Favorite AP, Module, and / or Homebrew for Pathfinder?


Pathfinder First Edition General Discussion


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So what are your favorite APs, Modules, and/or homebrew campaigns?

Sovereign Court

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Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Sixfold Trial by Richard Pett (Council of Thieves Vol2) is one of my favorites. A good mix of roleplaying and a awesome demiplane dungeon.


APs- I really like King Maker, Skull and Shackles, and Mummy's Mask.

Modules- I played only one and that is the one were you start at 17th level.

Homebrews- None in Pathfinder.


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I've been running a Mystara campaign since 2012, with just over a year's worth of breaks for other games interspersed. The PCs are 20th level and getting on their way to Immortality, using adapted Immortal rules from Wrath of the Immortals. This of course means the campaign won't be done for another few years while they (hopefully) achieve this, since this requires a bunch of impressive feats on the part of the individual characters, any single of which would be the finale of most any other campaign. Then they will play in a campaign where they play their first worshippers.


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I’ve enjoyed the Iron Fang Invasion AP (one more book to go).


I grew up playing classic D&D modules that became rites of passage for groups. It was fun comparing stories on how each group made it through the Temple of Elemental Evil or died horribly in the Tomb of Horrors.

There are several Paizo adventures and modules that I think are worthy of classic status such as the Crypt of the Everflame and its sequels. For adventure paths, I'd put the three Runelords paths up there along with Iron Gods, Wrath of the Righteous, Kingmaker and Ironfang Invasion.

Of course, I haven't played or run everything yet, so there are plenty more I'll most likely want to add before it is all said and done and long before I move on to Second Edition.

Silver Crusade

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My favourite AP is Hell's Rebels. I love the flavour of rebelling against the evil empire. :)


Way of the Wicked has been wickedly fun!


Hell's Rebels may have been the best I've tried, but Wrath of the Righteous is the one I'd most like to replay.


Anyone played Wrath of the Righteous without the mythic rules?


Anyone?


Pretty sure I remember some folks doing so. I don't remember where I saw them talk about it though. Sounds like it'd be a tough game.


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On topic:

AP: Strange Aeons, given a creative group and a lot of work filling in the gaps, is an absolute delight.
AP runner-up: Rise of the Runelords is more "classic" D&D than most D&D games I've played.)

Module: The Moonscar. Succubi on the freaking moon? Where do I sign up?
Module runner-up: Feast of Ravenmoor. A solid low-level adventure that hammers home several core mechanics that may not have been heavily exercised yet and has plenty of potential for kicking off later plot hooks.

Homebrew: Jacob's Tower by Zenith Games. I liked it so much I worked it into the fabric of my own campaign setting.
Homebrew runner-up: The ever-evolving list of house rules, custom magic items, artifacts, and out-of-context player quotes my players and I have built up over the years.


blahpers, can you elaborate on some of that "work filling in the gaps" for Strange Aeons?

I was looking forward to that one, but the later books in particular were a real disappointment. What sort of work did you and your group do to overcome that?


J. A. wrote:

blahpers, can you elaborate on some of that "work filling in the gaps" for Strange Aeons?

I was looking forward to that one, but the later books in particular were a real disappointment. What sort of work did you and your group do to overcome that?

Full disclosure: I haven't run this yet, though I've planned through the first three books and have read the rest in preparation.

Strange Aeons:

The first three books can basically be run without any changes. That doesn't mean they wouldn't benefit from some. For example, I'm swapping out the cannibals in Book II because (1) I find them problematic and (2) since there isn't much of a way for the PCs to learn why they were there, they seem gratuitous. But for the most part they're enjoyable as is. I particularly enjoy Book I's unusual conditions for an AP start and the way Book III ties up the reason for those conditions.

Books IV and V are a bit rougher. I expect that I'll have to rewrite a major chunk of the plot in Book IV+, including the narmy mind messages from Grandma Yith, to better fit the mood of the game. But I'm used to that sort of thing. The whole PC immunity to X-D thing is odd, though, like it wasn't really thought through. I'm still figuring out how to revise it to make sense--or to *not* make sense in a way that feels thematic.

