Non-fertile human hybrids?


Lost Omens Campaign Setting General Discussion


Are there any races descended from humans that have the proper anatomy for reproduction (some Changlings and Planetouched don't) that explicitly are not fertile with humans? Tieflings, Aasimar and Half-Dragons explicitly can, and I presume Changelings and Dhampir can as well since there's sorcerer bloodlines for them. I don't know off-hand anything about Half-Elves being fertile with humans in Pathfinder, but I'd presume they're fertile given their prominence I'd expect it would have been mentioned by now if they weren't.


Morlocks and dark folk, maybe? I've never heard about half-fetchlings or half-gillmen either.


I didn't even consider the monsters that spawned from humanity! That's a good point.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Half Elves and Half Orcs are both explicitly interfertile with humans and their other respective parent species.

That said, Adjoint's list sounds right for examples that are no longer cross-fertile with humans.

For Tieflings, Dhampirs, and Aasimar (and probably also Changelings), it's also worth noting that they can also be descended from species other than Humans and will be handled as a Heritage available to all Ancestries in PF2 (this was explicitly already the case in PF1 for at least Tieflings and Aasimar, the rules just weren't great at reflecting it).


3 people marked this as a favorite.

It's a fantasy world; my baseline assumption is that anything can produce viable offspring with anything unless we are expressly told otherwise.
And even then, I'm not discounting the combined world-defying powers of strong magic and stronger liquor.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Perpdepog wrote:

It's a fantasy world; my baseline assumption is that anything can produce viable offspring with anything unless we are expressly told otherwise.

And even then, I'm not discounting the combined world-defying powers of strong magic and stronger liquor.

The assumption of Golarion seems to be that anything can produce viable offspring with anything else [i]with the intervention of magic[i]. But whether they can do so just by, y'know, getting it on, is a different matter and clearly species specific (Half Dwarf is not a standard Ancestry option, for example).


I don't think the intention is that the absence of X should be taken to say "X cannot exist in the world".

Just that X isn't archetypal or popular or frequent enough to warrant publishing special rules for X.

I believe it is much more worthwhile to say: "it's my world, I can do whatever I want with it".

For instance, if I want there to be characters with a Leshy for a mother and a Hobgoblin for a father, now there are Hobgobleshies, and I don't have to explain how :)

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.

For your own game? Absolutely.

But in order to build a coherent world, which Paizo have very much done with Golarion, you need a certain set of defaults, and one is pretty clearly which species can interbreed without magic being involved.

So, speaking canonically, which is what deuxhero seems to want, there is indeed a default set of creatures that can easily interbreed and others that can only do so with difficulty.


Deadmanwalking wrote:

For your own game? Absolutely.

But in order to build a coherent world, which Paizo have very much done with Golarion, you need a certain set of defaults, and one is pretty clearly which species can interbreed without magic being involved.

So, speaking canonically, which is what deuxhero seems to want, there is indeed a default set of creatures that can easily interbreed and others that can only do so with difficulty.

Absolutely yes.

No wait.

You appear to agree with me and then turn around and say the exact opposite.

So let me try again:

The fact half-dwarves aren't in the CRB can be because
a) there are indeed no "naturally made" half-dwarves
b) the choice isn't one of the more popular ones among players, and space in the CRB was limited.
c) there aren't many half-dwarves in Golarion, so rules for them weren't a priority
d) CRB ancestries are selected for their "poster boy" qualities, and half-dwarves didn't make the cut
e) other, unspecified, James Jacobs hates half-dwarves, or other 2 :)

Since the rules don't say, there is no reason to assume any one of these is true but all others false.

So speaking canonically, which is what deuxhero seems to want, there is indeed a default set of creatures that can easily interbreed and others that might be able to do so just as easily, we just don't know.

Liberty's Edge

3 people marked this as a favorite.

The rules don't say, but the entire setting seems predicated on "A" being the case. Which, since this is the setting Forum, seems the relevant thing when discussing what's canonical.

I just don't think canon should necessarily limit what's going on in a particular game, hence noting that it was fine to ignore that in a specific game.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

An example which may interest you is the ulat-kini, or skum, who are actually genetically modified humans and are incapable of breeding with one another but which nonetheless remain fertile with humans


Perpdepog wrote:

It's a fantasy world; my baseline assumption is that anything can produce viable offspring with anything unless we are expressly told otherwise.

And even then, I'm not discounting the combined world-defying powers of strong magic and stronger liquor.

I can't link due to the creator also doing NSFW stuff. But one artist has done the adventures of a bard and his many adventurers with escaping alimony after meeting with

Dragons
Centaurs
Minotaurs
Rocks

I think it is high time that the halflings and humans of Kaer Maga find success in their quest to produce children together! Long live the Halmens!


Sibelius Eos Owm wrote:
An example which may interest you is the ulat-kini, or skum, who are actually genetically modified humans and are incapable of breeding with one another but which nonetheless remain fertile with humans

Heh.

That's because the reason why Skum exist is so we can reenact Lovecraftian stories where the Deep Ones come out of the ocean to steal our women and our jobs.

But mostly our women.

Zapp

PS. Fun fact: "skum" in Swedish doesn't just mean "foam". If something is "skumt" in Swedish, it's dodgy, shady, weird.

And Skum sure are dodgy - good ol' H.P. made damn sure of that! :-)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Zapp wrote:
Sibelius Eos Owm wrote:
An example which may interest you is the ulat-kini, or skum, who are actually genetically modified humans and are incapable of breeding with one another but which nonetheless remain fertile with humans

Heh.

That's because the reason why Skum exist is so we can reenact Lovecraftian stories where the Deep Ones come out of the ocean to steal our women and our jobs.

But mostly our women.

Zapp

PS. Fun fact: "skum" in Swedish doesn't just mean "foam". If something is "skumt" in Swedish, it's dodgy, shady, weird.

And Skum sure are dodgy - good ol' H.P. made damn sure of that! :-)

And then we went and got "regular" Deep Ones too.

Downright fishy!


Somewhere here on the Carrion Crown section, some PCS actually negotiated a more benevolent relation ship between the DO/Villagers.

Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Lost Omens Campaign Setting / General Discussion / Non-fertile human hybrids? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.
Recent threads in General Discussion