Am I Co-opting Representation?


Advice

Dark Archive

Hi! I'm James. I'm a cis/het male. I like writing characters of all kinds, but I feel a certain reluctance when I write and play a female-presenting character because I'm concerned I may be playing into stereotypes or potentially misrepresenting the experience of female-presenting individuals. I don't want to cause offense or make people uncomfortable. I'm not asking for someone to tell me it's okay, rather I'm asking for advice to avoid the pitfalls of playing into stereotypes or falling into the classic "men writing women" tropes you see in most fantasy and sci-fi.

One thing I've been doing is avoiding gender in the writing process until I'm deciding on appearance, leaving it out of the backstory entirely until I'm finalizing the minor details, but that comes with the concern of erasure and omitting someone's gender identity can be as harmful as misrepresenting it, as gender is a big part of life.

I would love to hear what you folks think and how I can improve my RP in a meaningful way. Is even asking this insensitive? I hope that this can be a productive discussion with as little trolling and namecalling as possible. Thanks so much, and I hope you have a good one!


Dotted for (hopefully) useful information.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Abyssal_Drake88 wrote:

Hi! I'm James. I'm a cis/het male. I like writing characters of all kinds, but I feel a certain reluctance when I write and play a female-presenting character because I'm concerned I may be playing into stereotypes or potentially misrepresenting the experience of female-presenting individuals. I don't want to cause offense or make people uncomfortable. I'm not asking for someone to tell me it's okay, rather I'm asking for advice to avoid the pitfalls of playing into stereotypes or falling into the classic "men writing women" tropes you see in most fantasy and sci-fi.

One thing I've been doing is avoiding gender in the writing process until I'm deciding on appearance, leaving it out of the backstory entirely until I'm finalizing the minor details, but that comes with the concern of erasure and omitting someone's gender identity can be as harmful as misrepresenting it, as gender is a big part of life.

I would love to hear what you folks think and how I can improve my RP in a meaningful way. Is even asking this insensitive? I hope that this can be a productive discussion with as little trolling and namecalling as possible. Thanks so much, and I hope you have a good one!

Gender is social role anyway, that role will shift from society to society let alone another world. Write and act character as people first and foremost and you will do fine imo.

(Being female in india is different from being female in maori culture, being a female bible belt woman is different to being female in a cosmopolitan high income environment. And being male is different in scotland than it is in western australia for many)

I disagree that gender is a big part of life, gender can be a big part of life for individuals but it has no inherrent value other than its informative nature on a wider scale.

It is healthier to have people including a wide variety of characters than not, a man writing a gay woman is only every problematic if they are primarilly leaning on tropes, in the same sense that a man or woman writing a straight man can lead to the same issues when writing the character via stereotypes. Even then there is little wrong as long as things fall into balance.

It is all about intent.

If I write a haberdasher side character with a flamboyant and sterotypical fashion queen personality based off say, rupaul, is that bad? How about a hetronormative woman writing the same character? Or if the flamboyant character was actually female but literally nothing else changed because I thought it was a cool personality, but someone at the table thought it was annoying. Is it then my issue or that players issue?

I fall into the "write characters in a spectrum of personality types with a spectrum of experiences" camp.

(Sorry if this is a little rambly, just woke up)


7 people marked this as a favorite.

My thoughts would be to become aware of the stereotypes, ask people of the groups you’re writing if there are any “hidden pitfalls” to avoid. Which, in posting a thread like this, you’re doing! It’s a good first step.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I myself am a heterosexual demisexual monogamous male, yet I play plenty of female characters. When my preteen daughter talked her mother into running a D&D game for her friends, all female playing female characters, with me included as a player, I played a female character, too, to avoid standing out. Later, in a Serpent's Skull Pathfinder campaign, I played Muffin, a female gnome barbarian. As a GM, the NPCs are 50/50 male and female.

The Gleeful Grognard talked of the key issue: culture. Gender in roleplaying games are enacted through personal relationships and by cultural norms. In an adventuring party, the default relationship is comrades in arms, people who have each other's backs. That relationship has no sexual markers in Pathfinder. Gendered relationships are optional. Reacting according to the character's culture, on the other hand, is meaningful roleplaying.

Most cultures have women building connections to other people. Do that, and the character will seem womanly. Men tend to vie for status and recognition.

