Are there Pathfinder adventures that discuss racism?


Pathfinder First Edition General Discussion

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Good evening all. I hope you had a good and safe Thanksgiving. Are there Pathfinder adventures that discuss racism as a theme or story detail?

Your thoughts would be greatly appreciated.


Fantasy racism ("can't trust those elves...") or Earth-style skin-color racism?


I think Paizo mostly steers clear of those choppy waters. There may be some notes for GMs on how to handle that kind of stuff, but doubtful there's an AP that really focuses on it.

Sovereign Court

There is some implied in the Sodden Lands module.

That’s about it.


Curse of the Crimson Throne showcases some racism, though it's never a central topic. A varisian or shoanti might get into some trouble in the city, and some shoanti aren't exactly welcoming either. Later the party encounters someone who hunts shoanti.

Giantslayer has a bit in the backstory: The hardy people of the frontier town Trunau are not fond of orcs due to skirmishes with them, but they usually accept half-orcs.


Good morning, all, and thank you for the replies!

Matthew, either fantasy racism or Earth-style / skin color racism would be of interest.

Thanks again!


I suspect it very much depends on how you interpret the adventures. there are several I can think of in which there are evil orcs/goblins/ other monsterous humanoid race, and depending on how you as the GM run things this could be seen as either "yay monsters to fight" or "why must we attack them just for being different?"

There are certainly parts of the world where the sourcebooks call out racism as a theme/issue, e.g. Sargarva, and it's possible that there are adventures or PFS scenarios set there that look at it a bit more deeply, though I can't think of any off the top of my head.

Out of interest, why are you asking?


I forgot about book 1 Giantslayer.

I too am interested in why you're asking. It's a difficult topic many tables avoid.


Thanks for the replies, Matthew, Arto, Geraint, Sheepish and Neria! Role-playing is a powerful tool for people to explore ideas and perspectives, so I want my players, and particular my young players, to have an opportunity to pursue important topics in our stories as you are able to in Star Trek, for example.


Carrion Crown starts out with Xenophobia...


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Interesting approach.

It is a topic I generally stray away from, overall. Sure, some settlements are mostly this or that, and may prefer to keep it that way (for whatever reasons). But if you are NOT this or that in those settlements, I don't suddenly have NPC's act racist against/towards you.

Diplomacy checks may have a higher DC, or you may have to haggle a bit to get fairer prices. But I don't have it in me to act that $#!+ out, or dive too deeply into the implications of it beyond adding a few to some DC's or prices or whatever.

You get the general feeling that you aren't very welcome here.

And that's really as far as I go with racism, usually. I don't want to allow people an avenue to exhibit real racism in my setting... and believe me, I don't hang out with or associate myself with real racists. But, I also don't have the ability (or desire) to background check everyone that plays at my table. So I avoid it, almost entirely, if I can.

I respect your willingness to tackle tough issues with young players in fantasy, hopefully controlled, environment. Tread with caution, is all I can say.


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Racial and ethnic ... conflicts happen quite often in my fantasy settings. They range from the innate suspicion of strangers of the same race/ethnicity/religion all the way out to outright fear and hostility. It all depends on the setting and background of each area/city/town/shire/etc. Larger cities that tend to see more traffic of strange or exotic races/ethnicities have a lower rate of open fear or hostility, and even have a higher rate of outright acceptance, but there are always some that have their own irrational (or very rational) reasons for feeling certain ways.

I try to keep the campaign worlds believable and reactive. I don't tend to play with players that have sensitivities to these things that would make them taboo topics, though who doesn't get a bit riled up when the local sheriff just doesn't like you or a group because of your race or ethnicity? These things are plot tools that make it useful to shape the player's reaction to certain NPCs and help steer the players without railroading them. When I want you to hate an NPC, I give you reasons for it.


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Neriathale wrote:

I suspect it very much depends on how you interpret the adventures. there are several I can think of in which there are evil orcs/goblins/ other monsterous humanoid race, and depending on how you as the GM run things this could be seen as either "yay monsters to fight" or "why must we attack them just for being different?"

Pretty much this. Many adventures touch on the subject. Whether it becomes a major campaign theme is dependent on the GM and your group though.

Rise of the Runelords:

Nualia is kind of a victim of racism. She gets other'd in her community leaving her isolated and vulnerable to the wrath runewell pulse.

