Should dimension door force you to leave your familiar to die?


Pathfinder Second Edition General Discussion

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TwiceTested wrote:
D Door: the ultimate tick removal spell!

"Oh my Aroden, Rachelleaf, have you tried the new Dim Door Cleanse?"

"No, Cherylstonehammer, can't say I'm familiar."

(I'll see myself out now.)

Dark Archive

Ravingdork wrote:
I can see why the dimension door spell received a debuff, but the idea that you can't take your familiar with you seems...well...awfully cold-hearted to me. Shouldn't familiars be an exception to the rule?

I house-rule that a familiar adjacent to its master doesn't count as a separate creature for the purpose of effects like teleport or selective channeling.


Familiars are mystically bonded creatures tied to your magic. Most familiars were originally animals, though the ritual of becoming a familiar makes them something more. You can choose a Tiny animal you want as your familiar, such as a bat, cat, raven, or snake. Some familiars are different, usually described in the ability that granted you a familiar; for example, a druid’s leshy familiar is a Tiny plant instead of an animal, formed from a minor nature spirit.

The big standouts of this description are "Familiars are mystically bonded creatures tied to your magic"

and "Most familiars were originally animals, though the ritual of becoming a familiar makes them something more"

Though not RAW I would say this indicates that Familiars are a part of the character's magic and therefore as long as they are being carried by the character (inside a pack or carrier) they count as part of the character.


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Also also:

Quote:
If this would bring another creature with you—even if you're carrying it in an extradimensional container—the spell is lost.

You can't leave your but biome, diseases, or other pests behind by Dim-Dooring. The spell fails.


Bard: "let me regale you of the story of how my druid friend"

Druid: "Stop. Please stop!"

Bard: "Yes, he stopped the evil necromancer from fleeing justice by infesting his bed with bugs!"

Druid: Facepalms


Pathfinder Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Can you carry an intelligent item with you when you use dimension door?


Orithilaen wrote:
Can you carry an intelligent item with you when you use dimension door?

In my game:

Familiar: Yes it can come with DD as it is bound to you.

Intelligent items: Yes they can come because they are items.

Your buddy in pest form. No not bound to you.

The real question is can I go pest form and jump on the back of say a Vrock and prevent him from DDing?


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Draco18s wrote:

Also also:

Quote:
If this would bring another creature with you—even if you're carrying it in an extradimensional container—the spell is lost.
You can't leave your but biome, diseases, or other pests behind by Dim-Dooring. The spell fails.

So unless you're a sanitized robot, the spell simply doesn't work.


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Ravingdork wrote:
So unless you're a sanitized robot, the spell simply doesn't work.

Nevermind, I guess, that diseases and other things of that nature are never treated as creatures by the rules.

Sure, let's just rule the spell never does anything ever.


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Ravingdork wrote:
Draco18s wrote:

Also also:

Quote:
If this would bring another creature with you—even if you're carrying it in an extradimensional container—the spell is lost.
You can't leave your but biome, diseases, or other pests behind by Dim-Dooring. The spell fails.
So unless you're a sanitized robot, the spell simply doesn't work.

The rules do not by any stretch of the imagination classify microorganisms as creatures.


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Ravingdork wrote:
Draco18s wrote:

Also also:

Quote:
If this would bring another creature with you—even if you're carrying it in an extradimensional container—the spell is lost.
You can't leave your but biome, diseases, or other pests behind by Dim-Dooring. The spell fails.
So unless you're a sanitized robot, the spell simply doesn't work.

In Pf1, robots are creatures too...


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Tender Tendrils wrote:
Ravingdork wrote:
Draco18s wrote:

Also also:

Quote:
If this would bring another creature with you—even if you're carrying it in an extradimensional container—the spell is lost.
You can't leave your but biome, diseases, or other pests behind by Dim-Dooring. The spell fails.
So unless you're a sanitized robot, the spell simply doesn't work.
The rules do not by any stretch of the imagination classify microorganisms as creatures.

Does it classify creatures as creatures though?

graystone wrote:
Ravingdork wrote:
So unless you're a sanitized robot, the spell simply doesn't work.
In Pf1, robots are creatures too...

Interesting point.

So microorganic creatures are not creatures, but manufactured artificial non-living autonomous tools, are.

That seems backwards. :)


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Ravingdork wrote:
So microorganic creatures are not creatures

It much like why you don't call a 10' piece of rock orbiting a planet a moon: it's a matter of perspective: A single microorganism has no meaningful way to interact with the game world. As such, it's a non-entity for the purposes of the game. It has no stats, no hp, no actions, ect. It has as much impact as the wallpaper on the rooms walls. That's even assuming fantasy worlds worlds have microorganisms: there is no evidence that they do. Some kind of magic can do the jobs they usually take care of.

Ravingdork wrote:
but manufactured artificial non-living autonomous tools, are.

A BROOM is a creature: animated broom. living is a non-issue compared to an ability to interact with the world.

So it's about something's ability to affect the game world more than biology here. In game terms, 'swarms' of microorganisms can only manage disease/poison effects.


(Living creatures are, compact bundles of microorganisms in a mutually dependent relationship. Undead are, microorgaisms forced to move. Unliving/constructs are, bundles of matter forced to move)

So the key of a creature is being able to interact with its environment actively in the course of at least one action every round.

Therefore, inserting an tiny or smaller animal into the bag or clothes of a creature prevents Dimension Door. Aka beware swarms and pay close attention to things getting in your bag.


Draco18s wrote:
Megistone wrote:
NielsenE wrote:
One of my gaming groups always worried about clauses like that disrupting their gut biome. Same group also proposed various dimdoor tricks for disinfecting people of plague/diseases.
I guess you should also become very very hungry after casting dimension door, since you are leaving back all your dinner...
That's not what your gut biome is.

I know. I was going further.

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