Let's cover some examples. Muffin was a survivor, born in the Sodden Lands and growing up under a permanent hurricane. Her female barbarian role was to band together like a tribe for survival. She served her temporary tribe (the party) by hunting for food, scouting ahead, flanking for the rogue, and intercepting the monster as it attacked more vulnerable members. A male barbarian role, in contrast, would be more about dealing damage.

In my current Ironfang Invasion campaign, I run two recurring female NPCs, Aubrin the Green and Rhyna. Aubrin is a retired Chernasardo Ranger, one of the respected protectors of the land. Her disabilities--a peg leg (born without one leg) and scarred half-blind eyes (battle damage)--forced her to live in a town rather than patrol with the other rangers. One female player is playing a male elf Chernasardo Ranger named Zinfandel being trained by Aubrin. This lets Aubrin take a feminine teacher role as opposed to a masculine leader role, good for keeping the PCs in the spotlight. The temple assistant Rhyna spends her time running errands and persuading people to go along with other people's plans. She is secretly a fire oracle (I decided to playtest the PF2 oracle with her) but hides her frightening powers and curse. She wants to avoid trouble.

On the other side of the coin, my wife plays the male halfling animal-whisperer scoundrel rogue Sam. Sam chose to herd goats, shunning social contact. Now that Sam has reached 3rd level while protecting villagers, my wife has roleplayed him realizing that they need leadership and he could provide it (scoundrel rogues are a Charisma class). Aubrin provides comfort to the villagers in the crisis, Zinfandel leads missions, and Sam could inspire with his vision.

A female character could lead and strive for status, but that means that either her culture has different roles for women or she is defying her cultural expectations. Either choice should be clarified through roleplaying. "I am not a simply a lady. I am the baron's daughter. Leadership is in my blood."


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

As with any roleplay, as long as you're not offending anyone, you're golden.

At my table we have mostly males, and one female player. We all have played both male and female characters, and because we're all "adults", nobody does anything stupid. Basically, there's no stereotype and there's no gender politics involved. Our female characters are no more or no less capable, intelligent, witty, and flawed than our male characters. Things don't happen at the table because has a particular quantity of free-space in their pants.

The most childish we get (as a group) would be that as an example, our current party is all-female and jokingly refers to itself as "Everyone's a Lesbian". This game includes our female player and she's the one who started it.

It's a sad thing to contemplate roleplay that can only be "who and what I am because I might Do It Wrong." Experiment. Learn.

Basically, all I can offer is: know your audience. That and... I usually find out during character generation if my planned character is male or female. It just happens, either because backstory makes it work, or because the character reminds me of a female character in a movie/book/TV show/Real Life.


6 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I'm probably not the best person to answer this, being genderfluid myself, but I did want to add that if you are worried about this sort of thing, the best thing to do is probably research.

Read about female historical characters; read fiction written by and about women; talk to your female friends about their relevant experiences (and by talk, I mean listen).

The above is good advice for playing any character well, but especially applies if you want to authentically portray a character of a different gender/culture/etc.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

This is such extreme over thinking.

Do you play with strangers or friends? The former just don't do it. Even if you are not offensive some people are just crazy. If the latter you should know your friends sensitivities well enough to know your answer


4 people marked this as a favorite.

I would like to firmly echo the sentiment that for most things, it is often enough to write a complex and interesting character first, and then scramble their descriptors (gender, ethnicity, orientation, etc.), tweaking and adjusting certain traits to reflect the change. As you have noticed, this does create a character whose identity is at least a little divorced from their culture's perception of them and their identity, but this method is also very unlikely to create a character who becomes an offensive cliche or stereotype. If you are simply roleplaying among friends odds are this is a good place to start your exploration, since most tables have a lot of understanding for 'what I was trying to portray' owing to our fledgling acting skills.

To create a character that is more shaped by their culture and label, the answer is definitely research--both the experiences of people who fit the label you have chosen (MaxAstro has good advice here!) and the cultural context the character grew up in (whether you are designing the cultural context in question or not). Also when it comes to writing characters whose identity reflects marginalized identities in real life, a good rule of thumb is that telling a story featuring a marginalized character is very cool, but telling the story of that character's struggles with being marginalized is poor form. It takes considerably more research than simply writing about a character, but also you run the risk of speaking over marginalized authors' chance to tell their own story. Being as you are already aware of the possible issues of misrepresenting a character's identity, you have already cleared the first hurdle to be aware of.