Are Goblins murderous pests who eat anything that they can get their hands on that should be exterminated wholesale or savage creatures abused by their own culture and taken advantage of by others?

Ironfang Invasion:

There's the Molthuni/Nirmathas conflict.

Hobgoblins operate on a meritocracy. Even a slave can rise to the upper echelon of their society if they can prove their worth. Is Azaersi a ruthless warlord or someone who understands the corrupted origins of her people and is trying to wean them away from it? How do you interpret the Goblinblood Wars? Hobgoblins become ready to fight by age 4. How do you settle peaceably with a race that soon becomes the majority within a few years with an inclination towards evil? How do you feed everyone with limited resources?

Even if you win, unless you wipe them out, they'll be back in a few generations as the Goblinblood Wars show and in great enough numbers to challenge a nation.

War for the Crown:

Boy, everyone hates Cheliax. And for good reason. But even more importantly, the feud between Qadira and Taldor is a major plot point on why Maxillar doesn't just win instantly.


Thank you for the replies TxSam88, VoodistMonk and DeathlessOne!

TxSam88: Carrion Crown might be a contender. I’ve written it down.

VoodistMonk: Thank you for the kind words about what we’re doing here. I agree you have to know your audience.

DeathlessOne, and VoodistMonk, we agree that some intellectual heft to our stories can go a long way. I also enjoy catching my players’ attention with political references regarding issues like this.

Neriathale, I can see the colonial references in Sargava.

Sargava, “The Serpent’s Skull”
Does anyone happen to know if this colonialism is expressed in any stories, like, for example, in “The Serpent’s Skull” adventure path, please?

Cheliax, “Hell’s Vengeance”
I’ve found a reference to halflings as being “are one of the most common races of slaves in the Inner Sea region, especially in Cheliax, where they are seen as less-than-people.[2]”
Are there any stories that happen to highlight this by any chance that you might be aware of, folks? Hell’s Vengeance?

Thank you!


Scavion, thanks for the reply! I figured that "Rise of the Runelords" might touch on racism because of the connections with Thassalonia.

Azlant, Thassalon: Any stories that might bring up the Azlanti supremacy theme?

Thanks again!


oteta wrote:


Azlant, Thassalon: Any stories that might bring up the Azlanti supremacy theme?

Azlantis were basically just the ancient humans. They drove off the serpentfolk and were pretty much uncontested. Most elves left the planet a long time prior and only came back after the Azlant got Earthfall'd. Dwarves hadn't quested for the sky yet.

Thassalonians were exiled Azlantis. Thassilon was a pretty nice place to live until Emperor Xin died, then the Runelords got really into enslaving giants and others in general.


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Thanks again, Scavion!

“Ruins of Azlant”: “Ruins of Azlant” touch on racism? I came across a reference that the Rune Lords drove out Xin because he was not Azlanti supremacist enough.

“Xin was exiled by the mystics who ruled the nation of Azlant for promoting the belief that the Azlanti could learn something from and should cooperate with the other races of Golarion.”

https://pathfinderwiki.com/wiki/Thassilon

Rise of the Runelords: This reference above points to racism amongst the Runelords.


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Hmm, after taking another look into the textbook definition of racism, I have to say that the subject in a game system such as Pathfinder (or any game that quantifies abilities) is uniquely different than what you find in the real world. Different races & ethnicities have quantifiable differences that can make them superior or inferior when compared to others on specific subjects. An average elf, for example is nowhere near as hardy as an average dwarf (4 point difference in CON scores). An average Azlanti Human is objectively BETTER than a normal human due to the +2 to every stat.

Personally, I believe that every race has something it can learn from another race, and offer something of value in return. That may have exceptions, of course, as no statement can really be universal. Sentience is all that really has any objective value to me.


DeathlessOne wrote:

Hmm, after taking another look into the textbook definition of racism, I have to say that the subject in a game system such as Pathfinder (or any game that quantifies abilities) is uniquely different than what you find in the real world. Different races & ethnicities have quantifiable differences that can make them superior or inferior when compared to others on specific subjects. An average elf, for example is nowhere near as hardy as an average dwarf (4 point difference in CON scores). An average Azlanti Human is objectively BETTER than a normal human due to the +2 to every stat.

Personally, I believe that every race has something it can learn from another race, and offer something of value in return. That may have exceptions, of course, as no statement can really be universal. Sentience is all that really has any objective value to me.

