive having already come to terms with their death, only arriving once they are ready, or do the psychopomps often have to watch out for unstable souls cutting loose back to become ghosts?

Of course, I readily expect that the process of travelling to the afterlife is highly individual and filled with variation from one soul to the next, but it seems like there is not necessarily conflicting implications about how quickly a soul (or souls) are likely to arrive in the Boneyard following death, but somewhat it's somewhat unclear whether a same-day transit is common for souls who are ready, or if most should be assumed to drift around the Ethereal plane for a few days before starting their journey.

---

Oh! And one more thing: It's generally stated and understood that Pharamsa's judgement is a big deal with regards to the afterlife, however sources (namely Planar Adventures) suggest that the majority of souls are quickly and simply judged in the many lesser courts. Is it just a common myth-conception that Pharasma personally judges every soul when in fact most souls can pass through Pharasma's Court without ever seeing her, or does she still personally see every soul off before they go, to approve the judgement so to speak, whether she personally judged them or not?


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I... actually already have another question.

When a tomb or graveyard is consecrated by a priest of Pharasma, a duplicate of it appears in the Boneyard. This is said to be the source of much of the Boneyard's architecture. The thing is... this apparently includes the bodies entombed? What do the souls of the dead need to have a duplicate of their corpse hanging around for? What happens when their material plane body gets moved as typically happens irl when the body is finished skeletonizing and go to an ossuary?

The Boneyard version is a copy and said to be a copy as of the time of consecration so, do they have to reconsecrate it each new burial? Does doing this provide any material or spiritual benefit to the souls (who had to take the long way around to the afterlife via the River) or was sending duplicate corpses to the afterlife an oversight?


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I ran Tyrant's Grasp and I actually wondered this too. I sort of assumed Pharasma is metaphysically aware of every judgement and makes sure they follow her will; I also assumed the Rosslar's issue to be specific and unique due to HOW they arrived there, and the situation being kind of a Soul Shock Quarantine zone.


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Two obscure ones about the nation of Nex.

First: The 1e Spymaster’s Handbook very briefly mentions a group called the Invisible Blades as part of a character background, with them mentioned as potentially being behind a “devastating magical accident” in Quantium. This group isn’t mentioned again, in that book or any other that I’ve seen from either edition, from the searching I’ve been able to do. Who are they? What do they do?

Second: The 2e Impossible Lands book suggests that Nex has diplomatic contacts with other planets, but never elaborates further. What planets are these, and how connected are they? There’s a world of difference between hosting a few Witchwyrd merchants and having a permanent Lashunta embassy.

Paizo Employee Design Manager

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keftiu wrote:

[...] a group called the Invisible Blades as part of a character background, with them mentioned as potentially being behind a “devastating magical accident” in Quantium. This group isn’t mentioned again, in that book or any other that I’ve seen from either edition, from the searching I’ve been able to do. Who are they? What do they do?

Those are the kind of questions the last person to talk about the Invisible Blades was asking right before they disappeared.


Michael Sayre wrote:
keftiu wrote:

[...] a group called the Invisible Blades as part of a character background, with them mentioned as potentially being behind a “devastating magical accident” in Quantium. This group isn’t mentioned again, in that book or any other that I’ve seen from either edition, from the searching I’ve been able to do. Who are they? What do they do?

Those are the kind of questions the last person to talk about the Invisible Blades was asking right before they disappeared.

Ah, so now they're what I like to call very invisible!


Is Seshu Neutral Good or Neutral? In Bounty #1: The Whitefang Wyrm, she's listed as "N female human elder", but in Monsters of Myth, she's listed as "NG female human shaman". It's clearly the same character, as MoM mentions that Seshu is the elder of Aaminut, which is what the questgiver of the same name in B1 is.

AP spoilers:
She's a major character in Gatewalkers, so we'll know soon enough, but I'm curious.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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She's neutral good. In cases like this, it's almost always the case that the more recently published information OR the information in the more prominent product represents the correct information.

As for her role in Gatewalkers...

