Book of the Dead as Character Study


Lost Omens Campaign Setting General Discussion

Radiant Oath

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

I really gotta say, not only is the Book of the Dead great for the options it presents players and GMs alike, I absolutely adore how much it fleshes out (pun intended) Geb's personality beyond just his rivalry with Nex!

The moments where it's clear his personal biases are showing are perhaps some of the best in the book, whether it's his insistence that undeath is a natural and ideal state of being (and rationalizing it when it clearly wasn't his intention to end up that way, given his shock at becoming a ghost rather than expecting it), or his snide contempt for anyone who might have a conscience, whether that's living undead hunters or fellow undead who don't share his viewpoints like Walkena or Ordellia Whilwren.

There's something I find compelling about villains who stubbornly insist other people are just as bad or selfish as they are as a rationalization for their own selfishness. Even if it's a common villainous trait, I'm glad this is articulated in text now, as for the longest time Geb just kind of seemed like "Tar-Baphon-lite" because the only personality traits we knew for sure he had was he hated Nex so bad he came back as a ghost just to make sure Nex was dead, and that he was quite vindictive given his actions with Arazni, the Knights of Ozem and the Field of Maidens.

I'm excited for the Blood Lords AP now, as it almost feels like the tables have flipped, with Geb as the more interesting personality than The Whispering Tyrant! Great job to the writers who brought this character to unlife!


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I quite enjoyed having his voice across the text, and was surprised to see multiple reviewers complain about it.


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I especially love the parts where he talks about ghosts, mentioning the mental pitfalls of becoming a ghost and claiming he's managed to avoid them ... and then falling into those same pitfalls in the next couple sentences.

It's also neat to read about a necromancer who is so practically-minded, rather than the pomposity of Tar-Baphon. They balance out the various necromancer tropes and the contrast is great to read.

I hope we get more books like these. Also, not at all on topic, but I'm super glad to see more of those handy dandy sidebars that explain the logic behind limitations on things like playing undead which also mention what to expect if you ignore their limitations.

Radiant Oath

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

I know it's a very reductive way of putting it, but I like the implications that Tar-Baphon's basically a "jock" necromancer while Geb's a "nerd" necromancer.

Tar-Baphon raises hordes of undead and uses necromancy to dominate all around him, but none of it ever lasts. He didn't contribute anything new to necromancy, doesn't really have any books he's authored (he mostly took his knowledge from Zutha and the Cenotaph and hasn't really pioneered anything new from it), and his servants are less following his commands than they are trailing in his wake and hoping he notices them. He's rebuilding his own fortress, sure, but he leaves the rest of the Gravelands to mostly do their own thing.

Geb, on the other hand, put a LOT of effort into building and maintaining his nation, to the point that it could function efficiently without him doing much when he was in that funk he just started getting out of. There's a high degree of control and each undead and living person KNOWS their place. I imagine a point that will get made in Blood Lords is that even as you ascend to power in Geb's court, you very much do NOT want to get his attention. The very book we're discussing is part of his legacy too, something that will outlast him even after he confirms Nex's death and his unfinished business is complete, learning and mastering new necromantic practices.

They're both supremely arrogant, vindictive and spiteful, they regard other people as objects for them to raise and control even before they're dead, and their obsessions with finalizing petty rivalries they essentially already won years ago make them awful people, but this book really brought out the contrasts between them, the unique ways they're awful!

Liberty's Edge

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Tar-Baphon is What if Conan studied Necromancy (Kellid).

Geb is Osiriani, like Nethys.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Lost Omens, Pathfinder Accessories, Rulebook Subscriber

I like how his view so rationally opposes Pharasma.


keftiu wrote:
I quite enjoyed having his voice across the text, and was surprised to see multiple reviewers complain about it.

yes I like how Paiso is trying to flesh out the two evil necromancers more. mostly by giving them any personality beyond “evil necromancer”

Dark Archive

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Shadowfoot wrote:
I like how his view so rationally opposes Pharasma.

I wouldn't call it completely rational since it has bit of climate change denialist type of tone. "They say it damages balance of multiverse, but where is the proof? *doesn't even try to counter possible arguments by Pharasman because they are discussing a strawman*" x'D

Fun thing about Geb is that while at times he has point from his evil viewpoint, there are lot of cases when you can tell he is extremely biased. Like when he claims to be beyond ghostly obsessions despite his Nex obsession :p

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