Aside from that, only other thing I would caution against is placing too much weight on gendered differences. It's true there are many ways in which men and women tend to differ in their experiences, but on the whole these gendered divisions are not as deep as some might assume. Without digging into specifics which are buried in my PSYCH notes, in the majority of behaviours, the spectrum of differences seen within one gender (i.e. one man to another) is much wider than the spectrum between genders (i.e. the average man to the average woman). This is to say, the potential difference between two random women is approximately as great as between a random man and a random women.

This is, of course, not even taking into consideration the how blurry things get in the area of nonbinary genders, but that's just yet another story.

(Incidentally, *waves at MaxAstro*, genderfluid buddies!)


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Hi!
First, you should definitely try playing characters who aren't like you, as long as you commit to making them actual people. I'm an Asexual person with Asperger's syndrome, and I definitely want to see more allosexual and/or neurotypical people play characters like me, as long as they do them well. Seeking out advice from said people is a great way to do that!
To that end, my 2 main pieces of advice:
1. Doing some amount of research is probably something you'll have to do, at least for playing a character from a culture other than your own, or for playing a character with a disability, etc. At the same time, don't make that completely inform how the character acts. (Not every person from a given culture is going to hold all of the values of said culture, not every person with autism displays all of the signs)
2. Being different from the "norm" doesn't count as characterization. It may inform characterization, but it shouldn't mean you make their character any less developed. For instance, a gay character might have a different personality than a straight character due to how society treats them, but that doesn't mean that they should have more or fewer personality traits, flaws, and goals.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Thank you all for your helpful replies. I feel as though I have a more robust foundation now than I did when I first made this post. Thanks again and I'll begin utilizing what I've learned here.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

A good way to go about it is to have characters with those identities, but have the stories you tell about them be about something other than their identity.

As an Asexual Autistic Trans person, I would much rather people focus on my accomplishments as an artist and a gm and a writer and a student than "oh look how brave I am for being trans" or "you are so smart and functional for an autistic person!". There is more to me than my identity.

What I would most like to see in fiction is characters that are trans or autistic or asexual in stories that aren't primarily about their identity. We have a lot of movies now about trans people finding acceptance and going through struggles and all of the things about being trans, but we don't really have any movies where the main character is a jedi or pirate or superhero who just happens to be trans.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I don't think their is a certain correct way to play another gender. People vary. I think avoiding harmful stereotypes as best one can is a good start to not playing a character poorly.


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I don't really have any advice to add because there's already so much good stuff here. I Just wanted to say I'm really glad this community is able to give such helpful advice on a topic that can be easily misunderstood.

A related situation I dealt with.

A number of years ago, when writing one shot games where I had to create pre-generated characters. I wanted to make sure there was plenty of diversity so that the players could feel more comfortable embodying their characters. As a cis/het guy I definitely found myself writing what my subconscious saw as 'default', which sadly wasn't very diverse. So I rolled 20 characters worth of attributes, assigned a class that made sense with their statistics, then I randomly assigned gender/sexuality. This was in Call of Cthulhu, which is set in the 1920's, and made it extra challenging to figure out how the characters would work given the discrimination of the setting. Rather than being a negative though, it was a really fun writing challenge, forcing me to research various real world examples of people overcoming racism/sexism in that era.


From what I've seen here and there, as long as you don't intend to be offensive, you're already on a good path. You can't 100% not be offensive, some people are easily offended even when no offense was actually made or intended, so don't worry too much about pleasing everyone.

I recommend checking out some of the many great characters in movies and animations and make a little cheat sheet on which feminine aspects made them a better character.

The gender stuff is generally a secondary trait. The character can be a badass world jumping horizon walker who loves exploring. The detail of them being a male or female is then added to flesh out details like how they interract with people.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

A lot of great advice here, especially when it comes to doing more listening than conversing as part of your learning process and making an effort to be conscientious about what you do that may be offensive.