Book VI will be the toughest for me. It's not because the material is bad but because it's basically unfinished. The writers had to cover a lot of area in that book, and it shows--when it comes to NPCs, the text basically just dumps a couple of sentences of motivation and leaves everything else for the GM to figure out. That was pretty disappointing, but I can afford to put the work in over the months it'll take to get that far (assuming they do make it that far).

Some of the ambiguity of the later books is to be expected. The first three books leave quite a bit to the specifics of the PCs' prior relationship to Lowls, so one might expect that after they recover their memories there'd be enough variation in players' reactions to warrant leaving some gaps to fill. But until I get there I'm not sure I can really judge it.

Since turnabout's fair play, what was disappointing to you about the later books? Is there something you might have done differently in retrospect?


We are only at the end of volume one of Strange Aeons, so we will just have to wait and see.


We are now more then half way through volume 4. So far I would have done the dream realm stuff differently.

Liberty's Edge

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My favorite. Module for PFS is 4-19 the Night March of Kalkemedes.


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Curse of the Crimson Throne was my first completed AP with a group, but also one of my most memorable. Of course, the party broke the crap out of the combat, but that was besides the point.

The campaign has a wonderful balance between combat and RP that simultaneously let my Abadarian Cleric and Charismatic young Sorcerer shine in social situations while the Eldritch Archer and Rogue shined on missions. The entire Shoanti arch was especially memorable and provide insight to a culture that I, as a GM, had not thoroughly explored. It kick started my investigation into the different human cultures across Golarion, further enhancing my gm knowledge-base and my PC creation/background skills.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Some of my favorite APs are Kingmaker, Rise of the Runelords, and Mummy's Mask.

I've never played any of the published modules.

I ran a homebrew campaign that I wrote myself (inspired by some of my own ideas mixed with some ideas I found here on Paizo's forums) called "The Godkiller". It dealt with the question of what happened to Aroden. It was well-liked by the people I ran it for.


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I really enjoyed running Iron Gods for my players and am quite eager to experience playing the campaign myself under a different GM.

I mostly enjoy running my own Homebrew setting in the Pathfinder 1e ruleset. Unique setting of my own creation, with its own Creation mythos. It started off with player's having their character's souls ripped out of their well-deserved afterlife and made into Extraplanar pawns of greater ... let's say amoral ... beings set on fundamentally changing the entire multiverse. Used psuedo-gestalt rules for hybridizing the characters with undead templates, and watching them explore the setting, all while things happened around them.


I enjoyed running Kingmaker.

It was a good learning experience... my time GM'ing PF1. Now, that being said, if I ever run Kingmaker again, it will be WAY different.


I did enjoy Kingmaker, though still not a fan of the mass combat stuff.

I would like to play Iron Gods, but our DM doesn't like a lot of Sci-fi in D&D/Pathfinder.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Dragon78 wrote:
I did enjoy Kingmaker, though still not a fan of the mass combat stuff.

I highly disliked mass combat when I played through Kingmaker, so I altered the way it worked when I had GMed it.


My experience with APs is very limited, so I'll pass on listing a favorite. (I'm currently in a game where we're alternating books of two APs, and just have #6 of each left. It's fun, but there is a huge amount of content that we're skipping due to playing them PFS-mode.) Strange Aeons is probably the AP that intrigues me the most (I'm a huge Mythos junkie), but I've never played or run it, and have only bought and read Book 1.

Modules:
* The House on Hook Street was a lot of fun--lots of roleplaying, some tough but interesting fights, and genuinely creepy horrors.
* Most of the We Be Goblins series are a blast to play, but my faves are probably B4 and Too.
* The module I haven't played but most want to run is The Harrowing. Lots of weird, fun encounters, and the Harrow Deck is a pretty cool prop.

I'd have a hard time choosing a favorite PFS scenario (in either edition, but for different reasons). Recently, though, I've been making a point of playing 2E scenarios that are direct sequels to some of my favorite 1E stories (like the ones featuring the Farheavens Clan and J Dacilane, which I'm running myself now). But my favorite recurring NPC is probably Valais Durant, so making my first 2E character belong to her faction was a no-brainer.


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KingGramJohnson, what was your version of mas combat like?