Spoiler:
...she DOES have a role but it's not one in which we need her stat block to show up, so her alignment doesn't come into play, so you as the GM can go with whichever version you prefer. (My preference remains neutral good, though.)


James Jacobs wrote:

She's neutral good. In cases like this, it's almost always the case that the more recently published information OR the information in the more prominent product represents the correct information.

As for her role in Gatewalkers...
** spoiler omitted **

Got it. Wasn't expecting an official reply. Thank you, James Jacobs!


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Virellius wrote:

In the Impossible Lands books, it refers to the large stew pots that the dwarves of Dongun Hold cook. It mentions some have been stewing and cooking since before the time of Nex and Geb according to their cooks. Just a few paragraphs later, it mentions that during the winter months, all fires are extinguished, and even cookfires go dark as dwarves eat only preserved or otherwise dry goods.

As written, it seems to imply these forever-cooking stews are allowed to just... sit for a season, which is understandably vile. Can we assume that these stews DO continue cooking and simply are not eaten, or is the assumption that the stews are somehow preserved or frozen in the mountain heights to be re-thawed when the fires roar back to life?

This confused me, too.

The cooking fire tradition seems to be based on the Jewish practice of not lighting or extinguishing a fire on the sabbath. Maybe they are allowed to keep the fire burning as long as it was started before the winter?


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There's some mishmashes about Tar-Baphon's original imprisonment. Early in 1st edition it was indicated that his body was destroyed by the Shield of Aroden embedding itself in his hand, that it was still there when he reformed, and that the crusaders sealed him away because they knew he'd reform inside of Gallowspire's dungeon, which implies his Soul-Cage was known to be down there.

Later supplements have indicated that his Soul-Cage was hidden away by Urgathoa and could be anywhere in the cosmos, which--if that were the case--would kinda throw a wrench in the idea that he reformed in the dungeon.

I don't expect an answer as to what his soul-cage is, of course. Or where it is. I've chalked most of these differentials up to the kinda unreliable-narrator nature of mythic history, but the inconsistencies make my brain itch a lil bit.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

So, there's been some confusion on the OoA forum about the exact geography of the Mana Wastes and Alkenstar, specifically the Bridge of the Gods. Between the old books, Guns and Gears, Impossible Lands, and OoA, there is some seriously conflicting and confusing info on the bridge, where the bridge is, and how it is incorporated into Alkenstar.
Is there any final, official word on this? On that note, is Trietta Ricia from GnG is the canon look for her, or is it her as depicted in OoA book 3?


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TheWarriorPoet519 wrote:

There's some mishmashes about Tar-Baphon's original imprisonment. Early in 1st edition it was indicated that his body was destroyed by the Shield of Aroden embedding itself in his hand, that it was still there when he reformed, and that the crusaders sealed him away because they knew he'd reform inside of Gallowspire's dungeon, which implies his Soul-Cage was known to be down there.

Later supplements have indicated that his Soul-Cage was hidden away by Urgathoa and could be anywhere in the cosmos, which--if that were the case--would kinda throw a wrench in the idea that he reformed in the dungeon.

I don't expect an answer as to what his soul-cage is, of course. Or where it is. I've chalked most of these differentials up to the kinda unreliable-narrator nature of mythic history, but the inconsistencies make my brain itch a lil bit.

Personally, I feel like the most likely answer is that it was a soft retcon. As you said, if TB got blasted and reformed inside Gallowspire, it implies that his soul cage is down there. I don't know about everyone, but my understanding of liches is that they're expected to hide their soul cage somewhere fiendishly difficult to access, as a back-up master plan contingency. For this reason, it's considered pretty poor form if your headquarters gets surrounded and your soul cage is already right there.

In short, it seems like the discrepancy is intended to correct the logical conflict between, "Why wouldn't he have hidden his soul cage?" (now he has) and "How did he end up trapped in Gallowspire?" (he retreated there, badly weakened).

Oh yeah, plus there's one more explanation that's technically aided by this question: If he were destroyed, why is there still a shard of the shattered shield embedded in his hand? (For myself, the idea that it became such a part of him that it followed him through rejuvenation works for me, though that would have to be squared away with the climax of Tyrant's Grasp).