I write and roleplay characters who identify in many different ways, and my process is to isolate the defining characteristics of a given character and then scrutinize them to see if I have allowed any gender stereotype or bias to influence my decision to make it a characteristic. In the process, I also ensure that my presentation of these characteristics also doesn't get wrapped up in gender stereotypes. My initial litmus test is whether that characteristic could be applied almost equally to any character of any gender identity - if the answer is yes, its probably just fine. If you have to do some mental gymnastics to make it fit, then you might have a problem. Of course, at the same time, you want to make sure you aren't erasing representation of individual gender identities, which goes too far and is harmful. But with enough work and dedication you can find a good balance.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Vidmaster7 wrote:
I don't think their is a certain correct way to play another gender. People vary. I think avoiding harmful stereotypes as best one can is a good start to not playing a character poorly.

100% this.

As others have said: do research, read work written by women, and do your best. If you screw something up or get called out, don't get defensive. Find out what you can do to be better and grow.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Kid, you're asking dumb questions. Focus on the character and what makes them tick. If part of their description doesn't necessarily change their story it's useless. Ie. A completely equal society would mean gender, place of birth, status, and wealth become completely cosmetic.

If the question of a character being a caricature or a trope is a problemq: write a more complete character. Even the way you describe yourself if rather contrived and doesn't actually tell us anything important - focus less on the paint and more on the structure.

Silver Crusade

9 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Being empathetic isn’t dumb, and what makes a person a person isn’t useless.

Asking questions and listening is a great way to learn and understand, and the OP has gotten plenty of good responses in this otherwise very pleasant and thoughtful thread.


Consider how a person's various traits influence their experience of the world you're creating. You may be writing for a world so different from our own, that you're better off ignoring the real world experience of people with identical traits since those traits won't have a similar impact on their life.

After you've determined all that, you then have to consider what your players bring to the table, as they are coming from a world you are familiar with and may have some preconceived notions as to what these traits mean. I like messing with my players cultural preconceptions a little bit, but it's a dick move and not recommended if you aren't a close group of friends.

As a final step, there are mechanical benefits tied to certain traits that make the cultural dynamic really weird and not at all parallel to our own experience. There's very specific testable effects based on heredity that shift discussions of racial superiority away from pure fantasy into something closer to concerns over accessibility. You can look at something as simple as a "light out" curfew as persecution of those without darkvision. Maybe the halfling district builds everything too small for tall folk in order to keep out the rifraff. Perhaps your elf sets a marching pace such that the dwarves need to hustle the whole time just to keep up.

Basically, the natural human range of traits is so narrow when set next to the breadth available in a fantasy setting, so you may want tone down the variation of experience within the natural human range to accommodate the additional range. On the other hand, you may want to tuck in some erroneous beliefs to add flavor. And, of course, people will be aware of the prejudices others typically hold regarding themselves and will learn to manipulate that to their advantage in some situations causing the very common prejudice against less respected groups as being duplicitous.

Scarab Sages

Ah, Rysky and Gorbacz appear again, the reincarnation of those two old Muppets. Once again, missing the point of what I'm saying to try and look cool. John Mulaney needed to be cheated on understand murder, I just had to talk to you two.

Rysky, while I think you're not getting what I'm saying I'm seeing some effort today so I'll try to explain what I'm saying better:
I'm not trying to say empathy is dumb - I'm saying empathy with the real world does not necessarily translate well to fictional worlds that are fundamentally different.
As for what makes a Person a Person, I think we'll disagree. All these labels our OP tosses around are inherently related to the "real world" setting - Golarion or anywhere else aren't exactly copies most of the time, and those labels have social and historical context and baggage that won't translocate well. Throwing caution to the wind, I'd say a trans in San Francisco has as much in common with a trans Kobald rivethun shaman from Absalom as I do.
Asking "am I writing/playing a bad woman?" isn't the right question in my opinion, "am I playing/writing a bad woman from Nidal?" is a better question. An example from my recent reading - gender matters to an Alethi Lighteye, not so much to a parshendi.

To the OP: I'm sorry I phrased my earlier post as I did, your questions aren't dumb but I do think they're surface level and you're just shy of hitting the questions to be really good at this. And don't worry so much, it takes practice and you will make mistakes and have an offensive character or two - that's what second drafts and new campaigns are for.

