Stone to Flesh on a Wall of Stone


Advice

Liberty's Edge

What do folks think would happen if someone cast Stone to Fleshon a Wall of Stone?

Stone to Flesh can target a “ human-size stone object,” and a Wall of Stone is way larger than human sized, but Wall of Stone provides that “Each 5-foot-by-5-foot section of the wall has AC 10, Hardness 14, and 50 Hit Points, and it's immune to critical hits and precision damage,” so I don’t think I’d be out of line treating each 5 foot section as an object. The volume is the average human is about 3,783 cubic inches. The volume of a single segment of the wall is 3,600 cubic inches, and that looks close enough for magic.

So my thought is that Stone to Flesh affects a five by five section of wall, transforming it into “a mass of inert flesh (without stone's Hardness) in roughly the same shape.” At that point, I assume it could just be knocked over, but if someone wanted to damage it, I’d just use the Wall of Stone stats minus the hardness.


Guess it is meant to target a

- Human size ( medium or smaller size )
- Stone object ( once turned into a Stone by a spell or a curse, you become an object )

Which means you can target any medium/small creature turned into Stone, in order to reverse the effect and turn them to flesh.


The Terraria party could access Hardmode.


The question is does size mean mass or volume? Depending on the density of the stone you could have 2 or 3 times the volume of flesh. Since you have to get in touch range you would then end up covered in a mess of flesh and blood! That's just unsanitary! Please use stone to flesh with extended range metamagic!

More seriously I could see how the spell might fail unless the whole wall is 5 by 5 because the wall is the whole object, but... I would probably play it they way the OP is reading it, because it is a 6th level spell, stone shape is 4th level and can get you past walls. I also don't know why else you would use the "turn a stone object into a mass of inert flesh" unless the flesh has particularly good culinary properties.


I imagine it as transforming a part of the wall into flesh, but the flesh is still connected to the rest of the wall, for example with ligaments and such. So you could cut through it more easily, but you couldn't knock it over.


TloniousMonk wrote:
I also don't know why else you would use the "turn a stone object into a mass of inert flesh" unless the flesh has particularly good culinary properties.

It's easier to cut a door out of a meat wall than a stone one.


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Depends on if you consider the entire wall as an object, or allow the portion of it. From the spell description I'd normally say the wall is too large to be affected, though it could be an interesting, if gruesome, creative use.

Liberty's Edge

TloniousMonk wrote:
The question is does size mean mass or volume?

I assume volume because a person transformed into a stone statue maintains their volume, but presumably increases their mass.


In classic editions, the spell was used to burrow holes in stone by some of the game makers, so there is a precedent.
The trouble is, can you target a portion of a whole?
I'd say usually not, so no more tunnels, except Wall of Stone seems modular, having stats for each section.

I'm still leaning "no" since Flesh to Stone seems to have rigorous limitations purposefully in PF2.


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

As a GM, I'd probably allow it. I can't really answer whether it ought to work as-written.


I lean toward allowing it as well - if you can target the 5 by 5 section with an attack, it is reasonable that you can also target it with a spell.


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Pathfinder Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Are you kidding? That's how gelatinous cubes came into being!


3600 cubic inches of meat weighs about 60 kg, worth about 240,000 kcal of food energy - enough to feed 120 people for a day.

World hunger solved!


We already have the "Wall of Meat" spell, that is when the Wizard sends forth their Barbarian friend.

EDIT: it's even more effective when the Wizard is a gnome or halfling.


I'm not sure I would let it go in our current age of ashes campaign, but for my homebrew world I would most definitely allow a ritual that could do that.


TloniousMonk wrote:
I also don't know why else you would use the "turn a stone object into a mass of inert flesh" unless the flesh has particularly good culinary properties.

That's how you make stone soup.

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