I was just going to favorite this, but I slipped, and I guess my tablet had other ideas. I really love your posts. I find you to be a clear, reasoned, and concise speaker, and I think I may have agreed with every one I've seen so far. Not a requirement (or even statistical possibility) that we agree on every point, but I appreciate the tenor you bring to the threads.


That's really up the GM. It's not like an adventure says, "this module deals with racisim!" The problem with most folks is that they don't understand subtext, allegory, or symbolism. Well, I guess they don't have to, but a GM should try to understand those things.

You can take a series like Ironfang Invasion or Giantslayer that deals with great numbers of an opposing race such as hobgoblins or orcs and play up the prejudice that the humans and other more accepted races might have against them. Voila, you've made an adventure that deals with racism. Throw in a "kill the baby hobgoblin" dilemma for your party and you have hours of fun debating over racism in your d20 game!


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Sysryke wrote:
I was just going to favorite this, but I slipped, and I guess my tablet had other ideas. I really love your posts. I find you to be a clear, reasoned, and concise speaker, and I think I may have agreed with every one I've seen so far. Not a requirement (or even statistical possibility) that we agree on every point, but I appreciate the tenor you bring to the threads.

That is quite a compliment and I appreciate it. I am no where NEAR as accomplished a speaker as I am at communicating through the written medium. My brain simply runs away with itself and gets well ahead during verbal conversation, and writing forces me to slow down so that my ideas have time to solidify in a manner easily understood by others.

I can pretty much guarantee that you will NOT agree with me on every point that we ever discuss. But I'd never hold that against someone unless they are insistent at forcing compliance to their viewpoint. If I am correct, I will be correct regardless of how others believe, and only time will tell.

PFRPGrognard wrote:
... The problem with most folks is that they don't understand subtext, allegory, or symbolism. ...

I believe 'nuance' would be an appropriate word to add to that list. People are becoming more and more polarized in the world at large and we are losing the shades of grey (illusions as they are, but they are pretty ones) that allow for different perspectives to co-exist peacefully.

The real tragedy is in that gray zone is where some of the most beautiful and expressive aspects of our imaginations and desires get to be played out. We get to experience the very real aspects of choice, for good or ill, and play out the repercussions of both. There very well might be a universal truth and a good standard out there. We will NEVER discover it if we are not FREE to choose.

As far as the whole racism thing goes... And this is very much my informed opinion on the matter, it stems from the very real human reaction to what is different. Fear of the unknown and the inability to trust in the actions of others that are not also equally constrained by a shared moral code. It is only natural to include it in the fantasy genre, where those differences are amplified by several factors.

Silver Crusade

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oteta wrote:


Cheliax, “Hell’s Vengeance”
I’ve found a reference to halflings as being “are one of the most common races of slaves in the Inner Sea region, especially in Cheliax, where they are seen as less-than-people.[2]”
Are there any stories that happen to highlight this by any chance that you might be aware of, folks? Hell’s Vengeance?

Halfling characters might experience this in Hell's Rebels.

Silver Crusade

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In Hell's Rebels, the PCs are trying to overthrow the government, so what to do about slavery is an issue they're likely to face. Do they compensate slave owners, like Great Britain did in 1833? The rebellion is presumably trying to build support with disaffected nobles. A prominent NPC is a member of the Bellflower Network, a secret society dedicated to freeing halfling slaves.

Followers of Milani play a prominent part in the AP, and are firmly opposed to slavery. My PC is a halfling Dawnflower Dervish Bard from Katapesh, trained by the Cult of the Dawnflower. In her backstory, one of the reasons for her transfer to the temple of Saranrae in Korvosa was disagreements over the cult's tolerance of slavery, particularly in Qadira.


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PCScipio wrote:
Followers of Milani play a prominent part in the AP, and are firmly opposed to slavery. My PC is a halfling Dawnflower Dervish Bard from Katapesh, trained by the Cult of the Dawnflower. In her backstory, one of the reasons for her transfer to the temple of Saranrae in Korvosa was disagreements over the cult's tolerance of slavery, particularly in Qadira.

I played a halfling Vigilante (Zealot) in that campaign who's secret identity was a professional valet (butler) to a noble (who was played by another player, a Vigilante (Teisatsu)). Pretty much the Alfred to Bruce Wayne, but Alfred was a devout follower of Milani, and Alfred would get almost DARK in his Zealot alter ego.