Silver Crusade

7 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Except your wrong. Cis and Trans women play this game, make this game, and are in this game.

Just because it's a fantasy setting doesn't make the women there completely alien to real life, there's absolutely no basis for that, especially since it's written by people in real life for people in real life to play.

Cultures are different of course, but there's absolutely nothing in Golarion or Pathfinder that suggests that women function so radically different that you should ignore them being women.

A Human and Kobold don't have everything overlapping, but both are written by humans and through humans and are played by humans.

A human trans woman and a kobold trans woman won't have much in common if you focus solely on human/kobold to the exclusion of all else, but they're both trans women.


5 people marked this as a favorite.

I think if you start off your post criticizing two fantastic posters on these forums, you're already straying into a weird personal area that isn't focused so much on the original question.

Real world terminology helps to ground fantastical settings and also gives us a vocabulary as writers to express ourselves. Looking for ways to approach one's writing from a comprehensive standpoint is something that - in my opinion - all writers should strive for. It's very limiting having only one viewpoint and as nearly all of the posters have shown in this thread, it's not outlandish to think and work at overcoming that.

That said, when I write (whether personally or for a game), I do try and talk through my ideas with others, just like the OP is doing. I'm fortunate to have friends all across the spectrum of life who provide plenty of insight, but not everyone has that same access.


5 people marked this as a favorite.

I sort of get what Angel Hunter is suggesting. Sometimes people get too wrapped up in the wrong kinds of context for the stories they want to tell and it's important to be mindful of what Golarion is (as opposed to any other setting), but at the same time you can't simply disconnect 'real world baggage' from the game, because the game is inevitably going to be played by people from the real world.

Everything is contexualized through that lens, because that's who we are. To try to ignore that "baggage" is to ignore the people who, as Rysky points out, play the game and write the game.


6 people marked this as a favorite.

1. You could say that any fictional setting is purely fictional and has no relevance to the real world. That ignores that literally every fictional setting has been created by people in the real world, and bears influence from the real world.
2. Please don't attack people on these forums. Rysky & Gorbacz have only refuted the content of your posts, whereas you have engaged in personal attacks in both of your posts. (Calling people kids or muppets is insulting, and you know that.)


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Bah, if you're not upsetting people at your table, then you're golden. If you're worried something you're writing might upset someone at your table (for any reason), just ask the group in general terms what they're okay with. Probably should have done that at the start of the campaign anyways.

Don't overthink it.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Hey, don't bring personal attacks onto the forums, even if "they started it." I would hope we could act like adults here.


7 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

The thread was going so well, too... I was just coming here to compliment people on how positive the discussion has been.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Rysky wrote:

Cultures are different of course, but there's absolutely nothing in Golarion or Pathfinder that suggests that women function so radically different that you should ignore them being women.

Would you mind elaborating on this a bit? I'm by no means a Golarion expert and really only use the game's rule set and not the lore, but it would seem odd if Golarion had the same series of cultural events that resulted in the types of expectations and prejudices people face based solely on their birth.

Just the existence of simple diagnostic magic hedges out the history of human prejudice against outsiders as a primary disease vector, and ends the belief that poverty and disease are caused by poor character. The existence of creatures that are equally capable to humans but easier to control sort of rules out the financial benefits slavery of others within the same species. Hell mind reading puts a hard end to the persecution through fraudulent psychology that women and minorities faced throughout history.

I'm curious how, in a world full of solutions to long standing societal confusion, they've managed to maintain contemporary cultural expectations.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

This is veering wildly off-topic and this thread has probably run its intended course. But stories need relevance and touchstones that people can relate to. I remember a history professor friend complaining to me once about crossbows existing in roleplaying games in which magic and monsters also worked. He argued that the impetus to create a crossbow wouldn't exist in that framework.

Counter to that, however, is that crossbows exist to (besides filling a mechanical niche) ground the game in a time period that we recognize. A strange hodgepodge of "middle ages." It's not often looked at askance because it naturally makes sense for us. We recognize it and it's one less gap we have to leap over to connect with the world.

Societal behavior is treated much the same way. We understand and interact with the familiar. The fantasy element also allows us to subvert that and play in that space as storytellers, but not at the cost of...