PS. As for the in-universe understanding, I feel like it makes sense that a lot of people don't draw a clear distinction between 'TB was defeated' and 'TB was destroyed' at the climax of the Shining Crusade.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Sibelius Eos Owm wrote:
TheWarriorPoet519 wrote:

There's some mishmashes about Tar-Baphon's original imprisonment. Early in 1st edition it was indicated that his body was destroyed by the Shield of Aroden embedding itself in his hand, that it was still there when he reformed, and that the crusaders sealed him away because they knew he'd reform inside of Gallowspire's dungeon, which implies his Soul-Cage was known to be down there.

Later supplements have indicated that his Soul-Cage was hidden away by Urgathoa and could be anywhere in the cosmos, which--if that were the case--would kinda throw a wrench in the idea that he reformed in the dungeon.

I don't expect an answer as to what his soul-cage is, of course. Or where it is. I've chalked most of these differentials up to the kinda unreliable-narrator nature of mythic history, but the inconsistencies make my brain itch a lil bit.

Personally, I feel like the most likely answer is that it was a soft retcon. As you said, if TB got blasted and reformed inside Gallowspire, it implies that his soul cage is down there. I don't know about everyone, but my understanding of liches is that they're expected to hide their soul cage somewhere fiendishly difficult to access, as a back-up master plan contingency. For this reason, it's considered pretty poor form if your headquarters gets surrounded and your soul cage is already right there.

In short, it seems like the discrepancy is intended to correct the logical conflict between, "Why wouldn't he have hidden his soul cage?" (now he has) and "How did he end up trapped in Gallowspire?" (he retreated there, badly weakened).

Oh yeah, plus there's one more explanation that's technically aided by this question: If he were destroyed, why is there still a shard of the shattered shield embedded in his hand? (For myself, the idea that it became such a part of him that it followed him through rejuvenation works for me, though that would have to be squared away with the climax of Tyrant's Grasp).

It also could be simply in-world confusion. Everyone ASSUMED he'd been destroyed but it was just a mistake.


Virellius wrote:
...

Yeah my default stance has been "history is an unreliable narrator and so all the stories differ."


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According to Pathfinder Lost Omens Impossible lands page 251,
"Quantium is a city made to eclipse all others. Imagine a city of circular plot, 15 miles in diameter and encircled by a wide "c"-shaped road."

This makes Quantium bigger than Absalom?


Sibelius Eos Owm wrote:
TheWarriorPoet519 wrote:

There's some mishmashes about Tar-Baphon's original imprisonment. Early in 1st edition it was indicated that his body was destroyed by the Shield of Aroden embedding itself in his hand, that it was still there when he reformed, and that the crusaders sealed him away because they knew he'd reform inside of Gallowspire's dungeon, which implies his Soul-Cage was known to be down there.

Later supplements have indicated that his Soul-Cage was hidden away by Urgathoa and could be anywhere in the cosmos, which--if that were the case--would kinda throw a wrench in the idea that he reformed in the dungeon.

I don't expect an answer as to what his soul-cage is, of course. Or where it is. I've chalked most of these differentials up to the kinda unreliable-narrator nature of mythic history, but the inconsistencies make my brain itch a lil bit.

Personally, I feel like the most likely answer is that it was a soft retcon. As you said, if TB got blasted and reformed inside Gallowspire, it implies that his soul cage is down there. I don't know about everyone, but my understanding of liches is that they're expected to hide their soul cage somewhere fiendishly difficult to access, as a back-up master plan contingency. For this reason, it's considered pretty poor form if your headquarters gets surrounded and your soul cage is already right there.

Well, Gallowspire could have been the most lethal dungeon ever designed, so Tar-Baphon could have felt safe keeping it there. I find that its mostly hypotheticals and adversarial GMs that put Soul-Cages in places that are actually impossible to gain access to even if it would be smart otherwise. (Lets not forget that Azlanti Lich who made his Soul-Anchor an Ioun Stone that floated around his head). Lichs are meant to be defeated, after all.