There was no promises of direct compensation to the nobles for getting rid of slavery. There was a simple statement: "It is going to be cheaper for you to have freed slaves, and hire them on as servants, than it is to keep them slaves. Cheaper in coin and loss of life." Alfred as the Vigilante known as "Blood Rose", was not into negotiation as much as he was for implied threats and direct action. He received several warnings from Milani about carrying out the darker of the threats he made, but thankfully, he never had to follow through.


Thanks for the replies, DeathlessOne, Sysryke, PFRPGrognard, and PCScipio!

DeathlessOne, the racial bonuses aspect of Pathfinder brings up the question of racism within the game, not the idea or theme of racism as expressed within a story or adventure. The former is something that has probably been discussed in another forum. I’d rather focus on the latter.
I also agree that, if handled well, forums are a great way to slow down the conversation and deal with sensitive topics like racism respectfully.

PFRPGrognard, DeathlessOne, I agree that symbols and allegories are powerful tools for dealing with this issue. At the same time, one of my groups is a Society game, so I feel that it might constrain artistic license and am looking for as many resources as possible.

PCScipio, DeathlessOne, good information on the role of Halflings in “Hell’s Rebels”. Writing that one down!


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oteta wrote:
PFRPGrognard, DeathlessOne, I agree that symbols and allegories are powerful tools for dealing with this issue. At the same time, one of my groups is a Society game, so I feel that it might constrain artistic license and am looking for as many resources as possible.

Ah, well... The only advice I can give you there is this: create a handout that supplies a 'trigger warning' or a 'disclaimer' that some content might not appropriate for all audiences. If they cannot handle PG-13 level material, this might not be the game for them to join. Obviously, you won't be playing Hell's Vengeance or having an evil aligned party, so going beyond PG-13 level material is not necessary.

Unfiltered Thoughts within, you have been warned:
... Now, think less of me if you will, but I say this out of full disclosure. I struggled not to make a crack about some players needing their parents present if they can't handle this kind of stuff with maturity.

I have dealt with real racism and bigotry in my lifetime. Experiencing this kind of material through a fantasy game is a real useful method of exposure therapy to help prepare people for real experiences that they will likely go through first hand, or help them deal with any internal issues they might have about experiences in their past, giving them a way to respond and overcome that they were not able to before. They have a measure of power and control within the game. We can't avoid these experiences, not entirely. We have to grow stronger from them.


This isn't for Pathfinder, but Chaosiums's Call Of Cthulu has a supliment called HARLEM UNBOUND which is about adding racial tensions to the game. Since this is supposed to be a supliment (not an adventure) it's designed to be added to existing games, so it might have some elements you can add to your games without drastically changing things (obviously it would need to be adjusted to a d20 system).

I haven't actually read/played Harlem Unbound, so I can't recommend it personally, but I've heard good things. Also since I don't have personal experience I don't know how difficult it would be to translate to PF. But if you're interested it' something that moght give you ideas.


DeathlessOne, MrCharisma, thanks for the replies! ‘Morning all!

DeathlessOne, thank you for sharing your personal thoughts and experiences on racism.

Also, you’re right I confused Hell’s Rebels with Hell’s Vengeance. I would probably lean to running the former.

Mr. Charisma, thank you for the Cthulu product suggestion. I also came across this product for D&D 5. Sadly, it seems to rip off Paizo’s ideas for 2e of background and heritage.

https://www.polygon.com/reviews/2020/7/9/21317614/dungeons-dragons-dnd-race -ancestry-and-culture-book

On a side note, I must say that I agree with the direction that Paizo went with 2nd edition by eliminating the term race in favor of background and heritage.

Speaking of Pathfinder 2e reminds me that the Society scenario 1-07 Flooded King’s Court has the theme of housing discrimination, and although I’m still not completely comfortable with the depiction of Goblins in the adventure, I like Paizo’s idea of bringing marginalized groups like Goblins into players’ societies.


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No right or wrong here, just a note on terms. It's important if you're approaching sensitive topics like this to define terms so that everyone knows what everyone else means. Too much rancor and argumentation comes from not clarifying semantic differences.

IRL and in game, I've always used and understood the term race from a Biology definition. In that context race=species, and I don't take issue with inherent differences in species being reflected by mechanics.

If on the other hand you take a Sociology definition, where race=ethnicity (ethnicity being semi-distinct perceivable variances within a single species, humans), then any inherent ability moods become spurious.