1) Alienating the audience
2) Offending the people we are portraying
3) Marginalizing actual real world problems that exist

Now, table variance is a thing! You can do, say, act however you wish at your tables. But if someone is coming to the forums specifically for help realistically portraying a character that exists outside their current worldview, we should be open to helping rather than shutting down their interest.

Silver Crusade

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
ErichAD wrote:


I'm curious how, in a world full of solutions to long standing societal confusion, they've managed to maintain contemporary cultural expectations.

Pretty much the same way George Lucas was able to project a totalitarian sterile Nazis cum Teutonic Knights all white all male Empire as the bad guys and the plucky democratic dirty best things about British Commonwealth meets Maquis colorful gender-varied Rebel Alliance as the good guys, despite the unlikeliness that either group would play into archetypes and tropes of non-existant Earth. It worked, and he shrugged every time somebody would bring the "how is that possible" argument.

Damn, was George smart, and ahead of his time.

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
ErichAD wrote:
Rysky wrote:

Cultures are different of course, but there's absolutely nothing in Golarion or Pathfinder that suggests that women function so radically different that you should ignore them being women.

Would you mind elaborating on this a bit? I'm by no means a Golarion expert and really only use the game's rule set and not the lore, but it would seem odd if Golarion had the same series of cultural events that resulted in the types of expectations and prejudices people face based solely on their birth.

Just the existence of simple diagnostic magic hedges out the history of human prejudice against outsiders as a primary disease vector, and ends the belief that poverty and disease are caused by poor character. The existence of creatures that are equally capable to humans but easier to control sort of rules out the financial benefits slavery of others within the same species. Hell mind reading puts a hard end to the persecution through fraudulent psychology that women and minorities faced throughout history.

I'm curious how, in a world full of solutions to long standing societal confusion, they've managed to maintain contemporary cultural expectations.

I’m not really sure what you’re talking about honestly.

Veering into the nonsequitur in the middle we do very much have slavery and racism and sexism in the setting, those evils very much exist here and there. And just like in the real world those are built around culture, not a single little brick that’s easy to dismantle (if debunking “fraudulent psychology” was all it took to squash racism it would have been dead a long time ago).

Despite that Pathfinder does point out that those evils are in fact evil, and women and minorities are not second class citizens, neither the player nor the characters, and are welcome to the game and setting.

And also the fact that those Evils are an outlier, and not the norm that shapes the setting and the characters within it.

Women are people. Cis women are people. Tran women are people. Trying to other them by removing the “woman” part of the character is outright necrotic. If there’s a culture where being a woman is so variant than what it’s like being one today then Paizo would spell that out in-setting rather than let you guess and and make up assumptions.

So until then, listen.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Gorbacz wrote:
ErichAD wrote:


I'm curious how, in a world full of solutions to long standing societal confusion, they've managed to maintain contemporary cultural expectations.

Pretty much the same way George Lucas was able to...

So, then it's just allegory? I guess that's fine, not everything needs to make sense.

Rysky wrote:

I’m not really sure what you’re talking about honestly.

...
So until then, listen.

It appears the listening can't go both ways here, so we probably shouldn't continue to engage one another. Sorry to have bothered you.

Paizo Employee Customer Service & Community Manager

11 people marked this as a favorite.

Removed a couple posts. I'd like to remind folks that if you personally aren't interested in asking a certain question, the question is not, therefore necessarily irrelevant or overthinking to everyone else. People can have very different intentions, and experiences with playing tabletop RPGs. For example one gaming group, or even one player within a group, might feel that putting a lot of thought or effort into considering gender dynamics between a characters their player is overkill or unnecessary, but another group or another player might find that really refreshing or be really grateful for the extra effort.

Some folks approach a game wanting to use the structure of creative narrative play to explore themes and topics that might be complex, or ambiguous, or things where they aren't sure they know how they feel about it yet. Some folks might be looking for a game that lets them escape from having to deal with issues and problems that they face in their personal lives. It can vary from player to player, or even sometimes from session to session. There is no universally correct way to play roleplaying games.

The community here is really diverse with our backgrounds, our experiences, and our priorities. Please be conscious of that when forming your responses. A way that I have found is really useful to phrase things is to use sentiments like "What worked for me/my group," "I feel," "In my experience , I've observed."

Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder Second Edition / Advice / Am I Co-opting Representation? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.