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Favorite APs:

1. Iron Gods: I love the mix of Super-science and sorcery.
2. Strange Aeons: Has probably the best first installment of the entirety of the Pathfinder Adventure Paths, IMHO.
3. Any of the Runelords APs. I love the way they play into the lore of the Inner Sea. I'm in book six of "Return" at the moment and it has been a lot of fun - and a lot of heartache!
4. The Ironfang Invasion offers an alternative to the mass combat rules by making it more in the background. The war with the hobgoblins brings great urgency and the modules all felt fairly sandboxy in how the players could approach them.

Favorite Modules:

The Price of Immortality trilogy is the perfect starting point for a Nirmathas based campaign. POI= Crypt of the Everflame and its two sequels.

Kingmaker, I didn't care for too much. It was just too loose and sandboxy, to the extent that the driving narrative felt missing to me. Kingdom Building is a huge slog and is best handled away from the table and between sessions. That said, I do want to see the changes in the updated Kingmaker hardback.


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PFRPGrognard wrote:

I grew up playing classic D&D modules that became rites of passage for groups. It was fun comparing stories on how each group made it through the Temple of Elemental Evil or died horribly in the Tomb of Horrors.

There are several Paizo adventures and modules that I think are worthy of classic status such as the Crypt of the Everflame and its sequels. For adventure paths, I'd put the three Runelords paths up there along with Iron Gods, Wrath of the Righteous, Kingmaker and Ironfang Invasion.

Of course, I haven't played or run everything yet, so there are plenty more I'll most likely want to add before it is all said and done and long before I move on to Second Edition.

Yeah, that "move" to Second Edition didn't quite happen. I tried to play Abomination Vaults, but I honestly hate the way second edition plays. Different strokes and all.


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‘Carrion Hill’ was great. I really enjoyed playing through it. It doesn’t seem to get the credit it merits.


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I haven't played too many modules but I do remember Carrion Hill.


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Favorite APs (All time) - Kingmaker, Carrion Crown, Runelords.
New Favorite APs (with massive GM reworking) - Serpent Skull, and to a lesser extent, Ironfang Invasion.

Favorite Modules - Carrion Hill, Realm of the Fellnight Queen, Dragon's Demand, Tomb of the Iron Medusa.

Favorite 3rd party stuff - Necromancer/Frog God Games (even if their encounter balance is frequently way out of whack to promote 1st edition realism.....err I mean TPKs). Crucible of Freya, Lost City of Barakus, and The Tomb of Abysthor in particular.


Never played Serpent Skull, but I did hear it had some issues.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Dragon78 wrote:
KingGramJohnson, what was your version of mas combat like?

My major issue with mass combat (as written) is that it's a slog, and it's boring.  I did not have fun doing it as a player, and I did not enjoy running it as a GM.  Overall, I found it to be disappointing, so I altered Mass Combat to function in three parts:

Army vs. army
Party vs. captains/generals
Complete objectives

Army vs. Army

This functioned similarly to mass combat army builds, but with reduced rules so it's a simple three-round fight that takes an arbitrary about of time (depending on the situation).  This was a simple best two out of three.  This would determine how many casualties on a mass scale there were for one side or the other.

Party vs. Captains/Generals

I describe this part of my version of mass combat as while the armies are battling, we "zoom in" to where the PCs are in the heat of battle (but for simplicity reasons) unaffected by the army around them, and there they face down the leaders of the opposing armies.  I treat this like a boss battle.  There is the general(s) (the boss(es), and the captains (the powerful minions of the general(s)).  This is fought like any other straight fight like you would run in a dungeon boss room.

Complete Objectives

This part of my version of mass combat provides something else to accomplish while fighting the captains/generals.  The party is given several objectives that they need to complete to prevent the opposing army from advancing/breaching the city/gaining a foothold, etc.  There is often a time limit or some similar factor involved here.

For example, in one fight, while in the boss battle, the party may have five rounds to close the city gate's portcullis.  And while they fight, they need to try to save as many civilians as they can from dying (if too many die, it will count as a failure), depending on why the reason for the battle and the location, these objectives will change.

Like with the army vs. army part, mass combat is best two out of three.  So if the party defeats the bosses and their army wins but loses the objectives, they still "win" the mass combat.  

Admittedly, this is stacked in favor of the party, BUT I think that's okay for mass combat.  When we ran it this way, my players liked it a lot better.

It's not perfect, but it works for us, and it's a heck of a lot more fun than the RAW mass combat rules.  


The thing(well one of..) I don't like about mass combat is that I am not playing my character.

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