You don't all have to agree to the same terms, but you do need to make an effort to understand what is meant by one and other's word choices. Then you can have meaningful discussions about the real issues of racism.


I'm running a Rise of the Drow campaign based on Golarion. No major spoilers here, but it is set against the backdrop of a battle between the Klavek Kingdom (out of the Lands of the Linnorm Kings) and the indigenous Vikmoredere tribe of Arcadia. There is hostility between the two countries and when there is an attack on the town (by Drow as stated in the adventure title), the townsfolk immediately blame the Vikmoredere.

This gave the players the opportunity to deal with racism to an extent, but it was not the primary focus of the game, just a piece of it and one that is neither heavy-handed nor overly self-righteous.

Dark Archive

Ability mods actually make sense regardless of whether the specific difference is driven by primarily genetic or primarily environmental factors or even if there is a combination of factors. As something of an example being raised in colder weather as a small child triggers some permanent developmental changes that increase cold tolerance throughout life. There are a host of interesting other examples sticking just with people let alone other animals. Our skeletons are actually quite malleable early in life to environmental changes and input. Educational differences and strategies certainly affect mental stats which are very general models at best.


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I don't disagree, but as the racial ability moods debate has cropped up on several threads, we have to allow that some people fixate on certain aspects or just see things in a different way all together. We don't have to agree with one and other's reasoning, but we do have to allow for the difference of opinions. Mental ability stat moods seem to be the biggest sticking point. I've made both biological and cultural arguments in favor of them, but for some they just don't fly. To each their own game.

Dark Archive

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Certainly some have different opinions on how to run their game, but to be honest I care relatively little about their house rules. My concern is when some of those ideas are rooted in not understanding the various aspects of the underlying biology. That does have real world consequences , many not even always appreciated. So my hope was to throw some small light on that without completely derailing.


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Good afternoon, all. Sysryke, PFRPGrognard, Davor, thanks for the replies!

Sysryke, thanks for the definitions!

PFRPGrognard, effective example of the use of stereotyping in an adventure!

Davor, I agree with Sysryke that the debate about whether there is racism within Pathfinder is a topic that has been handled elsewhere. One can find some of those discussions by searching ‘racism’ in the forums.

Our topic is whether Paizo had published adventures which touched upon the topic of racism, and we have found several examples.

Here’s what I have so far:

Carrion Crown: xenophobia
Rise of the Runelords: Thassalon enslaving giants.
Ruins of Azlant: alien creatures which inspired racism of Azlant.
Hell’s Rebels: racism against Halflings.
Sodden Lands: implied.
Pathfinder Society scenario 1-07 Flooded King’s Court has the theme of housing discrimination
Curse of the Crimson Throne v Varisians or Shoanti

Are we missing anything?

Silver Crusade

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Giantslayer: discriminations against half-orcs.

FWIW there is a non-hostile full-blooded orc NPC in this AP.


The first two (or three) books of Serpent Skull deal somewhat with colonialism.


Just like to point out that while racism can contribute to the darker aspects of some of these other issues, xenophobia, housing discrimination, and colonialism are not inherently racist things. You could be guilty of any or all of those issues, and have the motivation not be one of race, but rather nationality, language, religion, or another number of cultural descriptors. All still bad, but not racist.


Good evening, all. Java Man, PCScipio, Sysryke, thanks for the replies!

Sysryke, I suspect that people were referring to racism expressed in these different ways you mention.

That at least was what I was was doing when I mentioned Pathfinder Society scenario 1-07 Flooded King’s Court where there is race-based housing discrimination.

I guess we’d have to ask the participants to confirm.


Thanks again for all the posts, everyone. Anyone who comes across our discussion please feel free to add to it. Peace and equality!


Hells Rebels also has the tiefling slums. Tieflings might better resemble a more current form of racism, as they are poor second class citizens, but still citizens.


I was going to bring up the Tiefling thing in Hells Rebels. Melkiador beat me to it.

That example stood out to me more than any other I've seen in PF published, the slums there are almost exclusively Tiefling and they are (at best) ignored as, "a people," by those in power even before the Thrune takeover of Kintargo.


Good afternoon, everyone. Melkiador, Mardaddy, thanks for the input! I’ll add your thoughts to the suggestions. Sounds like an interesting, potential metaphor for racism in the USA, for example, where so many African-Americans are of a mixed background due to abuses in the past and presently continue to suffer from housing discrimination.


