What stops mental damage?


Rules Discussion


Specifically spells like Phantasmal Calamity. I think by RAW it just follows the standard rules for Line of Effect. It therefore treats the walls of a building no differently than a fireball does. So if your unleash it in a closed room it won't affect anything outside of the room.

But does that bother anyone else? It seems like a psychic event like that shouldn't really care about material per se. I'm sort of inclined to use the old PF1 standard of "The spell can penetrate barriers, but 1 foot of stone, 1 inch of common metal, a thin sheet of lead, or 3 feet of wood or dirt blocks it."


And solid barrier stops line of effect. That means the paper doors and walls in oriental style buildings stop fireballs and mental attacks.

While it seems odd, I have a long, long, long list of things that seem far odder. For instance, try figuring out the carry bulk of a warhorse and then figure out how many warhorse a warhorse can carry... Now THAT'S odd. ;)

Hint:
It's 16! plus it can still have a rider. :P


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Captain Morgan wrote:
What stops mental damage?

Tin foil hats.


Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
What stops mental damage?
Tin foil hats.

Adding to my list of homebrew.


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BellyBeard wrote:
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
What stops mental damage?
Tin foil hats.
Adding to my list of homebrew.

Didn't Occult Adventures have a tinfoil hat?


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Brew Bird wrote:
BellyBeard wrote:
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
What stops mental damage?
Tin foil hats.
Adding to my list of homebrew.
Didn't Occult Adventures have a tinfoil hat?

Not just tinfoil hats, BUT THE KING OF AAAAAAAAAAL TINFOIL HATS!


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I found removing the brain tends to make the subject immune to mental damage, though that comes with its own set of....complications.


Siro wrote:
I found removing the brain tends to make the subject immune to mental damage, though that comes with its own set of....complications.

It's easier if you start with a subject that has no brain to start with...

Liberty's Edge

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graystone wrote:
Siro wrote:
I found removing the brain tends to make the subject immune to mental damage, though that comes with its own set of....complications.
It's easier if you start with a subject that has no brain to start with...

But, Brain, where are we going to find that many politicians on such short notice? >narf<


Paul Watson wrote:
graystone wrote:
Siro wrote:
I found removing the brain tends to make the subject immune to mental damage, though that comes with its own set of....complications.
It's easier if you start with a subject that has no brain to start with...
But, Brain, where are we going to find that many politicians on such short notice? >narf<

Creating politicians were some of the...complications I was talking about.


Not having a mental process :)

Exo-Guardians

graystone wrote:
And solid barrier stops line of effect. That means the paper doors and walls in oriental style buildings stop fireballs and mental attacks.

In Knights of Everflame episode 4 (at 2:01:08), the cleric was able to effect another character with a 3-action Heal emanation, even though the character was on the other side of a wooden gate and the GM (Jason Bulmahn) specifically said that the cleric couldn't see him at all.


Saros Palanthios wrote:
graystone wrote:
And solid barrier stops line of effect. That means the paper doors and walls in oriental style buildings stop fireballs and mental attacks.
In Knights of Everflame episode 4 (at 2:01:08), the cleric was able to effect another character with a 3-action Heal emanation, even though the character was on the other side of a wooden gate and the GM (Jason Bulmahn) specifically said that the cleric couldn't see him at all.

If this is how it's actually meant to be adjudicated, the actual written rules fail to convey that even a little.

Exo-Guardians

graystone wrote:
If this is how it's actually meant to be adjudicated, the actual written rules fail to convey that even a little.

Oh, I definitely agree. That's why JB's ruling surprised me, and made me think of this thread... I wonder if it was a simple mistake in the moment, or a harbinger of errata to come? Only time will tell.


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Saros Palanthios wrote:
I wonder if it was a simple mistake in the moment, or a harbinger of errata to come? Only time will tell.

Or he could have just 'fudged' the rules to make the game run better. I recall some other posts on the podcast games that commented that things didn't exactly follow the rules.

There is also this from core: "Remember that keeping your game moving is more important than being 100% correct. Looking up rules at the table can slow the game down, so in many cases it’s better to make your best guess rather than scour the book for the exact rule." ;)


graystone wrote:
Saros Palanthios wrote:
I wonder if it was a simple mistake in the moment, or a harbinger of errata to come? Only time will tell.

Or he could have just 'fudged' the rules to make the game run better. I recall some other posts on the podcast games that commented that things didn't exactly follow the rules.

There is also this from core: "Remember that keeping your game moving is more important than being 100% correct. Looking up rules at the table can slow the game down, so in many cases it’s better to make your best guess rather than scour the book for the exact rule." ;)

Hey, when we played RPGs as kids, we rarely looked at the rules and it was a blast.

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