But, yeah. Most likely a retcon. I don't think The Shards of the Shield of Aroden being WMDs and that's how Tar-Baphon gets out was always the plan, but whatever the plan for Tar-Baphon was it involved the shield. (The theft of the shards was a long running plotline in the background). But, when it came time to do Tyrant's Grasp, the authors and developers were, "Yeah, this is a catastrophic development to end the edition with a bang on." A few tweaks to the story here and there and it makes sense.


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BylethEisner wrote:

According to Pathfinder Lost Omens Impossible lands page 251,

"Quantium is a city made to eclipse all others. Imagine a city of circular plot, 15 miles in diameter and encircled by a wide "c"-shaped road."

This makes Quantium bigger than Absalom?

Not in population, but in area, probably. I imagine Quantium has lots of open space and plazas and gardens and manifolds and


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BylethEisner wrote:

According to Pathfinder Lost Omens Impossible lands page 251,

"Quantium is a city made to eclipse all others. Imagine a city of circular plot, 15 miles in diameter and encircled by a wide "c"-shaped road."

This makes Quantium bigger than Absalom?

That gives it 60% of the land area of NYC.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Xenocrat wrote:
BylethEisner wrote:

According to Pathfinder Lost Omens Impossible lands page 251,

"Quantium is a city made to eclipse all others. Imagine a city of circular plot, 15 miles in diameter and encircled by a wide "c"-shaped road."

This makes Quantium bigger than Absalom?

That gives it 60% of the land area of NYC.

With less than 1% the population.


BylethEisner wrote:

According to Pathfinder Lost Omens Impossible lands page 251,

"Quantium is a city made to eclipse all others. Imagine a city of circular plot, 15 miles in diameter and encircled by a wide "c"-shaped road."

This makes Quantium bigger than Absalom?

This makes perfect sense to me, they're different measurements of big. Think of Dallas vs. NYC. Which city is "bigger"?


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I wanted to be like, "Imagine living in a city big enough that it would take most of 5 hours to walk across it" but then I remembered which reality I live in, so instead I'll say that, but add, "without trains/automobiles".

Then again, this is Quantium. For all I know they have fast, easy, and efficient magitek city transit for me to sit here and be jealous about.

(Also, to be fair, Quantium may be less than 1% the population of NYC, but that's still around 600% the population of a 'typical' medieval city. Granted it is sparse for its size, but I guess when your archwizard king decides the city is going to have 200 square miles of area, you just kind of have to wait for the population to grow into it.)


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Wrong John Silver wrote:
BylethEisner wrote:

According to Pathfinder Lost Omens Impossible lands page 251,

"Quantium is a city made to eclipse all others. Imagine a city of circular plot, 15 miles in diameter and encircled by a wide "c"-shaped road."

This makes Quantium bigger than Absalom?

Not in population, but in area, probably. I imagine Quantium has lots of open space and plazas and gardens and manifolds and

Given who runs Quantium and its long history, it wouldn't surprise me if space itself is a little stretchy and malleable throughout the city limits, and might even change over time with districts inexplicably moving as if they've always been in their new locations, sometimes disappearing entirely only to reappear years later with their people claiming they stayed in Basrakal. Really just go full Weird Wizard S$++ with it.


Yeah, I could imagine parts of Quantium looking like this.

Whether or not it's inhabited and with what, it's up to the GM.

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Thebazilly wrote:
BylethEisner wrote:

According to Pathfinder Lost Omens Impossible lands page 251,

"Quantium is a city made to eclipse all others. Imagine a city of circular plot, 15 miles in diameter and encircled by a wide "c"-shaped road."

This makes Quantium bigger than Absalom?

This makes perfect sense to me, they're different measurements of big. Think of Dallas vs. NYC. Which city is "bigger"?

The three biggest cities in the US by area are Sitka, Juneau, and Wrangell (all in sparsely populated southeast Alaska). Wrangell is 2,542 square miles and has a population of slightly more than 2k people. Big can mean a lot of things.

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