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Keep it to gaming please.

Some may agree with you, others may take issue and see other factors. Don't want to go kareening off into the boneyard of bad feels.


It’s open to be fluffed as much as you want. You’re expected deal with things in the slums. There’s been a rash of murders in the slums and the heroes are asked to look into it. By default you don’t have to play up the racism of the slums but the option is there if you and the players want to explore it.


I definitely played up discrimination against tieflings in my HR campaign, but I agree you should know your table.


Thanks for the replies, mardaddy, Melkiador and Artofregicide!

Melkiador and Artofregicide, "Hell's Rebels" is sounding better and better!

Mardaddy, as we discuss racism as a theme in Pathfinder, I think that we should agree to disagree from the start, and to be ready to acknowledge that we might be wrong. I think these basic attitudes will keep us open to a constructive conversation on an important topic.

As I mentioned at the beginning of this thread, rpgs are a powerful tool for exploring ideas and perspectives, and I want my players and especially my young players to explore important issues like rising racism in the U.S. I think one of the reasons that racism is increasing in the U.S., as we can see in the spike of racist hate crimes as documented by the Southern Poverty Law Center, is that we have not learned how to reconcile the well-researched advantages of diversity, democracy, and the new environment of the internet.

Just like I want my players to explore the idea of racism, I think that it would be good for us to be able to explore the idea here on this forum as well with respect and openness. Once again, I might be wrong, and we might disagree, and that’s ok.


oteta wrote:

Thanks for the replies, mardaddy, Melkiador and Artofregicide!

Melkiador and Artofregicide, "Hell's Rebels" is sounding better and better!

Mardaddy, as we discuss racism as a theme in Pathfinder, I think that we should agree to disagree from the start, and to be ready to acknowledge that we might be wrong. I think these basic attitudes will keep us open to a constructive conversation on an important topic.

As I mentioned at the beginning of this thread, rpgs are a powerful tool for exploring ideas and perspectives, and I want my players and especially my young players to explore important issues like rising racism in the U.S. I think one of the reasons that racism is increasing in the U.S., as we can see in the spike of racist hate crimes as documented by the Southern Poverty Law Center, is that we have not learned how to reconcile the well-researched advantages of diversity, democracy, and the new environment of the internet.

Just like I want my players to explore the idea of racism, I think that it would be good for us to be able to explore the idea here on this forum as well with respect and openness. Once again, I might be wrong, and we might disagree, and that’s ok.

This is the internet. Respect and openness tend to explode into flames in short order.

There is an outright ban talking politics on these boards - put into place after the 2016 election, apparently mostly because the staff was getting overwhelmed moderating discussions.

It is probably possible to talk about real world racism without crossing into politics, just very unlikely. Especially if you want to focus on current trends in the US.


My worry is that the aspects of racism and society that are worth being explored and delved into are the very nuances that might tend to ignite flames. We all agree that lynching is bad, no arguements there, but we won't grow our understanding of the issue by exploring that deeper.


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Thanks for the replies, thejeff and Java Man!

Melkiador, I thought your screen name looked familiar. I was using your guide to Slayers just last night! I finished building my ethnicity-bending, non-violence and 3 Stooges-influenced (believe it or not) 1e Rogue / Slayer up to 20th level today in part due to your help. Thank you!

Java Man, I hear your concerns about politics and the combustibility of the internet, or its propensity to flame. I think that this is not something that we should shy away from. Instead, I think the internet’s nature to divide is something that we need to engage with. We can agree to disagree, and I may be wrong.

thejeff, I hear your concerns about politics on the forum. Merriam-Webster defines politics as “the art or science of government”.
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/politics
We have not touched upon that subject. We have instead talked about Pathfinder stories that discuss the social phenomenon of racism, and I brought up potential connections to real-world racism that I and others could draw from when running those stories.

Nevertheless, I want to make sure to do right here. I looked without success for a forum discussion or behavior policy and could not find one. The closest thing I could find is the Organized Play Code of Conduct, and I see no problems there.
https://paizo.com/organizedplay/policies

Does anyone happen to know how I can find the forum rules? Thank you!


If you look down a couple lines below the box you type your reply in you can find a link to the posting guidelines.

Also: don't take my cautions expressed here to mean that I am opposed to your ideas, not at all. I strongly believe in using my games to question my, and my players, ideas and views. But knowing your audience (here and at the gaming table) is important.

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